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Register of the Edward Geary Lansdale Papers, 1910-1987
80116  
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14. "Black Patches," Hershel Gober and the Black Patches, Dexter Alder (English)

 

15. "Kansas City," Hershel Gober and the Black Patches, Dexter Alder (English)

 

16. "Mrs. Miller," Hershel Gober and the Black Patches, Jimmy Tobias (English)

 

17. Instrumental

 

18. "Mountain Dew," Hershel Gober and the Black Patches (English)

 

19. "Look Over My Shoulder," Hershel Gober (English)

 

20. "Proud American," Hershel Gober (English)

 

21. "Here Am I," Hershel Gober (English)

tape 23

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 9/30/66

Access Information

Use copy reference number: 80116_a_0000683

Additional Note

This is a continuation from tapes # 21 and 22. Hershel Gober sings alone on this tape.
 

22. "Tropic Rain," Hershel Gober (English)

 

23. "Advisory Team 54," Hershel Gober (English)

 

24. "I'm Just A Dog-Faced Soldier" (dedicated to General Lansdale), Hershel Gober (English)

 

25. "Bulgar Wheat," Hershel Gober (English)

 

26. "We Had Us Some Chickens," Hershel Gober (English)

 

27. "Black Patches," Hershel Gober and the Black Patches (instrumental)

 

28. "Dirty Old Town," Hershel Gober (English)

 

29. "You Are My Sunshine," Hershel Gober (English)

 

30. "Tom Dooley," Hershel Gober (English)

tape 24

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 12/11/66

Additional Note

This tape is labelled, "Pre-Tet: Christmas, 194 Cong Ly." It is the first in a series of three tapes: #'s 24, 25, and 26. It is evidently a recording of a large gathering, including Hershel Gober, Sam Wilson, Pham Duy, and Pham Duy's group, the Villagers. All sing.
 

1. "The Battle of Long Khanh (6th Royal Australian Regiment)," Hershel Gober (English)

 

2. "Dirty Old Town," Hershel Gober (English)

 

3. "Answer To The Green Beret," Hershel Gober (English)

 

4. "Planting Rice," Pham Duy and the Villagers (Vietnamese and Tagalog)

 

5. "Picture Of A Man," Pham Duy and Hershel Gober (Vietnamese and English)

 

6. "The Wounded Soldier," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

7. "Suc May Ma Boun," Pham Duy and the Villagers (Vietnamese)

Additional Note

After this song, General Lansdale presents a certificate of appreciation to Hershel Gober. Gober then gives a speech, and General Lansdale reads the citation.
tape 25

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 12/11/66

Additional Note

This is a continuation from tape # 24.
 

1. "Six Clicks," Hershel Gober (English)

Additional Note

After this song, Hank Miller "promotes" General Lansdale to the "Office of Regional Deputy Archbastard" in the "Order of the Old Bastard."
 

2. "Deep In The Heart Of Tennessee," Hershel Gober (English)

 

3. "Michael, Row The Boat Ashore," Hershel Gober (English)

 

4. "Advisory Team 54," Hershel Gober (English)

 

5. "Cadre Song," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

6. "To Sing Often Is Better Than To Sing With A Good Voice," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

Additional Note

At this point someone announces that Prime Minister Ky is going to sing.
 

7. Vietnamese song, Prime Minister Ky (Vietnamese)

 

8. "Silent Night," Pham Duy and the Villagers (Vietnamese)

 

9. "Jingle Bells," Hershel Gober and Pham Duy and the Villagers (Vietnamese and English)

 

10. "Vietnam, Vietnam," Pham Duy and the Villagers (Vietnamese)

 

11. "Rain On The Leaves," Pham Duy, Hershel Gober, and group (English)

 

12. "Oh Susannah," group (English and Vietnamese)

 

13. "Clementine," Pham Duy and group (English and Vietnamese)

 

14. "Hat Hoi Trang Ram," Pham Duy and the Villagers (Vietnamese)

 

15. Vietnamese song, Pham Duy and the Villagers (Vietnamese)

 

16. "Big Sam," Hershel Gober (English)

 

17. "Dirty Old Town," Hershel Gober (English)

 

18. "You Are My Sunshine," group (English)

 

19. "Let The Rest Of The World Go By," Hershel Gober and group (English)

tape 26

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 12/11/66

Additional Note

This is a continuation from tapes # 24 and 25.
 

1. "My Blue Heaven," group (English)

 

2. "Darktown Strutters' Ball" (instrumental)

 

3. "Silver Dollar," group (English)

 

4. "Red River Valley," Hershel Gober (English)

 

5. "Anybody Seen My Gal," group (English)

 

6. "Love Letters In The Sand," group (English)

 

7. "My Pretty Freulein," Hershel Gober (English)

 

8. "Auld Lang Syne," Hershel Gober (English)

tape 27

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 12/11/66

Additional Note

This is a recording of a "Salute to Captain Hershel Gober by General Westmorland." General Westmorland speaks; then Hershel Gober sings excerpts of his songs.
 

1. "Goodbye Travis Air Force Base," Hershel Gober (English)

 

2. "The Forgotten Man," Hershel Gober (English)

 

3. "Picture Of A Man," Hershel Gober (English)

 

4. "Birth Of A Nation," Hershel Gober (English)

 

5. "Saigon Warrior," Hershel Gober (English)

 

6. "Advisory Team 54," Hershel Gober (English)

 

7. "Answer To The Green Beret," Hershel Gober (English)

 

8. "Proud American," Hershel Gober (English)

 

9. "Six Clicks," Hershel Gober (English)

tape 28

Sound Recording - Vietnam, Fall/66

Additional Note

This is more of Hershel Gober's music, entitled by General Lansdale, "Gober On Departure." Gober left Vietnam in the fall of 1966. In between musical numbers, Gober discusses his experiences in Vietnam.
 

1. "Goodbye Travis Air Force Base," Hershel Gober (English)

 

2. "Proud American," Hershel Gober (English)

 

3. "Saigon Warrior," Hershel Gober (English)

 

4. "Here Am I," Hershel Gober (English)

 

5. "Picture Of A Man," Hershel Gober (English)

 

6. "Tropic Rain," Hershel Gober (English)

 

7. "Look Over My Shoulder," Hershel Gober (English)

 

8. "Six Clicks," Hershel Gober (English)

tape 29

Sound Recording - Vietnam, Fall/66

Additional Note

This is a continuation from tape # 28.
 

1. "The Forgotten Man," Hershel Gober (English)

 

2. "Beneath The Willow Tree," Hershel Gober (English)

 

3. "Birth Of A Nation," Hershel Gober (English)

 

4. "Proud American," Hershel Gober (English)

Additional Note

The last half of this tape contains songs by Pham Duy.
 

5. "Let's Build A New Life Hamlet," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

6. "To Sing Often Is Better Than To Sing With A Good Voice," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

7. "Wearing The Black Costume," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

8. "A Cup Of Rice Is A Cup Of Sweet And A Cup Of Blood," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

tape 30

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 1966

Additional Note

This tape and the next one (number 31) bring together songs by a variety of people, Vietnamese and American, who gathered in General Lansdale's Saigon quarters at 194 Cong Ly. Lansdale and other members of the Senior Liaison Office Staff selected folk songs and, with a narration written by Lansdale and read by Hank Miller (also on the SLO staff), included them in this recorded report entitled, "In the Midst of War."
According to Lansdale, this complilation of songs was made with Washington officials in mind. Copies of the tapes were sent to President Johnson, Vice President Humphrey, Secretary of State Dean Rusk, Secretary of Defense Robert MacNamara, Senator Fulbright, and National Security Advisor Walter Rostow. (Ambassador Lodge and General Westmoreland also received copies.) Lansdale hoped to give the policy makers a "feel" for the people involved in Vietnam, but he received only formal acknowledgements and "had a sneaking feeling" that the policy makers never listened to the contents of the tapes.
Many of the artists heard on other tapes--Pham Duy, Steve Addis, Hershel Gober, Sam Wilson, and Jim Bullington, among others--are included in this report. There are Vietnamese and American folk songs, and new songs written by servicemen in Vietnam. General Lansdale's friend, the Vietnamese songwriter Pham Duy, appears throughout the tape program. There are 51 songs, including some repeats.
A list of the songs, and a copy of the narrative part of the program, accompanies this register in Appendix B.
tape 31

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 1966

Additional Note

This is a continuation from tape # 30.
tape 32

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 1967

Additional Note

This is a tape of a visit to 194 Cong Ly by John Steinbeck. He listens to Pham Duy and to Steve Addis, and Steve Addis talks from time to time about Vietnamese music. According to Addis, there are three types of Vietnamese songs: folk, classical, and "heart" songs. Most of Pham Duy's songs are "heart" songs.
This is the first of a series of tapes: #'s 32, 33, and 34.
 

1. "Vietnam, Vietnam," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

2. "The Wounded Soldier," Pham Duy and Steve Addis (English and Vietnamese)

 

3. "Rain On The Leaves," Pham Duy and Steve Addis (English and Vietnamese)

 

4. "To Sing Often Is Better Than To Sing With A Good Voice," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

5. "A Cup Of Rice Is A Cup Of Sweet And A Cup Of Blood," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

6. "Clementine," Pham Duy and Steve Addis (Vietnamese)

tape 33

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 1967

Additional Note

This is a continuation of the Steinbeck visit. It begins with Pham Duy talking about American protest songs--"they only protest against us" and never against the other side. His songs are also protest songs, he says, but against the North Vietnamese.
 

1. "On Behalf," Pham Duy (Vietnamese), with Steve Addis giving a translation at the end of each verse.

 

2. "Suc May Ma Buon," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

Additional Note

Pham Duy, Steve Addis, and General Lansdale talk about the "tone" of Vietnamese songs. Since Vietnamese is a tonal language, its words have almost musical ups and downs. If a word has a rising accent, or a lowering accent, when set to music it would need appropriate rising or lowering tones in the song. Pham Duy comments that Vietnamese songs are usually sad and defeated-sounding. Although the next song has a different, uplifting tone, it nevertheless caught on.
 

3. "Youth Song," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

Additional Note

Pham Duy talks about trying to "entertain" a people which has endured 25 years of war. He says that the duty of an artist is to "harmonize" society. It is necessary to leave the city and work in the villages.
General Lansdale reminisces about the 1965 Thanksgiving dinner with General Thang. Thang told Pham Duy to write some new songs, because he hadn't written a good song since 1948 (when "Youth Song" was composed).
 

4. "Carrying Rice," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

Additional Note

This is an example of a song to mobilize the people.
 

5. "Dirty Old Town," Steve Addis (English)

Additional Note

After this song, Steve Addis discusses Vietnamese music, expecially the music of North Vietnam. Lansdale comments on a poem, written by a Viet Cong who had been killed in a battle. The poem was to his mother. Pham Duy set it to music and it was heard all over South Vietnam. Lansdale felt it was effective counter-propaganda, because it was critical of the Viet Cong.
Steve Addis talks about Hue, which is the "cradle of Vietnamese music." He talks about the night that he and Pham Duy recorded on the Perfume River, in Hue, in a boat. This recording is in this collection (tape # 52).
tape 34

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 1967

Additional Note

This is a continuation (and a partial repeat) from tape # 33. This is the last tape of the Steinbeck visit.
tape 35

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 5/14/67

Additional Note

This tape was recorded at 194 Cong Ly. It is labelled "Hank Miller Farewell," and is a tape of a gathering of friends, with entertainment provided by Pham Duy and group singing. The recording is continued on tape # 36.
 

1. Guitar music

 

2. Flamenco guitar music

 

3. Flamenco guitar music

 

4. "Youth Song," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

5. "Vietnam, Vietnam," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

6. "Rain On The Leaves," Pham Duy (Vietnamese and English)

 

7. "The Wounded Soldier," Pham Duy (Vietnamese and English)

 

8. "Clementine," Pham Duy and group (Vietnamese and English)

 

9. "Plaisir d'Amour," Pham Duy and group (Vietnamese, French, and English)

 

10. "Suc May Ma Buon," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

tape 36

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 5/14/67

Additional Note

This is a continuation from tape # 35.
 

1. "To Sing Often Is Better Than To Sing With A Good Voice," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

2. "The Enemy Is No Man," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

3. Vietnamese song, Pham Duy and group (Vietnamese)

 

4. "The Wounded Soldier," Pham Duy (Vietnamese and English)

 

5. Flamenco guitar music

 

6. Flamenco guitar music

 

7. "Vietnam, Vietnam," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

tape 37

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 7/27/67

Additional Note

This is a tape of the wedding reception given by Lansdale after the marriage of Trinh Minh Nhut and Pham Thi Khonh Chi. It was recorded at 194 Cong Ly. Trinh Minh The's widow asked General Lansdale to represent her family at the marriage of her oldest son to General Chi's daughter. All of the men of her family had died. Evidently Trinh Minh The had spoken of General Lansdale as his "brother," so she asked Lansdale to do the honors.
There is an introduction by Cal Mehlert, a career Foreign Service officer who speaks both Vietnamese and English. He joined the SLO in 1967-68, serving several tours of duty. He also spoke Chinese, and served as an interpreter during Nixon's visit to Peking.
 

1. "To Sing Often Is Better Than To Sing With A Good Voice," Pham Duy and the Villagers (Vietnamese)

 

2. Vietnamese song, Pham Duy and the Villagers (Vietnamese)

 

3. "Early Morning In The Woods," Pham Duy and the Villagers (Vietnamese)

 

4. Vietnamese song, woman soloist (Vietnamese)

 

5. Vietnamese song, two women (Vietnamese)

 

6. Vietnamese song, Pham Duy and two women (Vietnamese)

 

7. "Suc May Ma Buon," Pham Duy and two women (Vietnamese)

 

8. "Vietnam, Vietnam," Pham Duy and the Villagers (Vietnamese)

 

9. "Hat Hoi Trang Ram," two women (Vietnamese)

 

10. "Rain On The Leaves," Pham Duy and two women (Vietnamese)

 

11. "Clementine," Pham Duy and the Villagers (Vietnamese and English)

 

12. "Red River Valley," two women and the Villagers (Vietnamese and English)

 

13. "Hat Hoi Trang Ram," Pham Duy and two women (Vietnamese)

 

14. "Fishermen's Song," Pham Duy and the Villagers (Vietnamese)

tape 38

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 8/22/67

Additional Note

This is a tape of a gathering at 194 Cong Ly, evidently including Prime Minister Ky and General Thang. It begins with General Lansdale telling a joke. In the background is guitar music and humming ("The Rain On The Leaves"). After a while Pham Duy begins to sing. When the music ends, General Lansdale is heard commenting upon the earlier visit by John Steinbeck. This recording is continued on tape # 39.
 

1. "Rain On The Leaves," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

2. "Arirang," Pham Duy (Korean)

 

3. "Clementine," Pham Duy (Vietnamese and English)

 

4. Vietnamese song, Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

5. "Autumn In Paris," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

6. "On Behalf," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

tape 39

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 8/22/67

Additional Note

This is a continuation from tape # 38.
 

1. "Youth Song," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

2. Vietnamese song, Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

3. "The Wounded Soldier," Pham Duy (Vietnamese and English)

 

4. Vietnamese song, Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

5. "Suc May Ma Buon," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

6. Vietnamese song, Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

7. "Greensleeves," Pham Duy (Vietnamese and English)

 

8. Vietnamese song, Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

9. Vietnamese song, Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

10. "The Wounded Soldier," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

11. Vietnamese song, Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

tape 40

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 9/18/67

Additional Note

This is a recording of a "Goodby to Ambassador and Mrs. Lodge and Ambassador and Mrs. Porter" (Part I). The tape was made at 194 Cong Ly. It is the first in a series of three: #'s 40, 41, and 42.
 

1. "Rain On The Leaves," Pham Duy (English and Vietnamese)

 

2. "Suc May Ma Buon," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

3. Revolutionary Development song, Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

4. "In The Evening By The Moonlight," Sam Wilson (English)

 

5. "On Top Of Old Smokey," Ambassadors Lodge and Porter (English)

 

6. "Old 97," Ambassadors Lodge and Porter (English)

 

7. "Bill Bailey," Sam Wilson (English)

 

8. "Jack Of Diamonds," Sam Wilson (English)

 

9. "Cigarettes And Wiskey," group (English)

 

10. "Old Man You Oughter," Sam Wilson (English)

 

11. "Little Brown Jug," Sam Wilson (English)

 

12. "Summertime," Sam Wilson (English)

 

13. "Saigon Nights," Sam Wilson (English)

tape 41

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 9/18/67

Additional Note

This is a continuation from tape # 40.
 

1. "Love Letters In The Sand," Sam Wilson (English)

 

2. "Invitation To Dance," Sam Wilson (English)

 

3. "She's A Personal Friend Of Mine," Ambassador Lodge (English, French, German)

 

4. "Who Stole The Jam?" Ambassador Lodge (English)

 

5. "You Are My Sunshine," Sam Wilson and group (English)

 

6. "Clementine," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

7. "Red River Valley," Pham Duy and Sam Wilson (English and Vietnamese)

 

8. "In The Evening By The Moonlight," Ambassador Lodge and group (English)

 

9. "Shiek Of Araby," Sam Wilson and group (English)

 

10. "Lazy River," Sam Wilson and Ambassador Lodge (English)

 

11. "Oh Sammy," Ambassador Porter (English)

 

12. "Ten Pretty Girls," Ambassador Porter (English)

 

13. "I'll Be Glad When You're Dead," Ambassador Lodge (English)

 

14. "Miss Otis Regrets," Ambassador Lodge (English)

 

15. "To Sing Often Is Better Than To Sing With A Good Voice," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

tape 42

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 9/18/67

Additional Note

This is a continuation from tapes # 40-41.
 

1. "On Behalf," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

2. "The Lover Of The Cambo," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

3. "Vietnam, Vietnam," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

4. "Wiffenpoof Song," Sam Wilson (English)

 

5. "Oh Cherchonia," Sam Wilson (English and Russian)

 

6. "Saloon," Ambassador Lodge (English)

 

7. "Mississippi Mud," Ambassador Lodge (English)

 

8. "Truckin' On Down," Sam Wilson (English)

 

9. "Ain't She Sweet," Ambassadors Lodge and Porter (English)

 

10. "Hard Hearted Hannah," Ambassador Lodge (English)

 

11. "There Are Blues," Ambassador Lodge (English)

tape 43

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 10/25/67

Additional Note

This is a recording of a gathering at 194 Cong Ly. It begins with crowd noise and a Vietnamese speaker. Then there is a translation into English. The speaker introduces Nguyen Cao Ky as a "youth leader" and "singer who comes from Hanoi." Ky used to sing with the youths he led in North Vietnam. Pham Duy sings because Ky is too shy. This recording is continued on tape # 44.
 

1. "Youth Song," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

Additional Note

A group of singers from Saigon is introduced (their leader is "Mr. Yet").
 

2. "To Sing Often Is Better Than To Sing With a Good Voice," Saigon group (Vietnamese)

 

3. Cadre song, Saigon group (Vietnamese)

 

4. Cadre song, Saigon group (Vietnamese)

 

5. "Red River Valley," Saigon group (Vietnamese)

 

6. "Rain On The Leaves," Saigon group (Vietnamese)

 

7. Vietnamese song, Saigon group (Vietnamese)

 

8. Vietnamese song, Saigon group (Vietnamese)

 

9. "Clementine," Saigon group (Vietnamese)

 

10. "Planting Rice," Saigon group (Vietnamese and Tagalog)

 

11. "Red River Valley," Saigon group (Vietnamese)

 

12. "Oh Susannah," Saigon group (Vietnamese, with English chorus)

 

13. "Silent Night," group (English)

 

14. "Dinah Blow Your Horn," group (English)

 

15. Vietnamese song, Saigon group (Vietnamese)

 

16. "We Shall Overcome," Saigon group (Vietnamese and English)

tape 44

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 10/25/67

Additional Note

This is a continuation from tape # 43.
 

1. "All My Trials," woman (English)

 

2. Vietnamese song, Pham Duy and group (Vietnamese)

 

3. "Michael Row The Boat Ashore," Pham Duy and group (English)

 

4. "This Land Is Your Land," woman (English)

 

5. Vietnamese song, Pham Duy and group (Vietnamese)

 

6. Vietnamese song, Pham Duy and group (Vietnamese)

 

7. "Rain On The Leaves," Pham Duy and group (English and Vietnamese)

 

8. "Vietnam, Vietnam," Pham Duy and group (Vietnamese)

 

9. "The Wounded Soldier," Pham Duy and group (Vietnamese)

 

10. Vietnamese song, Pham Duy and group (Vietnamese)

tape 45

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 11/1/67

Access Information

Use copy reference number: 80116_a_0000245_a01

Additional Note

This is a recording of a "Vietnamese Youth Choral Group" recorded at 194 Cong Ly. It includes music of two young Vietnamese composers. It was taped at the time of the first national elections held under the new Constitution which had been written by the Constituent Assembly. Two of the political observers who had come at President Johnson's invitation were staying at General Lansdale's quarters. One of them, Robert Coate, was chairman of the Democratic Party for northern California. The other observer, Bill Connell, was executive officer for Vice President Humphrey. General Lansdale's nephew, Bill Lansdale, happened to be there at the same time (he was just beginning a tour of duty in Vietnam as a seaman in the Navy). The singers were from the Buddhist University in Saigon, who had stopped by to say hello.
The list of participants includes: Trinh Cong Son and Nguyen Duc Quang (composers and singers); Tran Dai Loc (teacher, southern Buddhist); Le Dinh Dieu and Mrs. Dieu (teachers); Do Ngoc Yen (announcer); Pham Phu Minh (teacher, central Vietnam); Phan Van Phung (teacher, Buddhist movement); Do Anh Tai (teacher), and Nguyen Huu Dang (architect).
This recording is continued on tape # 46.
 

1. "Hat Hoi Trang Ram," Youth Group (Vietnamese)

 

2. "We Shall Overcome," Youth Group (Vietnamese)

 

3. "A Long Day In Our Country," Youth Group (Vietnamese)

 

4. "War Sounds In The Night," Youth Group (Vietnamese)

 

5. "The Ballad Of An Insane Girl," Youth Group (Vietnamese)

 

6. "The Fortune Of My Mother," Youth Group (Vietnamese)

 

7. "The Wail of The Oxen," Youth Group (Vietnamese)

 

8. Song about Hanoi, Colonel Dinh (Vietnamese)

tape 46

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 11/1/67

Additional Note

This is a continuation from tape # 45.
 

1. "Joining The Army," Youth Group (Vietnamese)

 

2. "Lansdale," Youth Group (Vietnamese)

 

3. "Vietnam, The Bridegroom," Youth Group (Vietnamese)

 

4. "The Dawn," Youth Group (Vietnamese)

 

5. Song about unification of Vietnam, Youth Group (Vietnamese)

 

6. A cadre song, Youth Group (Vietnamese)

 

7. A cadre song, Youth Group (Vietnamese)

Additional Note

At this point there is a long discussion concerning the problem of dwelling in the past versus moving ahead to the challenges of the future.
 

8. Vietnamese song, Youth Group (Vietnamese)

 

9. "Hope Rises Again," Youth Group (Vietnamese)

 

10. "Vietnam, Vietnam," Youth Group (Vietnamese)

tape 47

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 6/14/68

Additional Note

This tape is entitled "Vietnamese Farewell Serenade." It was recorded at 194 Cong Ly. The group recorded on tape # 45 had come to say goodbye to Lansdale on his last evening in Saigon. According to Lansdale, the group stayed for dinner (cleaning out his refrigerator) and remained past curfew. They were driven home by Admiral Veth who had also stopped in to say goodbye. As they left they sang "goodbye Ed Lansdale," adding the names of the last remaining members of the SLO: "Cal" for Cal Mehlert, "Dave" for Dave Hudson, and "Charlie" for Charlie Sweet.
The songs are all in Vietnamese Most are performed by a female soloist, accompanied by the group.
tape 48

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

This tape was made on August 12, "After VAA Hootenany," at 194 Cong Ly. No year is given, though this tape must have been made either in 1966 or 1967. Two of the participants--Miss Pham Thai Thanh and Mr. Nghem Phu Phat--are from a group called the "Nguon Song Group."
 

1. "Suc May Ma Buon," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

2. "Ra Khoi" ("Let's Sail To The Ocean), Miss Pham Thai Thanh Lan (Vietnamese)

 

3. "A Guy Is A Guy," Miss Pham Thai Thanh Lan (English)

 

4. "I'm Gonna Leave On The Morning Train," Steve Addis (English)

 

5. "In Your Hand," Steve Addis and "Arthur" (no last name given) (English)

 

6. "It's The Last Thing On My Mind," Steve Addis and Arthur (English)

 

7. "Plaisir d'Amour," Pham Duy, Arthur, Jane Pratt (English and French)

 

8. Vietnamese song, Jane Pratt (Vietnamese)

 

9. "Dirty Old Town," Steve Addis and Arthur (English)

 

10. "Greensleeves," Arthur, Steve Addis, and Pham Duy (instrumental)

tape 49

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

This is a recording a of February 11th "Tet Work Session." No year is given. Pham Duy, Steve Addis, Art Guilliano, Hank Redford, and the Villagers all sing. This is the first in a series of three tapes: #'s 49, 50, and 51.
 

1. Flamenco, Hank Redford

 

2. "Danz Amoura" (Flamenco), Hank Redford

 

3. "Rose, Rose I Love You" (zither)

 

4. "Vietnam, Vietnam" (zither and guitar)

 

5. "Widow's Lament," Pham Duy and the Villagers (Vietnamese)

 

6. Southern Folk Song, Pham Duy and the Villagers (Vietnamese)

 

7. "On Behalf," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

8. Flamenco, Hank Redford

tape 50

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

This is a continuation from tape # 49.
 

9. Flamenco, Hank Redford

 

10. "Separation," Pham Duy and the Villagers (Vietnamese)

 

11. "Song Of Spring," Pham Duy and the Villagers (Vietnamese)

 

12. "Suc May Ma Buon," Pham Duy and the Villagers (Vietnamese)

 

13. "Many A Mile," Steve Addis and Art Guilliano (English)

 

14. "To Sing Often Is Better Than To Sing With A Good Voice," Pham Duy and the Villagers (Vietnamese)

 

15. Vietnamese song, Miss Pham Lan (Vietnamese)

 

16. "The End Of The World," Miss Pham Lan (Vietnamese)

tape 51

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

This is a continuation from tapes # 49 and 50.
 

17. "The Wounded Soldier," Art Guilliano, Pham Duy, Steve Addis, and Thao (Vietnamese and English)

 

18. "Hang Down Your Head Tom Dooley," Steve Addis and group (English)

 

19. "Rambling Boy," Steve Addis and group (English)

 

20. Vietnamese work song, Thao and Miss Pham Lan (Vietnamese)

 

21. "Children's song," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

22. "Vietnam, Vietnam," Pham Duy and group (Vietnamese)

Additional Note

The second half of this tape is a recording of a television or radio show, with Steve Addis and Pham Duy.
 

1. "The Wounded Soldier," Pham Duy and Steve Addis (Vietnamese and English)

 

2. "Rain On The Leaves," Pham Duy and Steve Addis (Vietnamese and English)

 

3. "Children's Song," Pham Duy and Steve Addis (Vietnamese and English)

tape 52

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

This is a recording of Steve Addis and Pham Duy singing while floating on the Perfume River, in Hue (not at 194 Cong Ly). There is no date, but it must have been recorded in 1966 or 1967.
 

1. "Rain On The Leaves," Steve Addis (Vietnamese and English)

 

2. "Hush Now My Darling," Steve Addis (English)

 

3. "Summertime," Steve Addis (English)

 

4. "Plaisir d'Amour," Steve Addis (French and English)

 

5. Vietnamese song, Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

6. "Widow's Lament," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

7. "Times Are Getting Hard," Steve Addis (English)

 

8. Folk song, Steve Addis (English)

Additional Note

The second part of this tape contains songs by Captain Hershel Gober.
 

1. "Proud American," Hershel Gober (English)

 

2. "Saigon Warrior," Hershel Gober (English)

 

3. "Look Over My Shoulder," Hershel Gober (English)

tape 53

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

This tape has three distinct parts: first, there is Mitch Miller's recorded version of "The Rain On the Leaves." Next are some songs by Pham Duy and Steve Addis, recorded at 194 Cong Ly in Saigon (no date). Finally, there are two songs by a Liberian singer, Sherman Brown.
The songs by Sherman Brown were from Hank Miller, who had come to Vietnam from Liberia. He had been in charge of the Voice of America for Middle Africa. His wife, Anne, wrote the first song, inspired by the flight of Gemini 4. The other song is Sherman Brown's own.
 

1. "Rain On The Leaves," Mitch Miller and chorus (English)

 

2. "Rain On The Leaves," Pham Duy and Steve Addis (Vietnamese and English)

 

3. "Sing With Me," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

4. "Rain On The Leaves," Steve Addis (English)

 

5. "Rain On The Leaves," Pham Duy and Steve Addis (English)

 

6. "The Wounded Soldier," Steve Addis and friend (English)

 

7. "To Have A Wife," Steve Addis and friend (English)

 

8. "Poem Of A Buddhist Monk," Steve Addis (English)

Additional Note

At this point General Lansdale's voice comes on the tape, in a new recording session at some other time. He says, "Here's a couple of songs that were recorded in Liberia, by a Liberian group that's playing at the ________ hotel in Monrovia. The leader's named Sherman Brown. He's a Liberian, and he's a wonderful musician; he's a writer of songs and he's a singer. The first song is one that was written for the Voice of America, for the flight of Gemini 4. It was written, produced, and performed in 36 hours, and it has a few faults, but it has some ideas in it. The second one, which didn't come out until the recording session for the first one, was one that Sherman Brown had written himself to express the same idea--that people are people the world or the universe around, and the sooner we get together, the better. The second is called 'Fly With Me.'"
 

9. "Strolling The Milky Way," Sherman Brown (English)

 

10. "Fly With Me," Sherman Brown (English)

 

11. "Strolling The Milky Way," Sherman Brown (English)

 

12. "Strolling The Milky Way" (instrumental)

tape 54

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

This is entitled "Songs--Music of Pham Duy. Guitar, Pham Duy; Mandolin, Bernie Yoh." There is no date, but it seems to be an earlier recording, judging from the sound of "Rain On The Leaves" and "The Wounded Soldier."
 

1. Mandolin music, Bernie Yoh

Additional Note

At this point, Pham Duy talks about his song, "Rain On The Leaves."
 

2. "Rain On The Leaves," Pham Duy (Vietnamese and English)

 

3. "Song Of A Militiaman," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

4. "The Wounded Soldier," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

5. "Vietnam, Vietnam," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

6. "Vietnam, Vietnam," Pham Duy and Bernie Yoh (instrumental)

 

7. "Wai Deo," Pham Duy (Vietnamese, accompanied by Bernie Yoh)

 

8. "Theme From The Village That Refused To Die," Bernie Yoh (instrumental)

 

9. "Theme From Fire And Shadow," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

10. "Our Enemy Is No Man," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

11. "Vietnam, Vietnam," Pham Duy (Vietnamese, accompanied by Bernie Yoh)

 

12. "Our Enemy Is No Man," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

 

13. "Our Enemy Is No Man," Pham Duy (Vietnamese, accompanied by Bernie Yoh)

Additional Note

After this music, there is a short recording of Steve Addis and his American partner, Bill Crowfoot. They perform the English version of "Rain On The Leaves," on the Godfrey television show.
 

1. "Rain On The Leaves," Steve Addis and Bill Crowfoot (English)

tape 55

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

This tape was evidently recorded in a nightclub or bar of some sort. It opens with Hershel Gober's band playing "What kind of fool am I?" Then Jim Bullington is persuaded to sing. He explains that he spent some time stationed in Hue (probably 1963-64), a city in the north of South Vietnam. After he finishes the band comes back, and later a woman does some folk-singing.
 

1. "What Kind Of Fool Am I?" Black Patches (instrumental)

 

2. "Brave Boys," Jim Bullington (English)

 

3. "Way Down Upon The Perfume River," Jim Bullington (English)

 

4. "Tai Shao," Jim Bullington (English)

tape 56

Sound Recording - U.S.A.

Additional Note

This is a recording of the "Cosmos Tabernacle Choir." This is the same group of CIA personnel which goes by the name of the "Embassy Boys' Choir" on other tapes. The recording was made after the war, at the home of Joseph Baker (a former SLO staff member) in McLean, Virginia. Lansdale had gathered the veterans together in order to record their songs and add them to his collection. The songs date roughly from l963 (but the recording was, of course, made much later).
This Choir sings mild satire about conditions in Vietnam, and about the coup(s). The songs are parodies sung to familiar tunes such as "The Twelve Days Of Christmas" and "The Yellow Rose Of Texas." The quality of the recording is not good--it is difficult to understand the words.
tape 57

Sound Recording - U.S.A.

Additional Note

This is a tape of Hershel Gober's music. It sounds like a professional recording.
 

1. "Forgotten Man," Hershel Gober (English)

 

2. "Here Am I," Hershel Gober (English)

 

3. "Saigon Warrior," Hershel Gober (English)

 

4. "Hello General Westy," Hershel Gober (English)

tape 58

Sound Recording - U.S.A.

Additional Note

This tape begins with a recorded "letter" to General Lansdale (also recorded on tape # 59), from Hershel Gober. Gober also sings the chorus to "Freedom's Gang."
 

1. "Freedom's Gang" (chorus), Hershel Gober (English)

 

2. "Proud American," Hershel Gober (English)

 

3. "I Need You So," Hershel Gober (English)

Additional Note

The rest of the tape is blank.
tape 59

Sound Recording - U.S.A.

Additional Note

This is a tape that Hershel Gober sent to General Lansdale, as a sort of letter. He describes what he has been doing, in the U.S., on behalf of the South Vietnamese people. He mentions a couple of T.V. and live shows, in which he has spoken about the people of Vietnam. He gives some personal news. While he talks, he strums on his guitar. After a while he sings the chorus from "Freedom's Gang," a song he had written in honor of General Lansdale (who leads the "gang"). The complete song is recorded on tape # 60.
tape 60

Sound Recording - U.S.A.

Additional Note

First on this tape is a recording of someone--probably Sam Wilson--strumming on a guitar and humming. Second is a complete recording of Hershel Gober singing his song, "Freedom's Gang," which he wrote upon his departure from Vietnam. It is in honor of General Lansdale and the Senior Liaison Office Staff in Vietnam. Gober forwarded a printed copy of the words to this song when he sent the tape to Lansdale, and these words are included in Appendix C.
 

1. "Freedom's Gang," Hershel Gober (English)

tape 61

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 5/7/68

Additional Note

This tape is a recording of a new song by Pham Duy, written in 1968 (after Lansdale had left Vietnam). Pham Duy recorded this tape and mailed it to General Lansdale, accompanied by a letter and a written translation. These are included in Appendix D.
 

1. "One, Two, Three, Let's Enter The Army," Pham Duy (Vietnamese)

tape 62

Sound Recording - U.S.A., 4/11/70

Additional Note

This tape is a recording of both Dolf Droge and Hershel Gober. Dolf Droge was a friend of Lansdale's who had served in Vietnam for USIS during the American advisory period. He had previously served in Poland and in Laos. The recording was made at General Lansdale's home in Wakefield, Virginia. Bernie Yoh is also present. This recording is continued on tapes # 63 and 64.
 

1. "Vietnamization," Dolf Droge (English)

 

2. "Dirty Old Town," Hershel Gober (English)

 

3. "Fighting Side Of Me," Hershel Gober (English)

 

4. "Muskogee," Hershel Gober (English)

 

5. "Air Commandos," Dolf Droge (English)

 

6. "Frightened Soldiers" (to the tune of "The Green Berets), Hershel Gober (English)

 

7. "Green Grammarians" (to the tune of "The Green Berets), Dolf Droge (English)

 

8. "Your Heart And Your Mind," Dolf Droge (English)

 

9. "Picture Of A Man," Hershel Gober (English)

 

10. "Day's Mighty Long," Dolf Droge (English)

 

11. "Advisory Team 54," Hershel Gober (English)

 

12. "Rain On The Leaves," Dolf Droge and Hershel Gober (English)

 

13. "So Lonesome," Dolf Droge (English)

 

14. " Vietnamization," Dolf Droge (English)

 

15. "Ho Chi Minh," Dolf Droge (English)

 

16. "Freedom Isn't Free," Hershel Gober (English)

 

17. "Follow Me" (U.S. Infantry), Hershel Gober (English)

 

18. "Big Sam," Hershel Gober (English)

 

19. "Land Of The Dragon," Dolf Droge (English)

 

20. "Proud To Be An American," Hershel Gober (English)

 

21. "Born Free," Hershel Gober (English)

 

22. "Voices Of The Dead," Dolf Droge (English)

 

23. "Mu Gia Pass," Dolf Droge (English)

 

24. "Poverty Program," Hershel Gober (English)

 

25. "Come And See My Poverty," Dolf Droge (English)

 

26. "Rain Drops," Dolf Droge and Hershel Gober (English)

 

27. "One Day Little Girl," Hershel Gober (English)

 

28. Johnny Cash imitation, Hershel Gober (English)

 

29. "Honey Come Back," Hershel Gober (English)

 

30. Johnny Cash imitation, Hershel Gober (English)

 

31. "Next Of Kin," Hershel Gober (English)

 

32. "Dirty Old Town," Hershel Gober (English)

 

33. "Never Hear Nobody Pray," Dolf Droge (English)

 

34. "Won't Cut Your Hair," Dolf Droge (English)

 

35. "Chieu Hoi," Dolf Droge (English)

 

36. "I'm Just A Dog-Faced Soldier," Hershel Gober (English)

 

37. "52-B," Dolf Droge (English)

 

38. "Christmas In Vietnam," Dolf Droge and Hershel Gober (English)

 

39. "Rudolph The Red-Nosed U-2," Dolf Droge (English)

 

40. "Nuoc-Mam," Dolf Droge (English)

 

41. "I Guess I Didn't Say It Right," Dolf Droge (English)

 

42. "Saigon Warrior," Hershel Gober (English)

 

43. "Six Clicks," Hershel Gober (English)

 

44. "Birth Of A Nation," Hershel Gober (English)

 

45. "100 Miles," Dolf Droge and group (English)

tape 63

Sound Recording - U.S.A., 4/11/70

Additional Note

This is a continuation from tape # 62. The first eleven songs are the same as numbers 35 through 45 on tape # 62. Unlike most of the tapes, this one is recorded on both sides.
 

12. (SIDE ONE) "Number Nine," Dolf Droge (English)

 

13. (SIDE ONE) "Are You Walking And Talking With The Lord?" Dolf Droge (English)

 

14. (SIDE TWO) "Tom Dooley," Dolf Droge (English)

 

15. (SIDE TWO) "All I Know Is What I Read In The Paper," Dolf Droge (English)

 

16. "Margarina," Dolf Droge (English)

 

17. "Way Down In Columbus Georgia," Hershel Gober (English)

 

18. "Rotation Blues," Dolf Droge (English)

 

19. "Birmingham Jail," Hershel Gober, Dolf Droge, and group (English)

 

20. "Rain On The Leaves," Hershel Gober and Dolf Droge (English)

 

21. "The Wounded Soldier," Hershel Gober and Dolf Droge (English)

 

22. Vietnamese song, Hershel Gober (Vietnamese)

 

23. "Spanish Eyes," Hershel Gober (English)

Additional Note

At the end of this tape General Lansdale is heard saying that Pham Duy will soon be in town.
tape 64

Sound Recording - U.S.A., 4/11/70

Additional Note

This is a continuation from tapes # 62 and 63. The music is truly in the background on this tape, with loud conversation. Only track one, on one-half of side one, is recorded.
tape 65

Sound Recording - U.S.A., 6/6/70

Additional Note

This is a tape of another get-together at Lansdale's home in Wakefield, Virginia. Dolf Droge is there, and Bernie Yoh.
 

1. "I'm In The Protest Generation (Burn It Down)," Dolf Droge (English)

 

2. "Don't Forget The Eagles," Dolf Droge (English)

 

3. "If You Live Down In The Delta (Hang On To Your Hearts And Your Minds)," Dolf Droge (English)

 

4. "What A Pity, Mao," Dolf Droge (English)

 

5. "Wizard Of Ooze" (about Everett Dirksen), Dolf Droge (English)

 

6. "Que Sera, Sera" (about VSIA training), Dolf Droge (English)

 

7. "Night Before Christmas" (for the NSC staff), Dolf Droge (English)

 

8. "Nerve Gas," Dolf Droge (English)

 

9. "I Know That I'm In Laos," Dolf Droge (English)

 

10. "Mao, Nikita's Making Eyes At Me," Dolf Droge (English)

 

11. "Six Feet And Rising" (song about Hershel Gober), Dolf Droge (English)

 

12. "That Young Harvard Man In The Old Rocking Chair" (about John F. Kennedy), Dolf Droge (English)

 

13. "Riders For LBJ," Dolf Droge (English)

 

14. "Come See My Poverty," Dolf Droge (English)

 

15. "Never Hear Nobody Pray," Dolf Droge (English)

tape 66

Sound Recording - U.S.A., 6/29/74

Additional Note

This is a recording of a get-together at General Lansdale's home in Wakefield, Virginia. Those present included Dolf Droge, Bernie Yoh, and Jim Bullington.
 

1. "Ballad Of The Green Gramarian," Dolf Droge (English)

 

2. "The Hawk, The Dove, And The Owl," Dolf Droge (English)

 

3. "McNamara's Band," Dolf Droge (English)

 

4. "Burned-Out Case Blues (There's Nothing To Do In Ougado)," Dolf Droge (English)

tape 67

Sound Recording - U.S.A., 2/6/75

Additional Note

This is a recording of a gathering including Sam Wilson, Jim Bullington, General Lansdale, and families. The occasion is Sam Wilson's birthday. It is continued on tape # 68.
 

1. "Saigon Warrior," Jim Bullington (English)

 

2. "Bury Me Beneath The Weeping Willow," Sam Wilson (English)

 

3. "Bill Bailey," Sam Wilson (English)

 

4. "Way Down In Columbus Georgia," Jim Bullington and Sam Wilson (English)

 

5. "The Old '97," group (English)

 

6. "Newsboy Of The Town," Jim Bullington (English)

 

7. "Country Road," group (English)

 

8. "When The Roll Is Called Up Yonder," group (English)

 

9. "Without A Song," Sam Wilson (English)

 

10. "Only A Shanty In Shanty-Town," Sam Wilson (English)

 

11. "We Are Winning, This I Know" (to the tune of "Jesus Loves Me"), Jim Bullington (English)

 

12. "In The Sweet Bye And Bye," group (English)

 

13. "Summertime," Sam Wilson (English)

 

14. "Is You My Baby," Sam Wilson (English)

tape 68

Sound Recording - U.S.A., 2/6/75

Additional Note

This is a continuation from # 67, containing mostly conversation.
Sound Recordings - Tapes 69-87

Tapes Of Vietnamese Music.

Scope and Content Note

These tapes are recorded entirely in Vietnamese. There is a series entitled "Trinh Cong Son" (69-70), a series entitled "Trinh Minh The" (71-78), and a series entitled "Signers and Players" (79-82). The last tape in this group (87) contains Viet Cong music.
The "Trinh Minh The" series contains tapes of the Lien Minh, guerrilla troops under Trinh Minh The. General Lansdale first heard the songs of the Lien Minh in 1954-55. When he returned to Vietnam in 1965, he asked General Van Thanh Cao, who had been Trinh Minh The's deputy, if he could locate any of the songs. Cao gave Lansdale these recordings.
The other two series include songs of the Vung Tao Choir, a cadre group of trainees at the Rural Development camp at Vung Tao. ("Rural Development" was changed to "Revolutionary Development" by the Americans; the work of the RD cadres was commonly known as "pacification.") The cadre songs were militant, and similar to Vietcong songs. Pham Duy wrote some strikingly unusual songs for the cadres; most of these were written at Lansdale's Cong Ly quarters.
tape 69

Sound Recording - Vietnam, l967

Additional Note

"Trinh Cong Son," part 1.
This entire tape is in Vietnamese. It goes with # 70, which has the same type of material.
tape 70

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 1967

Additional Note

"Trinh Cong Son," part 2.
This is a continuation from tape # 69.
tape 71

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

"Trinh Minh The."
This is the first of a series of tapes (#'s 71-78) under the same title, all of which are entirely in Vietnamese (spoken and song). Part of this series of tapes has a written translation, which is incuded in Appendix E.
Both sides are recorded.
tape 72

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

"Trinh Minh The," reel 2, part 1.
tape 73

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

"Trinh Minh The," reel 2, part 2.
The designation "instruments--songs for dancing" is printed on the box.
tape 74

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

"Trinh Minh The," reel 5.
tape 75

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

"Trinh Minh The," reel 9, side 1, part 1.
tape 76

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

"Trinh Minh The," reel 9, side 1, part 2.
tape 77

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

"Trinh Minh The," reel 9, side 2, part 1.
tape 78

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

"Trinh Minh The," reel 9, side 2, part 2.
tape 79

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

"Signers and Players."
This tape belongs with those labelled "Vietnamese music, signers and players" (#'s 79-82), all of which are entirely in Vietnamese. Side one, track one, and side two, track four are recorded.
tape 80

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

"Signers and Players."
This is entitled "Vietnam, Vietnam." Signers and players: Nguyen Thanh Men, Pham Minh De, and Le Thi Hoang.
tape 81

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

"Signers and Players."
This is entitled (1) "Nong Thon Quat Khoi (rural rebirth)," and (2) "Tieng Chieu Hoi (the call of Chieu Hoi)." Signers and players: Nguyen Thanh Men, Pham Minh De, and Le Thi Hoang.
tape 82

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

"Signers and Players."
This is entitled (1) "Loi Nguoi Ben Song (the message from this side of the river)," and (2) "Anh Ve (your return)." Signers and players: Nguyen Thanh Men, Pham Minh De, and Le Thi Hoang.
tape 83

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 9/66

Access Information

Use copy reference number: 80116_a_0000248_a01

Additional Note

This is entitled "Vietnamese Election Campaign Songs--National Assembly." It is entirely in Vietnamese.
tape 84

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 3/3/67

Additional Note

This is entitled "Rural Development." Throughout the tape speaking (by a man or a woman) alternates with singing. The singing is by a group of young people, probably Revolutionary (Rural) Development Cadre youths. They sing a number of songs, including some of Pham Duy's cadre songs. The tape is entirely in Vietnamese.
tape 85

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 8/67

Additional Note

This is entitled "Vieng Tan Choral Group--RD Cadre Songs." It is designated "from Major Be." In format it is similar to tape # 84. The tape is entirely in Vietnamese.
tape 86

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

This tape is in two parts. First there are four songs by an American singer, Vera Vanderland.
 

1. "Freedom Is A Hammer," Vera Vanderland (English)

 

2. "Let's Pretend," Vera Vanderland (English)

 

3. "Hello World," Vera Vanderland (English)

 

4. "The Torch Of Freedom," Vera Vanderland (English)

Additional Note

Second on this tape is a recording of unidentified voices in a Vietnamese conversation, followed by weird, electronicly-enhanced sounds of gunfire, bombs, and people screaming. General Lansdale has entitled this "JUSPAO Weird Sounds." ("JUSPAO" stands for "Joint U.S. Public Affairs Office," Saigon.)
Next is an unidentified voice saying, "Hi there. Upcoming is a tape; it is a general ________ [Vietnamese word] appeal in Southern Vietnamese dialect. In ten seconds the message will begin." This is followed by music, a woman's voice, and then more music. The entire seguence is repeated, this time "in the Central Vietnamese dialect." Then a voice says, "Hi there. We've got an upcoming tape; it is a warning to the Viet Cong that they will soon be bombed by aircraft, in the Southern Vietnamese dialect. In ten seconds the message will begin." This is followed by music, the message, and more music.
Fourth on this tape is unidentified sounds, and conversation which can't be heard. The only sentence sufficiently amplified is, "That was a good one." The sounds might be highly amplified eating noises. General Lansdale has entitled this section of the tape, "Joe Redick eats pi~ons."
tape 87

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Access Information

Use copy reference number: 80116_a_0000214_a01

Additional Note

This is a recording of Viet Cong music. A list of the songs (in French) accompanies this tape; this list, and an English translation, is included in Appendix F.
Tapes 88-97

Sound Recordings of Music By American Servicemen.

Scope and Content Note

These are tapes of music written and performed by individuals and groups who had served (or were at the time serving) in Vietnam. Towards the end of the war Lansdale added these songs to his collection, spending several years collecting them from veterans and friends. Many of the songs were virtually unknown in the United States. The tapes were put together by Hank Miller, who had been in the SLO with Lansdale and later became an official with the Voice of America. The original tapes are at the Library of Congress.
tape 88

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

This is entitled "Songs Of War," a CBS News-Saigon radio program. Ike Pappas (sp?) is the commentator. He reports that the war in Vietnam was the "singingest war of them all," and plays a number of popular and representative songs written by servicemen in Vietnam.
 

1. "Calling On The Kaiser," Harry Langdon (English)

 

2. "Good Morning Major," Lt. Mike Stagg (English)

 

3. "Army Aviation" (English)

 

4. "Jolly Green" (English)

 

5. "Ballad Of USS St. Francis River" (English)

 

6. "Battle For Ia Drang Valley" (English)

 

7. "Paper Soldier" (English)

 

8. "Tuyen" (English)

 

9. "Picture Of A Man," Hershel Gober (English)

 

10. "All My Trials" (English)

tape 89

Sound Recording of Air Force songs n.d.

Additional Note

This is a recording of Air Force songs by amateur composers, from World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. After the music there is one very obscene "interview" of a fighter pilot, by a "civilian correspondent." The pilot gives profane answers to a series of questions, then a "wing information officer" rephrases these answers. This is a satire of the way news of the war was reported.
Finally, there is a recording of communications among fighter pilots on a mission against Viet Cong MIG-21s.
tape 90

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

This tape is a recording of "Vietnam Fighter Pilot Songs." It is designated "from Morgan Smith."
 

1. "F-105" (English)

 

2. "Salute To The Eighth Tactical" (English)

 

3. "My Daddy" (English)

tape 91

Sound Recording - Vietnam/Korea

Additional Note

This tape is entitled "Morgan Smith--Korean and Vietnam Songs By Fighter Pilots." Many of the songs on this tape are identical to tape # 5.
 

1. "Oh Halleluja" (English)

 

2. "Never Mind" (English)

 

3. "Give Me Operations" (English)

 

4. "This Is Air Force 801" (English)

 

5. Song sung to the tune of "On Top Of Old Smokey" (English)

 

6. "The Army Air Force Heaven" (English)

 

7. "Bless Them All" (English)

 

8. Song sung to the tune of "The Battle Hymn Of The Republic" (English)

 

9. Song sung to the tune of "My Bonnie" (English)

 

10. "Barnacle Bill The Pilot" (English)

 

11. "There Are No Fighter Pilots Down In Hell" (English)

 

12. "I Wanted Wings Till I Got The God- Damned Things" (English)

 

13. "I'm A Lousy Co-Pilot And A Long Way From Home" (English)

 

14. "Cigarettes, And Sake, And Wild, Wild [Vietnamese word]" (English)

 

15. Song sung to the tune of "The Man Who Never Returned" (English)

 

16. "Army Makes The World Go 'Round" (English)

 

17. Pep talk from an officer

 

18. "I've Got Tales I Can Tell, Oh Lord" (English)

 

19. Talk about the Wolf Pack battalion-- the singer is reminiscing

 

20. "Robin O." (English)

 

21. "The Town On The Banks Of The River" (English)

 

22. "I'm A Son Of Satan's Angels" (English)

 

23. "I'm A Thud Pilot" (English)

 

24. "I Am A Yankee Air Pilot" (English)

 

25. "Will The Sun Rise Tomorrow" (English)

 

26. "Banana Valley" (English)

 

27. "The Phantom And The MIG-21" (English)

 

28. "Merry Christmas" (English)

 

29. "The Red River Rats" (English)

Additional Note

The sound ends in the middle of the last song. Side two is blank.
tape 92

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

This is a tape of the "Merrymen," a singing group of men from the 173rd assault helicopter company. The copy is not good.
 

1. "Hi Johnny, Hi Johnny," Merrymen (English)

 

2. "Silver Wings," Merrymen (English)

 

3. "Sky King," Merrymen (English)

 

4. "Tuyen," Merrymen (English)

 

5. "Serviceman's Ode," Merrymen (English)

 

6. "Army Aviation," Merrymen (English)

 

7. "Black Iron Cross," Merrymen (English)

 

8. "You Are My Sunshine," Merrymen (English)

 

9. "Picadilly Square," Merrymen (English)

 

10. "Airsick Arvin," Merrymen (English)

 

11. "KUZZ Radio," Merrymen (English; an imaginary Arkansas country and western radio station. The songs are satirical and profane, as are the "commercials" and the "interview from Saigon in Vietnamese")

tape 93

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

This is another recording of the "Merrymen," labelled "part one."
 

1. "I May Not Have A Mansion," Merrymen (English)

 

2. "Green Back Dollar," Merrymen (English)

 

3. "All My Trials," Merrymen (English)

 

4. "Chilly Winds," Merrymen (English)

tape 94

Sound Recording - Vietnam

Additional Note

This is labelled "Merrymen, part two."
 

1. "Baby, The Rain Must Fall," Merrymen (English)

 

2. (no name), Merrymen (English)

 

3. "In That Ole Cotton Field Back Home," Merrymen (English)

 

4. "In The Land Of Odom," Merrymen (English)

 

5. "I'm On My Way," Merrymen (English)

 

6. "In The Early Morning Rain," Merrymen (English)

 

7. "You Are On My Mind," Merrymen (English)

 

8. "Kansas City," Merrymen (English)

 

9. "Frank And Jesse James," Merrymen (English)

tape 95

Sound Recording, undated

Additional Note

This tape is entitled "Dick Jonas." There is no date. It is a tape of Jonas's country and western music, along with a couple of the "Wolf Pack" numbers heard on an earlier tape (tape # 89).
 

1. "Angelina," Dick Jonas (English)

 

2. "Henry Jones," Dick Jonas (English)

 

3. Song about sharecropping, Dick Jonas (English)

 

4. "Seven Little Chartreuse Men," Dick Jonas (English)

 

5. "Sadie Belle," Dick Jonas (English)

 

6. "Seaboard Line," Dick Jonas (English)

 

7. "Loving Her Was Easier Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again," Dick Jonas (English)

 

8. "Houseboy For The Wolf Pack," Dick Jonas (English)

 

9. "There's A Fireball Down There On The Hillside," Dick Jonas (English)

 

10. "My Daddy Died On Normandy Sand," Dick Jonas (English)

 

11. Drum, Bass, and recitation about getting a jet ready to take servicemen home

 

12. "Like The Sea Meets The Shoreline," Dick Jonas (English)

 

13. Religious song, Dick Jonas (English)

tape 96

Sound Recording undated

Additional Note

This is a recording of Sgt. Barry Sadler (most famous for "The Ballad Of The Green Beret), singing twelve of his songs. The entire album is recorded twice on this tape. The second side of the tape is blank.
 

1. "The Ballad Of The Green Beret," Barry Sadler (English)

 

2. "I'm Going Home," Barry Sadler (English)

 

3. "Oh Lord, I'm Tired And Sad (Letter Postmarked Vietnam)," Barry Sadler (English)

 

4. "Badge Of Courage," Barry Sadler (English)

 

5. "City On Mekong Shore, Saigon," Barry Sadler (English)

 

6. "Nurses Of Vietnam," Barry Sadler (English)

 

7. "Watching The Rain Drops Fall," Barry Sadler (English)

 

8. "Gari-Trooper," Barry Sadler (English)

 

9. "Green Sod O'er Me," Barry Sadler (English)

 

10. "Come All Ye Maidens (I Must Go Where Brave Men Die)," Barry Sadler (English)

 

11. "Ban Moui Ba," Barry Sadler (English)

 

12. "I'm Going Home," Barry Sadler (English)

tape 97

Sound Recording undated

Additional Note

This is entitled "Vietnam: Songs Of The Grunt." All songs were written and performed by Bill Ellis (@ DeGar Music, ASCAP).
 

1. "Grunt," Bill Ellis (English)

 

2. "Firefight," Bill Ellis (English)

 

3. "Song Of The First Cavalry," Bill Ellis (English)

 

4. "Freedom Bird," Bill Ellis (English)

Tapes 98-108

Tapes From The Philippines.

Scope and Content Note

This is an assortment of tapes from General Lansdale's years in the Philippines, including a recording of a party given for him before he left (98-99), recordings of Philippine music, and two recordings of the music used by Magsaysay in his campaign for the presidency (104 and 107).
tape 98

Sound Recording - Phil., 1/17/54

Additional Note

This is a "Despidida for Colonel Lansdale." A group of General (then Colonel) Lansdale's friends gathered at the Manila Overseas Press Club, to have a party and say goodbye to him as he was about to leave for other missions. The Mayor of Manilla, Arsenio Laoson, speaks at the beginning of the tape. Ramon Magsaysay (just inaugurated as President of the Philippines) was also present. This recording is continued on tape # 99.
This "Despidida" is recorded on track two only. Track one is a program entitled "Christmas With The Children Of New York City."
tape 99

Sound Recording - Phil., 1/17/54

Additional Note

This is a continuation from tape # 98. Arsenio Laoson is speaking. Then Colonel Lansdale speaks, very briefly, and says thanks. A friend by the name of Theo Rogers also speaks, twice on this tape--he seems to be having an especially good time. The whole crowd sings "For He's A Jolly Good Fellow." At the end of the tape a voice comes on and lists some "notables" of the 500 people who attended General Lansdale's "Despidida."
General Lansdale recalls that the Evening News ran a spoof edition for the affair, with the banner headlines warning the Pentagon that Lansdale was on his way home.
After the Despidida there remains a portion of the program which was recorded on the tape before it was used for the Despidida.
tape 100

Sound Recording - Philippines

Additional Note

This is a recording of Philippine folk songs and dances. All of the music is instrumental. Although there is a list of song titles on the back of the tape box, it is unclear whether or not this is accurate. There is a loose sheet of paper in the box which lists a different set of songs.
tape 101

Sound Recording - Philippines

Additional Note

This is more music like that on tape # 100. Again, there is a list of the song titles, which may or may not be accurate.
tape 102

Sound Recording - Philippines

Additional Note

This tape is entitled "Pilita--Philippine love songs, arranged and conducted by D'Amarillo, vocal supervision by Philip Maninang."
 

1. "Dahil Sa Iyo"

 

2. "Kay Hirap Ng Unibig"

 

3. "Carinosa"

 

4. "Lahat Ng Araw"

 

5. "Hinahanap Kita"

 

6. "Sapagka't Kamil'y Tao Lamang"

 

7. "Kapantay Ay Langit"

 

8. "Irog, Ako Ay Mahalin"

 

9. "Rosas Pandan"

 

10. "Lahat Ng Oras"

 

11. "Sapagka't Ikaw Ay Akin"

 

12. "Lihim Na Damdamin"

tape 103

Sound Recording - Philippines

Additional Note

This tape contains more Philippine folk songs, like those on tapes # 100 and 101.
tape 104

Sound Recording - Philippines

Additional Note

This is "Old Philippine records--Includes Magsaysay Mambo." The first two songs are the Mambo and "Magsaysay March," both of which were political jingles in the Philippines during Magsaysay's election campaign. The songs are in English and Tagalog. The rest of the tape contains more Philippine folk songs including some choral music.
tape 105

Sound Recording - Philippines

Additional Note

This tape contains more Philippine folk music, like tapes # 100, 101, and 103.
tape 106

Sound Recording - Philippines

Additional Note

This tape is entitled "Harana Ni Ruben Tagalog." It is a recording of a male singer, performing what sounds like Philippine popular music.
tape 107

Sound Recording - Philippines

Additional Note

This tape is a letter from General Lansdale to his wife, Helen. It was recorded in 1951, and a copy was made in 1953. General Lansdale and his friends sing and give personal news. After the letter, General Lansdale has recorded two Philippine campaign songs: "Magsaysay Mambo," and "Magsaysay March," both in support of Magsaysay. The songs are sung both in English and in Tagalog.
tape 108

Sound Recording - Phil., 9/74

Additional Note

This is a tape of the "Madrigal singers of the University of the Philippines at the Magsaysay Awards." Eight songs are sung; all except for the first one are in Tagalog.
Tapes 109-115

Sound Recordings of Miscellaneous Music

Scope and Content Note

This group includes tapes of the U.S. Army Band (109-110), "Spanish-Latin music" (111-114), and the Mexican Navy Quintet (115).
tape 109

Sound Recording - U.S.A.

Additional Note

This is a recording of the U.S. Army Band, W. O. Kinney, conductor. This tape is labelled "part one." There are nine songs recorded; titles are not provided. This recording is continued on tape # 110.
tape 110

Sound Recording - U.S.A.

Additional Note

This is a continuation from tape # 109: U.S. Army Band, part two. Five songs are recorded; the fourth is an instrumental version of "Vietnam, Vietnam," by General Lansdale's friend, the Vietnamese songwriter Pham Duy.
tape 111

Sound Recording undated

Additional Note

Spanish-Latin music.
Tapes # 111-114 are all "Spanish-Latin music" recordings. They appear to be recordings of music from various Latin American countries. It cannot be determined where the tapes were made; but the first one (# 111) has "April 11, 1963" printed on it.
This tape is entitled "Concierta en la Llanura--musica tipica Venezoland. Los Torrealberos Al Arpa: Juan Vicente Torrealba."
tape 112

Sound Recording undated

Additional Note

Spanish-Latin music
tape 113

Sound Recording undated

Additional Note

Spanish-Latin music
tape 114

Sound Recording undated

Additional Note

Spanish-Latin music
This tape also has the following printed on it: "Music of Bolivia, # 1-12; Music of Paraguay, # 1-12; Music of Guatemala, # 1-6."
tape 115

Sound Recording - U.S.A., 6/10/63

Additional Note

This is a recording of the Mexican Navy Quintet--the "Conjunto de Cuerdas." The group performs eight numbers while on a tour of the United States. (see also Lansdale papers, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE, subject file, Mexican Navy Quintet)
Tapes 116-117

Sound Recordings of Combat

Scope and Content Note

The first of these tapes was recorded during an incident in Saigon near the "Brinks," the principal U.S. officers' compound. The second is a recording of a radio operator attemting to direct some units during the Tet offensive.
tape 116

Sound Recording - Vietnam/Korea

Additional Note

This tape begins with a Voice of America correspondent in Korea (Robert Lasher) broadcasting a special report on parachute jumps. Next on the tape is a recording of the famous Bill Cosby routines, "Noah" and "A Flip Of The Coin."
Third on this tape is a recording of an incident on May 10th of an unspecified year. The tape was made by a correspondent who was staying at the Caravelle Hotel in Saigon. Hearing gunshots in the street, the correspondent had rushed out to see what was going on and to record the incident. Across the street from the hotel was "the Brinks," a U.S. officer's compound which had been bombed once by the Viet Cong. It had been rumored that the Viet Cong were about to attack again, and on this particular morning the police and others thought they saw a Viet Cong squad in a car trying to crash into the entrance of the Brinks. The police opened fire in the midst of the morning rush hour. There is the sound of explosions and weapons, and a description by the correspondent of the action taking place. Later, the wounded are carried away and pass near the microphone. The voices of those hurt and the medics caring for them are heard. This incident turned out to be a false alarm: there were no Viet Cong.
tape 117

Sound Recording - Vietnam, 1/1/68

Additional Note

This is a tape recorded in Saigon during the Tet offensive. The recording begins at 0440 (4:40 a.m.). It was taped by Admiral Veth, who turned on his recorder while listening to the "net" for the troops protecting the U.S. Embassy from the Viet Cong who had attacked. One individual on the tape provides communication among several different units. He attempts to guide a truck trying to bring in ammunition, he directs a helicopter which is dropping flares, and tries to get an ambulance to the wounded. The recording is on both sides of this tape. A partial transcript accompanies this tape and is included in Appendix G.
Tapes 118-126

Sound Recordings of Speeches, Seminars, Panels, And Interviews

Scope and Content Note

These tapes include speeches by General Lansdale, panels and seminars in which he participated, and classes he taught. There are also some recordings of speeches by others who mention General Lansdale and his work.
tape 118

Sound Recording - U.S.A.

Additional Note

This is a recording of a speech by General Lansdale, entitled "The Communist Way."
tape 119

Sound Recording - U.S.A.

Additional Note

This is a tape of a radio program in which General Lansdale took part. The program is entitled, "this Shrinking World," and it is a series of editorials based on American foreign aid and the mutual security program. this series is (or was) broadcast by an NBC affiliate, WRC (location unknown). This particular segment of "This Shrinking World" takes the form of a panel discussion with former American Ambassador to Turkey George McGee, now a member of the Draper Committee; the Financial Minister from the British Embassy; and Assistant to the Secretary of Defense Colonel Edward Lansdale. There are two journalist/ commentators.
The discussion begins with a comparison of British and American foreign aid to poorer countries. Each commentator seems anxious to establish which nation, the U.S. or Great Britain, gives more aid. The type of aid given to the various recipients is discussed, and it is agreed that it is futile to give economic aid without also giving military aid (for security). The type of aid given by the U.S.S.R. is discussed, and it is agreed that the Soviets give aid in order to dominate. Soviet "economic warfare" is mentioned and discussed. The panel also talks about the attitudes of the people of the nations giving aid, and those of the people receiving the aid.
tape 120

Sound Recording - Phil., 1954

Additional Note

This is a recording of a talk given by Lansdale to a military audience in the Philippines. His subject is the war in Indochina. Lansdale hopes to interest his audience in this topic because of the proximity of Vietnam to the Philippines. He begins with a history of Vietnam, from the colonial period on, to explain why and how the French come to be involved in this war. He discusses Ho Chi Minh, and describes him as a "professional revolutionary" educated, in part, in Moscow. He emphasizes that many "regular" (governmental) armed forces in Vietnam have voluntarily joined the French against Ho Chi Minh's forces. He finally points out that the Viet Minh are advised by at least 2,000 Chinese Communists, and draws an analogy with the Japanese invasion during World War Two: first Vietnam, then Thailand, Burma, Malaya, Indonesia, and finally the Philippines fell to foreign domination. After General Lansdale's talk there are questions and comments from the audience.
tape 121

Sound Recording - U.S.A., 6/59

Additional Note

This is a tape of a portion of the 12th annual conference of the Military Government Association, held in Washington, D.C.. A speaker calls the meeting to order, and introduces the chairman of the first panel, the topic of which is, "International Military and Political Affairs." the chairman, who is a past president of the Association, is Brig. General Strom Thurmond. Thurmond introduces each panel member as they present their talks. Below is a list, and a synopsis of what each has to say.
The Honorable John Erwin II, Assistant Secretary of Defense, was supposed to have given a talk but was unable to attend. His deputy, Robert H. Knight, took Erwin's place. Knight reviews the strength of the military of Communist states, and the uses to which the military is put. According to Knight, the Communists use their military to control others, to supply arms to small countries, to take over small countries, and to provide self-defense, in the event of war (including an accidental war). Knight also reviews the strength of the U.S. and other free-world military forces.
Brig. General Millard C. Young, Air Force, from the Office of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, covers the topic of personnel and planning for cold war activities. Before he begins he mentions that he feels "timid before such outstanding company as General Lansdale." He discusses the "state" of cold war, and the psychological preparedness of the Communists. He argues that Americans, military and non-military, must "put on our cold war glasses" to see reality, and we must "keep them on all the time." He further argues that to sucessfully combat Communist proganda against us (which makes us unpopular in the countries we are trying to help), we must send to trouble spots people who know the language and the customs of the host population.
The Honorable Robert D. Murphy, Undersecretary of State, is given the topic of the "international political situation." He decides to discuss the Berlin situation, "as it relates to the present talks going on in Geneva." Murphy outlines the plan offered by the U.S., which includes reunification of Berlin as the prospective capital of a reunited Germany; free elections; agreed-upon reduction of forces (by all four powers) in both Germanys; measures to prevent Germany from becoming aggressive; and a democratic government for the reunited Germany.
Colonel Edward Lansdale, Deputy Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Special Operations, speaks on "cold war and civil affairs." General Lansdale touches on the basic differences between Communist thought and American thought; and he discusses "the little people" who must deal with Communists in their own country. He outlines the reaction on the people of the Philippines to the Communist Huks, and the difference in morale made by the institution of free elections. He concludes by stressing that the U.S. must hold fast in the fight for freedom, because it is our bond with "men of good will, everywhere."
Richard M. Helms covers the fifth topic, "Soviet military occupation." Helms is the Assistant Director of the CIA. His talk is a review of history, concentrating on the way the U.S.S.R. tried to rule (and usually succeeded) in four contries: Austria, East Germany, Poland, and Hungary. He discusses the way the people of these countries resisted Soviet repression of their freedoms (of press, speech, and assembly). He then describes how the Soviets were able, more often than not, to crush any resistance.
tape 122

Sound Recording - U.S.A. 9/25/66

Additional Note

This is a recording of the dedication ceremonies for the Freedom Studies Center of the Institute for American Strategy at Boston, Virginia. The U.S. Navy Band plays, and a number of people speak. Below is a list of the speakers, each of whom was limited to two minutes. The Center is dedicated to studying Communist cold-war tactics and to protecting the American process of government and the American way of life. It is a school of "psycho-political warfare" which is funded privately and administered by the Institute for American Strategy. One of the speakers, Adm. Felix B. Stump (Navy, ret.), mentions that General Lansdale will be the administrative director of the Center. Below is a list of speakers.
Sen. Harry Flood Byrd, Jr. (D-Va) John O. Marsh, Jr., Virginia congressman John M. Fisher, President of Insitute Dr. James D. Atkinson, Georgetown Univ. Alan G. Grant, originator of the academy Dr. Walter H. Judd, Board of Directors Sen. Thomas Dodd (R-Ct), Board of Directors Adm. Burke, Georgetown Univ. Kenneth D. Wells, Jr., Freedom Foundation Dr. L.E. Dubrionski, Captive Nations Comm. John W. Piercy, State Dept. Lt. Gen. J.L. Stockmorton, Army Rear Adm. James F. Calbert, Navy Lt. Gen. Jack G. Merrill, Air Force Brig. Gen. Earl E. Anderson, Marine Corps Adm. Felix Stump, Navy, retired William C. Darby, Institute for Free Labor Andrew A. Pettis, AFL-CIO John C. Frame, Mutual Broadcasting Co. Chauncy Facell, Florida representative Dr. Woodrow W. Wilkinson, Va. school system Nat. Commander John E. Davis, Amer. Legion
tape 123

Sound Recording - U.S.A., 1/16/70

Additional Note

COIN course lecture. This lecture was the final class of a course preparing students to handle matters of "insurgency and counterinsurgency." some of the students were evidently bound for Vietnam. The speaker is Dr. Walter H. Judd, an expert on U.S. foreign policy who served in Congress for Minnesota's 5th District, and also acted as a delegate to the World Health Association of the U.N.. Dr. Judd lived in Mainland China for ten years as a medical missionary, under Communist rule.
The theme of Dr. Judd's lecture is that Communism is an international, not a national movement. "There is on this planet an organized, world-wide movement with the avowed objective and the unwavering will and the steadily-increasing capability to impose its rule on the rest of the world, including the United States." He scorns those who believe that Communism is "mellowing" or "maturing." He gives many examples of ways that the U.S.S.R. could lesson world tensions, but it does not do any of these things. Judd argues that the disagreement between the Chinese and Soviet Communists is a struggle within the Party, not between two parties. He emphasizes that it is important to recognize these facts about the Communists, if we are to defeat them. He further argues that individual Communist leaders, such as Ho Chi Minh, are not dedicated to the well-being of their own people but rather to the international movement. The war in Vietnam is not, then, simply a civil war and not a war of liberation. According to Judd, the U.S.S.R. wishes to embarrass the U.S. in Vietnam. Because Communist leaders view international Communism as an inevitability, and as the only way to achieve world peace, the U.S. is seen as an obstacle. Communist leaders use war, diplomacy, and tricks (Judd gives examples of each of these) to advance their cause. The U.S. should not expect the Communist leaders to grant concessions, Judd says, or to meet it halfway; and the U.S. should not be surprised when the Communists act with treachery. The Communists see themselves as engaged in total war. Judd concludes that the U.S. must learn to engage in total war--economic, social, educative, atheletic, artistic, etc.--if it is to successfully deal with them. Eventually, Judd says, the U.S. can out-last the Communists. The Communist movement will die out because of internal contradictions and because of the cruelty of its system of government.
tape 124

Sound Recording - U.S.A., 10/8/71

Access Information

Use copy reference number: 80116_a_0000247_a01

Additional Note

This is a recording of an informal interview of General Lansdale by a person--probably a journalist--whose name is not given. The interviewer is gathering information about the Vietnam War. At the start, however, the two men talk about a special program that NBC wants to air based on the Pentagon Papers. NBC wants to interview General Lansdale, which he agrees to do if NBC will, in turn, make some copies of some of Lansdale's tapes. The tapes he needs evidently include some of Pham Duy's music, and General Lansdale hopes that the producer will be interested in it.
Pham Duy "just showed up here in the U.S." with a group of classical musicians. He will be taping music at the University of Southern Illinois (at Carbondale), which has a Center for Vietnamese Studies (a Mr. H.B. Jacobini is Pham Duy's contact there).
Next the book General Lansdale has written is mentioned. It is to be released in February of 1972. Mme. Nhu has also written a book, and the two men discuss Mme. Nhu for a few minutes.
The interviewer says that he has done some reading since the last time he and General Lansdale talked, and he has some questions. The first topic he brings up is the concept of "personalism," which is a concept, philosophy, or technique which was related to politics (of the Diem regime) in South Vietnam. The two discuss Diem and his relationship to the people of Vietnam, and Diem's use of radio to provide information to the people. Lansdale discusses personalism and individuals from Vietnam's past. He also brings up Communist organizational techniques, which were adopted (in part) by other parties and even by the Saigon government.
The two then talk about Vietnam under French rule, and the difficulties the people in public office had in getting along with the citizens of Vietnam. The public officials were perhaps too anxious to use their authority, because they had had none before (like the newly-arrived Irish immigrants to the U.S., who became policemen).
General Lansdale then talks about Confucianism, and its strong influence in Vietnam. the interviewer asks a question about what he thinks might be an "Oriental custom"--bringing in a third party, if negotiations between two people break down. General Lansdale points out that this is not a custom particular to the Vietnamese, and says that Americans newly-arrived in Vietnam often find the culture so exotic that they don't think of the Vietnamese as humans who are more like than unlike other people.
General Lansdale talks about the strategic hamlet program in Vietnam and in the Philippines.
The interviewer brings up a new subject--what is referred to in the Pentagon Papers as "grey broadcasts." These are evidently broadcasts by clandestine radio stations. General Lansdale doesn't recall anything about this.
General Lansdale discusses "rumor campaigns" which are used to alert the people to Communist atrocities.
SIDE TWO

General Lansdale mentions the complicated U.S. bureaucracy which was quickly set up in Vietnam, and the tendency of officials to appoint committees to deal with ideas, thus burying them.
Finally, the two talk again about Pham Duy. He will be joined at Southern Illinois by Steve Addis.
tape 125

Sound Recording - U.S.A.

Additional Note

This is a recording of a seminar led, evidently, by General Lansdale. No date is given. A guest speaker, Colonel Yehuda Prihar of Israel, is featured during the particular session recorded here. Col. Prihar fought during World War II with the British, and then faught in Israel's war of independence. After independence, Prihar became experienced in resisting infiltration. His talk to General Lansdale's class is on "anti-infiltration warfare."
Prihar discusses the early days in Israel--the importance to the displaced people of Europe to have land of their own to farm. Then he describes the problem of guerrilla infiltrators crossing the borders into Israel, and terrorizing the population while gathering intelligence. Israel, therefore, devised a system of border settlements, populated by farmer-soldiers. The settlements, with their ponds and their groves of trees, block the pathways into Israel. Three "layers" of settlements are set up--the Kibbutz, which is the strongest type of village, the cooperative, and the traditional farming community. The young people of Israel, all of whom go through military training, are educated (Prihar says "indoctrinated") to go, if they desire, to set up a new settlement. There is cooperation among villages in case of an encounter with military forces of the enemy, and each settlement is equipped to defend itself. There is a military officer of the Israeli army for each set (or sector) of settlements. Prihar details certain tactics the settlers might use. He then describes how such infiltration-resistant settlements might be set up in other countries trying to resist enemy guerrillas.
tape 126

Sound Recording, undated

Additional Note

This is a recording of an undated "AWA" editorial. The speaker is not identified. He argues that the United States cannot win the war in Vietnam, and that it cannot pursuade Ho Chi Minh to negotiate a peace. He maintains that it is hopeless to continue, despite the technology of weapondry which the U.S. has employed against the Viet Cong, because (1) the Viet Cong have faught the Japanese, the French, and now the Americans and are willing to continue fighting; (2) the Viet Cong are capable of increasing troops and arms to meet U.S. increases; (3) the U.S. cannot compete with "Oriental patience and disregard for human life"; (4) the U.S.S.R. is determined to provide arms for the Viet Cong in order to keep the U.S. mired in this conflict; and (5) Ho Chi Minh is determined to win, even if he must retreat to the jungle and wage a guerrilla war. The speaker then argues that Vietnam is unlike other wars: the United States has used more fire power than it used in World War II, and "we have assembled the most formidable fighting machine in the world," but "it has not been equal to half-naked natives, and our wisdom unequal to bridging the huge gulf separating the cultures of East and West." The only "road out of the wilderness," he feels, is turning civil and military responsi-bilities over to the Vietnamese. He concludes that it is paternalistic to claim that the Vietnamese are not ready for this responsibility. The U.S. cannot govern Vietnam because it clearly does not understand the people and culture. A few brilliant men--"such as General Edward Lansdale"--understand the politics, but most U.S. leaders do not.
Tapes 127-134

Increment - Sound Recordings

Scope and Content Note

Tapes formerly stored in vault.
tape 127

Sound Recording - U.S.A., n.d.

Additional Note

De Calula, subversive warfare speech.
tape 128

Sound Recording - U.S.A., n.d.

Additional Note

Lansdale, counterinsurgency speech.
tape 129-130

Sound Recordings - U.S.A., 12/3/58

Additional Note

Lansdale, "Limited War--Southeast Asia," speech, National War College.
tape 131

Sound Recording - U.S.A., 7/3/62

Additional Note

Lansdale, speech, Foreign Service Institute.
tape 132-133

Sound Recordings - U.S.A., 1/28/70

Additional Note

Music, Dolf Droge.
tape 134

Sound Recording, 1/27/70

Additional Note

Music, Middle Eastern.
 

Appendix

 

Appendix A Transcript for tape # 4-6

 

Appendix B Transcript for tapes # 30-31

 

Appendix C Partial transcript for tape # 60

 

Appendix D Transcript for tape # 61

 

Appendix E Partial transcript for tapes # 71-78

 

Appendix F Song titles for tape # 87

 

Appendix G Partial transcript for tape # 117

 

Appendices To Register.

Scope and Content Note

There are seven appendices, including transcripts and translations of certain tapes.
2 of 2 pages
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