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Collection Overview
 
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Description
The collection contains a total of 506 items printed by Antonio Vanegas Arroyo's press. Among the items are half-sheet and full-sheet broadsides, chapbooks, and games. A majority of the prints were by José Guadalupe Posada, and possibly a few by Manuel Alfonso Manilla, his precursor and mentor. Themes in the collection include: Mexican popular culture, Calaveras, local disasters, supernatural acts, crimes, suicides, moral lessons, social critique, political caricatures, corridos, religious miracles, the Virgen de Guadalupe, and images of daily life and customs in Mexico.
Background
José Guadalupe Posada (1852-1913), born in Aguascalientes, Mexico, spent his most creative period in Mexico City, from 1888, as a prolific engraver, printmaker, and publisher during the final years of the Porfirio Díaz dictatorship and the beginning of the Mexican Revolution. In 1890, Posada began work for noted printer Antonio Vanegas Arroyo. Posada's works were widely distributed to both the illiterate and reading public, and, since the 1920s, made lasting impressions on Diego Rivera, Leopoldo Mendez, and many other prominent artists. Today Posada is best-known for his satirical and humorous illustrations of Mexican society. Among his most recognized works are his broadsides known as Calaveras, depicting lively images of skulls and skeletons, with accompanying text often in verse. Following Posada's death, the Calaveras became closely associated with Mexico's Dia de Muertos celebration (Day of the Dead). Posada's early work with printer Vanegas Arroyo was influenced by another graphic artist, Manuel Alfonso Manilla. The similarity between their work during Posada's early years in Mexico City led to the attribution to Posada of almost all of the Vanegas Arroyo broadsides, including those created by Manilla. In recent years researchers have begun to identify works by Manilla which were formerly attributed to Posada.
Extent
7.79 Linear Feet 7 boxes and 1 oversize folder 506 prints
Restrictions
All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Manuscripts Librarian. Permission for publication is given on behalf of Special Collections as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained.
Availability
Advance notice required for access.