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INVENTORY OF THE COLLECTION OF MEXICAN RELIGIOUS ENGRAVINGS, 1700-1830
960027  
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Collection Details
 
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  • Descriptive Summary
  • Administrative Information
  • Scope and Content of Collection

  • Descriptive Summary

    Title: Collection of Mexican religious engravings
    Date (inclusive): 1700-1830
    Collection number: 960027
    Collector: Getty Research Institute
    Extent: 49 prints
    Repository: Getty Research Institute
    Research Library
    Special Collections and Visual Resources
    1200 Getty Center Drive, Suite 1100
    Los Angeles, CA 90049-1688
    Abstract: Collection contains 49 loose prints, book cards, ex votos, and indulgences concerning the interpretation of religious subjects and their devotion. Printers include Jose Elogio Morales, Jose de Nava, Jose Benito Ortuno, Francisco Antonio Rubio, Tomas de Suria, Manuel de Villavicencio, and the Calle de la Profesa.
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    Language: Collection material in Spanish

    Administrative Information

    Access

    Open for use by qualified researchers.

    Publication Rights

    Preferred Citation

    Collection of Mexican religious engravings, 1700-1830, Getty Research Institute, Research Library, Accession no. 960027.

    Acquisition Information

    Collection acquired together with Mexican books of religious prints. The books have been transferred to the Library's rare book collection. Several of the loose prints are duplicates of those found in the books.

    Scope and Content of Collection

    The Collection of Mexican religious engravings contains 49 prints concerning the interpretation of religious subjects and their devotion. Printers include Jose Elogio Morales, Jose de Nava, Jose Benito Ortuno, Francisco Antonio Rubio, Tomas de Suria, Manuel de Villavicencio, and the Calle de la Profesa.
    The engravings appear in the form of book cards, ex votos, indulgences and loose prints concerning the interpretation of religious subjects. The collection features images of archangels, saints, virgins, and historical figures. The most common are of Catholic devotional statues (nos. 19, 44, 60, 71, 73, 74, 78, 79 and 84). In the Spanish colonies, and elsewhere such statues were believed to have aided in miracles and thus acquired local cults. Many of the saints and virgins represented in the collection are also patrons of pregnancy and childbirth, (St. Rita, St. Benito, Nuestra Señora de la Bala), or enjoy particular devotions in Mexico (the Virgin of Guadalupe and St. Joseph). Historical persons represented include Archbishop Nunez de Haro y Peralta and Don Juan de Palafox y Mendoza. Of particular interest is a map and geographic table of New Spain, dedicated to Agustin de Ahumada y Villalon (no. 30). Also noteworthy are three images of Our Lady of Angels (nos. 16, 29, 79), said to be copied from the original painted on an adobe wall near Mexico City. The image was considered a local miracle.