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Selections From the Henry J. Kaiser Pictorial Collection, 1941-1946
BANC PIC 1983.017-019, 027--PIC  
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Table of contents What's This?

Container List

 

1983.017, Richmond Shipyard--Workers--General

Scope and Content Note

502 photographic prints; various sizes

Photographs of various workers, many identified by name. Includes managerial staff, yardworkers, welders, riggers, etc.
A

1 Richmond workers in training class. September 12, 1945

A

2 Workers at launching of C-4 Troop Transport

 

Arrival and/or departure of workers

 

Workers performing various jobs

 

John Hallett giving presentation to various workers

PIC

33 Health Plan recruitment poster

A

34 Safety Award, Richmond yard 1

 

Workers (general photos)

A
A
A

60 3 press 1 cable splicer

A

61 3 press 2 cable splicer

A
A

63 3 press 1

A

64 3 press 4

 

Launching Committee of S.S. Geo. Washington Carver

 

Supervisory and Management personnel

 

Numbers not used

82 No image

83 No image

84 No image

85 No image

 

Mr. C. P. Bedford, Vice-President and General Manager

A

89 Drafting room employees (yard unknown)

 

Harmonettes; Richmond singing group

AX

92 Yard 1 Engineering Drafting room for Liberty ships. May 12, 1941

 

Commendations to employees

PIC

96 Workers (general)

 

Welders. June 28, 1943-November 27, 1944

PIC

101 Safety drill. August 13, 1942

PIC

102 Burners. March 12, 1943

PIC

103 Richmond shipyard No.2, workers. June 28, 1943

 

Unidentified workers. September 9-25, 1943

PIC

106 Richmond yard 2 workers

PIC

107 Welders, Richmond Shipyard No.1. March 16, 1944

PIC

108 View near stern. April 20, 1944

PIC

109 Men working on parts. June 16, 1944

PIC

110 Shipyard No.4, ship stacks

PIC

111 Men loading banks of values. December 18, 1944

 

Shipfitters. June 6, 1945

 

Unidentified workers, no date or yard

 

Workers in Pre-fab Dept. September 9-18, 1943

 

Labor management. September 16, 1943

PIC

131 Pipefitters

 

Chain and steel cable makers

 

Unidentified yard personnel. October 12, 1944

 

Welders. October 17, 1944

PIC

139 Unidentified yard workers

PIC

140 Painters. February 9, 1945

 

Riggers on deck. February 28, 1945

 

Unidentified yard workers. May 31, 1945

 

Unidentified yard workers. June 2, 1945

PIC

152 Yard 2. September 17, 1941

 

Ed Hanney. September 27, 1941

 

M. Nicholls and J. Friedman. September 27, 1941

PIC

157 September 27, 1941

 

Contribution to Red Cross

PIC

161 Driegelbis, Ruelle, and Fay. June 13, 1942

 

Yard and shipworkers. April 16, 1942

PIC

167 Worker. October 28, 1942

 

"Fare Thee Well", workers after launching. November 12, 1942

 

Welfare. November 27, 1942

PIC

194 Yard Band practicing. December 18, 1942

PIC

195 Jack Finder. February 6, 1943

PIC

196 Drill Retainer. February 6, 1943

 

Workers and equipment. February 16, 1943

 

Yard 1 workers. February 19, 1943

 

Bob Boles. February 19, 1943

PIC

206 Plant protection personnel. August 7, 1943

PIC

207 Shopfitters softball team

PIC

208 Workman. October 17, 1942

 

Yard workers. June 14, 1944

 

Thomas H. Hunt (Naval Offices?). June 16, 1944

PIC

216 Yard workers. November 9, 1944

PIC

217 Yard workers. November 14, 1944

 

Fire protection personnel. January 31, 1945

 

Fireman. May 10, 1945

PIC

232 Arriving (or departing) workers. November 17, 1943

 

Plant protection personnel. December 28, 1945-January, 1946

 

Plant Police. July 2, 1946

PIC

244

 

Invoice and audit group, yard 2. May 14, 1946

 

Fire protection personnel. June 20, 1946

 

Net lenders Warehouse. April 17, 1946

PIC

252 Refrigeration crew. April 9, 1946

 

First Aid Station (personnel and patients). April 9, 1946

PIC

255 Canteen yard 3. March 25, 1946

 

Ordinance Department. March 25, 1946

PIC

260 Frances Colleman. March 25, 1946

PIC

261 Norma Maudlin. March 25, 1946

 

Preston. May 28, 1946

PIC

264 Chas. English. May 28, 1946

PIC

265 Frank Tellie. May 28, 1946

PIC

266 C.S. Cecil. May 28, 1946

PIC

267 Claire Walden. May 28, 1946

PIC

268 E.E. Heffington. May 28, 1946

PIC

269 Jack Harris and Geo. Hammond. May 28, 1946

PIC

270 Leo Balliweg and Frank Edmuston. May 28, 1946

PIC

271 W.E. Hare. May 28, 1946

PIC

272 Geo. Holland. May 28, 1946

PIC

273 Lucile Silvas. May 28, 1946

PIC

274 W.E. Hare and Geo. Holland. May 28, 1946

PIC

275 Myrtle Pollard and Lee Hallock

PIC

276 Ken Dumpsey. May 28, 1946

PIC

277 Art Robinson and Robert Randell

PIC

278 Lewis Hasty. May 28, 1946

PIC

279 Clark, Blair, Kirkland. May 28, 1946

 

Christmas tree. May 23, 1946

PIC

282 Frances Gluck. January 17, 1946

PIC

283 Jane Fernandez. January 17, 1946

PIC

284 Frances Gluck. January 17, 1946

 

Public Voucher Department. January 17, 1946

 

Margarite Dutscher. January 17, 1946

 

Eusin Ford. January 17, 1946

PIC

291 Caterpillar driver, yard 1. January 17, 1946

 

Phil Southkeep. January 10, 1946

PIC

294 Major West. January 10, 1946

PIC

295 Austin Lettle. January 10, 1946

PIC

296 Kenny Flood. January 10, 1946

 

Warehouse, A Group. January 10, 1946

 

Merin Micke. January 31, 1946

PIC

301 Chas. Folger (?)

 

B.E. Wood. January 31, 1946

 

June Krumm. January 31, 1946

 

Richard Peterson. February 6, 1946

PIC

308 Bill Peterson. February 6, 1946

 

Mike Cerini. February 6, 1946

 

Vault Custodian Group. February 6, 1946

PIC

313 Reg Machado. February 6, 1946

 

Merit Award. February 13, 1946

 

Unidentified shipyard workers. February 28, 1946

 

Bill Stone, J. Stubbleford (?), McCuan, Quinn. February 28, 1946

 

Jack McCuan. February 28, 1946

PIC

327 Invoice Audit Group. February 28, 1946

PIC

328 Warehouse Audit Group. February 28, 1946

 

Kato Brothers, net makers. March 21, 1946

PIC

333 Unidentified shipyard workers. March 21, 1946

PIC

334 Machine shop and workers. March 21, 1946

PIC

335 Galli, Schwerin, Harney, Thomas

PIC

336 W.W. Coughran. March 21, 1946

PIC

337 T.J. Hare. March 21, 1946

PIC

338 George Garcia, Bill Finaly. March 21, 1946

PIC

339 Mercily, Cuigler, Pruim (?). March 21, 1946

PIC

340 O.H. Casey. March 21, 1946

PIC

341 Cook, Nave. March 21, 1946

 

Graham, Zack, and Thornson. March 21, 1946

PIC

344 Machine shop day crew. March 21, 1946

PIC

345 Clifford Meyers. March 26, 1946

 

Unidentified warehousemen. March 26, 1946

PIC

349 Freda Howard and Youngblood. March 26, 1946

PIC

350 Arch Smith. March 26, 1946

PIC

351 Ken Snell and Jim Sulperzio. March 26, 1946

 

Al B. Capron. March 26, 1946

PIC

354 Yard personnel in front of machine shop. March 26, 1946

PIC

355 Charlie Meyers. April 3, 1946

PIC

356 Jack Dearhart. April 3, 1946

PIC

357 Olie Dahl and W.L. Kay. April 3, 1946

 

Unidentified yard maintenance workers

PIC

363 Jim Whyten. April 3, 1946

 

Jim Wishart. April 3, 1946

 

Victory yard workers. May 8, 1946

 

Workers on Aultman. May 8, 1946

PIC

372 Kay Albright. May 15, 1946

PIC

373 Barney Stuart. May 15, 1946

PIC

374 Wm. Chief. May 15, 1946

PIC

375 Maintenance machinery and workers. May 23, 1946

PIC

376 G.A. Smith and E.O. Lane. May 23, 1946

PIC

377 Eric Edenholm. May 23, 1946

PIC

378 J.P. Anderson and Chas. A. McLarty. May 23, 1946

PIC

379 Wawvoldt (?); Patterson, Muller and Arnold

PIC

380 Andy Anderson and Foreman Jay

PIC

381 Leo Raible. May 23, 1946

PIC

382 Ray Richardson. May 23, 1946

PIC

383 Albert Leapley. May 23, 1946

 

Catherine Doone. May 23, 1946

 

Myrtle Pollard. May 23, 1946

 

Workers yard 2. May 28, 1946

PIC

392 Kaiser Shipyards softball team. June 7, 1946

PIC

393 Flood (ship boss). July 19,1946

PIC

394 Bob Scheurler. July 19, 1946

 

Peter Mapes. July 19, 1946

PIC

397 T.A. Bedford. July 19, 1946

PIC

398 McCloud. July 19, 1946

PIC

399 Jim Brown. July 19, 1946

PIC

400 Mode. July 19, 1946

 

Bret Holmes. July 19, 1946

PIC

403 Steve Bechtel. July 19, 1946

PIC

404 Larson. July 19, 1946

PIC

405 Shipyard workers. September 11, 1946

PIC

406 Yard workers. November 8, 1943

 

Welding operations

 

Pile drivers. April 1-3, 1941

PIC

417 Workman by railroad tracks. April 1, 1941

PIC

418 Plant Policeman. December 5, 1945

 

Plant Protection, all yards

 

Surveyors. April 3, 1941

 

Yard workers. March 15, 1945

PIC

435 Yard workers. July 15, 1946

 

Yard workers. March 5, 1942

PIC

438 Yard workers. January 3, 1946

PIC

439 Newkirk, Yard 1. January 3, 1946

PIC

440 Jack Sullivan. January 3, 1946

PIC

441 C.E. Herring. January 3, 1946

PIC

442 Bert Homes. January 3, 1946

 

Dockmen and storage riggers. January 3, 1946

PIC

445 Clarence Smith, yard 3. January 3, 1946

 

Workmen

 

Welders

PIC

460 Workman

PIC

461 Marine burner

 

Workers

 

Deep sea diver

 

Crowds

 

Workmen

 

Workmen arriving at (or departing from) yards

PIC

496 Workmen

 

Workers at Pre-fab facility

 

Workers at unspecified area

 

1983.018, Richmond Shipyard--Workers--Women

Scope and Content Note

59 photographic prints; various sizes

Various women employees including welders, firefighters, policewomen, etc. Includes photographs of the women's basketball team in 1946.
 

Women employees performing various jobs

PIC

34 Shipyard "Dress Code" poster

PIC

35 Shipwrights helper fitting compass platform onto liberty ship

PIC

36 Ruth Rhoades. March 26, 1946

 

Kaiser Co. Inc. Women's Basketball team. January 25, 1946

 

Burners. February 4 and February 19, 1943

 

Plant Policewomen

PIC

45 Workers. March 25, 1945

PIC

46 Welders. February 18, 1943

 

Welders. April 19, 1944

 

Firefighters. August 8, 1945

 

Unidentified personnel. March 11, 1943

PIC

57 Ambulance driver. March 11, 1943

 

Tool control personnel. March 11, 1943

 

1983.019, Richmond Shipyard--Workers--Housing

Scope and Content Note

138 photographic prints; various sizes

Divided into four sections.
Section 1, Living Conditions Prior to Shipyard Housing, (no. 1-81) depicts the deplorable living conditions of many shipyard workers in Richmond due to the housing shortage in the area. Extensive typewritten captions are reprinted in the container listing.
Section 2, Shipyard Housing Projects, (no. 82-102) includes photographs of the U.S. Maritime Commission Housing Project in Richmond which built affordable housing for workers and various street and home views of this housing.
Section 3, Schools, (no. 103-108) includes views of a federally built school and the United States Maritime Commission Nursery School.
Section 4, Housing Projects, (no. 109-127) includes additional photographs of the United States Maritime Commission Housing Project's work in Richmond.
 

Living Conditions Prior to Shipyard Housing, no. 1-86

PIC

1 Title page, "Housing Conditions", Richmond, California

PIC

2 [Explanatory text, no photograph]

PIC

3 A shipyard worker and his wife were asleep in their car at the time this picture was taken. The flashlight woke them. "Did we intend to sleep in our car when we came here? Hell no!" the workman exclaimed, bitterly. "But what else can we do? Our tires are too thin to drive 25 miles each day." Richmond police periodically "relieve congestion and promote sanitary living conditions" by asking these people to move somewhere else - usually just beyond the city limits, but there are always new settlers for this eucalyptus grove not far from the Richmond Shipyards. "I've seen 50 workmen sleeping in their cars there," one man said.

PIC

4 Long padlocked, untenanted, abandoned to termites and decay, this dump becomes a shipyard worker's hotel again with virtually nothing new except a sign. Each small, dreary room is the residence of several shipyard workers or their families. "Single rooms" are almost unobtainable at any price; landlords will not rent them.

PIC

5 [Tree house]

PIC

6 A handful of vacant buildings - mostly in ruins as this one was, remain available in Richmond (population 20,000 before the Yards were built; at year's end the Yards will employ 85,000.) These long-condemned and long-unoccupied structures are being made into habitable dormitories. At best, when all are so rebuilt, they will sleep only a few hundred more men, will accomodate [sic] no families.

PIC

7 Fortunate is this worker who arrived in the Defense Plant early with a stout little shanty and a Victory garden. For every enterprising fellow like this, a hundred arrive too late.

PIC

8 [Shack and piles of scrap lumber]

PIC

9 Boats for Sale. Home for shipyard workers. Walk to work. Permanently berthed. Richmond Yacht Service. [ad for boat sale]

PIC

10 [House in shipyard]

PIC

11 [Boat on water and buildings]

PIC

12 [Dock near shipyards]

PIC

13 [Shacks near water]

 

This group of buildings is bounded on one side by the city dump, on another by a tidewater swamp. The swamp smells at low tide; burning refuse in the dump smells always. On a third side of this site is a particularly odorous hog farm, where hundreds of pigs are fattened on garbage and swill. Never-the-less, the group of shacks provide homes for four shipyard workers' families. "Very temporarily," they say.

PIC

16 The shipyard man who lives in this tent has been through fall rains before.

PIC

17 [Car without tires]

PIC

18 Buy a ramshackle trailer, or throw one together, and you've a shipyard worker's home. "No houses to rent; we had to do it."

PIC

19 Whatever this used to be, it's a war-worker's home in Richmond.

PIC

20 "Modernized" into a home for shipyard workers in downtown Richmond.

PIC

21 "The health inspectors wouldn't let me rent my attic to shipyard workers any more," says the landlady here. "But men beg me every night to let them sleep there; they'd gladly pay anything."

PIC

22 Backyard of a typically crowded shipyard area trailer park.

PIC

23 More than 50 trailer camps are utilized by present employees of the Richmond Shipyards. More are being established. All are crowded; all charge high rates for parking privileges. This is one of the worst. A farm family has turned its barnyard into a trailer camp. At $3.50 per week from each trailer site, revenue from both sides of the barn is approaching $1500 a month. At present, when the barnyard is dry, conditions are bad enough. When rains begin this whole camp will be a stinking quagmire. One water faucet serves scores of families; there are no sewers; waste water is dumped everywhere. Four outdoor privies, all very dirty, serve this camp. Several people live in the barn. On subsequent pages appear more details.

PIC

24 Two months ago there were no trailers in this camp. The total now exceeds 100. Parking space is $4.50 per week with the owner prepared to park additional rows of trailers in the foreground. This is one of the "better" camps. It is five or six miles from the Richmond Shipyards, but nearer ones are filled.

 

Additional views of barnyard trailer camp described on previous pages. Each day more trailers arrive. Outdoor privies, no sewers, no bathing facilities. In winter, this old barnyard will become very muddy.

 

Scores of children live in this barnyard trailer camp which will soon become a sea of mud. Although flies are bad, these places are habitable in the summer because for four months no rain falls in the San Francisco Bay area. Schools are several miles away.

 

Typical privies - scores of them have been hurriedly erected - that serve Richmond Shipyard workers. Other families, living within a block or two of brush-lined Richmond "creeks" that are dry at this time of year, use the gravelled creek beds as latrines. After heavy rains, these lowlands overflow.

PIC

35 Most of the hundred-odd ladies for whom this toilet room is reserved - it's the only one available in a shipyard worker's auto camp - are counting the days until their husbands have made and saved enough money to enable them to quit the Richmond Shipyards and find jobs elsewhere, "even at smaller wages, but where living conditions are at least bearable."

PIC

36 "Gents fare no better than their ladies, whose sister-structure is illustrated on a previous page. This privy serves 100 men and boys. It has no roof. It swarms with flies. Heavy autumn rains begin in a month from the time this picture was taken. The men who are forced to use such accomodations [sic] have known good homes, to which most are eager to return. Some of the 10,059 shipyard workers who quit the Richmond yards in the last month did so because they could not stand to live and raise their children here.

PIC

37 This one serves 20 shipyard workers in Richmond. It is typical of many, many others. Often it is just "nobody's job" to keep such places sanitary.

PIC

38 About 25 people, their men folk shipyard workers, live in shacks and tents in this waterfront eucalyptus grove several miles from the yards. "We haul every drop of water a couple of miles...." "A baby got sick in that tent yonder. It died. Its father quit his shipyard job and went home." "What'll we do when wet weather comes? Cars can't drive in here then."

PIC

39 Tires gone; but it's still a place to sleep in Richmond, and it is used for that. Twelve families live in the U-shaped apartment court in the background, typical of the accomodations [sic] existing in Richmond before the yards were built.

PIC

40 About 25 people, their men folk shipyard workers, live in shacks and tents in this waterfront eucalyptus grove several miles from the yards. "We haul every drop of water a couple of miles...." "A baby got sick in that tent yonder. It died. Its father quit his shipyard job and went home." "What'll we do when wet weather comes? Cars can't drive in here then."

PIC

41 This woman, a refined and rather lovely grey-haired woman of two children and wife of a shipyard man, carries water for washing, has to dump waste water on the ground, because there are no sewers, uses a dirty outdoor privy kept that way by others - less fastidious. "We bathe in the washtub," she says. This family plans to stick it out, "because whenever we get to feeling sorry for ourselves, we think of what the soldiers are up against." But this viewpoint isn't too common.

PIC

42 Several hundred trailer people who have no showers, no sewers, obtain water from this single faucet.

PIC

43 There are neither sewers nor septic tanks in this trailer camp which accomodates [sic] several hundred people. Waste water is thrown out "just anywhere." Autumn rains will bring deep mud to this old barnyard.

PIC

44 Waste disposal facilities near Richmond Shipyards take the form of outdoor privies like that in the background, and open cesspools like this into which waste water is piped or dumped. With the coming of rainy weather and frequent cloudbursts, both will often overflow in this low, flat region. There is danger of typhoid.

PIC

45 This outmoded bus has become a home for a family of six. Two children have been sleeping in the luggage compartment visible on the roof. (See interior view on facing page.) Since they could not rent a house, the father is building one (framework at right shingles in foreground.) "I get one day a week for it."

PIC

46 Interior view of outmoded bus, now home for a family of six. This shipyard worker's wife wants "a kitchen".

PIC

47 "I earned $40 a week in the West," says this man, "and there we had a good house. I'm earning $60 a week here, but what good is it? Money's not good at all. I can't even buy a decent tent. There aren't any for sale. This is still fun while the weather is dry, but if we don't get a house or an apartment before it starts to rain, we'll just have to go back home. A welder can get work anywhere now."

PIC

48 This is one room of a "two room apartment" occupied by a Richmond Shipyard worker's family of five. Rent is $40. "We're from Idaho," they say, "and there we rented a whole house for $10. There were good schools, too, and something to do of an evening. None of that here. For the children's sake we expect to return in time for school - this is too much."

PIC

49 Both these excellent, intelligent workmen are employed in Richmond shipyards. "We brought our tent so's we could camp out on the way here; we didn't figure to have to live in it," they said. Between them, the men earn $100 weekly. "That's good money, but if we quit and go back home," the woman said, "it's only because of the kids. How can they keep clean in a place like this? Mister, when'll those houses be done?"

PIC

50 This single room is the home of a shipyard worker and his family of five. They can find no other.

PIC

51 "There wasn't room to bring our things to Richmond in an ordinary car, so we got his old bus. But now we have to live in it because there's nowhere else to go."

PIC

52 "We always had a good house to live in, until now," said the neat housewife who lives in this old school bus with her children and her shipyard-worker husband. "Maybe we could get by with it awhile if we could find a nice place to park it, but I wish I had a house - any kind of house."

PIC

53 Thatch construction, the handiwork of a subcontractor's employee, keeps out the sun and some of the wind. When rain begins, this will be useless; another shack, waterproof, is under way.

 

Both these families are now forced to live and eat and sleep in and under the "covered wagon" truck at the right, because the other truck is used as a "pest house" for two members of the family who are ill. "Our friends back home write and ask us about jobs in the shipyards," they say. "We write back and tell em wages are high, but we wouldn't have come if we'd known we couldn't find houses to live in."

PIC

56 There are several $40-per-month "apartments" in this building, to which this is the street entrance. All the apartments are occupied by shipyard worker's families. The men like their jobs, but all plan to get others. "There's one dirty, unheated outdoor bathroom, and one sink out back for all of us," they said.

PIC

57 A corner of the barn shown in the previous photograph. It required thirty minutes' argument with the people who live here to obtain permission to take a picture. They said "We've never lived this way before; we aren't going to continue to live this way long; we're very much ashamed of having to sleep in this dirty old barn - and we don't want any pictures taken. Suppose our friends should see them?" They would not pose. The figure providing perspective is Labor-Management's representative. For other shots of this camp, see subsequent pages.

PIC

58 "I consider myself lucky," says this Richmond Shipyards worker, "because I found this months ago, when you could still get single rooms." He pays $16 a month, uses his only chair for a dresser top, usually sits on the stairs to read the paper. "When I get me a good stake, I'm going back to Denver - unless they get some house built." Note the alarm clock, the broken window.

PIC

59 This trailer, hastily built of junk, is home to three Richmond Shipyard workers, one of whom sleeps in the lean-to at the left. "We couldn't rent a place," they said. "We're trying to build, but we can't get material." One water faucet, a block away, serves 17 such "homes." Privies are built of old boxes. There are no baths.

PIC

60 Four people - all shipyard workers - live in the two room house before which the woman and girl are standing. They share with eight families in adjoining buildings the single outdoor sink in front of the single bathroom and single privy visible in upper left. Rent for this "house" is $40 a month. Because Richmond Shipyards were in operation so long before the effective date at which rents were frozen, ceilings had little effect; rents were already atrocious in this area.

PIC

61 These boys can continue sleeping on the ground, delighted to do without baths, until heavy October rains begin. After that their father plans to quit the shipyards and go somewhere else "unless we find us a house to live in. There aren't any now. We've looked everywhere..."

PIC

62 "Every night," the Labor-Management Committee's investigator was told, "a couple of Richmond Shipyard workers sleep in an old icebox." This is it. A spring has been dragged in from the dump, with plywood mattress.

PIC

63 New employees may often be found asleep in a ruined building a mile or so from the Yards. Said the man in the foreground, "I'm a Texan. I got a construction job right away when I came here. I couldn't find me a room, so I slept in my jalopy at first. Then I found this place, so I sold my car for $7.50 because the tires were shot. I used that money to eat on, and sent my first check home to my babies. At night I just bummed around town - what else can you do? One night I had a little argument, hurt my hand. I didn't go back to work, figuring my hand would be better in a few days. But it isn't." When the Labor-Management Committee's investigator saw the hand, he drove the man to the Richmond Shipyards Field Hospital, where the doctors said, "You brought this man in just in time. A few days longer, and he'd have lost his hand." Lack of cleanliness, lack of hot water in proper living quarters nearly cost one able-bodied defense worker.

 

Scores of albums like this one could be filled with pictures of workmen who have had to sleep in their cars because there are no rooms near enough to be reached on their thin tires. These men are wearing Richmond Shipyards badges.

PIC

66 "The car windows aren't broke," said this machinists wife. "We had to put up something to keep the sun out of Daddy's eyes. He works nights and sleeps in the car days. The children and I sleep in it nights. I wish we were home again. War or no war, if I'd known there'd be no place in Richmond we could live, I just wouldn't have come. You can live like this only so long, then you can't stand it any more."

PIC

67 Scrap lumber, strawboard cartons, old roofing, used plywood, etc., are the only building materials available to many people who obtain good shipyard jobs, but cannot rent homes, apartments, or even rooms. They build shacks like this, from lumber shown in the pile. Ground rental runs $10 a month for such homes.

PIC

68 Said one mechanic, "I brought my tools along. If we're still without a house by the time winter comes, I'll show my wife how to make coffee and fry eggs in the car, using my blowtorch. But I'd rather not."

 

These men are not bums; they are skilled workers helping to build ships. Several hundred of them sleep outdoors for lack of rooms. These pictures were taken in August, when it never rains. "We deliberately choose to work the graveyard shift," they explain. "We get off at eight in the morning, have breakfast. By then it's warm enough to sleep most anywhere there's grass. Along toward evening we get up, shave in a filling station, and bum around town - in the bars, mostly; where else is there? - until time to go to work at midnight again."

PIC

72 This old, windowless brick storeroom has been converted - with wood floor, skylight, toilet, shower, plenty of paint - by an enterprising man into a 14-room dormitory. Every bed was occupied long before the place was complete. The man, unique in Richmond, is being assisted by the Richmond Shipyards to convert the few other such buildings that are available into sleeping quarters. But at best, they will accomodate [sic] only a few hundred men.

PIC

73 [Untitled]

PIC

74 Richmond trailer camp, 1944

 

[Untitled]

 

Shipyard Housing Projects, no. 81-102

 

Condemned improved property, October 1942. United States Maritime Commission Housing Project, Richmond, California [copy prints]

PIC

86 Condemned Property. Rear of property known as No. 700 South Thirteenth Street. United States Maritime Housing Project, Richmond California. May, 1942. [copy print]

PIC

87 L. C. Dunn Company, Sub-Contractor, Kaiser Company Incorporated, Contractor. United States Maritime Housing Project, Richmond, California [copy print]

PIC

88 Atchison Village developed by The Housing Authority of The City of Richmond. United States Housing Authority, Defense Housing Project, Federal Works Agency.

PIC

89 [Untitled]

PIC

90 Project Cal-4178 - looking Southwest. United States Maritime Housing Project, Richmond, California. January, 1943 [copy print]

 

[Street and house views]

 

Schools, no. 103-108

 

Federally built school

 

USMC Nursery School

 

Housing Projects, no. 109-127

 

United States Maritime Commission Housing Project, Richmond

 

[Untitled]

 

Richmond [housing tracts]

 

United States Maritime Commission Housing Project, Richmond, March 1943

A

120 Fire House, Richmond, United States Maritime Commission, Housing Project, Richmond, March 1943

 

United States Maritime Commission Housing Project, Richmond, March 1943

A

123 Richmond yard number four. Forty-Seventh Street and Wall Avenue, Looking Northwest. United States Commission Housing Project. November 1943

A

124 Workmen. Forty-Seventh Street and Cutting Boulevard - looking northwest. Richmond yard number four. United States Commission Housing Project. November 1943.

A

125 Fifty-Third Street and Bayview Avenue, looking north, Richmond. United States Commission Housing Project. November 1943.

A

126 Richmond yard number four. View from Easter Hill, looking south. United States Commission Housing Project. November 1943.

PIC

127 [Untitled]

 

1983.027, The Building of the Robert E. Peary

Scope and Content Note

212 photographic prints; various sizes

Photographs depicting the building and launching of a pre-fabricated steam ship in the Richmond, California shipyards of the Permanente Metals Corporation. Construction began on November 7, 1942 and was completed November 12. The Maritime Commission accepted the completely outfitted ship on November 15, setting a world record for the fastest-built steam ship. The photographs are grouped under fourteen subject headings showing the phases of construction, workers, and launching ceremony for the S. S. Robert E. Peary. Many of the individual photographs are well-captioned, including the subject matter, day and time taken, and names of individuals featured in the photographs. This information is not included in the brief container listing.
 

Construction of the Prefab Ship Robert E. Peary, no. 1-28

 

Construction of the prefab ship Robert E. Peary

 

Miscellaneous Photos (Construction, Launching, Sea Trials), no. 29-33

 

Miscellaneous photos (construction, launching, sea trials)

 

Proposed Erection Sequences, no. 34-49

 

Proposed erection sequences