Gail Jefferson papers, circa 1960s-2008

Finding aid prepared by Fiona Eustace and Jade Finlinson, with supervision from Kelly Besser in consultation with University Archivist Heather Briston, 2017; machine-readable finding aid created by Caroline Cubé.
UCLA Library Special Collections
Room A1713, Charles E. Young Research Library
Box 951575
Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1575
(310) 825-4988
spec-coll@library.ucla.edu
Online finding aid last updated 18 July 2017.


Title: Gail Jefferson papers
Collection number: 2319
Contributing Institution: UCLA Library Special Collections
Language of Material: English
Physical Description: 14.2 linear feet (35 document boxes and 1 shoe box)
Date: circa 1960s-2008
Abstract: Gail Jefferson (1938-2008) was an internationally renowned scholar in the field of Conversation Analysis, and developed transcription taxonomy standards used in the detailed analysis of conversational exchanges. The collection contains transcripts, talks, reports, articles, drafts, project proposals, news clippings, notes, recordings, and data collections from the major part of Jefferson’s career, which began when she was a student of UCLA Sociologist Harvey Sacks in the 1960s and continued until her death in 2008.
Language of Materials: Materials are in English.
Physical Location: Stored off-site at SRLF. Advance notice is required for access to the collection. Please contact the UCLA Library Special Collections Reference Desk for paging information.
Creator: Jefferson, Gail, 1938-2008

Conditions Governing Access

COLLECTION STORED OFF-SITE AT SRLF: Open for research. Advance notice required for access. Contact the UCLA Library Special Collections Reference Desk for paging information.
RESTRICTED MATERIALS: Box 9, Folder 3; Box 10, Folders 1-2, 5, 8-9.
Transcripts with full patient or doctor names were photocopied and names redacted, redacted photocopies were retained in these folders, and the extra set of photocopies used for the creation of redacted copies was shredded. The originals have been retained within the collection file. The originals will replace the redacted copies in 2117.

Conditions Governing Reproduction and Use

Copyright to portions of this collection has been assigned to UCLA Library Special Collections. The library can grant permission to publish for materials to which it holds the copyright. All requests for permission to publish or quote must be submitted in writing to the UCLA Library Special Collections Librarian Special Collections. Credit shall be given as follows: ©The Regents of the University of California on behalf of the UCLA Library Special Collections.

Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements

COLLECTION CONTAINS AUDIOVISUAL MATERIALS: Audiovisual materials in this collection will require assessment and possible digitization for safe access. All requests to access special collections material must be made in advance using the request button located on this page.
COLLECTION CONTAINS DIGITAL MATERIALS: Special equipment or further processing may be required for viewing. All requests to access special collections material must be made in advance using the request button located on this page.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Gail Jefferson Papers (Collection 2319). UCLA Library Special Collections, Charles E. Young Research Library, University of California, Los Angeles.

UCLA Catalog Record ID

UCLA Catalog Record ID: 8092531 

Provenance/Source of Acquisition

Albert Stuulen, 2014.

Processing Information

When Gail Jefferson died in February 2008, her husband and executor, Albert Stuulen, arranged her papers into 33 boxes and transferred this archive to be catalogued at the University of York, by Clare Jackson. This collection was moved to UCLA in 2013 and reprocessed by Fiona Eustace and Jade Finlinson, with supervision from Kelly Besser, 2017.
Terms useful for understanding the content of Jefferson's files are defined within the collection level Language of Materials note and again within the series-level scope and content notes.
The detailed catalogue prepared by Jackson at York is included as an attached PDF for research purposes, but locations listed there vary from the final arrangement. An updated inventory of the Audiovisual Materials series, prepared by UCLA Library Special Collections, is also attached as a PDF.

Biography/History

Gail Jefferson (1938-2008), a leading scholar of Conversation Analysis, developed transcription standards for use in this field. Jefferson earned her B.A. in Dance at UCLA in 1965 and her Ph.D. in Social Sciences at UC Irvine in 1972. Inspired by Harold Garfinkel's Ethnomethodology, Conversation Analysis was developed by UCLA Sociologist Harvey Sacks along with Jefferson and UCLA Sociology Professor Emanuel Schegloff as co-founders.
Conversation Analysis is an approach to the study of social interaction, embracing both verbal and non-verbal conduct of mundane interactions. Jefferson's work specifically examines overlapping exchanges, laughter, and other interactional phenomena in daily conversation.
In addition to transcribing and editing two published volumes of lectures by UCLA Professor Harvey Sacks, Jefferson published articles and performed transcription for other scholars in the field. She taught Conversation Analysis methods at a summer school in Denmark in the early 2000s, and lived in the Netherlands with her husband Albert Stuulen until her death in 2008.
Talking About Troubles in Conversation, a compilation of Jefferson’s essays edited by Paul Drew, John Heritage, Gene Lerner, and Anita Pomerantz, was published by Oxford University Press in 2015.

Scope and Content

The material covers the major part of Gail Jefferson’s career as a scholar in Conversation Analysis, including transcripts of conversations used for research and workshops, data collections, reports, talks, drafts and completed articles, project proposals, and news clippings. This collection contains transcriptions of UCLA Professor Harvey Sacks' lectures from the 1960s used for Jefferson’s edited volumes of his published work as well as Jefferson's audio cassette and VHS recordings of interviews and conversations, raw material for transcription and analysis.

Organization and Arrangement

This collection has been arranged in the following series based on preservation of the existing order and the imposition of an intellectual order:
  • 1. Offers, Compliments, and Corrections
  • 2. Complete Articles and Corresponding Notes
  • 3. Collections, Notes, and Articles
  • 4. Workshop Materials and Transcripts
  • 5. Harvey Sacks' Lectures and Related Materials
  • 6. Transcripts, Talks, and Collections
  • 7. Project Proposals and Reports
  • 8. "At first I thought" Materials
  • 9. Latency and Poetics Materials
  • 10. Poetics Paper and Standard Max Materials
  • 11. Audiovisual Materials

Conversation Analysis Taxonomy Terms

The terms used to organize series titles are part of a taxonomy developed by Gail Jefferson and Harvey Sacks, and are highly specific to concepts examined in the field of Conversation Analysis. Terms are listed in the order in which they appear in each series, and are also found within the series scope and content notes.
  • Offers: conversations centered around someone giving/offering information, working through some sort of informational dilemma.
  • Compliments: conversations commenting on the likeable nature of things/people.
  • Non corrections: corrections that did not happen in the conversation, Jefferson interpreting potential “corrections” or secondary meanings of what is said, interpreting content. Conversations where people choose not to correct each other, interprets this choice. Examines verbal and mental corrections that could have been made in conversation.
  • Corrections: information is confirmed in conversation.
  • Overlap: a recipient starts to talk at a possible end of a turn in progress while the current speaker, instead of stopping there, goes on with more talk.
  • Question No: questions that end either directly in no, indirect responses suggesting no.
  • Troubles-telling: type of confessional conversation when a “trouble” or emotional problem is revealed.
  • Conversation restart: someone starts a new topic to move out of talk about a trouble.
  • Insertions: different instances including insertions of word particles, word repair, comment on statement, background information, and modifiers.
  • Topic shift: broadly understood as to shift to new, related, closing, or prior topics. Shifts differ in speaker and emotional severity.
  • Topic attrition-hold: the topic is not abandoned, but no additional life is contributed to the topic and as a result the topic withers.
  • Heroic minimizing: invoking the ordinary on the occurrence of the extraordinary. Acting humble/modest in response to a heroic deed.
  • Mundane Boundarying: mundane talk after a special/problematic event.
  • I thought: 'At first I thought' A normalizing device for extraordinary events. In Gene H. Lerner (Ed.), Conversation Analysis: Studies from the First Generation (pp.131-167). Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 2004.
  • Call closings: final or closing talk at the end of a phone call between two people.
  • Going along with: when people in conversation essentially go along with what is said.
  • Adjacency pairs: (broadly) some natural two-utterance sequences in which their parts properly go adjacently. A large number of them are known names, and given the names, the parts are relatively ordered and discriminatively related (from lecture 1 folder 1).
  • ‘uh’: when someone initially responds with 'uh' before their actual answer to a question in conversation.
  • Sequencing in conversation: aims to lay out some of the ways that the discoverable aspects of single utterances turn out to be handleable by reference to sequencing considerations. Examines how sequencing considerations turn out to be implicative of what happens in a given utterance (Sacks).
  • Latency: delay/silence before a transfer of information.
  • Stolen Jokes: joke-teller displays recipient-ship of the steal or joke-teller dis-attends the steal (Jefferson).
  • Pursuit tags: relates to (1981) “The Abominable 'ne?' An Exploration of Post-Response Pursuit of Response.” In P. Shroder (Hrsg.), Sprache der gegenwaart (pp.53-88). Dusseldorf.
  • Innocuous and Problematic Standard Max: silences in talk.

Related Material

Harold Garfinkel Papers (Collection 1273).  Available at UCLA Library Special Collections, Charles E. Young Research Library, University of California, Los Angeles.
Harvey Sacks Papers (Collection 1678).  Available at UCLA Library Special Collections, Charles E. Young Research Library, University of California, Los Angeles.

Container List

 

Offers, Compliments, and Corrections.

Scope and Content

BOX 1 TERMS
Offers: conversations centered around someone giving/offering information, working through some sort of informational dilemma.
Compliments: conversations commenting on the likeable nature of things/people.
Non corrections: corrections that did not happen in the conversation, Jefferson interpreting potential “corrections” or secondary meanings of what is said, interpreting content. Conversations where people choose not to correct each other, interprets this choice. Examines verbal and mental corrections that could have been made in conversation.
Corrections: information is confirmed in conversation.
Overlap: a recipient starts to talk at a possible end of a turn in progress while the current speaker, instead of stopping there, goes on with more talk.
Question No: questions that end either directly in no, indirect responses suggesting no.
Box 1, Folders 1-2, 6

Offers. 2001.

Scope and Content

Collection of offers used as the basis for work in Odense Summer School. Folder 2 also contains correspondence with Paul Drew.
Box 1, Folders 3-5

Compliments. 2000.

Scope and Content Note

Collection of compliments used as the basis for work in Odense Summer School. Folder 4 includes expanded fragments from collection. Folder 5 includes a handout containing fragments and handwritten notes on a candidate phenomenon.
Box 24, Folders 1-4, Box 25, Folders 1, 9, Box 1, Folders 7-11

Corrections.

Scope and Content Note

Box 1
Folders 7 and 8: Collection of non-corrections and related practices. Folder 7 includes brief handwritten notes.
Folder 9: Preliminary list of correction category in which two broad categories present: correction and question no. Each broad category has approximately 20 sub-types.
Folder 10: Collection of corrections and non-corrections.
Folder 11: Instances of corrections appearing in overlap.
Box 24
Folder 1: Rahman corrections transcripts.
Folders 2-4: Rahman corrections collection.
Box 25
Folder 1: Conference paper and data handouts for “On Exposed and Embedded Correction in Conversation.”
Folder 9: Drafts, papers, and lectures for “”Embedded Correction: An Interactional Non-Event.”
Box 26, Folders 1-9

Odense University materials.

Scope and Content

Box 26
Folder 1:Data collections and handouts for Odense Summer School 2003 in Conversation Analysis.
Folder 2: Schedules, course outlines, and exercises for Odense Summer School 2003 in Conversation Analysis.
Folders 3: List of participants, pre-assignment materials, and participants work for Odense Summer School 2003 in Conversation Analysis.
Folders 4: Emails, notes, and participant work for Odense Summer School 2004.
Folder 5: Data Collection of Apologies for Odense Summer School 2003.
Folder 6: Data Collection for Odense Summer School 2004.
Folder 7: Meiji Gakuin collection.
Folder 8: Materials relating to a research symposium: Conversational analysis of foreign language data, Odense University, Denmark, 1994.
Folder 9: Papers on from other academics in Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis sent to Jefferson for editorial revision.
 

Complete Articles and Corresponding Notes.

Scope and Content

BOX 2 TERMS
Troubles-telling: type of confessional conversation when a “trouble” or emotional problem is revealed.
Conversation restart: someone starts a new topic to move out of talk about a trouble.
Box 2, Folder 1

Transcripts.

Scope and Content Note

Two transcripts “Where’ve you been” and “Yer line’s been busy” prepared for a data session.
Box 2, Folders 2-3, 5, 10-11

Articles.

Scope and Content Note

Folder 2: Complete Stepwise Transitions articles.
Folder 3: Two complete copies of article ‘What’s in a “Nyem.’”
Folder 5: Complete articles “On ‘Trouble-Premonitory’ Response to Inquiry” and “On The Organization of Laughter in Talk About Troubles.”
Folder 10: Copy of article “List-Construction as a Task and Resource” as first presented in 1973, published in 1991.
Folder 11: Copies of article “List-Construction as a Task and Resource,” copies are dated 1980-referring to the First British/German Conference on Ethnomethodology and Conversational Analysis at the University of Konstanz, 1980.
Box 2, Folder 4

Paper. 1982.

Scope and Content Note

Complete paper Jefferson delivered on selective detailing/glossing and corresponding notes from a University of Manchester class.
Box 2, Folder 6

Conference packet.

Scope and Content Note

Jefferson's annotated Centro Internazionale Di Semiotica E Linguistica Urbino, Italy conference packet.
Box 2, Folder 7

Lectures.

Scope and Content Note

Two versions of lecture on Error-Correction (what Jefferson was then calling Mistake-Correction format).
Box 2, Folders 8-9

Reports. 1978-1980.

Scope and Content Note

Folder 8: Progress and end reports on project “The Analysis of Conversation in which ‘Troubles’ and “Anxieties’ are Expressed” to Social Science Research Council.
Folder 9: Complete final report on project “The Analysis of Conversation in which ‘Troubles’ and “Anxieties’ are Expressed” to Social Science Research Council conducted with J. Lee, University of Manchester.
Box 2, Folder 12

Bibliographies. 1965, circa 1980.

Scope and Content Note

Different versions of Conversation Analysis bibliography. This folder also includes a bibliography of Harvey Sacks’ published and unpublished work, a Sacks handout detailing an exam from Spring 1965, and a glossary of transcript symbols.
 

Collections, Notes, and Articles.

Scope and Content

BOX 3 TERMS
Insertions: different instances including insertions of word particles, word repair, comment on statement, background information, and modifiers.
Topic shift: broadly understood as to shift to new, related, closing, or prior topics. Shifts differ in speaker and emotional severity.
Topic attrition-hold: the topic is not abandoned, but no additional life is contributed to the topic and as a result the topic withers.
Heroic minimizing: invoking the ordinary on the occurrence of the extraordinary. Acting humble/modest in response to a heroic deed.
BOX 4 TERMS
Mundane Boundarying: mundane talk after a special/problematic event.
BOX 5 TERMS
I thought: "'At first I thought' A normalizing Device for Extraordinary Events." In Gene H. Lerner (Ed.) Conversation Analysis: Studies from the First Generation (pp.131-167). Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 2004.
Call closings: final or closing talk at the end of a phone call between two people.
Box 4, Folders 3, 9-11, Box 29, Folders 3-4, Box 3, Folders 1-5, 9, 12-13, Box 5, Folders 2, 5, 8, 10-11, Box 17, Folder 2

Collections.

Scope and Content

Box 3
Folder 1: Collection of insertions data.
Folder 2: Collection of assessments.
Folder 3: Collections related to topic shifts.
Folder 4: Collection of topic attrition-hold and topic shifts.
Folder 5: A collection of “Yeah yeahs” selected from Jefferson/Lee Troubles Talk collection.
Folder 9: Collection of compliments data.
Folder 12: Collection of newspaper clippings related to heroic acts and notes on ‘heroic minimizing.’
Folder 13: A Collection of 37 call openings sent to Jefferson by Emanuel Schegloff.
Box 4
Folder 3: Collection of data for “Remarks on the Post-Self-Correction Repeat” and assorted handwritten notes to self.
Folder 9: Collection exploring problem of pseudonyms. Also includes papers titled “A Report on Some Difficulties Encountered when Using Pseudonyms in ‘Research Generative’ Transcripts” and “Some Notes on Pseudonyms.”
Folder 10: This collection of data in which arrangements are being made was sent to Jefferson by Paul Drew.
Folder 11: Assortment of small collections. Folder also contains transcripts and notes.
Box 5
Folder 2: Collection of "I thought."
Folder 5: Collection of news receipts dated February 1980. Folder also includes handwritten copy of collection.
Folder 8: Collection of “Because” in Overlap which Jefferson puts in parentheses: From Conjunctionals Collections.
Folder 10: Collection of call closings.
Folder 11: Collection of data in which participants argue.
Box 17
Folder 2: Collections from Mrs. P.B which include corrections.
Box 29
Folders 3-4: Collection of Sudnow conversations which Jefferson titled "The Ladies."
Box 4, Folders 1, 6, Box 3, Folders 6-8, 10, Box 6, Folders 1-3, 6, 10, Box 5, Folders 6, 9

Articles.

Scope and Content

Box 3
Folder 6: Proofs for (2002) “Is 'No' an acknowledgment token? Comparing American and British uses of (+)/(-) tokens.” Journal of Pragmatics, 34, 1345-1383.
Folder 7: Copy of article “On Exposed and Embedded Correction in Conversation.”
Folder 8: Draft and proofs for 2004 “A Note on Laughter in ‘Male-Female’ Interaction.”
Folder 10: Editor’s proofing symbols.
Box 4
Folder 1: Proofs of “Preliminary notes on abdicated other-correction.” This folder also includes handout and notes on Post-Self-Correction Repeat.
Folder 6: Copy of “Remarks on the Post-Self-Correction Repeat.” This folder also includes a data session handout related to this article and annotated copy of Emanuel Schegloff’s talk titled “Discourse As An Interactional Achievement II: An Exercise In Conversation Analysis.”
Box 5
Folder 6: Proofs and letters relating to “A Note on Resolving Ambiguity.”
Folder 9: Early and rewritten versions of “Is “No” an Acknowledgement Token? Comparing American and British Use of (+) – (-) Tokens.”
Box 6
Folder 1: Copies of “A Technique for Inviting Laughter and its subsequent Acceptance/Declination.” Folder 2: Copies of article, lectures, and handouts for “Notes on ‘Latency’ in Overlap Onset.”
Folder 3: Copy of “Notes on Laughter in the Pursuit of Intimacy” published with Sacks and Schegloff, 1987.
Folder 6: rafts, final copies, and published version of University of Manchester Sociology paper No. 6 “The Abominable ‘Ne?’: A Working Paper Exploring The Phenomenon of Post-Response Pursuit of Response,” April 1981.
Folder 10: Copy of “On the Poetics of Ordinary Talk” published in Text and Performance Quarterly, January 1996.
Box 3, Folder 11, Box 6, Folder 7, Box 5, Folder 1, Box 25, Folders 3, 7

Papers.

Scope and Content

Box 3: Complete paper “Sketch! Some Orderly Aspects of Overlap in Natural Conversation,” presented with Emanuel Schegloff as second author, December 1975.
Box 5: Paper titled “Some Notes on Pseudonyms.”
Box 6: Copy of paper “On the interactional unpackaging of a ‘gloss’” sent to Language in Society. Folder includes correspondence with editors from 1984-1985.
Box 25
Folder 3: Copies of paper “Notes on Some Orderlinesses of Overlap Onset,” presented at University of Lancaster, March 1984.
Folder 7: Notes and data for paper “Another Failed Hypothesis: Pitch/Loudness and Overlap Resolution.”
Box 6, Folders 4-5, 8-9, Box 5, Folders 3-4, 7, Box 4, Folders 2, 5, 8, Box 25, Folder 2

Lectures.

Scope and Content

Box 4
Folder 2: Two incomplete copies of “Remarks on the Post-Self-Correction Repeat” given at Copenhagen, 2002.
Folder 5: Talk titled “Colligation as a Device for Minimizing Repair or Disagreement” presented at “Talk and Social Structure,” University of California, Santa Barbara, March 1986.
Folder 8: Talk titled “Managing Extraordinary Events: II” and collection of extractions and notes on mundane boundarying.
Box 5
Folder 3: Copies of talk “Notes on a Systematic Deployment of the Acknowledgement Tokens 'Yeah' and 'Mm hm'” 1983 revisited 1999. Folder includes a handout relating to talk.
Folder 4: Copies of talk and corresponding data handouts for “Is 'No' an Acknowledgement Token? Comparing American and British Use of (+) – (-) Tokens” given at Jyvaskyla, August 1996. Folder includes an abstract from the conference with a note from Paul Drew on back.
Folder 7: Copy of a lecture and corresponding handouts for “Remarks on ‘Non-Correction’ in Conversation.”
Box 6
Folder 4: Copies of talk and paper “An Exercise in the Transcription and Analysis of Laughter.”
Folder 5: Talk titled “Preliminary Notes on the Sequential Organization of Laughter” given in 1973 with Sacks and Schegloff.
Folder 8: Talk titled “On Exposed and Embedded Correction in Conversation” and corresponding data handout.
Folder 9: Copies of two talks and corresponding data handouts for “The Rejection of Advice: Managing the Problematic Convergence of a ‘Troubles-Telling’ and a ‘Service Encounter’” given with John R. E. Lee and “On a Problematic Convergence: ‘Telling a Trouble’ and/or ‘Negotiating a Plan.’” Folder also includes paper titled “The Rejection of Advice: Managing the Problematic Convergence of a Troubles-Telling and a Service Encounter.”
Box 25
Folder 2: Handouts and data for lecture on transcribing “Caricature versus Detail.”
Box 25, Folders 4, 6, Box 4, Folder 4

Notes.

Scope and Content

Box 4
Folder 4: Notes and handout for talk “On counting cases for a distributional analysis.”
Box 25
Folder 4: Notes and data handout on overlap.
Folder 6: Notes and handouts for “Issues for Transcription.”
 

Workshop Materials and Transcripts.

Processing Information

Box 9, Folders 2-3, Box 10, Folders 1-2, 5, 8-9.
Transcripts with full patient or doctor names were photocopied and names redacted, redacted photocopies were retained in these folders, and the extra set of photocopies used for the creation of redacted copies was shredded. The originals have been retained within the collection file. The originals will replace the redacted copies in 2117.

Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements

SERIES CONTAINS DIGITAL MATERIALS: Special equipment or further processing may be required for viewing.

Scope and Content

BOX 25 TERM
Going along with: when people in conversation essentially go along with what is said.
Box 22, Folder 1, Box 7, Folders 1-8, Box 17, Folder 5

Workshop materials.

Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements

One 3.5 inch floppy disk.
BOX 7: FOLDER 5 CONTAINS DIGITAL MATERIALS: Special equipment or further processing may be required for viewing.

Scope and Content

Box 7
Folder 1: Participants’ pre-assignments, marked by Jefferson, for Conversation Analysis Seminar 2006 at Meiji Gakuin University.
Folder 2: Email from an Acquisitions Editor at Wiley Blackwell dated May 31, 2007.
Folder 3: Copies of talk “Colligation as a Device for Minimizing Repair or Disagreement.” One copy originally presented at UCSB in 1986 but revised for workshop presentation in Tokyo, March 2006 and other copy revised in September 2006.
Folder 4: Emails between Jefferson and Gene Lerner, Aug Nishizaka, and Paul Drew concerning arrangements for Tokyo workshops in Japan. This folder includes two copies of Debbie and Shelley transcript for workshop.
Folder 5: Email from Paul Drew attaching collection of offers from Holt corpus plus a list of transcription changes. This folder includes a floppy disk of this collection and additional emails and letters between Jefferson and Drew.
Folder 6: Papers and notes relating to transcripts and participants for Tokyo workshop, 2005.
Folder 7: Transcript for London data sessions.
Folder 8: Collection of Doctor Patient transcripts related to workshops in conjunction with Drew.
Box 17
Folder 5: Receipts and letters relating to Sixth International Systemic-Functional Workshop, University of Antwerp, 1994.
Box 22
Folder 1: Programs and papers for Discourse Analytic Research Weeks: Medical and Therapeutic Communication, 1987.
Boxes 9-10, Box 8, Folders 1-5, Box 25, Folders 5, 8

Transcripts.

Processing Information

Box 9, Folders 2-3, Box 10, Folders 1-2, 5, 8-9.
Transcripts with full patient or doctor names were photocopied and names redacted, redacted photocopies were retained in these folders, and the extra set of photocopies used for the creation of redacted copies was shredded. The originals have been retained within the collection file. The originals will replace the redacted copies in 2117.

Scope and Content

Box 8
Folder 1: Transcripts from preliminary hearing of O.J. Simpson trial and coverage of trial from television shows such as Larry King Live, CNN, and BBC2.
Folder 2: Transcripts from Rivera Live “Black Rage: Abuse Excuse?” May 16, 1994 and Larry King Live March 17, 1995. Folder also includes Dutch transcript, Alle Mensen Zijn Ongelijk.
Folder 3: Verbatim record of Biography of Edward VIII, undated. Folder includes copy of record with notes.
Folder 4: Transcripts of excerpts from television shows Rivera Live and Larry King Live, circa 1990s.
Folder 5: Transcripts and paper “A Case of Transcriptional Stereotyping” related to a workshop at Odense, June 1994. Transcript documents a Danish speaker and German speaker conversing in English.
Box 9
Folders 1-4: Transcripts and notes of medical consultations.
Folder 5: Dutch and English transcripts of 17-18 year olds doing homework.
Folders 6-7: Counseling transcripts.
Folder 8: Copies of Dutch transcript of Gesprek III and 5 letters from Iris Bogaers, University of Amsterdam, 1993.
Box 10
Folders 1-3, 5-9: Transcripts of medical consultations.
Folder 4: Handwritten legal transcript.
Box 25
Folder 5: Data, notes, and transcripts for “going along with.”
Folder 8: Feedback to students’ analysis of Coutchavlis transcript.
 

Harvey Sacks' Lectures and Related Materials.

Scope and Content

BOX 11 TERMS
Adjacency pairs: (broadly) some natural two-utterance sequences in which their parts properly go adjacently. A large number of them are known names, and given the names, the parts are relatively ordered and discriminatively related (from lecture 1 folder 1).
BOX 13 TERMS
‘uh’: when someone initially responds with 'uh' before their actual answer to a question in conversation.
BOX 14 TERMS
Sequencing in conversation: aims to lay out some of the ways that the discoverable aspects of single utterances turn out to be handle-able by reference to sequencing considerations. Examines how sequencing considerations turn out to be implicative of what happens in a given utterance (Sacks).
Box 11, Folders 1-7, Box 20, Folders 6, 8-12, Box 21, Folders 1, 5, Box 4, Folder 7

Harvey Sacks' lectures.

Scope and Content

Box 4
Folder 7: Transcripts of 4 of Harvey Sacks’ lectures on greetings which includes larger collection of his lecture “Greetings Bypass.”
Box 11
Folder 1: Six original chapters for Sacks' Lectures on Conversation from Spring of 1972, edited by Jefferson. Lectures focus on ‘adjacency pairs.’
Folder 2: Sixteen original chapters for Sacks' Lectures on Conversation from Fall of 1971, edited by Jefferson. Lectures focus on phenomenon of storytelling in conversation.
Folder 3: Thirteen original chapters for Sacks' Lectures on Conversation from Spring 1971, edited by Jefferson. Lectures focus on conversation broadly.
Folder 4: Three original chapters for Sacks' Lectures on Conversation from Winter of 1971, edited by Jefferson. Lectures focus on conversation broadly.
Folder 5: Four original chapters for Sacks' Lectures on Conversation from Winter of 1970, edited by Jefferson. Lectures focus on overall structural organization of conversation.
Folder 6: Eight original chapters for Sacks' Lectures on Conversation from Spring 1970, edited by Jefferson. Lectures focus on storytelling in conversation.
Folder 7: Nine original chapters for Sacks’ Lectures on Conversation from Winter of 1969, edited by Jefferson. Lectures focus broadly on the makings of conversation.
Box 20
Folder 6: Manuscripts of selected Sacks lectures including letters and attached lecture –of “Ordinary People” from “Phillip” of the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies at Oxford.
Folder 8: Sacks lectures and articles including “You Want to Find Out if Anybody Really Does Care,” “Remarks on Memory,” and “Some Considerations of a Story Told in Ordinary Conversation.”
Folder 9: Transcription of Sacks’ lecture “Sacks: Ann Arbor Lecture 2.”
Folder 10: Transcripts of Sacks’ lectures from 1961. Folder includes conversation between Sacks and Harold Garfinkel “New version of the problem of order” and Sacks’ presentation at the Ethnomethodology Conference, June 1962.
Folder 11: Bound collection “Sacks Lectures: Fall, 1964. Retranscribed and New Transcripts.”
Folder 12: Two copies of "Sacks Lectures: Fall 1964."
Box 21
Folder 1: Sacks lectures from 1972. Folder includes 1962 lecture “Localizing the World.”
Folder 5: Sacks lectures from 1964-1965 including “Everyone Has to Lie.”
Boxes 12-15, Box 22, Folder 5, Box 20, Folders 1-5, 7, Box 21, Folders 2-4

Related materials.

Scope and Content

Box 12
Folder 1: Handwritten/draft reference lists and index list for Volume I of Jefferson’s book Harvey Sacks: Lectures, 1964-1965.
Folder 2: Receipts and various loose sheets related to accountancy for Harvey Sacks: Lectures, 1964-1965.
Folder 3: Complete indexes for both Volume I and II for Harvey Sacks: Lectures, 1964-1965.
Folder 4: Internet sources for Harvey Sacks: Lectures, 1964-1965. Folder 5: Published reviews of Harvey Sacks: Lectures, 1964-1965.
Folder 6: Revisions for final copy of Harvey Sacks: Lectures, 1964-1965.
Folder 7: Six original chapters for Sacks’ Lectures on Conversation from Fall of 1968, edited by Jefferson. Lectures focus on sequential organization of conversation.
Folder 8: Six original chapters for Sacks’ Lectures on Conversation from Spring of 1968, edited by Jefferson. Lectures focus on topic in conversation.
Folder 9: Revisions for Volume I of Harvey Sacks: Lectures, 1964-1965.
Box 13
Folder 1: Transcripts of Sacks’ lectures from Fall of 1964.
Folder 2: Copies of transcripts of Sacks’ lectures from Fall of 1964.
Folder 3: Collections of corrections and notes. Folder 4: Materials related to publishers of Sacks’ book Lectures on Conversation, edited by Jefferson.
Box 14
Folders 1-2: Transcripts of Sacks’ Lectures from Spring of 1966, edited by Jefferson. Lectures mainly focus on a group therapy session for teenagers.
Folders 3-5: Transcripts of Sacks’ Lectures from Spring of 1967, edited by Jefferson. Folder 3 lectures mainly focus on the consideration of “everyone has to lie” and “we” in conversation, folder 4 lectures focus on sequencing, and folder 5 lectures focus on multi-party conversations and consideration of a topic.
Box 15
Folder 1: Transcripts of Sacks’ Lectures from Fall of 1965, edited by Jefferson. Lectures focus on a group therapy session for teenagers.
Folder 2: Materials from Blackwell Publishers for a proposed shorter volume of key readings of lectures.
Folder 3: Materials related to Human Studies Special Issue of Sacks’ lectures.
Folder 4: Copies of chapters from 1964-1965 edited by Jefferson for Blackwell book of selected readings from the Harvey Sacks: Lectures, 1964-1965.
Folder 5: Complete proofs for Sacks’ selected readings book.
Box 20
Folder 1: Draft of Sacks’ paper “On Some Formal Properties of Children’s Games.”
Folder 2: Extract from article “Intimates” by Paul Valery.
Folder 3: Sacks’ handouts.
Folder 4: Assorted collection of Sacks’ notes regarding various matters such as questions, children’s games, and categories.
Folder 5: Chapter on sequential organization in conversation.
Folder 7: Articles from Michael Moerman and Sacks.
Box 21
Folder 2: Sacks’ contributions to data sessions from Summer 1972.
Folder 3: Bound collection titled “Sacks Worktapes,” transcribed data sessions at UCLA that include Frankel, Jefferson, Moerman, Pomerantz, Sacks, and Schegloff.
Folder 4: Book on “Aspects of Sequential Organization.”
Box 22
Folder 5: Copy of Schegloff Article “On Sacks on Weber on Ancient Judaism,” 1999. Folder includes letters from Paul Drew.
 

Transcripts, Talks, and Collections.

Scope and Content

BOX 16 TERMS
Latency: delay/silence before a transfer of information.
Stolen Jokes: Joke-teller displays recipient-ship of the steal or joke-teller dis-attends the steal (Jefferson).
Pursuit tags: Relates to (1981) "The abominable 'ne?' An exploration of post-response pursuit of response." In P. Shroder (Hrsg.) Sprache der gegenwaart (pp.53-88).
Box 16, Folders 1-4, 7, 10, Box 28, Folders 1-2, Box 22, Folders 3-4, Box 17, Folder 1, 6

Transcripts.

Scope and Content

Box 16
Folder 1: Los Angeles Police Department (L.A.P.D.) transcripts.
Folder 2: Transcriptions of speeches, letters, and interactions. This folder includes Richard Nixon's November 5, 1962 campaign speech for California Governor.
Folder 3: Notes and transcripts for Jefferson’s talk “Some Notes on Behaviors of First- and Second-Person Reference in Overlap,” Katholieke Hogeschool Tilburg, June 1983.
Folder 4: Copy of “Issues in the Transcription of Naturally-Occurring Talk: Caricature versus Capturing Pronunciational Particulars” with an appended glossary of transcript symbols.
Folder 7: Data, transcripts, notes, and notices for Working Conference on Conversation Analysis, Human Interaction and Ethnomethodology, University of South Carolina, April 1980.
Folder 10: Emanuel Schegloff's transcription critiques of a paper co-authored by Jefferson.
Box 17
Folder 1: Handwritten and typed transcripts.
Folder 6: J.G. transcripts.
Box 22
Folders 3-4:Transcripts of doctor and patient interaction.
Box 28
Folder 1: Transcripts and notes on overlap including “Cancer on the Presidency” about President Richard Nixon.
Folder 2: Heritage transcripts. Folder also contains Sacks’ “Notes on Methodology” and newspaper clippings.
Box 16, Folders 11, 13

Talks.

Scope and Content

Folder 11: A talk on the organization of laughter.
Folder 13: Drafts of Jefferson and Schegloff talk “Sketch: Some Orderly Aspects of Overlap in Natural Conversation” and collections on overlap in conversation.
Box 16, Folders 6, 8-9, 12, Box 19, Folders 1-4

Collections.

Scope and Content

Box 16
Folder 6: Collection of various exercises including handouts on latency.
Folder 8: UCLA/UCI Seminars including collection of Stolen Jokes.
Folder 9: A collection of transcripts including that of a Hell’s Angels interview tape.
Folder 12: Collection of pursuit tags.
Box 19
Folders 1-4: Organized collection of “no” responses to questions. Folder 4 includes Harrie Mazeland draft of “Some notes on variance in the uses of minimal response tokens in medical consultations” and notes from Sacks lectures relating to Mazeland paper.
 

Project Proposals and Reports.

Box 16, Folder 5, Box 17, Folder 3

Project proposals.

Scope and Content

Box 16
Folder 5: Research proposal for a two-year study of overlapping talk.
Box 17
Folder 3: Proposed project on error correction with Paul Drew and Tony Wootton.
Box 22, Folder 2, Box 17, Folders 4, 7-9

Reports.

Scope and Content

Box 17
Folder 4: Application and progress report for study of correction as it occurs in ordinary conversation.
Folder 7: Final report for Social Science Research Council (SSRC) funded project “A Preliminary Exploration of Shift-Implicative Recipiency in the Articulation of Topic.”
Folder 8: Final Report for SSRC funded project “The Analysis of Conversations in which ‘Troubles’ and ‘Anxieties’ are Expressed.”
Folder 9: Original final report for SSRC funded project “A Preliminary Exploration of Shift-Implicative Recipiency in the Articulation of Topic.”
Box 22
Folder 2: Report based on the Warren Commission investigation of the assassination of John F. Kennedy.
 

"At first I thought" Materials.

Scope and Content

Materials related to Jefferson's “'At First I Thought': A Normalising Device for Extraordinary Events” paper.
Box 18, Folders 1-3

Talk, paper, and notes.

Scope and Content

Folder 1: Script of talk “At first I thought” and related newspaper clippings.
Folder 2: A copy and versions of paper “At first I thought” given at the Temple University Conference on Discourse, March 1985.
Folder 3: Early lecture notes on “At first I thought.”
Box 18, Folders 4-5

Research materials.

Scope and Content

Folder 4: A mix of collections, transcripts, and notes including a collection of “I will” as a response.
Folder 5: Copies of papers by various authors in conversation analysis including John Heritage, Christian Heath, and Charles Goodwin.
 

Latency and Poetics Materials.

Box 23, Folders 1-3, 6, Box 28, Folders 3-10, Box 29, Folders 1-2

Collections.

Scope and Content

Box 23
Folders 1-3: Collections of the latency phenomenon in turn-taking.
Folder 6: Collections of data for Poetics paper.
Box 28
Folder 3: Collections of Post-Silence Latency.
Folder 4: Collection of Latency Phenomenon.
Folder 5: Collection of doctor emergency calls, includes an attached note from Paul Drew.
Folder 6: Collection of J10 data.
Folder 7: Collection of Post-Silence Successive Onsets.
Folders 8-9: Collection of Post-Silence Simultaneous Starts. Folder 10: ‘Disaffiliative’ Interaction and Latency: Post a Silence collection and handwritten Schenkein transcripts.
Box 29
Folders 1-2: Collection of post-silence latency.
Box 23, Folders 4-5

Drafts.

Scope and Content

Folder 4: Draft versions and editorial materials related for “On the Poetics of Ordinary Conversation.”
Folder 5: Collections, lecture notes, and drafts for Poetics paper. Folder includes Jefferson paper “Sometimes A Cigar is Just a Cigar: An Investigation of Some In-Speech Errors.”
 

Poetics Paper and Standard Max Materials.

Scope and Content

BOX 27 TERMS
Innocuous and Problematic Standard Max: silences in talk.
Box 27, Folder 1

Poetics paper.

Scope and Content

Folder 1: Drafts of “On the Poetics of Ordinary Talk.”
Box 27, Folders 2-10, Box 25, Folder 10

Standard Max materials.

Scope and Content

Box 25
Folder 10: Papers by other authors such as B. Butterworth and Robert E. Kraut regarding silences in talk.
Box 27
Folder 2: Handwritten notes mostly in Dutch.
Folder 3: Collections of Innocuous and Problematic Standard Max.
Folder 4: Tallies of silences over 0.9 seconds.
Folder 5: Collection of tallies and data for Standard Maximum.
Folder 6: Collection of standoff silences.
Folder 7: Paper “Preliminary Notes on a Possible Metric which Provides for a ‘Standard Maximum’ Silence of Approximately One Second in Conversation,” University of York, 1983.
Folder 8: Handouts and draft paper for Standard Maximum York talk.
Folder 9: Reference list for Het Biologisch-Muzisch Ritme.
Folder 10: Collection of Standard Maximum Silences.
 

Audiovisual Materials.

Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements

SERIES CONTAINS AUDIOVISUAL MATERIALS: Audiovisual materials in this collection will require assessment and possible digitization for safe access. All requests to access special collections material must be made in advance using the request button located on this page.
Boxes 30-36 contain 218 audio cassettes and 2 VHS recordings.

Scope and Content

These materials include audio cassette and VHS recordings of interviews used as raw material in the creation of data collection transcriptions for Conversation Analysis.
Boxes 30-36

Audio cassettes.

Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements

BOXES CONTAIN AUDIOVISUAL MATERIALS: Audiovisual materials in this collection will require assessment and possible digitization for safe access. All requests to access special collections material must be made in advance using the request button located on this page.
The following boxes contain recordings of conversations and interviews used for transcription and analysis:
Box 30 contains 44 audio cassettes.
Box 31 contains 45 audio cassettes.
Box 32 contains 45 audio cassettes.
Box 33 contains 38 audio cassettes and 2 VHS tapes.
Box 34 contains 45 audio cassettes.
Box 35 contains 46 audio cassettes.
Box 36 contains 18 audio cassettes.
Box 33

VHS cassettes.

Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements

BOX CONTAINS AUDIOVISUAL MATERIALS: Audiovisual materials in this collection will require assessment and possible digitization for safe access. All requests to access special collections material must be made in advance using the request button located on this page.
Box 33 contains 2 VHS cassettes. One is labeled "Copy for GJ" and the other is labeled with the following:
1) 112 [and] 353-15.1.01
2) 109 [and] 315-27.10.00
3) 347 [and] 102-6.12.00