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Guide to the Greater Los Angeles Press Club Collection, 1953-1999
URB/GLAPC  
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Collection Overview
 
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Description
The Greater Los Angeles Press Club was formed following World War II. The Club operated a café and cocktail lounge for their members from 1960 through the 1980s, but as interest in gathering there waned, offices were leased instead. During the early 1970s the Press Club actively defended freedom of the press and the rights of newsmen, protesting the arrest of journalist William Farr. The collection consists of newsletters and administrative files generated by the Greater Los Angeles Press Club, which document such events as the arrest of journalist William Farr during the Charles Manson trial in the early 1970s, correspondence regarding numerous First Amendment issues, and the club's annual Headliner Awards ceremony.
Background
Founded just after 1900, the Los Angeles Press Club was initially located at 327 South Hill Street where it served as a gathering spot for local journalists. The club shut down during the Great Depression, but following World War II the Greater Los Angeles Press Club was formed: "On September 24, 1946, newsmen from the surviving four daily newspapers founded the Greater Los Angeles Press Club. Since Los Angeles Press Club was taken by a nightclub we became the Greater…The nightclub is no longer around and we have reposessed [sic] our real name." The Club operated a café and cocktail lounge for their members from 1960 through the 1980s, but as interest in gathering there waned, offices were leased instead.
Extent
3.00 linear feet
Restrictions
Copyright for unpublished materials authored or otherwise produced by the creator(s) of this collection has not been transferred to California State University, Northridge. Copyright status for other materials is unknown. Transmission or reproduction of materials protected by U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17, U.S.C.) beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of the copyright owners. Works not in the public domain cannot be commercially exploited without permission of the copyright owners. Responsibility for any use rests exclusively with the user.
Availability
The collection is open for research use.