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Guide to the Amelia Reid National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Human Computer Papers, 1945-1958
PP09.16  
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Collection Overview
 
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Description
The Amelia Reid Papers include computation charts, computing tools, convention brochures, computation manuals and notes pertaining to Reid's career as a human computer for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The papers are related to Reid's professional development and work as a human computer, and contain organizational information about the NACA.
Background
Amelia Reid, formerly Amelia Lola, was born on November 13, 1924 in Ord, Nebraska. Reid obtained her bachelor's degree in mathematics from Kearney State College in Nebraska. Reid went on her first flight in 1939 in a Taylor J-2 Cub with Evelyn Sharp, Nebraska's first female pilot, which sparked a lifelong interest in aviation. Amelia Lola took on the name Carman from her first husband.In 1939 the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory was established as a second laboratory for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). Throughout the life of the organization, the NACA used human computers to convert its raw flight research data into analyzable forms. Proficient in mathematics, these individuals analyzed and transcribed data accumulated in research tests, and performed complex calculations in order to transform it into manageable units. For example, they might transcribe and reduce an oscillograph recording from a flight test into standard engineering values. Human computers used basic tools such as slide rulers and electronic calculators to complete these calculations.
Extent
Number of containers: 2

Volume: 1 cubic foot
Restrictions
Copyright does not apply to United States government records. For non-government material, researcher must contact the original creator.
Availability
Collection is open for research.