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Register of the Thomas Ray Bodine Papers, 1941-1982
82035  
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Collection Details
 
Table of contents What's This?
  • Descriptive Summary
  • Administrative Information
  • Access Points
  • Biographical Note
  • Scope and Content of Collection

  • Descriptive Summary

    Title: Thomas Ray Bodine Papers,
    Date (inclusive): 1941-1982
    Collection number: 82035
    Creator: Bodine, Thomas Ray, 1915-
    Collection Size: 11 manuscript boxes, 1 oversize box, 3 envelopes (5 linear feet)
    Repository: Hoover Institution Archives
    Stanford, California 94305-6010
    Abstract: Correspondence, writings, notes, memoranda, reports, newsletters, printed matter, and photographs, relating to relocation of Japanese Americans during World War II, and to the placement of Japanese-American students in colleges.
    Physical Location: Hoover Institution Archives
    Language: English.

    Administrative Information

    Access

    Collection open for research.

    Publication Rights

    For copyright status, please contact the Hoover Institution Archives.

    Preferred Citation

    [Identification of item], Thomas Ray Bodine Papers, [Box no.], Hoover Institution Archives.

    Access Points

    Education.
    Japanese Americans--Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945.
    World War, 1939-1945.
    World War, 1939-1945--Education and the war.
    World War, 1939-1945--United States.
    United States.

    Biographical Note

    On December 7, 1941, when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, Thomas R. Bodine was in training for foreign service with the American Friends Service Committee. As a result, rather than being sent overseas, he was assigned to Seattle, Washington, to aid the Japanese-American population on the West Coast. He arrived in late January, several weeks before President Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066 (Feb. 19, 1942). During the months of January and February, the Seattle Friends Committee (as well as other West Coast Friends committees) was active in helping Japanese-Americans relocate voluntarily to the interior of the country, and performed an important role in advising and informing the Japanese-American population about the events which culminated in the order of March 2, 1942, excluding all persons of Japanese ancestry from the area.
    Through the spring and early summer, as Japanese-Americans were collected in assembly centers and subsequently transferred to more permanent relocation centers, the Friends Committees provided many important services such as preparation for evacuation, transportation, provision of food and supplies, and agitation for improvement of camp conditions. Even before internment was an established fact, efforts of religious, educational and other service organizations focused on relocation of individuals from the camps. The attempt to relocate college students was formalized on May 29 1942, with the establishment of the National Japanese-American Student Relocation Council (NJASRC). In June, Thomas Bodine went from Seattle to the West Coast office of the NJASRC, located in Berkeley, which had been set up to deal with the logistical arrangements for student relocation. In December, 1942, following internal administrative problems, he became the West Coast Director. In February of 1943, the decision was made to centralize the program in Philadelphia to allow closer contact with the War Relocation Authority, as well as educational institutions and cooperating service organizations on the East Coast. At that time, Thomas Bodine became the NJASRC Field Director, traveling to the various relocation centers as the liaison between counselors and students and the main office. He continued in this position until 1945, when he was reassigned to duty overseas in France.

    Scope and Content of Collection

    Correspondence, writings, notes, memoranda, reports, newsletters, printed matter, and photographs, relating to relocation of Japanese Americans during World War II, and to the placement of Japanese-American students in colleges.