Guide to the Theodore Wores Papers, 1880-1999

Processed by Phyllis Dorset; machine-readable finding aid created by Steven Mandeville-Gamble
Department of Special Collections
Green Library
Stanford University Libraries
Stanford, CA 94305-6004
Phone: (650) 725-1022
Email: speccollref@stanford.edu
URL: http://www-sul.stanford.edu/depts/spc/
© 2001
The Board of Trustees of Stanford University. All rights reserved.

Guide to the Theodore Wores Papers, 1880-1999

Collection number: M0816

Department of Special Collections and University Archives

Stanford University Libraries

Stanford, California

Contact Information

  • Department of Special Collections
  • Green Library
  • Stanford University Libraries
  • Stanford, CA 94305-6004
  • Phone: (650) 725-1022
  • Email: speccoll@sulmail.stanford.edu
  • URL: http://www-sul.stanford.edu/depts/spc/
Processed by:
Phyllis Dorset
Date Completed:
1999 Sept.
Encoded by:
Steven Mandeville-Gamble
© 2001 The Board of Trustees of Stanford University. All rights reserved.

Descriptive Summary

Title: Theodore Wores Papers,
Date (inclusive): 1880-1999
Collection number: Special Collections M0816
Creator: Wores, Theodore, 1859-1939.
Extent: 8 linear ft.
Repository: Stanford University. Libraries. Dept. of Special Collections and University Archives.
Language: English.

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

None.

Publication Rights

Property rights reside with the repository. Literary rights reside with the creators of the documents or their heirs. To obtain permission to publish or reproduce, please contact the Public Services Librarian of the Dept. of Special Collections.

Provenance

Gift of Dr. A. Jess Shenson, 1996.

Preferred Citation:

[Identification of item], Theodore Wores Papers, M0816, Dept. of Special Collections, Stanford University Libraries, Stanford, Calif.

Biography

If the measure of a painter is the number of times that he or she has been shown, then Theodore Wores ranks higher today than any of his critics would have imagined. From the time that he became an acknowledged professional in his art in the 1880s, Wores' has been shown with relative frequency throughout the intervening years.
Born in 1859 in San Francisco, Wores was indulged in his talent by perceptive parents who enrolled him in the San Francisco Art Association's School of Design so that he could study art under Virgil Williams, a well-known San Francisco artist of the period. In 1874, the young Wores had advanced in his art so far that his parents sent the sixteen-year-old to study at the Royal Academy in Munich. Munich in 1974 was the rival of Paris as the art capital of Europe, with young artistic aspirants flocking to the German city owing to the shambles existing in the French capital as a result of the Franco-Prussian War. So many Americans came to Munich to study art that they formed the American Art Students Club of Munich. Among the membership of this club were William Keith, Toby Rosenthal, William Merritt Chase, and Frank Duveneck. The courtly Wores, with his keen gray eyes, shortly fell under the spell of Duveneck and his theories. A cadre of students, including Wores, Duveneck, Orrin Peck, John White Alexander, Frank Currier, Joseph Henry Sharp, and Julius Rolshoven, lived in a small village outside the city, and, when not in class, ate together, traveled throughout Germany and Italy on painting junkets, and shared their artistic discoveries.
Munich taught the young Wores "to paint with oil pigments-creating a neutral ground on which to record a basically realistic formal interpretation of model, still life, or scene.By working up to light and down to dark, a schematic value relationship was quickly established. " In Munich, this was the "virtual end of the painting.a monochromatic essay in technical virtuosity." Hallmarks of the Munich style were realistic observation and alla prima painting.
But Wores broke away from this realism and its "unified color." He abandoned the brown, black, and white effects of the Munich School for a "brilliatnt, high-keyed color technique, which, though they had never met is said to be often close to Van Gogh's highly personal use of alla prima painting. Wores, under the influence of Frank Duveneck's enthusiasm for plein aire painting, created his own personal and fresh version, using color to represent sunlight and shadow and, particularly, to adopt Duveneck's theory that the genuine foundation for a painting was the brush work, and not the charcoal or pencil drawing of a draughtsman. The painter, if necessary, could make rough outlines, "but preferably cover the canvas directly with paint, boldly blocking in the large masses."
Wores returned to San Francisco after six years in Munich, and established his studio in the heart of downtown. Exhibitions of his work followed and so did prizes, commission, and triumphant reviews. To his other subjects, he added a series of very well-received renditions of scenes in San Francisco's Chinatown. His popularity led to his election to the Bohemian Club, San Francisco's exclusive club for professional men.
With his reputation now firmly established, as well as his bank account, Wores, who had met James Whistler in Venice in 1879, now took Whistler's advice and packed up his paint box, palette, and easel and sailed for Japan. The pictures that came out of his sojourn in the Orient were among his most sought after. Back in San Francisco in 1894, Wores added commissioned portraits to his other subjects. Before long, through exhibitions and sales, his coffers grew healthy. The habit of leaving the studio for painting trips in the open had stuck with him from his Munich days, and now he added landscapes to his painting talents. A painting trip to Hawaii and Samoa brought profitable shows in San Francisco, Boston, and New York. Next on his itinerary was Spain, where he discovered "the sort of subject I have been searching for for years. I had thought I had found it in Japan and Samoa. But these scenes all dwindle away in comparison with the beauty and picturesqueness of this place."
Again back in San Francisco, Wores was in line for three momentous events. He was in Los Angeles, having brought a number of his paintings to that city for an exhibition, when he learned about the San Francisco earthquake of April 1906. Rushing back to San Francisco, he found that his family's home as well as his studio and all it contained had been lost. This blow was somewhat assuaged by his being appointed Dean of his old school, the San Francisco Art Association's School of Design, which was now associated with the University of California. Wores remained dean for seven years, during which the third great event in his life took place. In 1910, he married the attractive Miss Carolyn Bauer, whom he had met when she came to sit for her portrait the year before their marriage.
Theodore and Carolyn, who remained childless, led an elegant and unfettered life, filled with travel and society activities. For Theodore, it was a heady time, moving in the rarefied circles of the Bohemian Club in New York, being invited to exhibit across the country, and hobnobbing with the elite from West to East.
The travel bug persisted, and Wores resigned his deanship in 1913, and was once more on the road with his brush and palette. Sometimes Carolyn accompanied Theodore, other times he traveled alone. For several years in the mid-1900s, Wores painted in the Canadian Rockies in spring, in the Indian lands of the Southwest in the fall, in Chicago and New York in winter, and in California in summer, catching the lush valleys of northern California in full bloom. From 1918 on, these "blossom paintings" dominated his work.
The couple left San Francisco in 1926, to move to remote Saratoga, some fifty miles outh, at the foot of California's Coastal Range, in the heart of his beloved blossom land. The move occurred the day after Wores publicly announced his philosophic aversion to what was termed "modern art" (Cubism and Futurism), which was causing a fundamental upheaval in artistic circles. "It is a disease," he told reporters, "the weird grotesque daubs that a so called new school is trying to foist on the public are anything but artistic." "I shall live," he said, "in recollection of the golden days when I roamed through art capitals of the world. And I shall remember the hideous monstrosities of cubism and futurism only as fantastic nightmares of the past." This outburst drew bad press for Wores, as the newspapers, ever ready to foment a scrap, published retorts by two art professors at the University of California, and the dean of the San Francisco School of Fine Art. But Wores had said his piece. He was now seventy years old, and his best work was behind him.
Theodore and Carolyn remained in Saratoga for thirteen years, until he could no longer paint because the sight in those once keen gray eyes was failing. In early 1939, the couple returned to San Francisco, where Theodore died quietly at home on September 11,1939, in his eightieth year.
Today, art historians vary in their summation of Wores' contribution to art. It was true that he absorbed the dark, realistic style of Munich, but it is also true that he attempted with some considerable success to break out of the unbroken somberness to bring into his paintings, especially the landscapes, a brilliance fueled by vivid color. Some consider him merely a workaday artistic craftsman, others regard Wores as a forerunner of painting directly on the canvas, in plein aire, and of bringing the "dominant strategies of Impressionism into northern California," well before any other painters.

Scope and Content

The Theodore Wores Collection contains material especially pertinent to the painter's career in art. A relatively small amount of correspondence is organized by decade, from 1880 to 1939 (1880-1909, 1910-1919, 1920-1929, 1930-1939). The rest of the Collection includes exhibit catalogs (1973-1999), a biography of Wores that accompanied an exhibit in 1968-1969, a few magazine articles by Wores, two albums of photographs of the artist's oriental paintings, framed photographs of the painter's studio in San Francisco, photographic portraits of Wores, a considerable collection of reviews and other publicity, including the controversy over his pronouncements on Cubism and Futurism. In addition, a map case file (97-20l.1) contains photographs, prints, and mounted news clippings, mainly relating to his residence (l926-1939) in Saratoga, California. The painter's palette and paint box complete the Collection.

Access Terms

Beatty, J.W. (John William), 1869-1941.
Damrosch, Walter, 1862-1950.
Duveneck, Frank, 1848-1919.
Gray, Percy, 1869-1952.
Keith, William, 1938-1911.
Monroe, Harriet, 1860-1936.
Peck, Orrin.
Peters, Charles Rollo.
Phelan, James D. (James Duval), 1861-1937.
Root, Elihu, 1845-1937.
Russell, Ida.
Lewis, Agnes Smith, 1843-1950.
Trowbridge, Alexander Buell, 1868-1950.
Art, Modern--20th century--United States.


Container List

Box 1, Folder 1

Correspondence, 1880-1909

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco from William Keith, Munich, Germany, January 30, 1884. Keith relates printing problems. Eva Withrow. 1884

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, New York, from D.W. McCall, Montreal, Canada, July 29, 1898.

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from Orrin Peck, Washington, D.C., March 4, 1901. See also Orrin Peck, October 5, 1902. Mrs. [Phoebe ] Hearst. 1901

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from [ _. _. ?] Gilchrist, Matautu[?], Hawaii, May 3, 1902

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, Honolulu, Hawaii, from Roland F. [_________?], (M. Knoedler & Co.), London, September 9, 1902 1902

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from Orrin Peck, Pleasonton, California, October 5, 1902 Mrs. [ Phoebe] Hearst.

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, New York, [?] Garath [?], New York, December 30, 1902 1902

 

Letter to Thodore Wores, New York, from Adile Gardiner, New York, January 12, 1903.

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, New York, from Charles de Kay, New York, March 5, 1903.

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, New York, from A. Esterbrook [?], Boston, April 2, 1903.

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, New York, from George B. Mallon, New York, May 2, 1903. (See also letters from George B. Mallon, March 28, 1913 and February 8, 1915). 1903

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, Los Angeles, from Ida Evelyn Russell [Mrs.Alexander Russell], San Francisco, February 19, 1906. The Right Reverend Shaker Sayen, Lord Abbot of Kamakura. (See also letter from Ida Evelyn Russell, May 10, 1906.) 1906

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, Los Angeles, from Ida Evelyn Russell [Mrs Alexander Russell], May 10,1906. San Francisco earthquake of April, 1906. (See also letter from Ida Evelyn Russell, February 19, 1906.) 1906

Box 1, Folder 2

Correspondence, 1910-1919

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, Honolulu, from Robert H. Fletcher, San Francisco, November 12, 1910. 1910

 

Postcard to Theodore Wores, Honolulu, from P. Eyre Macpline, Venice, Italy, December 7, 1910. 1910

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco from George Barry Mallon, New York, March 28, 1913. The Delineator, The Woman's Magazine, Adventure. (See also letters from George Barry Mallon, May 2, 1903 and February 8, 1915.) 1913

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from C. A. Hamond [ ?], Norfolk, England, April 8, 1913. 1913

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from Peter F. Dunne, San Francisco, June 3, 1913. 1913

 

Postcard to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from [_________?], Haden [?], France, June 27, l913. 1913

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from W. Sproule, San Francisco, December 17, 1913. 1913

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from George Barry Mallon, New York, February 8, 1915. (See also letters from George B. Mallon, May 2, 1903 and March 28, 1913.) 1915

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from Agnes [Ketia ?] Smith, Perak, Federated Malay States, March 11, 1915. 1915

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from Frank Duveneck, Cincinnati,, March 27, 1915 ( See also letters from Frank Duveneck, April 19, 1915, and May 17, 1915.) 1915

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from H. Shugio [?], San Francisco, April 18,1915. 1915

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from Frank Duveneck, Cincinnati, April 19, 1915 ( See also, letters from Frank Duveneck, March 27 and May 17, 1915.) 1915

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from Frank Duveneck Cincinnati, May 17, 1915. ( See also, letters from Frank Duveneck, March 27, 1915 and April 19, 1915.) 1915

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from Walter Sandoni [?], Riverside, California, February 3, 1917. 1917

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, New York, from Charles L. Freer, Detroit, December 22, 1917. 1917

 

Invitation to Theodore Wores, New York, from Walter Damrosch, [New York?], [December, 1917]. See also Walter Damrosch, March 21, 1918. 1917

 

Card to Theodore Wores, New York, from Robert Chrett [?], Hubbard Woods, Illinois, January 9, 1918. 1918

 

Letter to Theodore Wores,[New York], from Walter Damrosch, New York, March 21, 1918. (See also invitation from Walter Damrosch, [December 1917].) 1918

 

Envelope [only] to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from [?], April 22, 1919. 1919

Box 1, Folder 3

Correspondence, 1920-1929

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco,from John W. Beatty, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, October 26, 1920. Carnegie Institute.

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from Elihu Root, San Francisco, March 16, 1923. 1923

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from James D. Phelan, San Francisco, December 22, 1924. ( See also card from James D. Phelan, September 15, 1926.) 1924

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, Santa Clara, California, from Harriet Monroe, Bellingham, Washington, March 30, 1926. 1926

 

Postcard to Theodore Wores, Saratoga, California, from James D. Phelan, San Francisco, September 15, 1926. (See also letter from James D. Phelan, December 22, 1924.) 1926

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from J. M. Davis, New York, September 24, 1926. 1926

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from G. P. Jacomb-Hood, Calcutta, India, February 2, 1927. (See also letter from G.P. Jacomb-Hood, June 26, 1927.) 1927

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from Ivanhoe Whitted, Columbus City, Iowa, March 6, 1927 1927

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from G.P. Jacomb-Hood, London, June 26, 1927. (See also letter from G.P. Jacomb-Hood, February 2, 1927) 1927

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from Alexander B. Trowbridge, Washington D.C., February 28, 1928. 1928

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from Edgar Stillman Kelley, Oroville, California, August 25, 1928 1928

Box 1, Folder 4

Correspondence, 1930-1939

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from Mrs. Alma B. Spreckels, San Francisco, March 27, 1931. 1931

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from Mabel R. Gillis, Sacramento, California, March 31, 1931. 1931

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from George H. Hotaling San Francisco, April 16, 1931, with a copy of a letter to A. Harry Field, from George Hotaling, April, 17, 1931. 1931

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from A. Harry Field, San Francisco, with enclosure. Envelope dated April 21, 1931. 1931

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from Percy Gray, [ Location unknown], April 27, 1931. 1931

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from Douglas Tilden, Berkeley, California, February 1, 1932. 1932

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from Jane Amundsen, Sacramento, California, March 18, 1932. 1932

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from William Ritchell, Carmel Highlands, California, February 19, 1933. 1933

 

Letter to Theodore Wores from the Bay Area Art Association, with membership forms enclosed, envelope dated October 17, 1935. 1935

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from J. Anthony Smythe, San Francisco, envelope dated October 17, 1937. 1937

 

Annotated letter (copy) to Andrew Summers Rowan, from Jose Zarza, Consul for Cuba, July 27, 1938. sent to Theodore Wores, 1938 February 6, 1939. [1939]

Box 1, Folder 5

Correspondence, Undated

 

Letter to Theodore Wores, from Charles Rollo Peters n.d.

 

Notecard to Theodore Wores, from M. Townsend, New York, April 21 [no year date] n.d.

 

Notecard to Theodore Wores, from [?] . dated November 21 [no year date] n.d.

Box 1, Folder 6

Business Matters

 

Declaration of copyright of a Painting by Theodore Wores, New York, signed by A. R. Spofford, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., March 25, 1899. 1899

 

List of steps necessary to secure copyright, under Act of 1909, as amended, to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., September 30, 1913. 1913

 

Envelope [only] to Theodore Wores from Library of Congress, [copyright section], November 19, 1914 1914

 

Entry forms and prospectus for 13th Biennial Exhibition,( December 1932-January 1933), to Theodore Wores, San Francisco, from the Corcoran Gallery, Washington D.C., September 12, 1932. 1932

Box 1, Folder 7

Exhibit Catalog, "Theodore Wores Retrospective," Kennedy Galleries, New York, May 4-June 1, 1973

Box 1, Folder 8

Exhibit Catalog, "Theodore Wores," Saint Francis Memorial Hospital, San Francisco, 1974.

Box 1, Folder 9

Exhibit Catalog, "Theodore Wores, The Japanese Years," the Oakland (California) Museum, March 16-May 16,1976.

Box 1, Folder 10

Exhibit Catalog, "Theodore Wores,1859-1939. A Retrospective," Huntsville Museum of Art [Alabama], March 16-April 27, 1980.

Box 1, Folder 11

Exhibit Catalog, "The Art of Theodore Wores," Asahi Shimbun, Tokyo, Kyoto, Yokohama, May-September 1986.

Box 1, Folder 12

Exhibit Catalog, "Theodore Wores, 1859-1939," Wunderlich and Company, New York, March 18-April 17, 1987.

Box 1, Folder 13

Exhibit Catalog, "Theodore Wores, An American Artist in Meiji Japan," Pacific Asia Museum, [Los Angeles ?], 1993

Box 1, Folder 14

Theodore Wores: Artist in Search of the Picturesque, by Lewis Ferbrache`, San Francisco, 1968, 63 pages [Biography]. Published in connection with a retrospective exhibit of Wores' paintings at the Calilfornia Historical Museum (San Francisco), Triton Museum ( Santa Clara, California), and Carmel Museum of Art (Carmel, Califoria), 1968-1969.

Box 1, Folder 15

"A San Francisco Painter, Theodore Wores," by Gary A. Reynolds, American Art Review, September/October 1976, pp. 101-117. Retrospective review of Wores' work. 1976

Box 1, Folder 16

Theodore Wores and the Beginnings of Internationalism in Northern California Painting:1874-1915, Library Associates, University Library, University of California at Davis, 1978,42 pp. Frank Duveneck, William Merritt Chase, Frank Currier, Taos School, Joseph Henry Sharp. 1978

Box 1, Folder 17

From Exposition to Exposition: Progressive and Conservative, Northern California Painting, 1915-1939. Joseph Armstrong Baird, Jr, Editor. Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, California, 1981. Development of modern art in California. Theodore Wores, Clay Spohn, Hans Hoffman, others. 1981

Box 1, Folder 18

"Theodore Wores's Chinese Fishmonger in a Cosmopolitan Context," The American Art Journal , Vol. VI, No 1, Winter, 1984. (pp. 65-75) 1984

Box 1, Folder 19

"The Passing of Picturesque Chinatown as Viewed by the Artists," by Theodore Wores and Amadee Joullin, The San Francisco Call, Sunday, (5 pp., typescript ), n.d.

Box 1, Folder 20

Theodore Wores: Copies of San Francisco Newspaper Publicity (Additional). February 16, 1879 to April 10, 1910, 1879- with summaries. Loose leaf. (63 pp.)

Box 1, Folder 21

Exhibit Catalog, "TheWorld of Theodore Wores," Iris and B Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts, Stanford University, Stanford, California, June 23-August 29,1999

Box 2, Folder 1

Bound Volume of Newspaper and Other Publicity on Theodore Wores and his Work. (86 pp., Announcements, Reviews, Commentary, Notes.) Applegarth Studio, London, 1881-Chelsea Testimonial, 1891. 1902

Box 2, Folder 2

Bound Volume of Newspaper and Other Publicity on Theodore Wores and his Work. (96 pp.) Photo portrait 1902- of Mrs. Wores. Controversy: traditionalists vs. modernists. 1938

Box 3, Folder 1

Bound magazines containing articles by Theodore Wores. "An American Artist in Japan," The Century Illustrated Monthly, Vol. XXXVIII, No. 5, September 1889 (pp. 670-686). "The Wisteria Shrine of Kanseido," The Cosmopolitan, Vol. XXV, No. 1, May 1898 (pp.15-22). "Ah Gau's New Year's Celebration," St .Nicholas Magazine for Young Folks, Vol. XXIV, No, 4, February 1898 (pp.293-298). "Japanese Flower Arrangement," Scribner's Magazine, Vol. XXVI. No. 2, August 1899 (pp. 205-212). "Nature and People in Japan," The Century Illustrated Monthly, Vol. XXXIX, No.2, 1889-December, 1889, (pp. 231-239).1899

Box 4

Exhibit Placards, location of Theodore Wores' Studio pre-1906,and an anecdote regarding Wores and a woman's portrait. (2 placards). n.d.

Box 4

Photographs of Theodore Wores' studio, pre-1906, San Francisco. (4 framed photographs, labeled 2-1, 2-2, 2-3, and 2-4.n.d.

Box 5

Wooden Paint Box belonging to Theodore Wores, n.d.

Box 6, Folder 1

Theodore Wores as a Young Man. (2 B/W photo portraits, 8" x 10") n.d. [1880?]

Box 6, Folder 2

Photograph album containing copies of Theodore Wores' Japanese and Chinatown paintings, and from his Munich days (24 pp. l4" x 18" sepia tone photos) n.d. [1880's]

Box 7

Theodore Wores' oil painting palette.wooden, (approx. 2-ft. long [Vertical crack] [1890+]

OS Box 8, Folder 1

Placard announcing permanent Wores exhibit at Saratoga Art Gallery ( 1 placard 2" x 4 ") (97-20.1) [1930?]

OS Box 8, Folder 2

Photo of Theodore Wores at his easel (1 photo) ( 97-201.1) [1930?]

OS Box 8, Folder 3

Mounted photo of painting by Wores of his Saratoga studio (97-20.1) [1930?]

OS Box 8, Folder 4

Colored and B/W photoprints of sketches of Villa Montalvo, 1925 & Saratoga, California, former home of James D. Phelan. 1927 (2 prints) (97-20.1)

OS Box 8, Folder 5

Photocopy of postcard to Wores from James D. Phelan (97-20.1) 1936

OS Box 8, Folder 6

Mounted newsclip with illustration by John W. Winker. (97-20.1) 1924

OS Box 8, Folder 7

Mounted photographs and newspaper photos of exterior of Wores' studio and blossom paintings, Saratoga, California. (5 photos, 1 clip) (97-20.1) 1930

Map File Case 9, Folder 1

Newspaper illustrations of California blossom time, San Francisco Chronicle Rotogravure , March 29, 1925 ( 4pp.). Review of Wores' painting in Saratoga, California, Los Gatos Mail News, December 3, 1925. "Passing of Chinatown," The Sunday Call [19--?]. Photos of paintings by Theodore Wores and Amadee Joullin. (97-201.1) 1925

Map File Case 9, Folder 2

Mounted photographs, Theodore Wores and his studio, Saratoga, California. (11 photos) (97-20.1) n.d. [1926?]

Map File Case 9, Folder 3

Mounted newsclippings and illustrations of Theodore Wores and his studio, Saratoga, California. (97-20.1) 1923-