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Guide to the Herbert C. (Herbert Coffin) Jones Papers, 1903-1954
Special Collections M0099  
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Collection Details
 
Table of contents What's This?
  • Descriptive Summary
  • Administrative Information
  • Biographical Note
  • Guide the Correspondence and Reference Materials
  • Subject Index to H.C. Jones Reference Material

  • Descriptive Summary

    Title: Herbert C. (Herbert Coffin) Jones Papers,
    Date (inclusive): 1903-1954
    Collection number: Special Collections M0099
    Creator: Jones, Herbert C. (Herbert Coffin), b1881?
    Repository: Stanford University. Libraries. Dept. of Special Collections and University Archives.
    Language: English.

    Administrative Information

    Access Restrictions

    None.

    Publication Rights

    Property rights reside with the repository. Literary rights reside with the creators of the documents or their heirs. To obtain permission to publish or reproduce, please contact the Public Services Librarian of the Dept. of Special Collections.

    Provenance

    Gift of Herbert C. Jones, 1954.

    Preferred Citation:

    [Identification of item] Herbert C. (Herbert Coffin) Jones Papers, M0099, Dept. of Special Collections, Stanford University Libraries, Stanford, Calif.

    Biographical Note

    Herbert C. Jones was born in Oskaloosa, Iowa, where his father taught in Penn College. He received his grammar school and high school education in San Jose, California, and his university training at Stanford University, where he completed his bachelor's degree in 1902. In 1904 he graduated from the Stanford school of Law. After graduation, Mr. Jones spent a short period in the County Clerk's Office, Santa Clara County, then began to practice law in San Jose where he since has maintained law offices. Mr. Jones took a leading part in the civic and community affairs of San Jose and Santa Clara County and manifested an interest, as well, in state and national political events. On January 2, 1913 he was elected to the California State Senate, in the first recall election of a state legislative official in California. Senator Jones served as State Senator for twenty-two years, 1913 through 1934. The Jones Papers include material from 1912 to 1954, however, because Mr. Jones continued to follow closely state political activity after his term of official service.
    Mr. Jones gave his papers to the Stanford Libraries' California Collection in 1955, for the interest and use of students of California history and politics in the twentieth century.
    The papers were catalogued during the summers, 1956-and 1957, by a graduate student (Donna Keyes) in the Stanford Department of History.

    Scope and Content Note

    Note

    R
    I. Quantity, Scope, and Nature of the Collection.
    The Collection consists of:
    1. CORRESPONDENCE. Letters to and from Senator Jones. Correspondence with individuals, groups, organizations, companies, fellow legislators, etc., pertaining principally to past, current, or future legislation in the years 1912 through 1954. Also there are letters such as those from applicants for appointive positions in State committees or apencies, and letters of congratulation to Senator Jones upon his re-election to Legislature, or letters of appreciation for his work in defeating or promoting a given legislative measure. All Correspondence is filed in chronological order.
    2. REFERENCE MATERIAL. Legislation, copies of Senate and assembly Bills and Constitutional Amendments, material relating to Bills, explaining or justifying them; Newspaper clippings and magazine articles pertaining to specific legislative measures; proceedings, hearings, reports, etc. of Senate and/or Assembly permmanent or temporary committees. Reference Material is filed chronologically and within this division, alphabetically according to topic,
    3. HANDBOOKS for Legislature. Sessions: 1903, 1911, 1913, 1915, 1917, 1919, 1921, 1923, 1925, 1927, 1929, 1933, 1935, 1937, 1939, 1941. The Handbooks for each legislative session are useful guides in discovering on which Senate Committees Mr. Jones served as Chairman or was member.
    4. BOOKS. All books in the Jones Collection are listed in the Bibliography Card File.
    5. PAMPHLETS, PERIODICALS, GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS, and other material of this nature are arranged chronologically from 1903 through 1953 in the Pamphlet Boxes, nos. 1 through 45. Pamphlet Box no. 46 is a collection of Directories of State and County Officials of California, from 1925 through 1937.
    6. BIBLIOGRAPHY CARD FILE. A list of all Books, Pamphlets, Periodicals, Government Publications (State and Federal), etc. in the Collection that are not filed in folders along with the Correspondence and Reference Materials. The cards are arranged 1) Chronologically 1903 through 1953; and 2) Alphabetically by title or author of each publication, within the years.
    7. NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS. Individual Newspaper Clippings which have been preserved because they pertain to a given legislative matters, are filed in the Correspondence or the Reference Material files, in some cases alphabetically according to topic of the clipping and in other cases attached to letters as enclosures. Newspaper Clippings which report on an entire Legislative Session during a given year are arranged in the eight Leather-Bound Scrapbooks in the Collection. (see page 3 of this Guide) Newspaper Clippings which could not be identified by topic, date or source are placed in the four Brown Paper Folios in the Collection (see page 3 of this Guide).
    8. PHOTOGRAPH of John Randolph Heynes, friend of Mr. Franklin Hichborn and of Mr. Jones.

    List of Newspaper clippings in leather-backed scrapbook

    1. Bills, (copies of) Introduced by Senator H.C. Jones, Legislative Session, 1921.
    2. Newspaper Clippings on topics and action of Legislature, 1923, book no. 1
    3. Newspaper Clippings on topics and action of Legislature, 1923, book no. 2
    4. Newspaper Clippings on Legislature, 1925
    5. Jones, H.C. Political Campaign for Senatorship, 1926. 28th Senatorial District. Newspaper Clippings, several letters.
    6. Newspaper Clippings on topics and action of Legislature, 1931. Clippings from San Francisco Chronicle, S.F. Examiner, and The Sacramento Bee.
    7. Newspaper Clippings on Legislature, 1933.
    8. Senate Investigating Committee. Newspaper Clippings of progress of the Investigation of the Rolph Administration, 1933.

    List of Newspaper Clippings in Brown Paper Folios

    1. Newspaper Clippings, pamphlets, etc. For 1914, 1915, 1916. 1917, 1918.
    2. Newspaper Clippings on Legislation, 1921 Session. King Tax Bill, etc.
    3. Newspaper Clippings from The Sacramento Bee, 1929 and Miscellaneous Clippings, 1931.
    4. Newspaper Article and Clippings, Miscellaneous, Business notes of Senator Jones.
    I I. The Nature of the Collection:
    Mr. Jones himself speaks for the nature of the collection in excerpts From two letters.
    Excerpt from a letter from Mr. Jones, San Jose, January 4, 1956, to Mr. J. Terry Bender, Chief, Division of Special Collections, Stanford Libraries, Stanford University:
    The period covered by my own collection deals with numerous phases of the political and economic life of California over a quarter of a century.
    1. The complete circle traveled by the Prohibition or liquor control movement, beginning with the regulation of such matters as the hours of liquor sale, proximit to universities and schools, then on to the local option movements in cities, supervisorial districts and counties, and then to state regulation and on to national prohibition, then the repeal of national prohibition and back to the starting point.
    2. The slow and steady increase in the political influence of organized labor.
    3. The development of flood control, including the levees along the Sacramento, the bitter struggle between the Sutter Basin, leveeing the waters from its area, only to force higher levels on orchards and farm areas around Marysville, the dynamiting of such levees, and, in turn, the patrolling of them by men armed with rifles.
    4. The growth of the pension movement for teachers, municipal employees, old-age pensions.
    5. The insistence on increasing governmental regulation--inspection of foods, protection of drinking water, sanitation along our rivers and shore fronts, safety codes in building, fruit standardization, minimum prices, fair trade laws, etc.
    6. The converting of the old Railroad Commission into the Public Utilities Commission
    7. The regulating of banks, building and loan associations, insurance companies--how much for the protection of the public, and how much to stifle competition?
    8. The increase of State expenditure and State taxes--18,000,000 dollars for State expenses in Hiram Johnson's first administration and 1,081,000,000 under Governor Warren--why the increase out-runs population. The foregoing are but examples of the trends covered during my own period of service in the Legislature.
    Excerpt from letter from Mr. Jones to Dr. Edgar E. Robinson at Stanford University, dated: San Jose, California, March 23, 1956.
    The hope I had in mind in placing the material at Stanford was that it might be of assistance to students of California politics. I served under six governors, beginning with Hiram Johnson and extending down to Erank Merriam. This has been described as an explosive period in California politics. Certainly the Johnson campaign of 1910 and his administration ushered in a new era in California. The impact of his administration has been felt during the succeeding half century. His was the era when Theodore Roosevelt was President and we had a political up-surge that produced state governors like Charles Evans Hughes of New York, Robert LaFollette in Wisconsin, Woodrow Wilson in New Jersey, and Joe Folk in Missouri.
    Their reforms, attempted or accomplished, were numerous, and the shift in public opinion and the development of the social viewpoint as against the old Laissez-faire doctrine were fundamental and far reaching.
    There followed many problems with which the modern day students of history and government must be greatly interested. A few of these developments come readily to mind.
    First, there was the implementing of public expression through the new instruments of democracy:
    • The Initiative
    • The Referendum
    • The Recall
    • Women's Suffrage
    • Direct election of U.S. Senators
    • Regulation of expenditures in political campaigns and publicizing the same.
    These instruments for the expression of public opinion were used in dealing with Prohibition, the Red Light Abatement Act, and Race Track Gambling.
    There was then afforded a chance to see how they have worked out, some of the abuses and to what extent results have been disappointing. These are subjects of interest to students.
    Then in the field of taxation, there are such problems us:
    1. The mounting public debt
    2. Whether republics are able successfully to cope with these burdens.
    For example, in California, Hiram Johnson ran the entire state government during the first year of his administration for approximately 18,000,000 dollars. Governor Knight's budget today (1956) is 1,770,000, 000 dollars. If these figures are put on a chart, they are startling and show the mounting of State expenditure far exceeds the rate of population increase.
    There is the study of new and expanded State activities. During Hiram Johnson's time came the first State highway. At the session in which the first gasoline tax bill was introduced for one cent a gallon sach was the public outcry that no attempt was made even to bring the bill out of Committee. The next session came around and public opinion had so changed that a bill for two cents a gallon went sailing through the Legislature with scarcely a ripple of opposition.
    The whole program for State highways is a most interesting study--how little we realizer when the first bond issues for 18,000,000 and 15,000,000 dollars were approved, what the highway system was ultimately to become.
    Then there has been the development of the pensions--teacher's pensions, pensions for firemen, policemen, municipal and county employees, etc. The old-age pension, required many sessions of study and investigation before the Legislature dared to act. In later years there has been a scramble among Legislators to lead the fight for even higher old age allowances.
    In the field of regulation of utilities, the cry of the railroads was that the State keep its hands off. Their slogan was that country is best governed which is governed least, that the power to tax is the power to destroy. Then came the jitneys and motor vehicles carrying passengers and freight, and over-night there was a reversal in the traditional attitude of the railroads; they wanted their opponents taxed and regulated out of existence; it made a difference whose ox was gored.
    There is a vast field of public health legislation--the inspection of public food markets, restaurants, barber shops, slaughter houses; also State supervision of fresh water streams, and subsidies to County tuberculosis hospitals.
    Then followed the whole program for the supervision of adoptions, orphans' homes, rest homes.
    The licensing of doctors, lawyers, banks, building and loan associations, accountants, realtors and insurance companies, extended to contractors, beauty parlors--a vast field of regulation in which there is a question of whether the protection of the public is not mixed with a desire to restrict competition.
    Then there is the development of the fee system--the charging of tuition at Stanford (1 put through the bill for the Trustees legalizing this); charges for out-of-state students at the University of California; the entering wedge for tuition charges and the State University and State colleges; the attempt during the depression to impose a tuition system in high schools and to take the Budgetary control from school boards and place it with Boards of Supervisors.
    One of the biggest subjects of all is water.
    In the 1915 session I was made chairman of the Senate Committee on Drainage, Swamp and Overflowed Lands. This was because a Chairman was wanted who came from a part of the State not affected by the bitter controversy over the Sutter Basin development. The reclaiming of this ruly vast area area by levees was backing flood waters on the farms and orchards around Marysville. The dykes were dynamited by those whose lands were thus flooded. The Sutter Basin owners in turn patrolled the levees with armed guards. There was almost a state of civil war.
    The theory then was to get rid of surplus waters. They were looked upon as the common enemy. A long notch was cut in the east bank of the Sacramento River, known as the Tisdale Wier, through which the flood waters of the river flowed over into the Sutter Basin and moved slowly down to join the waters of the American River. Here another wier was cut, this time in the west bank of the Sacramento River, and the water allowed to flow as a vast inland sea down the Yolo Basin and on toward Suisun Bay. The theory was to rush the waters down to the Bay by fast express' rather than slow freight.
    Six years went by. Then came Colonel Marshall before the legislature in 1921 backed by the land owners of the Tulare region whose orchards were dying from lack of water. There followed the fascinating story of his plan for transporting the surplus waters of the Sacramento Valley to the deficient areas of the San Joaquin Valley in a giant east-side canal. The Legislature appropriated approximately 1,000,000 dollars over the next ten years to have the plan studied by the State Engineer. He made his Report in 1931. In 1933 we passed the Central Valley Act.
    It was I who, at the request of the State Grange and the League of Municipalities, put in the amendment in the Central Valley Act which provided for the construction by the State of the transmission line from Shasta to Antioch. This put the fight into the Central Act which caused the power companies to invoke the referendum. The measure, however, was sustained by the voters at the Special Election on December 19, 1933. In the midst of the depression of the `30's the State could not float bonds for 170,000,000 to build the project and so appealed to the Federal Government to take over. This it was placed in the hands of the U.S. Reclamation Bureau. The Bureau instead of transporting the water either through Marshall's proposed east-side canal, or the channel of the San Joaquin River by a series of booster dams, as recommended by the State Engineer, constructed its giant Delta-Mendota Canal running 120 miles along the west side of the San Joaquin Valley from Tracy to Mendota.
    The tremendous increase in the State's population today is centering a new attention to water. Involved are all the problems of State vs. Federal financing and operation, the controversy over the 160 acre limitation, and the effort by are s of dearth to modify the count of origin law.
    All this challenges the attention of the student of California history.
    Running through all these instances just cited, is the shifting in the public viewpoint from the old laissez-faire doctrine toward the theory of the Welfare State with ever increasing public expenditure and public debt--municipal, state, and federal.
    All these are problems which are pressing on our communities and states with increasing insistance. They naturally are questions in which the student of history and government in our universities must be profoundly interested if he would fit himself to plot the course of Society in the future.
    An important feature whould be the interpretation that those of us who are identified with Hiram Johnson and succeeding governors, such as Stephens and Young, could give in clarifying the material.
    There are many things that do not become clear unless accompanied by such personal interpretation. One example is why the candidacy of Stephen M. White for U.S. Senator and Judge McGuire for Governor ran hand in hand and were mutually supported until the very end of the campaign. Stephen M. White's support was withdrawn from McGuire. Franklin Hichborn furnishes the explanation for this.
    In the case of C.C. Young, there was the incident when he was hesitating to announce his candidacy for Governor, when Franklin Hichborn summoned Senator Inman down from Sacramento and myself up from San Jose. We went into a huddle with Young who still wanted a few days to make up his mind. The others of us told Young that he would have to announce that night or it would be too late; that the next day Mayor Cryer of los Angeles expected to make his announcement. We finally shoved Young over the brink and made him issue his announcement.
    The next morning Senator Inman and I called on Hiram Johnson. He scowled at us as we entered his office. His first words were, You have nominated Young, now elect him. Johnson's choice would have been Neumiller of Stockton.
    The difficulty in interpreting the collections of contemporary history is that unfortunately the men of that era are fast dropping from the scene. Mr. Hichborn is 87 years of age with health not too good. Senator Inman has passed away. My colleague and seatmate, Senator W.J. Carr of Pasadena, whom I visited last December, I found in bed and kept alive by an oxygen tank. Senator Frank Benson of Santa Clara County, one of the leaders in the Hiram Johnson administration, suffers from a stroke of paralysis that makes it difficult for him to get around.
    This invaluable aid in interpreting the documents and events of the Johnson era will shortly be gone.

    Guide the Correspondence and Reference Materials

    File Drawers no. 1 through 17: 1912 - 1954
    Organization of the Correspondence and Reference Material
    1. All Correspondence and Reference Material is arranged Chronologically From 1912 through 1954.
    2. All Correspondence and Reference Material is arranged Alphabetically within the Chronological divisions.
    3. From the beginning year of Senator Herbert C. Jones' term in the California legislature (1913) to 1925, Correspondence is filed alphabetically by name of the correspondence. For this period, 1913-1925, the Correspondence is filed according to name of the sender or recepient of the letters, regardless of the topic or subject matter of the letters. Pamphlets, Newspaper clippings, etc. that pertain to a given legislative topic are filed in folders identified as Reference Material. Example: 1917, Reference File. These Reference Material folders are place in the file drawers after the Correspondence folders for each of the years of Legislature from 1913 to 1925.
    4. Beginning with 1925, the material in the collection was more clearly arranged (upon receipt of the collection) according to subject matter. Therefore, most of the material from 1925 on could be filed alphabetically according to subject matter or topic, rather than by the name of the correspondent. Of course, not all of the material could be filed by subject matter. So it has been done in this manner: Whenever there was no evident subject or topic of a given letter, the letter was filed under the name of the correspondent. From 1925 on, there are for each legislative year three groups of folders:
      1. A group of folders of Correspondence filed according to the name of the person or group to whom Senator Jones wrote or from whom he received letters.
      2. A group of folders of Correspondence and Reference Materials, integrated, filed according to Subject Matter of the correspondence.
      3. A group of folders of Correspondence in which there are letters filed according to subject matter if such is evident, or by name of correspondent.
    Because the material in the collection after 1925 was more clearly arranged according to legislative or other topics of concern to Senator Jones, the bulk of the material from 1925 on has been filed topically, that is, by subject matter. This made unnecessary the earlier method of filing (1913-1925) some material (pamphlets, clippings, etc., relating to given legislative topics) in folders separate from Correspondence, known as Reference Files. Subsequent to 1925, these two groupings have been incorporated into one grouping of folders known as Legislative Correspondence, filed by Subject Matter. That is, Correspondence and reference material on Adoption or Initiative and Referendum, have been filed together. It was necessary, however, to continue filing; some letters by name of Correspondent rather than by subject matter. In many cases the letters do not pertain to a given legislative measure or topic and thus for each legislative year there is a group of folders of correspondnece arranged alphabetically according to the name of the correspondent. These are the letters referred to in 1) above, and are identified as: legislative Correspondence, files according name of correspondent.
    After-Session Correspondence. Correspondence (with some reference material) after the biennial legislative session closes (may-june). This division is the material referred to in section 3) above. The After-Session Correspondence usually dates from the close of a given legislative session to the opening of another. For example, this group of folders will contain correspondence From June 1920 through 1928, to the opening (January) session of legislature in 1981. However, correspondence dated 1928, which pertains specifically to a topic of legislation to be dealt with in the 1929, the coming session, will be filed with the correspondence of the 1929 session. That is, letters of the late months of 1928 that pertain to coming legislative business will be filed with the 1929 legislative folders, in the Legislative Correspondence filed by Subject Matter, 1929, if the topic of the letter can be ascertained; -- if the letter is about a general matter which does not become a principal topic of legislation in the 1929 session, it will remain grouped with the other 1928 letters in the 1927-1928 After-Session Correspondence file.
    In the 1918-1925 Folders, before the creation of a grouping known as After-Session Correspondence, the correspondence from non-legislature years is arranged thus:
    Since the California Legislature met biennially, the bulk of Senator Jones' correspondence falls under odd-numbered years. 1913, 1915, 1917, etc.; usually the correspondence in even-numbered years, 1916, 1918, 1920, etc., has been incorporated with Folders of correspondence dated in the odd-numbered, legislative session years.
    Example: Part of the correspondence dated 1916 is filed with the 1915 and part of it with the 1917 folders, depending upon the month in which a certain letter was written. Most even-numbered year correspondence in the collection pertains to legislative business of the previous or coming legislative session. Therefore, the first six months of correspondence dated 1916 will be found filed with the 1915 legislative correspondence folder. The correspondence dated in the last six months of 1916 is filed with the 1917 correspondnece folders.
    Example of the Division of the correspondnece from even-numbered non-legislative session years into the previous and subsequent odd-numbered legislative session, year's folders : In the 1915 Correspondence folders, the bulk of the letters are dated during the annual legislative session (January-June, 1915).
    In addition to these Letters, the 1915 folders contain letters dated in the last months of 1914 (usually July through December), and the letters dated in the first six months of 1916 (January through June). This arrangement of the material is followed from 1913-1925 material.
    After 1925, as has been explained, a group of folders identified as After-Session Correspondence, has been created to contain the correspondence of legislative years after the session closes (June thru December of the legislative year), and to contain the correspondence of the even-numbered year which follows a given legislative year. For example, the 1927 After-Session Correspondence folders will contain letters dated from June, 1927 through 1928, up to the opening of the 1929 Legislative Session in January, 1929.
    In a few non-legislative session years such as 1926 and 1932, Senator Jones did receive a greater quantity of correspondence on a given topic than in other even-numbered, non-legislative years. Therefore, in this case a group of folders for the Correspondence and Reference Materials for these even-numbered years has been arranged, separate from the usual incorporation of non-legislative years (correspondence in the folders for legislative years.
    Further Notes about the filing of the Correspondence:
    Enclosures (clippings, other letters, etc.) in letters sent to Senator Jones have been kept, in most cases, with the letter by the use of a folded yellow sheet. If the enclosures mentioned in certain letters to and from Mr. Jones are not with the letter, refer to the Reference File (1913-1925 material) of the year in which the letter was written, checking under the initial letter and/or title of the subject in question. Or the yellow sheet with a letter will where the original enclosure may be found. Example: If an enclosure on Education is mentioned in a letter to Senator Jones, and this enclosure is not attached to the letter, see the Reference File for the year, under E.
    As stated earlier, the material in the collection is filed first chronoligically. However, when material would seem to be more valuabe or meaningful if kept together in one folder rather than distributed in separate folders within various years, this material over different years (such as Consolidation, 1927-1934) is kept together in one folder, filed with folders in the latter year (1934). The cases in which material is kept together although it ranges over a period of years, are few; chronological organization of material has been maintained unless there were good reasons for exception.
    Letters which are not dated at all, or are of uncertain dates, are kept with the correspondence of the year with which they were originally received; for filing they are placed at the front of a given folder (for example: with A if the correspondents name begins with this letter--in the 1918-1925 material; or according to the initial letter of the subject of the letter in the 1925-1954 material). Although a letter be of uncertain date, if it can be ascertained from other letters, approximately what month it was written in, the letter is placed at the end of a group of other letters in a given month.
    Reference Material:
    Bills. A list of the bills introduced by Senator Jones in a given legislative session are arranged in folder labeled B in the Reference folders, from 1918-1925. For Bills after 1925, 1925-1954, Bills are filed in a separate folder labeled Bills in sectio B of the group of folders known as Legislative Correspondence, filed by Subject Matter.

    Subject Index to H.C. Jones Reference Material

    Papers is filed chronologically and then alphabetically by subject, thus related subjects can and do appear in five or more years. This index is designed to assist the searcher in locating subject matter without the necessity of reading the entire Register. Numbers correspond to folders in the collection. After obtaining the desired numbers, it is advisable to check the major portion of the Register for fuller details.
    accountants - 353
    adoption - 459, 504
    adult education - 459, 593-597, 692
    advisory boards - 216
    Agnew State Hospital - 79, 112
    agriculture, dept. of - 79, 162, 188, 216, 353, 505
    aircraft - 262
    alien teachers - 79
    All-American Canal - 695
    almshouse - 112
    Americanism - 162
    anatomy bill - 353
    animal trainers bill - 314
    Anti-Saloon League (under A, correspondence files 1920's) See also Briggs, A.H.
    apples - 162
    apprentices - 79
    arbitration - 216, 354
    architects - 79
    assessors - 262
    automobiles (includes Jitney) - 79, 84, 119, 216, 354
    automobiles (includes Jitney) liens - 354
    automobiles (includes Jitney) stealing of - 162
    aviation - 354
    Bank of Italy - 382
    banks and banking - 163, 263, 355, 397, 460, 506
    Bar Association - 163, 263, 309, 355, 397
    barbers - 263, 507
    Bartlett, Louis - 654
    Bayshore Highway - 309
    bee keeper - 163
    beer - 507
    berry baskets - 217
    berry growers - 163
    Better America Federation - 217, 286
    Bible in public schools - 80, 263
    Big Basin - 113, 163, 263, 287, 309
    billboards - 28
    birds and arbor conservation - 80, 113
    blindness - 80
    Blue Sky Law - 28, 80, 342
    Board of Equalization - 632
    bootleg (see also stills) - 382
    Boiler inspection - 28
    boxing - 263
    Briggs, A.H. (State Superintendent of the California Anti-Saloon League). - 440
    Briggs, C.R., - 654
    Bromley Spoils System bill - 696
    budget, State - 217, 264, 266, 267, 309, 357, 461, 513-14
    budget, uniform laws for counties - 357
    building and loan - 113, 163, 217, 263, 358, 382, 398, 463-64, 515-16, 697
    Bureau of Commerce - 516
    business colleges - 309
    The California Liberator - 190
    California Oriental Exclusion League - 188
    California Polytechnic School - 276
    Cameron, W.H. - 654
    capital punishment - 81, 114, 115, 165, 218, 268, 359, 399, 518
    Caranhan, H.L. - 165
    Catholics - 218, 518
    Cattlemen's Association - 218
    cement trust - 29, 81, 401-404, 693
    cemeteries - 81, 518
    cemetery protection - 165, 268
    cemetery removal - 218
    Central Valley water project - 654
    chain stores - 465, 519
    Chamber of Commerce - 114, 165, 218, 441, 520, 633, 658
    charities and correction - 81, 268
    chattel mortgage - 81, 268
    Child Hygiene Board - 165
    child labor - 114, 165, 268, 310, 359, 633, 698
    child welfare - 268, 359
    Chile, aid to - 165
    chiropractors - 521
    Christian Science - 268
    civil service - 466
    Clear Lake - 165
    collection agencies - 218
    colleges, at Sacramento - 81;
    Sec. - 466
    Colorado River project - 268
    commercial arbitration - 190
    commercial federation - 165
    Commonwealth Club - 218
    community property - 114, 165, 218, 268, 360, 699-700
    compensation insurance - 81
    comptroller - 218
    conservation - 29
    constitutional convention - 635
    cooperatives - 114, 383
    corporation bills - 81
    corporation taxes - 165, 268
    counties - 218
    county clerks - 268
    county government - 81, 165, 268, 310, 360, 524
    county water district - 524
    courts (see also judges) - 268
    Cox, James - 190
    coyotes - 218
    Crail, Joe - 494
    Creel, George - 658
    crime and criminals (see also capital punishment) - 29, 118, 218, 268, 360
    dairy council - 270
    dairy laws - 166, 219
    daylight savings - 442
    deaf and blind - 166, 270, 525
    death penalty (see capital punishment) -
    deciduous fruit - 219, 361
    delinquent women - 166, 270
    dental mechanics - 270
    district attorneys - 82
    divorce - 270
    Domestic Court - 270
    draft - 124
    dredges - 270
    dried fruit - 467
    drinking cup law - 115
    dry candidates - 137
    dry zone - 30
    Dumbarton bridge - 115
    Eberhard, Roy C. - 659
    education - 82, 116, 167-69, 219, 270, 311, 362, 468-69, 592-629
    Education, State Department of - 561
    education investigation committee - 179-187
    education, part-time (see also Adult education) - 276
    eight hour law - 31, 219
    elections (of 1918 - 135-36) - 82, 638-40
    Ellis, W.R. - 659
    embalmer's bill - 31
    employment agencies - 167, 270
    Equalization, State Board of - 82
    eugenics - 31
    exemption, doctors - 311
    expert testimony (witnesses) - 116, 167, 219
    fair trade - 527
    farm labor - 117
    farmers - 170, 384
    Farmer's Union - 117
    farms and farming - 270, 527, 641, 661
    Federal aid - 180
    Federal practice liens - 270
    feed standards - 170, 636
    fees, official - 170
    ferries - 32
    fire boats - 170
    firearms - 363
    fish and game - 32, 82, 170, 270, 312, 363, 470, 528
    fish and game law - 117
    food control - 219
    foot and mouth disease - 270
    forest fire legislation - 182
    forestry - 32, 170, 190, 219
    forests - 270
    fraternities - 32
    Free, Arthur, M. - 494
    fruit standardization - 483
    gambling - 83, 529
    gasoline - 219, 271
    gasoline tax - 364, 471, 530
    German, teaching of in California schools - 171
    Givens, Willard E. - 660
    Glasson, Maude C. - 660
    grade crossings - 364
    grand jury - 117, 171
    Grange (see also farmers) - 411
    Grant, E.E. recall election - 83
    Grape Growers' Association - 219
    grape growing - 117
    Haight, Raymond - 662
    Happy Valley Irrigation District - 117
    Harding's liquor record - California - 190
    Hardy, Judge Carlos S., trial of - 412
    Harris bill - 220
    hay - 171
    Haynes, John Randolph - 662
    Haynes, John Randolph foundation - 532
    health insurance - 117, 171, 220
    Hetch Hetchy - 271
    Hichborn, Franklin - 271, 314, 344, 378, 392, 422, 495, 572, 652, 663-64, 739-743
    high schools - 220
    highway patrol - 533
    highways - 220, 271, 365
    Hill, Andrew P. - 171
    historical association - 533
    history textbooks - 271
    holding companies - 533
    holidays - 533
    homesteads - 171
    Hoover, Herbert - 190;
    clippings - 385
    horticulture - 220
    humane pound - 534-535
    Hunter's Point project - 171
    hydro-electricity - 220
    income tax - 537
    indemnity certificates - 221
    indeterminate sentence - 221
    Indian Basin - 83
    Indians - 118
    Industrial Accident Commission - 171, 473
    industrial strikes - 314
    inheritance tax - 365
    initiative - 118, 171, 221, 271, 314, 538-41, 642-645, 701
    injunction - 34, 83, 171, 314
    Inman - 500
    installment taxes - 542
    Institute of Technology - 229
    insurance - 34, 83, 118, 171, 221, 473
    I.W.W. - 171
    investment trusts - 473
    Irish - 271
    irrigation - 34, 83, 221, 271
    jail - 119
    Japanese - 172, 188, 221, 272
    immigration - 35, 84
    Jews - 221
    Jitneys (see automobiles) -
    Johnson, Charles G. - 665
    Johnson, Hiram - 119, 190, 286, 356, 398
    Jones, H.C., bills - 80, 113, 164, 263, 508
    Jones, H.C., election campaigns - 1912 - 2a
    Jones, H.C., election campaigns - 1914 - 49-52
    Jones, H.C., election campaigns - 1926 and 1090 - 339-341
    Jones, H.C., election campaigns - 1930 - 443-447
    Jones, H.C., election campaigns - 1933 - 654
    Jones, H.C., speech - 572
    judges - appointment of - 84, 172, 221, 366, 413, 474, 546, 703
    Judiciary Committee - 84, 366, 414-417, 704-709
    Judiciary reform - 35
    jury system - 84, 119, 272, 314
    justice of the peace -
    juvenile court - 84, 119
    kindergarten legislation - 272, 601-606
    King tax bill - 272
    Klu Klux Klan - 272
    Kosher - 367
    labor - 36, 85, 120, 165, 188, 222, 272, 367, 418, 548
    labor legislation and labor record of legislature - 272, 736
    Lake County land settlement - 222
    land settlement act - 120
    Lawyer's bill, - 710
    legal reform - 120, 165
    League of Nations - 165
    League of Women Voters - 314
    Lick Observatory - 85
    liquor - 36, 85, 120
    loan sharks - 85
    lobbying - 272
    Loma Prieta Game Refuge - 272
    lotteries - 272
    McPherson, Aimee Semple - 412
    manufacturers - 223
    market act - 86, 121, 173
    marketing price - 223
    Marshall Plan - 223
    masks, safety - 273
    maternity - 273
    Matton act - 551
    Meadow Larks - 173
    mechanic's lien law - 37
    mediation - 121
    medical - 38, 86, 121, 173, 223, 273, 477
    Merriam, Frank - 668
    military training (1917) - 122
    military training (1917) in schools - 121, 173, 223
    milk bill - 173, 477
    minimum wage law - 36, 273
    Mooney case - 173, 1077
    morons - 121
    mortgage and loan - 315
    Mother lode mine - 273
    mother's pension - 121
    motion pictures - 223, 273
    motor carriers - 712
    motor vehicles (taxation of, 274) - 173, 223, 315, 552
    Muir, John, trail - 86
    music teachers - 477
    mutual insurance - 368
    narcotics - 419, 1079;
    hospital - 553
    National Guard - 224
    The National Republican - 226
    nautical school - 553
    Negro - 658
    newspapers - 369
    non-partisan - 87, 275
    Normal schools - 87, 123, 224
    nurses - 173, 224, 369
    oil - 87, 275
    old age pensions - 275-276, 437, 554
    oleomargarine - 225, 316
    Olson, Cuthbert L. - 715
    optometry - 316
    osteopaths - 225
    Owens Valley Power and Recreation - 715-716
    Pacheco Rancho - 174
    Pacific Epileptic Colony - 276
    paint - 174
    Palo Alto annexatio - 370
    Parent-Teachers in schools - 124
    Parks and Park Commission - 88, 316, 370, 557, 717
    partisanship (see also non-partisan) - 276
    peace - 40, 174
    pension; for teachers - 40
    (pension; for widows - 88) - 124, 174
    pest control - 480
    petroleum central - 190
    picketing - 276
    Pine road - 276
    pipe line bill - 40
    poet laureate of California - 422, 480, 557
    police - 124
    political campaigns (1914) - 53;
    political campaigns (1920-1938) - 720-726
    political prisoners - 276
    power trusts - 225, 276, 388, 422
    primary, direct - 225
    primary laws - 174, 557
    prison bill (womens) - 422
    prison bill (womens) labor - 316
    prisons - 124, 225
    probate orders - 225
    photographs - 174
    probate procedure - 174
    probation - 124, 276, 480
    Progressive Commonwealth Party - 675
    Progressive Party, 1
    Progressive Voters League - 328-338, 727
    Progressives - 225
    prohibition - 137, 174, 225, 276, 370, 423, 558, 728-729
    proportional representation - 276
    prostitution - 225
    psychopathic hospital, state - 174
    public defenders - 124, 174
    public health - 33, 423, 558, 730
    public ownership - 40, 223, 558
    public utilities - 480, 559
    public works - 276, 558
    pure food - 225
    Quinn, John R., 1039
    railroad commission - 263, 277
    railroads - 88, 175, 226, 481
    railroads, government control - 171
    real estate - 124, 226, 277
    reapportionment - 226, 278-281, 317, 481
    reclamation - 124-129, 175
    reconstruction, post World War I - 175
    recorders - 175
    recreational inquiry committee - 45-48
    Red Cross - 175
    Redwood League - 175, 226
    Redwood Park - 88, 371
    referendum (see also initiative) - 642
    rehabilitation, industrial - 226
    religious education - 371
    reporters, court - 371, 226, 317
    Republican Party - 277
    Republicans - 175
    retail license tax - 481
    revenue - 277
    revolver law - 226, 277
    Riley Tax bill - 562
    roads and highways - 41, 88, 175, 277, 563
    Rolph administration investigation - 544-5, 564, 574
    Roosevelt, T. club - 731
    Rosecrucians - 732-734
    sabotage - 282
    San Francisco harbor - 171, 176, 220
    San Jose port - 40, 557
    Santa Clara boundary - 265
    Santa Clara township - 229
    school administration - 383
    schools - 130, 176, 282, 483, 678-670
    schools, county elementary - 409
    Seavy, Clyde L. - 680
    sewage research - 429
    shearer content - 176
    short ballot - 89, 130, 176
    Sinclair, Upton - 681
    Sloane, W. A. - 176
    slot machines - 372
    social evil - 42
    social insurance - 229
    social welfare - 567
    socialism - 42, 89
    Soviet health insurance - 176
    spiritualists - 372
    spoils system - 282
    Spreckels, Rudolph - 685
    state fair - 42
    state government reorganization - 228
    stills - 372
    subsidized officials - 282
    Sunday Closing law - 42, 130, 176
    supervisors, county - 282
    supreme court - 372
    surety companies - 176
    surplus corporation - 282
    Sutter Basin - 130
    syndicalism, criminal - 229, 317, 373, 567
    taxes and taxation - 43, 131, 229-233, 283, 374, 425, 429-433, 485, 497, 523, 566, 569, 650
    Tax Commission - 131, 426-428
    teachers - 994;
    agencies - 283;
    retirement - 561;
    tenure - 283, 374, 628-629;
    (pension for - 40, 131;) 90, 163, 486-488
    textbooks - 131
    tidelands - 177
    Tioga Road - 131
    title companies - 283, 374
    toll bridges - 374
    Torrens Land Title Law - 43, 131, 317
    trading stamps - 131, 177
    trappers - 131
    trucks - 570
    trusts - 131
    tuberculosis - 43, 90, 177, 283, 511
    Tulare Lake District - 131
    unemployment - 572
    uniform condition sales act - 234
    University, State, budget, 572
    usury - 91
    utilities, taxation of - 573
    vaccination - 44, 91, 234
    VD - 177
    veterans - 574
    vivisection - 132-133, 177, 234
    vocational training - 284
    Volstead Act (see also prohibition) - 234, 497
    war gardens - 178
    war loan organization - 234
    war risk insurance - 178
    water - 134, 497
    water and power - 284
    water conservation - 434, 581
    water development act - 234
    water plan, State - 576-580
    water supply - 91
    Whitney, Charlotte Anita, case of - 190
    Whittier school - 178
    women, employment - 476, 551
    women's bill - 134
    Women's Relief Corp. - 284
    women's suffrage - 178
    Working Reserve, U.S. Boys - 178
    workmen's compensation - 44, 91, 134, 178, 235-236, 284, 318
    Young, C. C. - 313, 376, 447-453, 686
    Y.M.C.A. - 134
    Pamphlet on The Progressive Voters League, 1923-26 in first copy of registers.