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Levy (Joseph) Papers
MS.275  
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Collection Overview
 
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Description
This collection contains daily dispatches from Jerusalem, Cairo, and Ankara between 1928 and 1945. In addition there is personal correspondence, research materials, financial papers, photographs, scrapbooks, and ephemera that document Levy's journalism career, and the events and politics of the Middle East and Eastern Europe.
Background
Joseph Meyer Levy (1901-1965) was an American citizen, due to his father’s citizenship, who was born, brought up and educated in Palestine. He was the New York Times correspondent for the Middle East, reporting from Jerusalem in Palestine, and Cairo, Egypt from 1928 to 1940, and from Ankara, Turkey from 1943 to 1944. Previously he had worked for the Civil Authorities of the British Mandate in Jerusalem. He was multilingual, speaking English, French, German, Hungarian, Hebrew, Yiddish, and a number of Arabic dialects. His Arabic was augmented by his experiences living with the Bedouin in the desert for six months. Following his work with the New York Times he worked for the American Jewish Committee in New York, and was a public relations representative for Congressman Emmanuel Cellar and the French government in the U.S., for Ambassadors Herve Alphand and Couve de Mourville.
Extent
13 Linear Feet 17 half cartons; 4 flats
Restrictions
Property rights for this collection reside with the University of California. Literary rights, including copyright, are retained by the creators and their heirs. The publication or use of any work protected by copyright beyond that allowed by fair use for research or educational purposes requires written permission from the copyright owner. Responsibility for obtaining permissions, and for any use rests exclusively with the user. For more information on copyright or to order a reproduction, please visit the UCSC Special Collections and Archives website.
Availability
Collection open for research.