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Lady Adams Letters: Finding Aid
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Collection Contents

Box 1

Correspondence: A-Cooke, I.

Folder 1

Adams, Lady Agnes Ann (Cook). 1 letter (1942) to Jean Roxburgh, Sunningdale, England.

Folder 2

Adamson, Amanda. 1letter (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Christchurch, England.

Folder 3

Adamson, J[ohn] W[illiam] and Amanda. 6 letters (1940-1942) and 1 photograph to Lady Agnes Adams, Bournemouth, Christchurch, Hove, England.

News of London blitz, Londoners' business as usual, death of Amanda Adamson.
Folder 4

Adamson, Dorothy. 2 letters (1940-1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Durham, Christchurch, England.

News of scattered families preventing family gatherings at Christmas, government warnings about big railway stations and main lines being favorite enemy targets for bombing, all or partial destruction of famous old London buildings.
Folder 5

Anderson, [Sir] Francis. 1 letter, 3 photographs, 4 newspaper articles (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Sydney, Australia.

1 photograph of Lady Anderson with H.G. Wells, obituary of Sir Francis.
Folder 6

Anderson, Josephine. 3 letters (1941-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Sydney, Australia.

Sends news of her husband, Sir Francis Anderson's death, details of war preparation and her involvement.
Folder 7

Anderson, Maggie. 7 letters (1941-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Aberdeen, Scotland.

Thanks Lady Agnes for tea and magazines and copy of one of Sir John's books, compares WWII's easier rationing with queues of WWI.
Folder 8

[Ashley Cooper, Billy]. 1 letters (1939) to Lady Agnes Adams, Val Davide, Canada.

She is daughter of Patrick and Kathleen Ashley Cooper.
Folder 9

Ashley Cooper, Kathleen. 31 letters (1939-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Hitchin, London, England.

Kathleen is wife of Lady Adams' nephew Patrick and an active volunteer at the Beaver Club which supports the troops. She gives great detail about wartime in London living at Claridges with her husband. She regrets she cannot speak of the many details she knows about because of her husband's position in the government.
Folder 10

Ashley Cooper, Patricia. 9 letters (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Toronto, Canada; Hitchin, England.

Patricia is the daughter of Kathleen and Patrick Ashley Cooper and was presented in 1938. A newspaper photograph of her in her presentation gown is in the file of Kathleen Ashley Cooper. She brings a group of children out of England to safety in Canada and Australia. On her return she stays with Lady Adams in Hollywood for two months and afterwards returns to Canada where she works in an airplane factory. She eventually gets a flight back to England where she enrolls at Oxford to study to be a doctor.
Folder 11

Ashley Cooper, Patrick. 13 letters (1939-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams and 3 photographs, London, England.

He is Governor of the Hudson's Bay Company, Director of the Bank of England and during the war, Director General of Finance to the Supply Council for Munitions Production. The letters give extensive details about war-related issues he encounters in his official duties. He mentions meeting Col. J. G. Bowell of Pasadena on board ship.
Folder 12

Barrett, A. 1 letter (1940) to Lady Agnes Adams, London, England.

War news.
Folder 13

Barrett, P. A. 2 letters (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, London, England.

Mr. Barrett writes of his wife's death and says his own goodbye.
Folder 14

Bax, Evelyn. 2 letters (1940) to Lady Agnes Adams, London, England.

Ms. Bax writes of her mother's heart attack and continued illness.
Folder 15

Bax, Nellie. 3 letters (1940) to Lady Agnes Adams, Petworth, England.

Mrs. Bax was a dear friend who died in late 1940 from fear of the continuous air raids.
Folder 16

Birdstein, . 1 letter (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Birdstein took children to safety in America, husband in Sydney in the air ministry. They were at Cal Tech in 1930s and knew the Millikens.
Folder 17

Blyth, Agatha. 1 letter (1940) to Lady Agnes Adams, Hampstead, England.

She sends new of friends and family during WWII.
Folder 18

Boak, Dorn. 1 letter (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Touranga, New Zealand.

Thank you for hospitality to her daughter, Moya.
Folder 19

Boak, Moya. 1 letter (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Port Stanley, Falkland Islands.

After her stay with Lady Adams, she waited four weeks for a ship to take her to Falkland Islands to be married. She has interesting tales to relate due to war restrictions.
Folder 20

Brient, Irene M. 1 letter (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Olinda Victoria, Australia.

She discusses the many different aspects of rationing and seeing Mrs. McArthur and son at a tea tavern.
Folder 21

Brock, [Eirene]? 11 letters (l940-l942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Wells, Silverdale, London, England.

Describes visiting London after the Blitz.
Folder 22

Brown, Agnes Ballance. 1 letter (1940) to Lady Agnes Adams, Newport, England.

Discusses conditions during war and contemplates when America will "do more."
Folder 23

B[ullock], Dorothy. 2 letters (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, London, England.

Discusses life during the war, the spirit and dedication of the nursing staff and English soldiers and Winston Churchill.
Folder 24

Carr, Geraldine Wilder. 2 letters (1940-1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Polperro, Cornwall, England.

Accounts of wartime experiences on the home front, expressions of patriotism.
Folder 25

Chambers, Gertrude. 10 letters, (1940-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Aberystwyth, London, England.

With an added entry of R. W. Chambers. Describes her experiences during the bombing raids of London. R. W. thanks Lady Adams for gifts of lumps of sugar.
Folder 26

Chambers, Raymond Wilson. 1 letter (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Aberystwyth, England.

Miss Chambers and her brother Raymond, Quain Professor of English Literature at University College, London, both worked at the Huntington in 1935-6 and stayed at the Athenaeum.
Folder 27

Chandler, Ethel M. 1 letter (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Sunningdale, England.

News of her family and thank you for sympathy for loss of her husband.
Folder 28

Cockerell, T[heodore] D[ru]. 5 letters (1940-1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Boulder, Colorado and reprints of 10 letters from Douglas Cockerell, Letchworth, England.

There is much information on war conditions and the work of T.D. Cockerell in the area of increasing food production.
Folder 29

Cockerell, W[ilmatte (Porter)]. 1 letter (1929) to Lady Agnes Adams, Helsingfors, Finland.

Recounts her travels in the Baltic Republics.
Folder 30

Conway, Margaret M. 5 letters (1940-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Rugby, Cambridge, England.

Conditions for her during WWII.
Folder 31

Cook, George Stevani Littlejohn. 1 letter (1940-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, copies of 2 letters from W.C. Geoghan about GSLC and copies of 5 letters from GSLC to father, Aunt Margie and "My Darling," Belgium; Germany.

He discusses the regulations he will need to abide by in the German prisoner-of-war camp in which he is interred.
Folder 32

[Cook]? Gwen. 1 letter (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Takapuna, New Zealand.

Family news and accounts of shortages of petrol and the hardships of the blackout.
Folder 33

Cook, Irene. 2 letters (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Rangiriri, New Zealand.

News of sheep farming and the family.
Box 2

Correspondence: Cooke, J.-H

Folder 1

Cook, James. 3 letters (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Aberdeen, Scotland.

News of the area, health of wife, death of village soldier. Letters written on back of business letters.
Folder 2

Cook, John. 1 letter (1940) to Lady Agnes Adams, Rangiriri, New Zealand.

He makes small entries every few days about wartime conditions and t he fact that young men are not signing up to serve.
Folder 3

Cook, Margaret W. 2 letters (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Aberdeen, Scotland.

She is concerned about son George who is a prisoner of war. She comments on petrol shortages which affect cluck shooting.
Folder 4

Cook, R[obert] Haldane (a). 7 letters (1941-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Blockley, England.

Lady Adams' brother describes food shortages, his garden, his area filled with refugees, and how people are fined if they don't use proper blackout methods. His family is feeling the financial pinch because of their investments in New Zealand.
Folder 5

[Cook], R[obert] Haldane (b). 4 letters (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Rangiriri, New Zealand.

He is concerned how close the Japanese are getting. The Americans landed in Aukland in February, 1942 and are digging shelters and opening caves in Mt. Eden area.
Folder 6

[Cook], Sophia. 4 letters (1941-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Blockley, England.

She sends thanks for the cheque for a fund called "Los Angeles Fund for Bombed-out Civilians."
Folder 7

Cooper, John Russell. 1 letters (1940) to Lady Agnes Adams, Aberdeen, Scotland.

John works at Patrick Ashley-Cooper's business and gives details of PAC's busy schedule. His father uses the Dewey system for his own library.
Folder 8

Dawson, Belinda. 4 letters (1941-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Settle, England.

Belinda helped Patricia Ashley-Cooper take 34 children to Vancouver and Australia. She stayed with Lady Adams for eight weeks before returning to England. Her father is Geoffry Dawson, editor of The Times.
Folder 9

Dawson, Cecelia. 2 letters (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, London, England.

The mother of Belinda sends thanks for many kindnesses and hospitality shown to Belinda by Lady Adams. Cecelia and others are knitting for the Russians.
Folder 10

Dawson, Joy. 1 letters (1940) to Lady Agnes Adams, Basrah, Iraq.

She has moved on to Bagdad and is concerned about the length of time mail is received. Her children go to school in England.
Folder 11

Delgarmo, M. 1 letter (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Aberdeen, Scotland.

Sends thanks for "odds and ends."
Folder 12

Dell, Ethel. 4 letters (1940) to Lady Agnes Adams, Penzance, Wells, England.

Patriotic comments and hopes for America's entry into the fight for "The English speaking peoples throughout the world can and will save the freedom which all peoples are entitled to enjoy." She is thankful for all the help given to the English, especially the children, by the American Red Cross.
Folder 13

Dykes, Christopher. 8 letters (1941-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Cambridge, Liverpool, England; Baltimore, Ma1yland; Adana, Turkey.

He was a Commonwealth Fellow at Cal. Tech, 1936-38 and a good friend. He discusses the determination to win the war by the British people. He also feels there must be a revolution in England after the war.
Folder 14

[Drew,] Margie [Mrs. Charles]. 3 letters (1940-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Milltimber, Scotland.

She sends news of family and is comforted by Lady Adams' letters though not all get through.
Folder 15

[Eltehn]?, Ida. 1 letter (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Stafford, England.

Ida is concerned for Lady Adams and hopes to meet her in the hereafter.
Folder 16

[Fielder]?, Maty. 1 letter (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Maidstone, England.

She works at a war nursery caring for children whose mothers work the night shift.
Folder 17

Fisher, Godfrey (Bill) and Fisher, Gerry. 6 letters (1940-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Bournemouth, England.

Gerry states she is proud to be British and so happy America has come in to the war. She hopes the fight together will give a more lasting peace.
Folder 18

Frankenburg, Charis. 9 letters (1941-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Lymm, England.

She was left a wealthy widow from her husband's death in WWI. She has used her money to support a hospital for deformed children. She also takes in other children during the war. She also includes excerpts of her sons' letters about their war experiences.
Folder 19

Freeman, R[ichard] Austin. 4 letters (1939-1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Gravesend, England.

Dr. Freeman served as a physician in Africa and upon his return to England began to write detective stories.
Folder 20

Fyleman, Rose. 1 letter (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Dorking, England.

Rose is contributor to Punch and author of children's poems.
Folder 21

Galienne, [Wm.] 2 letters (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Washington, New York, United States.

Mr. Galienne served in British government posts throughout the world. He met Lady Adams when he was acting consul in Los Angeles in 1931.
Folder 22

Glennie, Cha[rle]s E. 1 letter (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Aberdeen, Scotland.

He received a copy of Sir John's book from Lady Adams and remembers their friendship.
Folder 23

Glover, Mabel. 2 letters (1941-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Sherston, Cheltenham, England.

Mabel remembers their friendship.
Folder 24

Gould, B M. 1 letter (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Teignmouth, England.

Advises Lady Adams of the death of Eirena Brock.
Folder 25

Grassam, Elsie. 8 letters (1940-1 942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Edinburgh, Scotland; London, England.

Miss Grassam was Sir John's secretary in London for 20 years and continued to be helpful to the Adams. She lived through the Blitz and later returned to her London apartment.
Folder 26

Gray, Howard. 2 letters (1940-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Osterley, England.

Mr. Gray comments on his life and its significance.
Folder 28

Guilbert, Giles and Claire. 1 letter (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Paris, France.

Claire explains about her life during the occupation. She escaped to Cannes to check on her mother and brother and sent copies of this letter to many friends. She planned to return to Paris by the same route.
Folder 29

Hallam, J H. 1 letter (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Cambridge, England.

He gives an amusing account of moving to a small cottage to avoid having to share his home with mothers and "under fives" evacuees from London.
Folder 30

Halliday, Clive. 5 letters (1940-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Edinburgh, Scotland; London, England; Pernambuco, Brazil.

They return to England when the war starts and describe the boat crossing as well as his first impressions of life in London. He gives amusing descriptions of life in a boarding house. They were eventually sent to Brazil where they describe the sights and sounds.
Folder 31

Halliday, Myrtle Anne. 2 letters (1941-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, London, Liverpool, England.

She is an American actress who worked in Cecil B. DeMille's theater group. After she and her husband Clive returned to England she gave radio broadcasts, a transcript of which is enclosed. She gives ve1y clear descriptions of air raids and t11e behavior of Londoners.
Folder 32

Hartoz, Lady Mabel. 3 letters (1940-1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, London, England.

Lady Mabel reports on her and her family's war work. She is on the Council for East India. She heard General DeGalle speak at a Free French rally.
Folder 33

Hay, Silvia. 9 letters (1940-1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Bali, N.E. Indies; Kashmir, Calcutta, Darjeeling, India.

She tells stories of ex-patriots with lots of local color.
Folder 34

Helm, Ida E. 6 letters (1940-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Stafford, England.

She is head-mistress of Clarendon House and tells of her life during the war. She encloses an article about that but also on the other side is an explanation of rationing as of June, 1941.
Folder 35

Hilder, Mary. 1 letter (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Maidstone, England.

She works in the sick bay for evacuee children with Dr. Whyte and mentions meeting his wife, a friend of Lady Adams.
Folder 36

Holmes, [Norris]? 1 letter (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Godalming, England.

He is happy that America is contributing mote to the war effort. He hopes to meet Lady Adams in the "11ew Jerusalem" someday.
Box 3

Correspondence: I-Re

Folder 1

Isaac, [May]? 6 letters (1940-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Devizes, England.

She writes war news and causes of war, and describes with hilarity the ineptness of her new maid. Her town had many of the Dunkirk soldiers passing through and describes the tight security of this area.
Folder 2

Jones, Enid Clement. 1 letter (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Oxford, England.

She sends news of the death of a friend Eirene Brock.
Folder 3

Jones, Mildred. 1 letter (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Fowey, England.

She sends news of the death of her employer, Mrs. Lobban and her distress afterward.
Folder 4

Kennedy, Kate. 1 letter (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Inverness, Scotland.

She thanks Lady Adams for sending her a copy of Sir John's book. She expresses pride in the people of England.
Folder 5

King, Jessie F. 2 letters (1940-1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Plymouth,

England. She sends news of family and the fact that due to bombing she lost her home and her precious pieces of Chinese cloth.
Folder 6

Lea, Marian. 1 letter (1940) to Lady Agnes Adams, Pelworth, England.

She tells of the death of her sister, Nellie.
Folder 7

Littlejohn-Cook, William. 8 letters (1940-1 942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Myrtle, Scotland.

He is Lady Adams' nephew and married to Kissia who is President of the All Service Canteen. He mentions Cary Grant and other Hollywood people contributing to this service. He expresses disappointment that America was not yet fighting with them.
Folder 8

Littlejohn-Cook, Zenia (Kissia). 4 letters (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, London, England.

As head of the All Service Canteen she set up a dance for America marines and nurses. She organized a broadcast heard throughout the kingdom.
Folder 9

Livingston, Barbara. 1 letter (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, London, England.

She is wife of a former vice-consul to Los Angeles.
Folder 10

Lobban, T L. 1 letter (1940) to Lady Agnes Adams, Essex, England.

Mrs. Lobban writes about a bomb exploding near them as they worked in their garden in Cornwall.
Folder 11

Loring, Theodosia (Thackeray). 5 letters (1940-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Southsea, England.

She writes of the damage and destruction of buildings in London. She thanks Lady Adams for the gifts of tea and sugar.
Folder 12

Lothian, Sir Arthur. 1 letter (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Alur, India.

He knew Lady Agnes in California and is a senior officer in the Rajputana Agency.
Folder 13

Macgregor, A. M. Robertson. 1 letter (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Cramond, Scotland.

She advises Lady Agnes of the death of an old friend, Miss Mary Mackay.
Folder 14

Mackay, Mary Amelia. 3 letters (1940-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Cramond, Scotland.

Mary Mackay was Lady Adams' governess in her early childhood and she continued to be a friend.
Folder 15

Mackenzie, Donald A. 3 letters (1940-1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Ashtead, England.

Mr. Mackenzie tells a sto1y of his children's amusing reaction to an enemy plane fight above their heads and how they ran out to gather bomb fragments afterward from the bomb craters. There are other such stories included and of the high spirits of the people.
Folder 16

Mackesy, Dorothy. 36 letters (1940-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Southwold, England.

Dorothy is Lady Agnes' niece and wife of Major-General P.J. (Pat) Mackesy. She gives many interesting behind-the­scenes details of their life during the war and often the censor has to cut out parts of her letter. Also included are articles from The Lady and other publications.
Folder 17

Mackesy, Piers. 1 letter (1942) to Cook, ?, Picton, England.

The letter from the son of Dorothy and P.J. Mackesy is to his grandfather. He tells him of the academic award he received and also mentions the school will be starting some training of the young men for future war-related service.
Folder 18

Maclaurin, Alice. 1 letter (1944) to Gerta Blanard Millikan, Boston, United States.

In answer to Mrs. Millikan's request for any of her wartime letters from Lady Agnes Adams, she quotes from the letters rather than sending the originals.
Folder 19

Marechal, [Fine]? 1 letter (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Liege, Belgique.

A typed note from Madame Felix Marechal who Lady Adams became acquainted with during WWI.
Folder 20

Miles, Connie. 2 letters (1941-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Shere, England.

She wants Lady Agnes to send her an American-made button which says "To Hell with Hitler." Her father, Reverend Sir W. Robertson Nicoll, was Sir John's greatest friend. She is keeping a war diary for her descendants.
Folder 21

Millikan, Greta Blanchard. A statement (1945), Pasadena, California.

Statement about the request from Mrs. Cornelius Engert for any letters from her husband to Lady Agnes Adams. Mrs. Millikan sent them to her and in 1992 and 1995 Mrs. Engert's son, Roderick sent all correspondence between them to the Huntington.
Folder 22

Mitchell, N. 1 letter (1944) to Lady Agnes Adams, Prospect, South Australia.

She writes war news and hopes it will be over soon. Greta Millikan writes back to tell her of Lady Agnes' death.
Folder 23

Mitchell, Sir William. 1 letter (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Adelaide, South Australia.

He expects war to be declared with Japan on or about December 1, 1941 because of a Japanese raider sinking an Australian ship.
Folder 24

Monk, E. C. 6 letters (1941-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Highbury, England.

Reverend Monk was a friend of Sir John's. He philosophizes about war and evil people and his great admiration of President Roosevelt.
Folder 25

Mordaunt, Elinor. 1 letter (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, London, England.

She works with the Salvation Army and helps the fire brigade. She tells a story about a bombed slum area with only a piano standing and a worker playing jazzy tunes.
Folder 26

Morgan, Alex. 2 letters (1941-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Edinburgh, Scotland.

He mourns his wife's death and tells of his son, Major General Morgan being injured in an accident.
Folder 27

Mowat, Maisie. 1 letter (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Bristol, England.

Mrs. Mowat speaks of her husband's death in an airplane crash and her joy he was able to spend time with their grandchild in America beforehand.
Folder 28

Munro, Helen. 6 letters (1940-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Aberdeen, Scotland.

Mrs. Monroe was housemaid to Sir John and Lady Adams for their first 15 years of marriage. Her family worked for Lady Adams' family back a couple of generations.
Folder 29

Munroe, Norval M. 1 letter (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Vancouver, Canada.

She is visiting her sister and reports war preparations are everywhere. She is knitting turtleneck tuck-ins for the English navy.
Folder 30

Newton, Anne. 5 letters (1940-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, North Bovery, England.

Mrs. Newton is Lady Agnes' niece and is married to Colonel Ivan Newton who is involved in the war though retired.
Folder 31

Northwood, B. G. 1 letter (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, London, England.

Mrs. Northwood was Lady Adams' friend's charwoman. She informs Lady Agnes of the burning of her former home in London.
Folder 32

Nosworthy, Lyle. 14 letters (1932-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, La Paz, Bolivia; Rome, Italy; London, England; Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Lady Agnes knew Mr. Nosworthy when he was the British Consul in Los Angeles. He comments with dismay on the Italian people which he observed from 1934 to 1940.
Folder 33

Nunn, [Sir] T[homas] Percy. 4 letters (1940-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Funchal, Madeira, Portugal.

Sir Percy was Sir John Adams' replacement at the Institute of Education. He discusses their mutual acquaintances.
Folder 34

O'Connor, Irma. 1 letter (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams. 1 letter (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Kohimararna, Auckland, New Zealand.

Miss 0'Connor, editor, refuses to accept Lady Adams' article for print since the "Weekly News" has had to cut back the size of their publication. She has been dismissed from her position by the Herald because she is the highest paid.
Folder 35

Palmer, Doris. 3 letters (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Claygate, England.

Mrs. Palmer knew Lady Agnes in Los Angeles and is now back in England raising chickens and a vegetable garden.
Folder 36

Pascual, Conrad A. 2 letters (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Sheppard Field, Texas.

Pvt. Pascual was the houseboy at the Hollywood Hotel where Lady Agnes lived before going into the Air Corp.
Folder 37

Paterson, Barbara and Mary. 2 letters (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Glasgow, Scotland.

Mother and daughter write to thank Lady Agnes for cheque and explain the difficulty of cashing it.
Folder 38

Raton, Agatha. 5 letters (1940-1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Highlands, Scotland.

Mrs. Raton is known for her work with sphagnum dressings for wounds. She discusses the war and the bravery of the English military.
Folder 39

Reid, Charlotte and Connie ? 2 letters (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, London, England.

Both Charlotte Reid and Connie discuss the inability of Jane Stoddart, a famous woman journalist and editor of the British Weekly, to communicate with any of her former colleagues.
Box 4

Correspondence: Ro-Z

Folder 1

Roscoe, Frank. 12 letters (1940-1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Berkhamsted, England.

Mr. Roscoe had been a friend of Sir John's and writes to Lady Agnes many interesting observations about Hitler, Socialism. He foresaw the need for a US/English "police force" to back up peace treaties with aggressor nations.
Folder 2

Roxburgh, Jean. 36 letters (1940-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Sunningdale, England.

Jean is one of Lady Agnes' oldest friends. She writes of family and their war experiences.
Folder 3

Sampson, George. 1 letter (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Hove, England.

Mr. Sampson thanks Lady Agnes for the L. A Times review of his book.
Folder 4

Shepherd, Gertrude M. 9 letters (1941-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, London, England.

Mrs. Shepherd is Lady Agnes former chairwoman. She tells of being bombed out of one home and after moving another close call. She is overburdened with care of husband and sister.
Folder 5

Smith, [Lady] Lilliam Adam. 1 letter (1940) to Lady Agnes Adams, Balerno, Scotland.

Lady Smith is a long time friend and writes of family and the fright of the air raids.
Folder 6

Smith, Mary Nichol. 2 letters (1941-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Oxford, England.

Professor and Mrs. Smith lived at the Cal Tech Athenaeum while he worked at the Huntington Library. She remarks about the "toughened up" spirit of the English people but also how very hard the war is on the elderly.
Folder 7

Spensley, Calvert. 1 letter (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Devonshere, England.

Mr. Spensley's wife had been a good friend of Lady Agnes. Eventually he lived with his French servant.
Folder 8

Stewart, W. 2 letters (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Johannesburg, South Africa.

He expresses many concerns about the war and Nazi intrigue and the many internal problems of racial hatred in South Africa.
Folder 9

Stoddart, Jane. See Reid, Charlotte.

Folder 10

Synge, Dinah. 15 letters (1940-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Stevenage, Kingwood, England.

Miss Synge is head of a girl's school in Surrey. During WWII she elicits Lady Agnes' help in communicating with an elderly aunt in Rome whose people were considered enemies of England. She writes many interesting impressions and mentions "double summertime" which is double daylight savings time.
Folder 11

Synge, Dinah. 3 letters (1941) to Dora (McDonald), Stevenage, England.

Lady Agnes recopied these letters from Miss Synge as if from Lady Agnes to Miss Synge's aunt in Rome.
Folder 12

Tandy, Lilian. 1 letter (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, New York City, New York.

Mrs. Tandy is the wife of the British Consul in New York and writes of her husband being sent on a tour of inspection and news of their various mutual friends he encounters.
Folder 13

Thomson, Margaret. 2 letters (1940-1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Edinburgh, Scotland; Granleigh, England.

Mrs. Thomson was sent from London by her family because of her various homes being damaged by the bombing.
Folder 14

Walker, Margaret. 2 letters (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Peterborough, England.

She is a long-time friend and explains her particular pattern of writing letters to friends and family.
Folder 15

Walker, Nea. 1 letter [before 1942?] to Lady Agnes Adams, (Wales).

Miss Walker tells of the local "Horne Guard" watching for Hitler's troops landing there during the night and the guards' use of the ground :floor of the house for refreshment while the family slept upstairs.
Folder 16

Wedd, Charlotte. 4 letters (1940-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Southminster, England.

Mrs. Wedd is Lady Agnes' niece. She discusses family matters and particularly her concern for George Cook who is a prisoner-of-war. Also she mentions Kissia Littlejohn Cook's gratefulness for the generosity of Ronald Coleman to her Canteen.
Folder 17

Weekes, Rose. 17 letters (1940-1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Slindon, England.

She describes her life and work during the war. She helps sort the salvage of the town and keeps a large garden.
Folder 18

Whyte, Grace. 1 letter (part only) to Lady Agnes Adams.

Grace is mother to Janet Whyte. Grace's household belongings in storage were mostly destroyed.
Folder 19

Whyte, Janet. 1 letter (1940) to Lady Agnes Adams, Kettering, England.

Miss Whyte is mistress of a secondary school of evacuee children. She claims the children without parents are much easier to manage.
Folder 20

Young, Minnie. 1 letter (1942) to Lady Agnes Adams, Aberdeen, Scotland.

There were over 260 "alerts" with sirens which is very unnerving. She feels Satan has been let loose upon the earth.
Folder 21

[ ], Ella. 1 letter to Mrs. Bright, London, England.

She writes about bombs dropping and her home's damage.
Folder 22

[ ], Maysie. 2 letters (1941) to Lady Agnes Adams, Moffat, Scotland.

After some difficulty finding a room Maysie moves in with a friend. In her travels through London she saw the windows of Buckingham Palace blown out.
Folder 23

[ ], Nigel. 1 letter (1942) to Civeney, London, England.

This author describes the bombing devastation.
Folder 24

[ ], Norah S. 1 letter (1941) to Mr. Brock, London, England.

She describes a fire near her home in Eaton Terrace and how an auxiliary fireman living in the house was helpful in containing the devastation.
Box 5

Engert Family Correspondence

Biographical Note on Cornelius Van Hemert Engert

Cornelius Van Hemert Engert (1887-1985) born in Vienna, Austria, educated at Berkeley 1905-1911, law degree; married in 1922 to Sara Morrison Cunningham (1885-1972). Engert was an American diplomat and served throughout his many years of service in exotic posts often during dangerous times. He was an accomplished and dedicated mountain climber.
Folder 1

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1911) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, London, England.

An invitation to lunch from Lady Agnes to her husband, Sir John's, student Mr. Engert.
Folder 2

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1917) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, London, England.

She discusses her care of Belgium soldiers wounded in WWI, men coming home to be married and going back to the war, the raid that had people going into the tube for protection and her worry over his reported illness.
Folder 3

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1918) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, London, England.

Lady Agnes apologizes for not letting Van know about Sir John's visit to Holland ahead of time. Sir John visited his college porter's son serving in the army and other lonely young men.
Folder 4

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1919) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, London, England.

Lady Agnes is pleased Mr. Engert is coming to visit on his way to United States. She mentions things are ve1y queer in England with "war-enditis" displayed with labor unrest. She is looking forward to the encl of rationing. She also would like to see more American-type labor saving devices for homes.
Folder 5

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1920) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, London, England.

Lady Agnes asks Mr. Engert to call on Sydney Armitage-Smith in Persia. Lady Ag-i1es going to France with Sir John.
Folder 6

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1920) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, London, England.

Lady Agnes is entertaining Major Robertson Glasgow at her club.
Folder 7

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1920) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, London, England.

Lady Agnes saw a French play and also saw Pavlova perform. She is happy that Sir John will not be lecturing in Dublin where they would be in the middle of all that "fuss." An article by Lady Agnes published in the Daily Chronicle about American university students' behavior is enclosed.
Folder 8

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1920) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, London, England.

Lady Agnes writes to Mr. Engert her concern for his whereabouts and safety.
Folder 9

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1920) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, London, England.

Lady Agnes expresses worry for Mr. Engert's safety in Tehran. An enclosed article by Lady Agnes is about the types of songs children Jove to hear.
Folder 10

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1921) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, London, England.

Lady Agnes is concerned for her "adopted son's safety." The Adams are going to France for an Easter holiday.
Folder 11

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1921) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, Cohors, France.

The Adams are having a restful time in France.
Folder 12

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1921) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, London, England.

Lady Agnes finally received a letter from Mr. Engert. Lady Agnes' nephew, Patrick Cooper, is going to United States. An article by Lady Agnes published in Daily Chronicle enclosed.
Folder 13

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1921) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, London, England.

The Adams entertained the Freemans, Riebers, and the Lloyds.
Folder 14

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1921) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, London, England.

Lady Adams received a letter from Mr. Engert. She is again entertaining the Freemans, Riebers, Noyes and Father O'Neill.
Folder 15

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1921) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, Yorkshire, England.

Lady Adams names the best English writers. Two articles by Lady Agnes published in Daily Chronicle enclosed.
Folder 16

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1921) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, Dijon, France.

Lady Agnes sends postcard written in French.
Folder 17

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1921) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, France.

Lady Agnes sends postcard promising to write a long letter soon.
Folder 18

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1921) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, London, England.

The Adams go to a reception also attended by the Prime Minister.
Folder 19

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1921) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, London, England.

Lady Agnes is anxious about peace conference in Washington. Professor Adams is to retire in July, 1922.
Folder 20

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1921) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, Annecy, France.

The postcard has a picture of Lac d'Annecy where the Adams are vacationing.
Folder 21

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1922) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, London, England.

Lady Agnes hopes to see Mr. Engert in London on his way to U.S. She comments she is dismayed by their mutual friends, the Freeman's pro-German opinions.
Folder 22

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1922) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, London, England.

Lady Agnes recommends the Fabre Line for travel which she feels is nicer and cheaper.
Folder 23

Adams, Lady Agnes . 1 letter (1922) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, London, England.

The Adams are looking forward to retirement. Professor Adams is writing a book and Lady Agnes will help with proofs and indexing.
Folder 24

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1922) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, London, England.

Lady Agnes discusses what names they should address each other. She prefers to call him Van and is happy that he calls her by her initials A.A.A. She is impressed that Van's last letter to her was written on the Amir's letterhead.
Folder 25

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1922) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, Yorkshire, England.

Lady Agnes thanks Mr. Engert for his fascinating letters and the enclosure of edelweiss. She sends him Yorkshire heather.
Folder 26

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1922) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, Annecy, Hautie Savoie, France.

Lady Agnes writes that her husband Sir John will be lecturing at the southern branch of the University of California for spring semester . She hopes they will all meet in 1923.
Folder 27

Adams, Lady Agnes. 2 letters (1922) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert and Sara Cunningham, Washington, D.C.

Lady Agnes responds with joy to Mr. Engert's announcement of his upcoming marriage. She encloses a letter to Mr. Engert's wife-to-be.
Folder 28

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1922) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert and Sara Cunningham, London, England.

Lady Adams sends the newlywed couple her congratulations and asks for God's blessings for them.
Folder 28a

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1925) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, Berkeley, California.

Sir John is on his way to Texas and Lady Agnes will give his last lecture. Lady Adams will write her niece to visit the Engerts the next time they are in El Salvador.
Folder 29

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1926) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, [Los Angeles], California.

Lady Agnes sends Mr. Engert Sir John's teaching and traveling plans. She also is grateful for the picture of their new baby and Sara.
Folder 30

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1926) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, Los Angeles, California.

Lady Agnes received a cable from Mr. Engert about a friend arriving in town and Lady Agnes entertained them. Sir John is busy lecturing everywhere in the United States and even at McGill University in Canada.
Folder 31

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1926) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, Berkeley, California.

Lady Agnes happy to hear Mr. Engert and family to be stationed in Chile. Sir John is at Harvard lecturing and Lady Agnes is busy with her own social activities.
Folder 32

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter both handwritten and typed (1926) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, Berkeley, California.

Lady Agnes sent letters to both Washington, D.C. and Santiago, Chile in hopes of reaching Mr. Engert to tell him her nephew has been assigned to Buenos Ayres as the President of the Water Company and the Gas Company of Buenos Ayres. She hopes they will go on to Santiago and the Engerts will entertain them.
Folder 33

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1926) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, Los Angeles, California.

Lady Agnes writes of being put on the University extension list :for lectures. She often talks to women in nearby towns. Sir John is writing a new book. He enjoys his teaching and is very appreciated by his students.
Folder 34

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1926) to [Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, Sara] and Roderick, Los Angeles, California.

Lady Agnes hopes they are enjoying their new assignment in Caracas.
Folder 35

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1929) to Mr. And Mrs. Freeman

1 letter ( 1929) enclosed from Katherine Freeman to Mr. And Mrs. Engert as a characteristic letter from mutual friends.
Folder 36

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1935) to Sara Engert, Los Angeles, California.

Lady Agnes responds to Sara's news of Van's new assignment to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. However she will not be able to join him but will stay with the children in Cairo.
Folder 37

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1935) to Sara Engert, Los Angeles, California.

Lady Agnes is happy to hear that Sara will not be sending the Engert son to boarding school in England but will continue to keep him with the family.
Folder 38

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1935) to Sara Engert, Los Angeles, California.

Lady Agnes has heard from Mr. Engert in his new post but tells Sara to let him know in her next letter as he must be too busy to read her letters. She is "serene" about her husband John's passing as he did not suffer and Lady Agnes is much more able to be alone than he would have been.
Folder 39

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter to Sara Engert, Los Angeles.

Lady Agnes writes she often reads of Mr. Engert in newspaper accounts and even saw him in a film as he attended the coronation of the Emperor of Ethiopia. Lady Agnes is moving to the Hollywood Hotel as the Canterbury Inn is being torn down.
Folder 40

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1935) to Sara and Cornelius Engert, Hollywood, California.

Lady Agnes sends Christmas greetings to the family and acknowledges they must be going through a very difficult time separated from each other.
Folder 41

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1936) to Sara and Cornelius Engert, Hollywood, California.

Lady Agnes sends her love and admits disgust at the Los Angeles Times for their very confusing article about what is happening in the Engerts' part of the world.
Folder 42

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1942) to Sara, Cornelius and Sheila Engert, Hollywood, California.

Lady Agnes introduces them to the bearer of this letter, Christopher Dykes, who was a friend and a Commonwealth Fellow at Cal Tech.
Folder 43

Adams, Sir John. 1 letter (1925) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, Berkeley, California.

Sir John has just returned from South Africa and sends much praise to Mr. Engert for his great success in the U.S. State Department.
Folder 44

Adams, Sir John. 1 letter [after 1935] to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, London, England.

Sir John states that seats for the procession and gala performances are much harder to get on the 2211 than the 231 because of the shorter route. He asks Mr. Engert to lunch at the Savile Club.
Folder 45

Cook, Anne A.D. 1 letter (1919) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, Myrtle, Scotland.

Lady Agnes' niece writes of Mr. Engert traveling to Persia as high adventure. She has enjoyed going to Northern Ireland but is concerned about it not being too peaceful.
Folder 46

Cook, Anne A.D. 1 letter (1920) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, Myrtle, Scotland.

She writes her concern for European people suffering after the war. She also thinks it would have been worse for everyone if America had not come into the war.
Folder 47

Engert, Cornelius Van Hemert. 1 letter (1920) to Lady Agnes Adams, Teheran, Iran.

Mr. Engert writes that Brig. Gen. Lamont is leaving for England and that his advice was not wanted. He has heard from their mutual friend, Mrs. Freeman.
Folder 48

Engert, Cornelius Van Hemert. 1 letter (1920) to Lady Agnes Adams, Constantinople, Turkey.

Mr. Engert is traveling to his various ports on navy transports and likes it. He met the American General Shuttlework who is assigned to the Turkish War Office where his experience will be valuable.
Folder 49

Engert, Cornelius Van Hemert. 1 letter (1921) to Lady Agnes Adams, Teheran, Iran.

Mr. Engert had visits from friends: Mrs. Freeman, Armitage-Smith and Mrs. Cooper. He is concerned about the American troops leaving Kazvin (Qazvin) and what it will mean for the area.
Folder 50

Engert, Cornelius Van Hemert. 1 letter (1922) to Lady Agnes Adams, Kabul, Afghanistan.

Mr. Engert was the first American diplomat to visit Kabul where he was the guest of the Amir in one of his "little palaces." He asks Lady Agnes to call him Van.
Folder 51

Engert, Cornelius Van Hemert. 1 letter (1922) to Lady Agnes Adams, Ganeshkhind, India.

Mr. Engert has been traveling in many interesting places and is now visiting with Sir George Lloyd. Previously he visited Sir Aurel Stein at his camp in Kashmir which only can be reached by climbing on hands and knees up a cliff. He mentions when he was in Kabul, he was able to convince the Imir to allow Lowell Thomas to film his "Empire." A sprig of edelweiss is enclosed.
Folder 52

Engert, Cornelius Van Hemert. 1 letter (1922) to Lady Agnes Adams, Washington, D.C.

Upon returning to the States he was ordered to Washington. As he was passing through New York he renewed the acquaintance of a woman he had met three years before and they are to be married.. Mr. Engert has just been made First Secretary of Embassy and Assistant to the Chief of the Near Eastern Division of the State Department.
Folder 53

Engert, Cornelius Van Hemert. 1 letter (1929) to Lady Agnes Adams, Caracas, Venezuela.

The Engert sends Lady Agnes a telegram announcing the birth of their daughter.
Folder 54

Engert, Cornelius Van Hemert. 1 letter (1929) to Lady Agnes Adams, Caracas, Venezuela.

Mr. Engert writes of his children and where he might school them. He mentions he feels that he and Lady Agnes have many more things in common than they were ever able to explore as they both find they like to read the obituaries in "The Times" and save ones they like.
Folder 55

Engert, Cornelius Van Hemert. 1 letter (1929) to Sir John Adams, Caracas, Venezuela.

Mr. Engert sends a thank you for a copy of Sir John's book and thanks him for the many years of devotion to the education of youth.
Folder 56

Engert, Cornelius Van Hemert. 1 letter (1930) to Lady Agnes Adams, Nanking, China.

Mr. Engert's new assignment in Peking where he will be joined by his wife Sara and the children after a few months. He relates the many historical events that he has experiences in the first months since his arrival: the bombing of Peking, the dramatic meeting in Nanking between the Manchurian warlord and President Chiang Kai-shek. He saw a good deal of Professor Elliot Smith when he was in China in connection with the "Peking Skull."
Folder 57

Engert, Cornelius Van Hemert. 1 letter (1935) to Lady Agnes Adams, Cyprus, Greece.

Mr. Engert sends his condolences to Lady Agnes on the death of her husband, Sir John. He missed the obituary in "The Times" and felt sick at not being a comfort to her at her time of deepest sorrow. Mr. Engert is now assigned to Cairo and is vacationing with his family in the mountains. He mentions his total dislike of the present Minister.
Folder 58

Engert, Cornelius Van Hemert. 1 letter (1936) to Lady Agnes Adams, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Mr. Engert sends his holiday greetings.
Folder 59

Engert, Cornelius Van Hemert. 1 letter (1936) to Lady Agnes Adams, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

The Engerts send New Years greetings.
Folder 60

Engert, Sheila. 1 letter (1939) to Lady Agnes Adams, Teheran, Iran.

Shelia sends her thanks for gifts.
Folder 61

Noyes, F. 1 letter (1924) to --, Berkeley, California.

A postcard picture of Berkeley destroyed by a fire with the comment they are enjoying a visit from the Adams.
Folder 62

2 photographs (1923) of the Adams with inscriptions.

Folder 63

Freeman, Allen and, Katherine. 1 letter (1923 May 26) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, Berkeley, California. A get-well wish to Mrs. Engert.

Folder 64

Freeman, Allen and, Katherine. 1 letter (1923 October 16) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, Berkeley, California. They report on the Berkeley fire disaster.

Folder 65

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1922 December 3) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, Hampstead, England. Christmas greetings, request to pray for her as she crosses the Atlantic.

Folder 66

Freeman, Allen and, Katherine. 1 letter (1923 April 24) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, Berkeley, California. Reports on their mutual friends, the Adams.

Folder 67

Adams, Lady Agnes. 1 letter (1920 December 8) to Cornelius Van Hemert Engert, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Lady Adams very worried for Mr. Engert's safety and happy to hear news that he was safe in Tehran.