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Terhune (Warren Jay) papers
M2132  
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Collection Overview
 
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Description
Warren Jay Terhune (1869-1920) was a Commander in the United States Navy and the 13th Governor of American Samoa who committed suicide while in office.
Background
Warren Jay Terhune was born in New Jersey on May 3, 1869. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1889 and was subsequently was stationed in a variety of ships and locations, including Florida, Europe and South America. He served in the Spanish-American War in Cuba and Puerto Rico. When President William Howard Taft ordered the Marine Corps to Nicaragua in an attempt to quell a rebellion primarily out of Managua, Terhune commanded the USS Annapolis, which landed hundreds of troops to protect American civilians and property. During World War I Terhune was an instructor at the Naval Academy. On June 10, 1919, Terhune was appointed Governor of American Samoa. His administration was controversial, and in the midst of various power struggles Terhune took his life on November 3, 1920 two days before a Naval Board of Inquiry arrived to investigate the situation. Terhune is interred at Arlington National Cemetery. His ghost is rumored to walk the Government House's grounds at night.Warren Jay Terhune (1869-1920) was a Commander in the United States Navy and the 13th Governor of American Samoa who committed suicide while in office.
Extent
1.5 Linear Feet (one box, one small flat box)
Restrictions
While Special Collections is the owner of the physical and digital items, permission to examine collection materials is not an authorization to publish. These materials are made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Any transmission or reproduction beyond that allowed by fair use requires permission from the owners of rights, heir(s) or assigns.
Availability
Open for research. Note that material must be requested at least 36 hours in advance of intended use.