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Peru newspaper collection
2019C87  
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Collection Details
 
Table of contents What's This?
  • Access
  • Accruals
  • Acquisition Information
  • Historical Note
  • Preferred Citation
  • Scope and Contents
  • Publication Rights

  • Title: Peru newspaper collection
    Date (inclusive): 1912-1989
    Date (bulk): 1963-1989
    Collection Number: 2019C87
    Contributing Institution: Hoover Institution Archives
    Language of Material: Spanish; Castilian .
    Physical Description: 18 oversize boxes (28.3 Linear Feet)
    Abstract: The newspapers in this collection were originally collected by the Hoover Institution Library and transferred to the Archives in 2019. The Peru newspaper collection (1912-1989) comprises seven different Spanish-language titles of publication. All of the titles within this collection have been further analyzed in Stanford University Libraries catalog.
    Physical Location: Hoover Institution Archives

    Access

    The collection is open for research; materials must be requested at least two business days in advance of intended use.

    Accruals

    Materials may have been added to the collection since this finding aid was prepared. To determine if this has occurred, find the collection in Stanford University's online catalog at http://searchworks.stanford.edu/ . Materials have been added to the collection if the number of boxes listed in the catalog is larger than the number of boxes listed in this finding aid.

    Acquisition Information

    Materials were acquired by the Hoover Institution Archives in 2019 from the Hoover Institution Library.

    Historical Note

    The Hoover Institution's collecting history regarding newspapers spans over 80 years. Newspapers became an integral core component of the "Hoover War Collection" soon after it was established in 1919 as a repository of materials on World War I and the states and societies involved in it. The subsequent widening of focus to cover the themes of "War, Revolution, and Peace" caused the collection to grow further in scope and volume into a variety of directions.
    As a result, over the course of 80 years, thousands of newspaper titles from close to a hundred different countries were collected. They document major political and historical events, such as military conflicts and wars, the collapse of political systems, states, and empires, the establishment of radical and revolutionary regimes, and the corollaries of all these developments, including economic crises, famines, and migration for political reasons.
    In 2000-2001, the Hoover Library's newspaper collection activities came to an almost complete halt. Around that time, the "realignment" of library activities and collections at Stanford saw the transfer of more than 2,000 newspaper titles from specific (mostly non-European) countries from the Hoover Library to other libraries at Stanford. Moreover, prior to the realignment, a significant but unknown volume of paper copies of newspapers (including many Russian/Soviet titles) were discarded after being microfilmed.
    In totality, the remaining paper copies of newspapers at Hoover - excluding microfilm holdings - comprise more than 5,000 unique titles, of which at least many hundreds can be considered rare or very rare. These remaining newspaper collections at Hoover contain materials dating from all periods of the 20th century, with some titles reaching back into the 19th century. While the variety and diversity of papers is considerable, most titles fall into one of three groups: 1) general daily and weekly newspapers; 2) party and propaganda newspapers; 3) newspapers addressing national or ethnic minorities, émigré newspapers, veterans' papers, professional and union papers.
    The largest number of newspaper runs include copies from the first half of the 20th century. Newspapers from this period illuminate in particular the two world wars and their consequences as well as political, social, and economic developments in Europe and beyond, including the rise of Socialist, right-wing, and Fascist ideologies and movements. Among the late 20th century holdings, a significant number of papers reflect political change in various regions, most prominently the end of Socialist and Communist regimes in Eastern Europe, but also revolutionary or radical political movements in non-European states, e.g. in Latin America.
    Very few holdings of individual newspaper titles possess complete or near-complete runs. However, in cases of gaps, supplementation can sometimes be found in the form of microfilm copies available at the Hoover Library or holdings at Stanford University Libraries.

    Preferred Citation

    The following information is suggested along with your citation: [Title/Date of Publication], Peru newspaper collection [Box no.], Hoover Institution Archives.

    Scope and Contents

    The Peru newspaper collection (1912-1989) consists of thirty-eight (38) Spanish-language newspapers and seven (7) unique titles. The titles, publication information, and Hoover-held date ranges are: 1. El comercio grafico. (Lima: Comercio Grafico, 1966); 2. El comercio. (Lima: J.M. Monterola, 1943, 1964, 1966); 3. La crónica. (Lima, 1964); 4. Frente: órgano del Frente de Liberación Nacional. (Lima: Industrial Gráfica, 1964); 5. La prensa. (Lima: J. Ignacio de Olazábal S., 1912-1914); 6. El socialista: organo del Partido Socialista del Peru. (Lima: F.L. Chávez León, 1935); and 7. Unidad: semanario del Partido Comunista Peruano. (Lima: Partido Comunista Peruano, 1963, 1968, 1970-1989).
    Further analyzed title information can be found in Stanford University Libraries catalog.

    Publication Rights

    Due to the assembled nature of this collection, copyright status varies across its scope. Copyright is assumed to be held by the original newspaper publications, which should be contacted wherein public domain has not yet passed. The Hoover Institution can neither grant nor deny permission to publish or reproduce materials from this collection.