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Register of the Poland. Ambasada (United States) Records, 1918-1956
45015  
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Collection Details
 
Table of contents What's This?
  • Descriptive Summary
  • Administrative Information
  • Access Points
  • Introductory Note

  • Descriptive Summary

    Title: Poland. Ambasada (United States) Records,
    Date (inclusive): 1918-1956
    Collection Number: 45015
    Creator: Poland. Ambasada (United States)
    Collection Size: 111 manuscript boxes. (46.2 linear feet)
    Repository: Hoover Institution Archives
    Stanford, California 94305-6010
    Abstract: Reports, correspondence, bulletins, communiques, memoranda, dispatches, and instructions, speeches and writings, and printed matter, relating to the establishment of the Republic of Poland; the Polish-Soviet War of 1920; Polish politics and foreign relations; national minorities in Poland; the territorial question of Danzig, Memel, the Polish Corridor, and Galicia; the Polish emigration abroad; Poland during World War II; and the Polish Government-in-Exile in London. A digital copy of this entire collection is available at http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/800/36/0/-/ .
    Language: Polish.

    Administrative Information

    Access

    Collection is open for research.

    Publication Rights

    For copyright status, please contact the Hoover Institution Archives

    Preferred Citation

    [Identification of item], Poland. Ambasada (United States) Records, [Box no.], Hoover Institution Archives.

    Alternative Form Available

    Also available on microfilm (139 reels).
    Digital copy in Poland's National Digital Archive at http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/800/36/0/-/ . It was digitized from microfilm by the Polish State Archives.

    Access Points

    Minorities--Poland.
    Poles in foreign countries.
    World War, 1939-1945.
    World War, 1939-1945--Diplomatic history.
    World War, 1939-1945--Governments in exile.
    World War, 1939-1945--Poland.
    Galicia (Poland and Ukraine)
    Gdansk (Poland)
    Klaip'eda (Lithuania)
    Lithuania.
    Poland.
    Poland--Boundaries.
    Poland--Foreign relations--1918-1945.
    Poland--Foreign relations--United States.
    Poland--History--Wars of 1918-1921.
    Poland--History--Occupation, 1939-1945.
    Poland--Politics and government--1918-1945.
    United States--Foreign relations.
    United States--Foreign relations--Poland.

    Introductory Note

    The United States and Poland established formal diplomatic relations in January 1919, a month ahead of the other Allied powers. During the next eleven years Poland was represented in Washington by an envoy in the rank of minister and, since January 1930, by an ambassador. The following diplomats were the Second Polish Republic's chief representatives in the United States:
    The archives of the Polish embassy in the United States fared better than those of other Polish diplomatic posts. Most of the embassy's files were tranferred to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Archives during the 1930's. There about 38 linear meters survived World War II. This collection is now held in the Contemporary Records Archives (Archiwum Akt Nowych) in Warsaw. The rest of the embassy's records, as well as those generated during the war, remained in Washington until July 1945. When the United States withdrew its recognition from the London-based Polish government in exile, the Second Republic's Ambassador to the United States, Jan Ciechanowski, decided to protect all of the archival collections held in Washington from falling into the hands of the Soviet-sponsored government in Warsaw by transferring them to the Hoover Institution. The Hoover collection of the Polish embassy in Washington, supplemented by some related later emigre files and printed matter, occupies 111 manuscript boxes or about 14 linear meters. Ambassador Jan Ciechanowski's personal collection is held in the Archives of the Polish Institute and the Sikorski Museum in London.
    Maciej Siekierski

    June 1998