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Inventory of the Oleg Nikolaevich Moskvin papers
2008C68  
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Collection Details
 
Table of contents What's This?
  • Collection Summary
  • Administrative Information
  • Biographical/Historical Note
  • Scope and Content of Collection
  • Arrangement
  • Indexing Terms

  • Collection Summary

    Title: Oleg Nikolaevich Moskvin papers
    Dates: 1962-1999
    Collection Number: 2008C68
    Creator: Moskvin, Oleg Nikolaevich, 1954-
    Collection Size: 10 ms. boxes, 2 oversize boxes (7.5 linear feet)
    Repository: Hoover Institution Archives
    Stanford, California 94305-6010
    Abstract: The papers are comprised of writings, correspondence, memoranda, government documents, and printed matter relating to civil liberties and independent labor movements in the Soviet Union and post-Soviet Russia.
    Physical Location: Hoover Institution Archives
    Languages: Russian and French

    Administrative Information

    Access

    Collection is open for research.
    The Hoover Institution Archives only allows access to copies of audiovisual items. To listen to sound recordings or to view videos or films during your visit, please contact the Archives at least two working days before your arrival. We will then advise you of the accessibility of the material you wish to see or hear. Please note that not all audiovisual material is immediately accessible.

    Publication Rights

    For copyright status, please contact the Hoover Institution Archives.

    Preferred Citation

    [Identification of item], Oleg Nikolaevich Moskvin papers, [Box number], Hoover Institution Archives.

    Acquisition Information

    Acquired by the Hoover Institution Archives in 2008.

    Accruals

    Materials may have been added to the collection since this finding aid was prepared. To determine if this has occurred, find the collection in Stanford University's online catalog Socrates at http://library.stanford.edu/webcat . Materials have been added to the collection if the number of boxes listed in Socrates is larger than the number of boxes listed in this finding aid.

    Related Materials

    Nezavisimost' records, 1989-2001, Hoover Institution Archives
    Russian independent trade union publications collection, 1989-1999, Hoover Institution Archives
    SMOT (Svobodnoe mezhprofessional'noe ob'edinenie trudiashchikhsia) records, 1988-1998, Hoover Institution Archives

    Biographical/Historical Note

    1954 September 4 Born, Leningrad, Soviet Union
    1976 Joined editorial board of the underground journal Demokrat
    1976 November 4 Arrested by police for political activity
    1977 June 8 Sentenced to psychiatric confinement in Leningrad and Kazan' for "socially dangerous" behavior
    1984 March 30 Released from psychiatric confinement
    1984 December 3 Began working as a painter at the "Kartonazhnik" factory in Leningrad
    1986 July 4 First of repeated firings from "Kartonazhnik" for trade union activities
    1988 January 14-February 3 Successful hunger strike for reinstatement at work
    1989 June 16 Independent trade union "Nezavisimost'" established
    1992 January 16 Final dismissal from "Kartonazhnik"
    1992 August 24 Registered as journalist

    Scope and Content of Collection

    The papers consist of correspondence, writings, government documents, photographs and printed matter relating to the development of independent labor groups in late-Soviet Leningrad. Comprised primarily of correspondence between Moskvin and various labor organizers and government officials, the papers illustrate the rise of Nezavisimost', one of the first independent trade unions in the Soviet Union.
    The bulk of the collection dates from 1986 through 1992, when Moskvin was active in the rapidly developing workers' movement in Leningrad. In 1986, shortly after joining the labor group Rabochaia initsiativa, Moskin sent a series of reports to Pravda criticizing factory management for misuse of property and the unfair awarding of bonuses. These reports, titled "Vzgliad iz khudozhki," can be found in the Writings series. Moskvin was subsequently fired and successfully filed a number of complaints, petitions, and cases for reinstatement. These documents, which can be found in the Court cases file, show the Soviet court system's evolving relationship with trade unions.
    In June 1989, Moskvin and other labor organizers formed the independent trade union Nezavisimost', which emphasized workers' control over wages and factory administration. Moskvin founded his own cell within the union, the Tsentr vzaimopomoshchi rabochikh (Center for Workers' Mutual Aid), documents of which can be found in the Labor movement files. The TsVR agitated on behalf of factory workers across Leningrad who had been fired for political activities.
    Moskvin's interest in the use of psychiatry as a tool for political repression is reflected in the Subject file, which includes articles and correspondence regarding psychiatric practices in the Soviet Union. The Subject file also documents Soviet and post-Soviet elections in Leningrad and St. Petersburg, particularly through the lens of Gennadiĭ Kravchenko, a Rabochaia initsiativa activist elected to the Leningrad Soviet. Newspapers, correspondence, and electoral flyers reflect the multi-party democratic movement in the city.
    Related Article
    Temkina, Anna A. "The Workers' Movement in Leningrad, 1986-91." Soviet Studies 44 (1992): 209-236. PURL: www.jstor.org/stable/152023

    Arrangement

    The collection is organized into seven series: Biographical file, Correspondence, Court cases files, Labor movement documents, Writings, Subject file, and Newspapers

    Indexing Terms

    The following terms have been used to index the description of this collection in the library's online public access catalog.
    Labor movement--Soviet Union.
    Labor movement--Russia (Federation)
    Civil rights--Soviet Union.
    Dissenters--Soviet Union.