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Table of contents What's This?
  • Access Restrictions
  • Use Restrictions
  • Preferred Citation
  • Acquisition Information
  • Processing Information
  • Biographical/Historical note
  • Scope and Content
  • Arrangement
  • Related Materials

  • Language of Material: English
    Contributing Institution: UC Santa Barbara Library, Department of Special Research Collections
    Title: Favianna Rodriguez papers
    Identifier/Call Number: CEMA 148
    Physical Description: 10 Linear Feet (3 oversize flat-boxes, 1 document box, 2 flat-file drawers).
    Date (inclusive): 2003-2018
    Abstract: Favianna Rodriguez is an internationally renowned artist, activist, and teacher based in Oakland, California. Her bold posters and digital artwork deal with social justice issues such as immigration, globalization, economic injustice, patriarchy, racism, and war. Rodriguez works in a variety of graphic media, including digital art, silkscreen art, linoleum cuts, wood block cuts and monotypes. Her papers currently include graphic art posters and prints on various media, newspaper articles, designs and sketches of artwork, and a video from her talk at UC Santa Barbara. Her papers will grow over time to eventually include art sketches, lectures, correspondence, photographs, videos and more ephemera.
    Physical Location: Special Research Collections, UC Santa Barbara Library
    Language of Material: The collection is in English with some materials in Spanish.

    Access Restrictions

    The collection is open for research.

    Use Restrictions

    Copyright has not been assigned to the Department of Special Research Collections, UCSB. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Head of Special Research Collections. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the Department of Special Research Collections as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which also must be obtained.

    Preferred Citation

    [Identification of Item], Favianna Rodriguez papers, CEMA 148. Department of Special Research Collections, UC Santa Barbara Library

    Acquisition Information

    Donated by Favianna Rodriguez.

    Processing Information

    Processed by Callie Bowdish and Mari Khasmanyan, 2013. Additional material processed by Leonardo Vargas and Lauren Cain, 2015. Supplemental material processed by Mari Khasmanyan and Pablo Amaya, 2018.

    Biographical/Historical note

    Favianna Rodriguez is a celebrated printmaker and digital artist based in Oakland, California. Using high-contrast colors and vivid figures, her composites reflect literal and imaginative migration, global community, and interdependence. Whether her subjects are immigrant day laborers in the U.S., mothers of disappeared women in Juárez, Mexico, or her own abstract self portraits, Rodriguez brings new audiences into the art world by refocusing the cultural lens. Through her work we witness the changing U.S. metropolis and a new diaspora in the arts.
    Hailed as "visionary", Favianna is renown for her vibrant posters dealing with issues such as war, immigration, globalization, and social movements. By creating lasting popular symbols - where each work is the multiplicand and its location the multiplier - her work interposes private and public space, as the art viewer becomes the participant carrying art beyond the borders of the museum.
    Rodriguez has lectured widely on the use of art in civic engagement and the work of artists who, like herself, are bridging the community and museum, the local and international. Rodriguez's has worked closely with artists in Mexico, Europe, and Japan, and her works appear in collections at Bellas Artes (Mexico City), The Glasgow Print Studio (Glasgow, Scotland), and Los Angeles County Museum of Art (Los Angeles).
    Rodriguez has exhibited at Museo del Barrio (New York); de Young Museum (San Francisco); Mexican Fine Arts Center (Chicago); Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (San Francisco); Sol Gallery (Providence, RI); Huntington Museum and Galería Sin Fronteras (Austin, TX); and internationally at the House of Love and Dissent (Rome), Parco Museum (Tokyo), as well as in England, Belgium, and Mexico. She was a 2005 artist-in-residence at San Francisco's prestigious de Young Museum, a 2007-2008 artist-in-residence at Kala Art Institute (Berkeley, CA), and received a 2006 Sea Change Residency from the Gaea Foundation (Provincetown, MA). Rodriguez is recipient of a 2005 award from the Center for the Study of Political Graphics.
    As a teacher, Rodriguez has conducted workshops and presentations at Loyola Marymount University (Los Angeles), El Faro de Oriente (Mexico), de Young Museum (San Francisco), the Habana Hip Hop Festival (Habana, Cuba), as well as Williams College and The Commonwealth Club. In 2003, she co-founded the Taller Tupac Amaru printing studio to foster resurgence in the screenprinting medium. She is co-founder of the EastSide Arts Alliance (ESAA) and Visual Element, both programs dedicated to training young artists in the tradition of muralism. She is additionally co-founder and president of Tumis Inc., a bilingual design studio helping to integrate art with emerging technologies.
    Rodriguez is co-editor of Reproduce and Revolt! with internationally renowned stencil artist and art critic Josh MacPhee (Soft Skull Press, 2008). An unprecedented contribution to the Creative Commons, the 200-page book contains more than 600 bold, high-quality black and white illustrations for royalty-free creative use. Her artwork also appears in The Design of Dissent (Rockport Publishers, 2006), Peace Signs: The Anti-War Movement Illustrated (Edition Olms, 2004), and The Triumph of Our Communities: Four Decades of Mexican Art (Bilingual Review Press, 2005).
    Biography retrieved from Stanford University's artist profile. https://diversityarts.stanford.edu/people/favianna-rodriguez

    Scope and Content

    Favianna Rodriguez is an internationally renowned artist, activist, and teacher based in Oakland, California. Her bold posters and digital artwork deal with social justice issues such as immigration, globalization, economic injustice, patriarchy, racism, and war. Rodriguez works in a variety of graphic media, including digital art, silkscreen art, linoleum cuts, wood block cuts and monotypes. Her papers currently include graphic art posters and prints on various media, newspaper articles, designs and sketches of artwork, and a video from her talk at UC Santa Barbara. Her papers will grow over time to eventually include art sketches, lectures, correspondence, photographs, videos and more ephemera.

    Arrangement

    This collection is broken down into three series.
    Series I. Graphic art materials. The series includes publications that feature Favianna's artwork as well as newsarticles that feature information on Rodriguez. Also included are graphic art materials such as mosaic art, sketches, drawings, calendars, and more.
    Series II. Posters This series contains a variety of posters that Favianna Rodriguez created, ranging from silkscreen prints, digital prints, to lithographs. They are arranged in alphabetical order.
    Series III. Videos. This series includes a video of Favianna Rodriguez's discussion held at the University of California Santa Barbara regarding the power of art in social movements and politics. The video can be streamed live at Archive.org http://archive.org/details/cbowdish_library_FR01

    Related Materials

    Favianna's artwork can also be found in: Self Help Graphics and Art Archives, CEMA 3. Department of Special Research Collections, UC Santa Barbara Library

    Subjects and Indexing Terms

    Mexican American artists
    Chicana art
    Chicanas
    Mexican American artists -- California
    Mexican Americans -- Civil rights
    Art and social action -- United States
    Rodriguez, Favianna