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Collection Guide
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Peruvian Textiles
2018.001  
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Collection Overview
 
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Description
The Peruvian Textiles are products mostly of the Chancay, Chimú, and Tiohuanaquence or Tiahuanaco, with one folder dating back Pre-Colombina. Most of the collection is that of the Chancay an indigenous group that produced a variety of textiles such as clothing, bags, and funeral masks. The Chancay culture (1200-1450 A.D.) reigned mainly in the valleys of Chancay and Chillón on the central coast of Perú. The Chancay were considered expert weavers and used llama and alpaca fur. Additionally, the textiles may have been used to cover the heads of the dead. Textiles from elite Chancay tombs include elaborate gauzes, embroidery, painted plain weave and tapestry. The best-known of the Chancay artifacts are textiles that consist of embroidery work, paint-decorated fabrics and gauzes.
Background
The Peruvian Textiles are products mostly of the Chancay, Chimú, and Tiohuanaquence or Tiahuanaco, with one folder dating back Pre-Colombina. Most of the collection is that of the Chancay an indigenous group that produced a variety of textiles such as clothing, bags, and funeral masks. The Chancay culture (1200-1450 A.D.) reigned mainly in the valleys of Chancay and Chillón on the central coast of Perú. The Chancay were considered expert weavers and used llama and alpaca fur. Additionally, the textiles may have been used to cover the heads of the dead. Textiles from elite Chancay tombs include elaborate gauzes, embroidery, painted plain weave and tapestry. The best-known of the Chancay artifacts are textiles that consist of embroidery work, paint-decorated fabrics and gauzes. 2 The Chimú state apparently began to take shape in the first half of the 14th century AD. The Chimú culture was active between the years 1000-1200 AD. The Chimú embellished their fabrics with brocades, embroidery, fabrics doubles, and painted fabrics. The garments were made of the wool of four animals: the guanaco, llama, alpaca, and vicuna. The people also used varieties of cotton which grows naturally in seven different colors. The Tiohuanaquence or Tiahuanaco Culture, a Pre-Inca Culture, developed among 400 B.C. and 120 A.D. Their typically geometric designs also included drawings of plants, animals such as fish, cats, birds, monkeys and dogs. Birds and deities wearing crescent-like headdresses were one of the more common decorative features. Similar to the later Inca, the Tiahuanaco had few commercial or market institutions. However, Tiahuanaco culture relied on elite redistribution. Woven garments worn during life indicated an individual's social rank, and were often interred with the individual in death. Ultimately, the textiles represent the skill and artistry and cultural landscape of each civilization.
Extent
2.58 Linear ft.
Restrictions
Permission for publication is given on behalf of Special Collections as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained by the researcher.
Availability
Access is available by appointment for Cal State LA student and faculty researchers as well as independent researchers.