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Motion Picture Association of America clippings and radio transcripts
1224  
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Collection Details
 
Table of contents What's This?
  • Descriptive Summary
  • Important Information for Users of the Collection
  • Biography
  • Collection Scope and Content Summary
  • Indexing Terms

  • Descriptive Summary

    Title: Motion Picture Association of America clippings and radio transcripts
    Date (inclusive): 1934-1976
    Collection number: 1224
    Creator: Motion Picture Association of America
    Extent: 7 linear feet of papers. 1 linear feet of photographs.
    Repository: Margaret Herrick Library. Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
    Languages: English

    Important Information for Users of the Collection

    Access

    Available by appointment only.

    Publication rights

    Property rights to the physical object belong to the Margaret Herrick Library. Researchers are responsible for obtaining all necessary rights, licenses, or permissions from the appropriate companies or individuals before quoting from or publishing materials obtained from the library.

    Preferred Citation

    Motion Picture Association of America clippings and radio transcripts, Margaret Herrick Library, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

    Acquisition Information

    Gift of the Motion Picture Association of America, 1979

    Biography

    The Motion Picture Association of America is an American film self-censorship organization. In 1922, the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America (MPPDA) was formed with Will Hays as president, primarily to defend the film industry against censorship. In 1930, Hays introduced the Production Code, a document designed to help the industry regulate itself by following certain moral principles and guidelines. Hays chose Joseph Breen to oversee the administration of the Code in 1934. Under Breen, the studios were required to submit all screenplays for approval. In 1946, the organization changed its name to the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) and Hays was succeeded by Eric Johnston. The Production Code remained in force until 1968, when it was superseded by the MPAA ratings system, which is still in use today.

    Collection Scope and Content Summary

    The Motion Picture Association of America clippings and radio transcripts span the years 1934-1976 and encompass 8 linear feet. The collection consists of clippings on the Production Code Administration, censorship, SMPTE conferences, and legal opinions on California Proposition 18 concerning obscenity legislation. There are also press releases from 1961 to 1971, clippings of columns by Bosley Crowther and Jimmie Fidler, and transcripts for radio programs with Fidler, Sheilah Graham, and Will Tusher. Finally, there are photographs of foreign dignitaries in the United States.

    Arrangement

    Arranged in the following series: Not arranged in series.

    Indexing Terms

    Motion Picture Association of America