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Wilson (Gertrude) papers
0498  
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Collection Overview
 
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Description
Gertrude Wilson (1895-1984) was considered a pioneer in the development of social-group work as a specialty within social work. She eventually became involved in the American Association for the Study of Group Work where the field of social-group work was just emerging. Beginning in 1935, Wilson headed the social-group work department of the University of Pittsburgh's School of Social Work, where she remained for a dozen years, ultimately becoming Associate Dean. There she wrote and published the works for which she became well-known: Case Work and Group Work, and Social Group Work Practice-- co-authored with colleague and lifetime friend, Gladys Ryland. Wilson would go on to join the faculty at the University of California, Berkeley as Professor and Director of Social Welfare Extension with the charge of developing a professional education program for the professionally untrained social worker. In addition to teaching social-group-work at Berkeley, Wilson lead workshops and guest-lectured at the Columbia, Smith, and Tulane Schools of Social Work. This small collection of Gertrude Wilson's papers includes her college notes on child welfare, social investigation, and other social work topics; notes and papers that she wrote while at UC Berkeley; a biography of Wilson by Sister Patricia Ann Denny who was a candidate for the master's degree in Social Work; a few photographs of both Ryland and Wilson; photographs and ephemera pertaining to Wilson's retirement in 1963; three bound albums of cards, photographs, and letters from her retirement dinner; a few audiocassette tapes with paper transcriptions related to Gladys Ryland; and a written memoir of Gertrude Wilson as an oral history project in 1978.
Background
Gertrude Wilson (1895-1984) was considered a pioneer in the development of social-group work as a specialty within social work. After earning her PhD in 1920 at the University of Chicago, she taught high school for a couple of years before moving on to YWCA work. While she worked, she continued her education, enrolling first in Columbia University's Sociology Department and later in the University of Chicago's School of Social Service Administration, where she obtained an M.A. in 1938. Wilson's work with the YWCA began in 1922 as a secretary in Allentown, Pennsylvania, then continued in Buffalo, New York as program director. She then moved to Chicago where she served as the administrator for the Y's program for young women in industry. Her interests led her to become involved in the American Association for the Study of Group Work where the field of social-group work was just emerging. Beginning in 1935, Wilson headed the social-group work department of the University of Pittsburgh's School of Social Work, where she remained for a dozen years, ultimately becoming Associate Dean. There she wrote and published the works for which she became well-known: Case Work and Group Work, and Social Group Work Practice-- co-authored with colleague and lifetime friend, Gladys Ryland.
Extent
0.83 Linear Feet 2 boxes
Restrictions
All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Manuscripts Librarian. Permission for publication is given on behalf of Special Collections as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained.
Availability
COLLECTION STORED OFF-SITE: Advance notice required for access.