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Guide to the Leo Holub Photographs of Stanford University
PC0138  
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Collection Overview
 
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Description
Collection contains prints (mostly black and white) of Stanford presidents, faculty, trustees, staff, students on campus, campus lands, and construction, as well as a series of mounted images from Stanford Seen, an exhibition of Holub’s photographs held in 1964. Other topics include a sit-in at Dr. Sterling’s office 1966; photos of Prof. Moffatt Hancock and prints Holub made of Hancock’s negatives of campus scenes; images of Chris Stinehour, stone carver working on the Quad; and prints Holub made from glass plate negatives of historic images of Stanford. Collection also includes prints of images used in the book LEO HOLUB PHOTOGRAPHER, which documents his whole career.
Background
Leo Holub, graphic artist and photographer, studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and the California School of Fine Arts, most notably under Ansel Adams. He came to Stanford in 1960, working first in the Planning Department and then in 1969 creating the photography program in the department of art, at the invitation of Lorenz Eitner, head of the department. Holub taught for 11 years, retiring as senior lecturer of photography, emeritus, in 1980.
Extent
12 Linear feet
Restrictions
All requests to reproduce, publish, quote from, or otherwise use collection materials must be submitted in writing to the Head of Special Collections and University Archives, Stanford University Libraries, Stanford, California 94304-6064. Consent is given on behalf of Special Collections as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission from the copyright owner. Such permission must be obtained from the copyright owner, heir(s) or assigns. See: http://library.stanford.edu/depts/spc/pubserv/permissions.html.
Availability
This collection is open for research.