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box 1, folder 1

Photographs 1 through 25 1890-1948

box 1, folder 1, photograph 1

View from the Bluffs of Santa Monica Beach and an Early Pier circa 1890

Physical Description: (malibu00001.tif)

Scope and Content

A view looking south from the rim of Pacific Palisades, overlooking the original "99 Steps" which provided access to the northern portion of Santa Monica Beach. The Hotel Arcadia, built in 1886, is visible in the distance, as is the stub of the wharf built by the Los Angeles and Independence Railroad company. This wharf was in use between 1875 and 1879, at which time it was purchased by the Southern Pacific Railroad company and partially dismantled. It stood just south of the present location of the Santa Monica Pier at the foot of Colorado Avenue. Beach shacks line the beach, most of which would be removed with the laying of railroad tracks along the beach by Southern Pacific in 1892. The vantage point of this photograph is near the foot of Wilshire Avenue.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 2

Construction of Rindge Railway Bridge at Corral Creek circa 1907

Physical Description: (malibu00084.tif)

Scope and Content

A crew hired by May Rindge builds the railroad bridge at Corral Creek in central Malibu in about 1907. Rattlesnake Point is seen in the background. Called the Hueneme, Malibu and Port Los Angeles Railway, the tracks stretched from Las Flores Canyon (the eastern point) to Yerba Buena Canyon (the western point). The railway was used to move supplies around the ranch and ship goods from the Malibu wharf, although its chief purpose was to keep the Southern Pacific Railroad company from gaining right-of-way access to the private lands of the Rancho Malibu. The railway was in use until about 1920, and completely dismantled by 1942.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 3

Rindge Railroad Bridge over Solstice Creek circa 1910

Physical Description: (malibu00070.tif)

Scope and Content

A railway bridge over Solstice Creek outlet built by the Rindge family for the Hueneme, Malibu and Port of Los Angeles Railway. This bridge stood on the beach in western Malibu, just west of Corral Beach. The railway was in use until about 1920, and completely dismantled by 1942.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 4

Automobile on the Old Rindge Ranch Road circa 1910

Physical Description: (malibu00075.tif)

Scope and Content

A lone car makes its way along the narrow Rindge Ranch road on the Rancho Malibu near Corral Canyon (looking west). In the early 20th century, wagons and early automobiles typically traversed Rancho Malibu using "beach roads" and occasional by-pass, or "mesa" roads.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 5

Beach Road near Big Rock Area of Malibu circa 1910

Physical Description: (malibu00003.tif)

Scope and Content

An early beach road, also known as "The Track" winds through the rocky beach of the Big Rock area of Malibu, connecting Santa Monica to the eastern gate of Rancho Malibu at Las Flores Canyon. Seen here in about 1910, this path was paved about a decade later, forming the forerunner of the Pacific Coast Highway.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 6

Railroad Tracks on the Beach in Malibu circa 1915

Physical Description: (malibu00002.tif)

Scope and Content

Completed in 1908, this 15-mile standard gauge railway was built by May Rindge, the matriarch of the Rindge family that owned the expansive Rancho Malibu, starting in 1892. Called the Hueneme, Malibu and Port Los Angeles Railway, the tracks stretched from Las Flores Canyon (the eastern point) to Yerba Buena Canyon (the western point). The railway was used to move supplies around the ranch and ship goods from the Malibu wharf, although its chief purpose was to keep the Southern Pacific Railroad company from gaining right-of-way access to the private lands of the Rancho Malibu. The railway was in use until about 1920, and completely dismantled by 1942. As evidenced by this photograph, the tracks were at a continual risk of being buried by beach sand, and high surf and landslides meant that the railway required constant repair.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 7

Rancho Malibu Gate Looking East to Las Flores Inn 1913 April

Physical Description: (malibu00083.tif)

Scope and Content

This photo shows the small bridge over Las Flores Creek that marked the eastern boundary of the Rindge family's Rancho Malibu property. May Rindge set up a gate and guard station at this location to keep uninvited guests off of the property. Looking east, the Las Flores Inn appears in its original state. This is now the site for the Duke's Malibu restaurant. Note that the letters on the roof of the inn have been enhanced for publication in a newspaper. The liquid on the bridge is a quarantine dip to disinfect car tires. Such dips were put in place to prevent the spread of a devastating hoof-and-mouth disease outbreak in April and May of 1924. In total, the outbreak led to the slaughter of over 100,000 animals in California, including cattle, swine, sheep, goats, and even deer.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 8

Early Work on State Highway Through Rancho Malibu 1926

Physical Description: (malibu00076.tif)

Scope and Contents

Following the US Supreme Court decision in 1923 that forced May Rindge to open up Rancho Malibu for a public road, construction begins on the State Highway near the beach in eastern Malibu. This paved road would be completed in 1929 as the Roosevelt Highway, linking Santa Monica and Ventura, as well as Mexico and Canada. This photo was taken just inside the Rancho Malibu, near Las Flores Canyon (present home of Duke's Malibu restaurant) looking west toward Carbon Point. Just visible is "Spire Rock," a distinctive landmark on Carbon Point, later demolished to expand the highway in about 1939.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 9

Kangaroo Court on the Beach in Malibu 1939

Physical Description: (malibu00019.tif)

Scope and Contents

Residents gather for a mock trial event at a make-shift courtroom on the beach. A sign identifies the structure as the Coral Beach Court Room involving people identified as Wheeler and Constable Chuck Sears. The atmosphere is festive. Handwritten in the upper left corner: Kangaroo Court, 1939.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 10

Remains of a Home Following Malibu Wildfire 1940s

Physical Description: (malibu00011.tif)

Scope and Contents

Two men, two women and a dog examine the aftermath of a wildfire in Malibu, possibly near Topanga Canyon. The home is reduced to its foundation; resilient appliances mark the boundaries of the kitchen. The decade is most likely the 1940s.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 11

Roadside Gathering after Traffic Accident in Malibu 1940s

Physical Description: (malibu00015.tif)

Scope and Contents

Men and women gather around two cars and a motorcycle following a traffic accident on the Roosevelt Highway (now the Pacific Coast Highway) at Las Flores Canyon.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 12

Car in Ravine following Traffic Accident 1940s

Physical Description: (malibu00018.tif)

Scope and Contents

A badly damaged car lies at the base of a canyon after apparently rolling down the embankment. Spectators gather on the road above.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 13

Army Band at United Service Organizations Center in Malibu Plaza early 1940s

Physical Description: (malibu00021.tif)

Scope and Contents

During World War II, the Malibu Plaza building located on the Pacific Coast Highway in the La Costa area of eastern Malibu, served as a center for the armed forces. Facilities here included the United Service Organizations (USO) center (identified here as the Hospitality Center for Service Men), Malibu Women's Emergency Unit, Civilian Defense Group, Red Cross Unit, and Ration Board. In this photo, an Army Band is set up for a performance outdoors before the arched facade. The Malibu Plaza building was originally built in 1927 as the Olas Grandes Inn, a restaurant, and it was located on the beach side of Roosevelt Highway. In 1937, the building was purchased by W. L. Gunn, moved to its current location and renovated. Following the war, Malibu Plaza was home to the Malibu post office along with several other businesses, including the Malibu Times.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 14

Car Accident on Topanga Canyon Road 1946 June 15

Physical Description: (malibu00016.tif)

Scope and Contents

A damaged automobile appears on its side following an accident on Topanga Canyon Road (now S. Topanga Canyon Boulevard) in which two teenaged drivers were injured.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 15

Car on Beach Embankment following Traffic Accident 1946 September 10

Physical Description: (malibu00017.tif)

Scope and Contents

A car belonging to Lola May Pyle is seen here being pulled back up an embankment to the Roosevelt Highway (now Pacific Coast Highway) just east of Solstice Canyon in Malibu. According to the Malibu Times, the young woman fell asleep at the wheel and plunged down the embankment to the beach, where she awaited rescue for 16 hours. Despite serious injury, she was expected to recover. The structure in the background is one of several beach houses owned by the Rindge family.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 16

Officers Posing in front of the Sheriff's Sub-Station in Malibu 1946

Physical Description: (malibu00012.tif)

Scope and Contents

Los Angeles County Sheriff's officials and deputies pose in front of the old Malibu Courthouse building, which received an additional, two-story wing on its western end in 1940 to accommodate a new Sheriff's Substation and holding cell. The substation was located on Roosevelt Highway (later the Pacific Coast Highway) in the La Costa area of Malibu near Las Flores Canyon Road. The original building dates to 1933 and still stands today. The Sheriff's Substation moved to a new complex in the Civic Center area in 1972, before moving out of Malibu to Agoura Hills in 2001. Pictured from left to right: Deputy Edgar McClue, Sgt. R. S. Rowe, Deputy John Coady, Inspector L. J. Hoassack, Lt. W. A. Bennett, Judge John L. Webster, Deputy Frank Becker, Deputy N. J. Sindelar, Deputy C. T. Human, Deputy J. L. Deane, and Deputy John P. Butler.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 17

View of Malibu Pier from the Bluff Looking Southwest circa 1946

Physical Description: (malibu00087.tif)

Scope and Contents

A view of Malibu Pier from the bluffs, looking southwest over Malibu Colony. Recently reconstructed following severe damage from a 1944 storm, the pier has its modern day appearance with its iconic twin structures at the end of the pier.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 18

Promotional Photo with Beauty Contestants for the Malibu Remuda 1947 September

Physical Description: (malibu00008.tif)

Scope and Contents

Three models, possibly beauty contestants, pose in this publicity photo for the Malibu Remuda, a two-day celebration of Malibu's culture and heritage held September 27-28, 1947. The swimsuit clad women appear to be putting the final touches on a giant tasseled hat that marked the entrance to the arena grounds off the Roosevelt Highway (soon to be called the Pacific Coast Highway) near the Malibu Colony. Remuda refers to a corral of horses, and the Malibu Remuda featured an impressive display of horses (over 900 riders), in addition to a circus, a western bathing beauty contest, aquatic races, and an air show. The event was sponsored by the Malibu post of the American Legion, and proceeds were intended to fund the building of a local post clubhouse.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 19

Malibu Remuda Horse Parade 1947 September

Physical Description: (malibu00006.tif)

Scope and Contents

The Malibu Remuda, a two-day celebration of Malibu's culture and heritage held September 27-28, 1947, took its name from the corral that vaqueros would use to select a horse for the day. The event featured this impressive display of horses (over 900 riders) on both days, in addition to a circus, a western bathing beauty contest, aquatic races, and an air show. Here, the riders (dressed as Spaniards and cowboys) are seen moving in procession down what would shortly become the Pacific Coast Highway, following its realignment away from the Malibu Colony (seen on the right). The Malibu Remuda was sponsored by the Malibu post of the American Legion, and proceeds were intended to fund the building of a local post clubhouse. Although it was billed as the first of an annual event, the tradition would fail to catch on.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 20

Cabrillo's Beach Landing Reenacted at the Malibu Remuda 1947 September 27

Physical Description: (malibu00007.tif)

Scope and Contents

Actors and locals gather on the beach just east of the Malibu Pier during a reenactment of the 1542 beach landing by Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo. This was the opening event of the Malibu Remuda, a two-day celebration of Malibu's culture and heritage held September 27-28, 1947. Frank Morgan, famous for his role in The Wizard of Oz played Cabrillo, disembarking from his personal yacht and rowing ashore. From left to right: Warner Baxter (actor and honorary Mayor of Malibu), Rev. Augustine Hobrecht (director of the nearby Serra Retreat), June Havoc (actress and Remuda Queen), Frank Morgan, and John McNabb. The Malibu Remuda featured an impressive display of horses (over 900 riders), in addition to a circus, a western bathing beauty contest, aquatic races, and an air show. The event was sponsored by the Malibu post of the American Legion, and proceeds were intended to fund the building of a local post clubhouse.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 21

Malibu Remuda Horse Show 1947 September

Physical Description: (malibu00086.tif)

Scope and Contents

The Malibu Remuda, a two-day celebration of Malibu's culture and heritage held September 27-28, 1947, took its name from the corral that vaqueros would use to select a horse for the day. The event featured this impressive display of horses (over 900 riders) on both days, in addition to a circus, a western bathing beauty contest, aquatic races, and an air show. Here, the riders (dressed as Spaniards and cowboys) are seen moving in procession down what would shortly become the Pacific Coast Highway, following its realignment away from the Malibu Colony (seen on the right). The Malibu Remuda was sponsored by the Malibu post of the American Legion, and proceeds were intended to fund the building of a local post clubhouse. Although it was billed as the first of an annual event, the tradition would fail to catch on. The area in this photo was known as Crummer Field and now includes the site of Legacy Park.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 22

Trailor Park at Paradise Cove 1947

Physical Description: (malibu00020.tif)

Scope and Contents

By the 1940s, the lot behind the Paradise Cove Beach Cafe at Ramirez Canyon had become a popular destination for trailer homes. The view in this photo, looking due south out to the beach, captures a corner of the cafe on the left.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 23

Malibu Plaza Shops 1947

Physical Description: (malibu00057.tif)

Scope and Contents

The Malibu Plaza building was originally built in 1927 as the Olas Grandes Inn, a restaurant, and it was located on the beach side of Roosevelt Highway. In 1937, the building was purchased by W. L. Gunn, moved to its current location on the Pacific Coast Highway in the La Costa area of eastern Malibu, and renovated. During World War II, the building served as a center for the armed forces. In this 1947 photograph, we can see several of the businesses housed in Malibu Plaza, which was also home to the Malibu post office and the Malibu Times newspaper.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 24

Malibu Sea Lion Restaurant on Pacific Coast Highway late 1940s

Physical Description: (malibu00014.tif)

Scope and Contents

The Malibu Sea Lion, a legendary seafood restaurant on the Pacific Coast Highway, is seen here in its original form in the late 1940s, shortly after proprietor Chris Polos purchased and converted the Las Flores Inn. Polos kept the Inn's seal tank (seen here center-left), and barking seals greeted patrons as they parked their cars. The Sea Lion went through several iterations on this spot over the ensuing decades--due to either expansion or fire--and, in 1996, became the site of Duke's Malibu restaurant.
box 1, folder 1, photograph 25

Pacific Coast Highway along Carbon Beach in Malibu circa 1948

Physical Description: (malibu00005.tif)

Scope and Contents

Roosevelt Highway, recently widened to four lanes and soon to be called the Pacific Coast Highway, stretches east toward the horizon along Carbon Beach in Malibu. Some of the local businesses of the late 1940s seen here include the Malibu Beach Motor Hotel, Frank Kerwin's Seacomber restaurant ( America's Tropical Show Place), and, on the beach side, the Colony Cafe. The perspective is from a bluff overlooking the Malibu Pier (out of frame).
box 1, folder 2

Photographs 26 through 50 1950-1974

box 1, folder 2, photograph 26

Malibu Road and Colony circa 1950

Physical Description: (malibu00004.tif)

Scope and Contents

This photo from the bluff overlooking Malibu Road--the former Roosevelt Highway--captures a view of the Malibu Movie Colony in about 1950. The Malibu Beach Cafe can be seen on the left, while the newly redirected Pacific Coast Highway splits off in the upper left. The Malibu Pier can barely be seen on the horizon.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 27

Malibu Community Presbyterian Church under Construction 1951

Physical Description: (malibu00013.tif)

Scope and Contents

Known simply as Malibu Pres, the English parish style Malibu Community Presbyterian Church is seen here nearing the end of construction in late 1951. Formed in 1948, the Presbyterian congregation met in the old Malibu Courthouse for its first few years--even using the jury box as a choir stand--until the funds were raised to build this church in Malibu Knolls off Malibu Canyon Road. Unfortunately, the church burned to the ground in the Canyon wildfire of 2007. Today, Malibu Pres stands once more--modernized and expanded--on the same grounds.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 28

Wildfire near Zuma Canyon in Central Malibu 1956 December 26

Physical Description: (malibu00010.tif)

Scope and Contents

A firefighter races by a squad car during an effort to contain the Newton wild fire that raged on December 26, 1956. The fire scorched the area between Kanan and Decker Canyons and sent residents fleeing to the beach. In total, the fire burned 26,000 acres, including 100 homes, and caused one death. This photo was taken on Busch Drive, looking north.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 29

Wildfire near the Pacific Coast Highway in Eastern Malibu 1956 December 28

Physical Description: (malibu00009.tif)

Scope and Contents

A wildfire endangers a house on the Pacific Coast Highway as it spreads down Las Flores Canyon in eastern Malibu. Firefighters rush to save the homes. Known as the Hume fire, this blaze was one of several wildfires that threatened the west side of Los Angeles County just after Christmas in 1956, including the Zuma/Newton fire and the Sherwood fire. 18 houses were lost to the Hume fire, although no lives were lost. Combining damage from all three fires, there were about 36,000 acres burned, multiple injuries, and one death.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 30

Remains of a House in Corral Canyon following a Wildfire 1958 December 4

Physical Description: (malibu00056.tif)

Scope and Contents

Only a chimney and the foundation remain of this Corral Canyon house owned by Chad and Prudy McPeek following the Liberty wildfire of 1958. In total, the Liberty fire destroyed 74 homes, 17 of which were in Corral Canyon in central Malibu.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 31

Aftermath of a Wildfire in Corral Canyon 1958 December 4

Physical Description: (malibu00060.tif)

Scope and Contents

A man, probably Jack Tolley, exits the remains of a Corral Canyon house owned by Mr. Tolley and his wife Ruby. Their home was lost to the Liberty wildfire of 1958. In total, the Liberty fire destroyed 74 homes, 17 of which were in Corral Canyon in central Malibu.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 32

Wildfire Raging in Ramirez Canyon 1956 December

Physical Description: (malibu00058.tif)

Scope and Contents

A Ramirez Canyon ranch house in Malibu is threatened by the Zuma/Newton/Sherwood fire of December, 1956.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 33

Remains of a Home following Malibu Wildfire late 1950s

Physical Description: (malibu00059.tif)

Scope and Contents

A house in one of Malibu's canyons, hollowed by a wildfire, stands starkly against mountain views. This is most likely following the Liberty Fire of December, 1958, or the Zuma/Newton/Sherwood fire of December, 1956.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 34

View of Las Flores Canyon Looking Northwest 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00022.tif)

Scope and Content

View from a bluff looking northwest down Las Flores Mesa Canyon in Malibu, California. The road on the left is Rambla Pacifico, which was later altered by a major landslide.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 35

View of Las Flores Canyon Looking West 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00030.tif)

Scope and Contents

View from a bluff looking west over Las Flores Mesa Drive, Las Flores Canyon Road, and Rambla Pacifico in Malibu, California.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 36

View of Las Flores Canyon Looking Out to Sea 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00032.tif)

Scope and Contents

View from a bluff looking southwest over Las Flores Mesa Drive, Las Flores Canyon Road, and Rambla Pacifico in Malibu, California.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 37

Malibu Sea Lion Restaurant 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00064.tif)

Scope and Contents

The Malibu Sea Lion restaurant, owned by Chris Polos, located at the current site of Duke's Malibu at the intersection of Las Flores Canyon and the Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu, California.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 38

Las Flores Creek Bridge on the Pacific Coast Highway 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00077.tif)

Scope and Contents

The Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu, California at the intersection with Rambla Pacifico. The view is over the Las Flores Creek bridge looking east. Signs of local businesses include Cosentino's flower shop (under construction), the Union 76 gas station, the Albatross hotel and restaurant, and the Malibu Sea Lion restaurant.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 39

Malibu Plaza Shopping Center 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00063.tif)

Scope and Contents

The Malibu Plaza shopping complex, a fixture on the Pacific Coast Highway in the La Costa area of Malibu, California, as it appeared in 1974. The building on the left dates back to 1927.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 40

View of Malibu Coastline Looking West 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00026.tif)

Scope and Contents

View from a bluff of Keller's Shelter, the bay east of the Malibu Pier. The Malibu Colony stretches to the right. The view is to the west.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 41

Malibu Pier Viewed from a Bluff 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00085.tif)

Scope and Contents

View from a bluff of the Malibu Pier looking east in 1974. The Pacific Coast Highway and Surfrider Beach are in the foreground.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 42

Pacific Coast Highway though Carbon Beach Looking East 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00037.tif)

Scope and Contents

Viewed from a bluff looking east, the Pacific Coast Highway runs through the Carbon Beach area of Malibu, California, just east of the Pier.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 43

View of Adamson House and Malibu Lagoon from a Bluff 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00043.tif)

Scope and Contents

View of the tree-shrouded Adamson House of Vacquero Hill on Adamson Point. The Malibu Lagoon (mouth of Malibu Creek) opens up in the background with Surfrider Beach to the left.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 44

Surfrider Beach by the Adamson House 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00042.tif)

Scope and Contents

Surfrider Beach with the eastern edge of the Adamson House (note the pool) as viewed from the bluff.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 45

Entrance to the Adamson House 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00071.tif)

Scope and Contents

The entrance to the historical Adamson House in Malibu, California, on the beach side of the Pacific Coast Highway.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 46

Eastern Facade of the Adamson House 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00039.tif)

Scope and Contents

A view of the east-facing side of the historic Adamson House in Malibu, California. The house was built by the Rindge family for their daughter Rhoda and her husband Merritt Huntley Adamson in 1929. The building became a California Historical Landmark in 1985. During the early 1970s, when this photo was taken, the Adamson House was home to M. Norvel Young, Chancellor of Pepperdine University, and Helen Young.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 47

Decorative Potted Plant at the Adamson House 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00038.tif)

Scope and Contents

A large decorative potted plant atop a wall column near the garage of the Adamson House in Malibu, California.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 48

Star Fountain on the Grounds of the Adamson House 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00040.tif)

Scope and Contents

The Moorish Revival style Star Fountain on the grounds of the Adamson House overlooking Surfrider Beach in Malibu, California.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 49

Arched Window of the Adamson House 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00041.tif)

Scope and Contents

The arched window at the southeastern corner of the Adamson House in Malibu, California. The house is famous for its Malibu tile designs, as seen here.
box 1, folder 2, photograph 50

Peacock Fountain at the Adamson House 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00044.tif)

Scope and Contents

The Peacock Fountain on the eastern side of the Adamson House in Malibu, California. The house is famous for its elaborate use of Malibu tiles, which were produced by the Rindge family-owned Malibu Potteries.
box 1, folder 3

Photographs 51 through 75 1974

box 1, folder 3, photograph 51

Pool at the Adamson House 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00029.tif)

Scope and Contents

The swimming pool at the Adamson House in Malibu, California. The tiled pool was equipped to handle either saltwater or freshwater.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 52

Adamson House Bathhouse 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00024.tif)

Scope and Contents

The bathhouse at the Adamson House swimming pool at the east end of the property in Malibu, California. The mural of Vasco Núñez de Balboa on the wall is by Ejnar Hansen.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 53

Circular Window on the Adamson House Garage 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00046.tif)

Scope and Contents

One of the high circular windows on the garage building of the historic Adamson House. Like many details of the house, the window features designs with Malibu Potteries tile.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 54

Potting Bench and Mural at the Adamson House 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00045.tif)

Scope and Contents

The potting bench and ocean mural behind what is now the Visitor Center/Gift Shop of the Adamson House in Malibu, California.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 55

Deck Over the Boathouse at the Adamson House 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00028.tif)

Scope and Contents

The viewing station built over the Adamson House boathouse at the edge of the Malibu Lagoon in Malibu, California. This is at the southern edge of the property opposite the Pacific Coast Highway entrance.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 56

Palm Canyon Lane Leading up to Serra Retreat 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00035.tif)

Scope and Contents

A look down Palm Canyon Lane, the road to Serra Retreat in Malibu, California. Purchased from the Rindge estate in 1942 by the Franciscan Order of California, Serra Retreat remains a religious retreat and conference center.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 57

Serra Retreat in Malibu 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00054.tif)

Scope and Contents

Purchased from the Rindge estate in 1942 by the Franciscan Order of California, Serra Retreat remains a religious retreat and conference center. Although the original structure was destroyed by a wildfire in 1970, the Franciscans rebuilt the retreat to its current form, a relatively new structure in 1974.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 58

Stairway from Serra Point at Serra Retreat 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00052.tif)

Scope and Contents

Malibu Tile decorate the stairway between Serra Point and the main buildings of Serra Retreat. Purchased from the Rindge estate in 1942 by the Franciscan Order of California, Serra Retreat remains a religious retreat and conference center.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 59

Serra Point at Serra Retreat 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00065.tif)

Scope and Contents

The cross and statue on Serra Point, the southern tip of Serra Retreat overlooking the ocean in Malibu, California. Purchased from the Rindge estate in 1942 by the Franciscan Order of California, Serra Retreat remains a religious retreat and conference center.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 60

Statue of Junípero Serra at Serra Retreat 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00053.tif)

Scope and Contents

The statue of Junípero Serra, the Apostle of California, on Serra Point at the southern tip of Serra Retreat in Malibu, California. Purchased from the Rindge estate in 1942 by the Franciscan Order of California, Serra Retreat remains a religious retreat and conference center.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 61

View from Serra Point at Serra Retreat 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00088.tif)

Scope and Contents

The view from Serra Point of Serra Retreat in Malibu, California looking south follows Malibu Creek out to the Pacific Ocean. Purchased from the Rindge estate in 1942 by the Franciscan Order of California, Serra Retreat remains a religious retreat and conference center.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 62

Statue of Mary at Serra Retreat 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00089.tif)

Scope and Contents

A statue of Mary before a double peacock mosaic made with Malibu Tile at Serra Retreat in Malibu, California. Purchased from the Rindge estate in 1942 by the Franciscan Order of California, Serra Retreat remains a religious retreat and conference center.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 63

Malibu Tile Detail from Serra Retreat 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00055.tif)

Scope and Contents

A close up of Dutch-themed Malibu Tiles in an interior room of Serra Retreat in Malibu, California.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 64

View Westward from Serra Retreat 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00027.tif)

Scope and Contents

The view looking west from Serra Retreat in Malibu, California. Malibu Creek runs through the canyon and Palm Canyon Lane is on the right. Hazard Ranch is near the center of the photograph.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 65

Laudamus Farm Viewed from Serra Retreat 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00049.tif)

Scope and Contents

Laudamus Farm, one of the hubs of Rancho Malibu owned by the Rindge family, as seen looking northeast from Serra Retreat in Malibu, California. The razed lots in the foreground are all that's left of the Serra Retreat tile storage barns, which burned along with the retreat in a 1970 wildfire a few years before this photo was taken.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 66

Tack Room Facilities at Laudamus Farm 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00051.tif)

Scope and Contents

The tack room facilities for horseback riding at Laudamus Farm near Serra Retreat in Malibu, California. Laudamus Farm, one of the hubs of Rancho Malibu, was owned by the Rindge-Adamson family.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 67

Weeping Willow at Laudamus Farm 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00048.tif)

Scope and Contents

A giant weeping willow provides shade for an animal cage on Laudamus Farm near Serra Retreat in Malibu, California. A dog rests nearby. Laudamus Farm, one of the hubs of Rancho Malibu, was owned by the Rindge-Adamson family.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 68

Squirrel Cage at Laudamus Farm 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00047.tif)

Scope and Contents

A large squirrel cage at Laudamus Farm near Serra Retreat in Malibu, California. Laudamus Farm, one of the hubs of Rancho Malibu, was owned by the Rindge-Adamson family.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 69

Ranch House at Laudamus Farm 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00025.tif)

Scope and Contents

One of the ranch houses in which members of the Adamson family lived at Laudamus Farm near Serra Retreat in Malibu, California. Laudamus Farm, one of the hubs of Rancho Malibu, was owned by the Rindge-Adamson family.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 70

Wide Shot of the Barbecue Grounds near Serra Retreat and Laudamus Farm 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00034.tif)

Scope and Contents

The barbecue grounds near Laudamus Farm and Serra Retreat in Malibu, California. Laudamus Farm, one of the hubs of Rancho Malibu, was owned by the Rindge-Adamson family.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 71

Barbecue Grounds near Serra Retreat and Laudamus Farm 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00050.tif)

Scope and Contents

The barbecue grounds near Laudamus Farm and Serra Retreat in Malibu, California. Laudamus Farm, one of the hubs of Rancho Malibu, was owned by the Rindge-Adamson family.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 72

Malibu Civic Center as Viewed from Malibu Knolls 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00061.tif)

Scope and Contents

The view of the Malibu Civic Center, recently opened at the time of the photo, from Malibu Knolls. The view is southeast.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 73

Malibu County Mart Shopping Center 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00078.tif)

Scope and Contents

View from hill looking west across Malibu Creek to the Malibu Country Mart shopping center, lumber yards, and Crummer Field.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 74

Pacific Coast Highway Intersection with Webb Way 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00066.tif)

Scope and Contents

Pacific Coast Highway looking east near the present-day intersection of Webb Way. Civic Center Way goes off to the upper left of the photo.
box 1, folder 3, photograph 75

Malibu Community Recycling Center 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00023.tif)

Scope and Contents

The Malibu Community Recycling Center, which was located near the Civic Center and public library in central Malibu, California.
box 1, folder 4

Photographs 76 through 89 1974-1990

box 1, folder 3, photograph 76

Malibu Colony Viewed from a Bluff 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00036.tif)

Scope and Contents

View of Malibu Colony from a bluff. Malibu Road is on the left.
box 1, folder 4, photograph 77

Malibu Colony and Beach 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00031.tif)

Scope and Contents

View of Malibu Colony from a bluff. Malibu Road is on the left.
box 1, folder 4, photograph 78

Malibu Presbyterian Church 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00062.tif)

Scope and Contents

Malibu Presbyterian Church in 1974. Originally built in 1951, the church would later burn down in the wildfire of 2007.
box 1, folder 4, photograph 79

View of Latigo Beach in Malibu from Hill 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00081.tif)

Scope and Contents

A view from Willmott's Hill of Pacific Coast Highway and Latigo Shore Drive looking southwest. The large structure is Tivoli Cove Condominiums.
box 1, folder 4, photograph 80

View of Paradise Cove and Point Dume 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00069.tif)

Scope and Contents

A view southwest of Paradise Cove and Point Dume from Willmott's Hill near Latigo beach in Malibu, California.
box 1, folder 4, photograph 81

View of Malibu Road and Pacific Coast Highway from Willmott's Hill 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00068.tif)

Scope and Contents

The view east from Willmott's Hill near Latigo in Malibu, California. The Pacific Coast Highway splits to the left, Malibu road to the right.
box 1, folder 4, photograph 82

Yellow Flowers Blooming in Malibu 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00067.tif)

Scope and Contents

Yellow springtime flowers blooming in Malibu, California.
box 1, folder 4, photograph 83

Fields of Yellow Flowers in Malibu 1974

Physical Description: (malibu00033.tif)

Scope and Contents

A field of wild springtime flowers in Malibu, California.
box 1, folder 4, photograph 84

Charley Brown's Malibu Sea Lion Restaurant circa 1990

Physical Description: (malibu00082.tif)

Scope and Contents

Charley Brown's Malibu Sea Lion, located at the current site of Duke's Malibu at the intersection of Las Flores Canyon and the Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu, California. Netter took this photograph at a later date in the early 1990s.
box 1, folder 4, photograph 85

Rambla Pacifico Intersection with Pacific Coast Highway circa 1990

Physical Description: (malibu00080.tif)

Scope and Contents

The Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu, California at the intersection with Rambla Pacifico. The bridge over Las Flores creek is visible and Charley Brown's Malibu Sea Lion restaurant is in the background.
box 1, folder 4, photograph 86

Las Flores Creek Bridge on Pacific Coast Highway circa 1990

Physical Description: (malibu00079.tif)

Scope and Contents

The Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu, California at the intersection with Rambla Pacifico. The bridge over Las Flores creek is visible and Charley Brown's Malibu Sea Lion restaurant is in the background.
box 1, folder 4, photograph 87

Pacific Coast Highway at Corral Canyon circa 1990

Physical Description: (malibu00072.tif)

Scope and Contents

The Pacific Coast Highway winds through Malibu, California through Corral State Beach approaching Willmott's Hill. The coastline stretches to Point Dume in the background. The view is looking west.
box 1, folder 4, photograph 88

Pacific Coast Highway at Corral Canyon circa 1990

Physical Description: (malibu00073.tif)

Scope and Contents

The Pacific Coast Highway winds through Malibu, California through Corral State Beach approaching Willmott's Hill. The coastline stretches to Point Dume in the background. The view is looking west.
box 1, folder 4, photograph 89

Pacific Coast Highway at Corral Canyon circa 1990

Physical Description: (malibu00074.tif)

Scope and Contents

The Pacific Coast Highway winds through Malibu, California through Corral State Beach approaching Willmott's Hill. The coastline stretches to Point Dume in the background. The view is looking west.
box 1, folder 5

Hardcopy Printout of Original Photo Album 1890-1990

Physical Description: (Netter_Malibu_album_01 through Netter_Malibu_album_32)

Scope and Content

Color hardcopy printout compiling the scanned pages of Lani Netter's photo album, preserving her original order and arrangement of the photographs. She also includes some captions and notes.