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Guide to the Papers of Max Delbrück, 1918-1997
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Collection Overview
 
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Description
This collection encompasses most of Delbrück's lifetime and chronicles his role in the development of molecular biology. The bulk of the materials date from the time of his immigration to the U.S. in 1946. They include personal and professional correspondence, lectures, manuscripts, and biographical material. These materials relate to topics such as his immigration as a German scientist during the early years of World War II; biophysics; his work with the Phage Information Service; his teaching and collaboration with students; and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.
Background
Max Delbrück was born in Berlin in 1906, the youngest member of a large, intellectual family. His father was professor of history and his uncle professor of theology at the University of Berlin. Seeking his own identity in a highly distinguished family, Delbrück decided to study astronomy during high school. He continued his studies at the universities of Tübingen, Bonn and Berlin. He intended to do his dissertation at Göttingen in astronomy, but switched to theoretical physics. He worked under Max Born as a teaching assistant while doing his research under W. Heitler, and received his doctorate in 1930.
Extent
22 linear feet
Restrictions
Copyright may not have been assigned to the California Institute of Technology Archives. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Caltech Archivist. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the California Institute of Technology Archives as the owner of the physical items and, unless explicitly stated otherwise, is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained by the reader.
Availability
The collection is open for research. Researchers must apply in writing for access.