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INVENTORY OF THE AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY COLLECTION
D-207  
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Table of contents What's This?

Container List

 

Box 1

Box 1, Folder 1

Allen, J.S.

American Negro. New York: International Pamphlets, 1932.

Box 1, Folder 2

Allen, James S.

Marshall Plan--recovery or war? New York: New Century Publishers, 1948.

Box 1, Folder 3

Allen, James S.

Negro liberation. New York: International Publishers, 1938.

Box 1, Folder 4

Allen, James S.

Smash the Scottsboro lynch verdict. New York: Workers Library Publishers, 1933.

Box 1, Folder 5

Allen, Robert L.

Dialectics of Black power. Boston: New England Free Press, 1968.

Box 1, Folder 6

AFL-CIO, Industrial Union Department.

Tent City..."Home of the Brave" Washington, D.C.: Industrial Union Department, AFL-CIO, [196-?].

Box 1, Folder 7

American Civil Liberties Union.

Testing whether that nation: 41st annual report. New York: American Civil Liberties Union, 1961.

Box 1, Folder 8

American Civil Liberties Union.

The stakes grow higher: 44th annual report. New York: American Civil Liberties Union, 1964.

Box 1, Folder 9

American National Red Cross.

The final report of the Colored Advisory Commission appointed to cooperate with the American National Red Cross and the President's Committee on Relief Work in the Mississippi Valley Flood Disaster of 1927. Washington, D.C.: American National Red Cross, 1929.

Box 1, Folder 10

American Reform Tract and Book Society.

The law and the testimony concerning slavery. Cincinnati: American Reform Tract and Book Society, [185-].

Box 1, Folder 11

American Reform Tract and Book Society.

On slavery. Cincinnati: American Reform Tract and Book Society, [185-].

Box 1, Folder 12

American Society of African Culture.

The American Negro writer and his roots: selected papers from the First Conference of Negro Writers, March, 1959. New York: American Society of African Culture, 1960.

Box 1, Folder 13

American Tract Society.

Cain and Patsy: the Gospel preached to the poor, a story of slave life. Boston: American Tract Society, 1860.

Box 1, Folder 14

American Tract Society.

Speeches of Chief Justice Williams, Judge Parsons, and Ex-Governor Ellsworth: delivered in the Center Church, Hartford, Conn. at the anniversary of the Hartford Branch of the American Tract Society, Jan. 9, 1859. Hartford, Conn.: E. Geer, 1859.

Box 1, Folder 15

American Union for the Relief and Improvement of the Colored Race.

Exposition of the objects and plans of the American Union for the Relief and Improvement of the Colored Race. Boston: Light and Horton, 1835.

Box 1, Folder 16

Ammoun, Charles D.

Study of discrimination in education. New York: United Nations, 1957.

Box 1, Folder 17

Aikman, William.

The future of the Colored race in America. New York: A.D.F. Randolph, 1862.

Box 1, Folder 18

Alpenfels, Ethel J.

Sense and nonsense about race. New York: Friendship Press, 1946.

Box 1, Folder 19

Ambroise, Fernand.

Le General Magloire Ambroise: a-t-il ete tue ou s'est-il suicide? Port-Au-Prince, Haiti: Imprimerie Nemours Telhomme, 1937.

Box 1, Folder 20

American Anti-Slavery Society.

Slavery and the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. New York: American Anti-Slavery Society, 1859.

Box 1, Folder 21

American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions.

Relation of the "American Board" to slavery. [S.l.]: [s.n.], [186-].

Box 1, Folder 22

American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions.

Report of the Committee on Anti-Slavery Memorials. Boston: T.R. Marvin, 1845.

Box 1, Folder 23

American Church Institute for Negroes.

Down where the need is greatest: a record in the field of Negro education. New York: American Church Institute for Negroes, [193-?].

Box 1, Folder 24

American Church Institute for Negroes.

The rebirth of an ancient race. New York: American Church Institute for Negroes, [193-?].

Box 1, Folder 25

American Church Institute for Negroes.

Report from May 1, 1938 to May 31, 1940. New York: Church Missions House, [194-].

Box 1, Folder 26

American Church Institute for Negroes.

Annual report for 1929. New York: Church Missions House, [1930?].

Box 1, Folder 27

American Church Institute for Negroes.

Report for 1933. New York: Church Missions House, [1934?].

Box 1, Folder 28

Alston, Christopher C.

Henry Ford and the Negro people. Washington, D.C.: National Negro Congress, 1940.

Note

2 copies
Box 1, Folder 29

Abram, Morris B., and Alexander F. Miller.

How to stop violence! Intimidation! in your community. Atlanta: Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, 1949.

Box 1, Folder 30

African and Afro-American Cultural Exhibit Association.

Glimpse into blackness. El Cerrito, Calif.: Artline Printing, [197-?].

Box 1, Folder 31

African Institution.

Foreign slave trade. Abstract of the information recently laid on the table of the House of Commons on the subject of the slave trade. London: Ellerton and Henderson, 1821.

Box 1, Folder 32

African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Junior manual of the Allen C.E. League of the African M.E. Church for the Officers and Committees. Nashville: Allen C.E. League, 1925.

Box 1, Folder 33

African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church.

Minutes of the 57th annual session of the New Jersey Conference of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church. [Charlotte, N.C.]: A.M.E. Zion Publishing House, [1930].

Box 1, Folder 34

Allen, George.

Report on slavery read to the Worcester Central Association, March 2, 1847. Boston: Wm. Crosby & H.P. Nichols, 1847.

Box 1, Folder 35

Leys, John K., et. al.

Along the darkies' narrow way. [New Jersey]: [s.n.], [18--].

Box 1, Folder 36

American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society.

The Fugitive Slave Bill: its history and unconstitutionality; with an account of the seizure and enslavement of James Hamlet, and his subsequent restoration to liberty. New York: W. Harned, 1850.

Box 1, Folder 37

American Church Institute for Negroes.

Negro education in wartime. New York: American Church Institute for Negroes, [1942?].

Box 1, Folder 38

American Church Institute for Negroes.

Our Church Industrial High Schools for Negroes. New York: Church Missions House, [1922?].

Box 1, Folder 39

American Church Institute for Negroes.

Report from January 1, 1936 to May 1, 1938. New York: Church Missions House, [1938?].

Box 1, Folder 40

Ancient United Order of Sons and Daughters Brothers and Sisters of Moses.

Regulations for conducting business, and form of initiation of the first or white degree of the A.U.O. of S. and D.B. and S. of Moses. Baltimore: Guide Printing Co., 1910.

Box 1, Folder 41

Anderson, Charles.

The cause of the war: who brought it on, and for what purpose? New York: Wm. Bryant & Co., 1863.

Box 1, Folder 42

Andrew, John A.

Speeches of John A. Andrew at Hingham and Boston, together with his testimony before the Harper's Ferry Committee of the Senate, in relation to John Brown. [Boston?]: Republican State Committee, [1860?].

Box 1, Folder 43

Anti-Slavery and Aborigines Protection Society.

Slavery in Europe: a letter to neutral governments from the Anti-Slavery Society. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1917.

Note

2 copies
Box 1, Folder 44

[May, Samuel].

The Fugitive Slave Law, and its victims. New York: American Anti-Slavery Society, 1861.

Box 1, Folder 45

Whipple, Charles K.

Relations of anti-slavery to religion. New York: American Anti-Slavery Society, [185-?].

Box 1, Folder 46

Bowditch, William I.

The United States Constitution. New York: American Anti-Slavery Society, [1855].

Box 1, Folder 47

Antoine, Yves.

La Veillee. Port-au-Prince, Haiti: Impremerie Serge L. Gaston, [1964?].

Box 1, Folder 48

Appleton, Nathan, and John G. Palfrey.

Correspondence between Nathan Appleton and John G. Palfrey intended as a supplement to Mr. Palfrey's pamphlet on the slave power. Boston: Eastburn's Press, 1846.

Box 1, Folder 49

Appleton, Nathan.

Letter to the Hon. Wm. C. Rives, of Virginia, on slavery and the Union. Boston: Eastburn's Press, 1860.

Box 1, Folder 50

Aptheker, Herbert.

The Negro in the abolitionist movement. New York: International Publishers, 1941.

Box 1, Folder 51

Aptheker, Herbert.

The Negro in the American Revolution. New York: International Publishers, 1940.

Box 1, Folder 52

Aptheker, Herbert.

America's racist laws. New York: Masses & Mainstream, 1952.

Box 1, Folder 53

Aptheker, Herbert.

The labor movement in the South during slavery. New York: International Publishers, [1954?].

Box 1, Folder 54

Aptheker, Herbert.

"Literacy, the Negro and World War II." Reprinted from The Journal of Negro Education.[Fall 1946].

Box 1, Folder 55

Aptheker, Herbert.

The Negro in the Civil War. New York: International Publishers, 1938.

Box 1, Folder 56

Payne, Buckner H. [Ariel].

The Negro: what is his ethnological status? 2d ed. Cincinnati: Published for the Proprietor, 1867.

Note

2 copies
Box 1, Folder 57

Armstrong, Samuel Chapman.

Armstrong's ideas on education for life. Hampton, Va.: Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, 1926.

Box 1, Folder 58

Aptheker, Herbert.

The Negro today. New York: Marzani & Munsell, 1962.

Box 1, Folder 59

Aptheker, Herbert.

"The Negro in the Union Navy." Reprinted from The Journal of Negro History 32:2.[April 1947].

Box 1, Folder 60

Arnett, Benjamin William.

The Black laws: speech of Hon. B. W. Arnett, of Greene County, in the Ohio House of Representatives, March 10, 1886. [S.l.]: [s.n.], [1886].

Box 1, Folder 61

Ashland Place Y.M.C.A.

Fortieth Anniversary Celebration. Brooklyn: Brooklyn Academy of Music, 1943.

Box 1, Folder 62

Montagu, Ashley.

Race and other kindred delusions. New York: Equality Magazine, [19--].

Box 1, Folder 63

Associated Charities of Savannah.

Fourth Annual Report of the Associated Charities of Savannah, Georgia. Savannah: Office City Hall, [1914].

Box 1, Folder 64

Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, Inc.

Bibliographical suggestions for the study of Negro history. Washington, D.C.: Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, Inc., [19--].

Box 1, Folder 65

Fulchon, Celestine T.

Negro in sports. Philadelphia: Association for Study of Negro Life and History, [1941].

Box 1, Folder 66

Augustus, Earl, et al.

Gambage. Trinidad, West Indies: University of the West Indies, 1966.

Box 1, Folder 67

Baird, Robert.

Progress and prospects of Christianity in the United States of America, with remarks on the subject of slavery in America, and on the intercourse between British and American churches. London: Partridge & Oakey, 1851.

Box 1, Folder 68

Baker, James Loring.

Slavery. Philadelphia: John A. Norton, 1860.

Box 1, Folder 69

Baker, Thomas Nelson.

"The Negro woman." Reprinted from Christian Recorder.[18--].

Box 1, Folder 70

Baker, J.N.

"Alabama's health program for the Negro." Reprinted from The Journal of the Medical Association of the State of Alabama.[July 1940].

Box 1, Folder 71

[Baldwin, John Denison].

Mr. Baldwin of Massachusetts, in reply to Hon. James Brooks, of New York, on the Negro race. Washington, D.C.: Union Republican Congressional Committee, [1868?].

Box 1, Folder 72

Balfour, Errol, et al.

Racism and Black power. Port-of-Spain: Workers Educational Association, [19--].

Box 1, Folder 73

Regional Council of Ministers.

Draft federal scheme as amended at ninth meeting. Barbados: Government Printing Office, 1964.

Box 1, Folder 74

Barstow, Benjamin.

Speech of Benjamin Barstow, of Salem, on the abolition propensities of Caleb Cushing. Boston: Office of the National Democrat, 1853.

Box 1, Folder 75

Bassett, Theodore R.

Why the Negro people should vote Communist. New York: Workers Library Publishers, [1940?].

Box 1, Folder 76

Bauman, Arthur.

Artie cuts out. New York: Jaguar Press, 1953.

Box 1, Folder 77

Baxter, Daniel Minort.

Richard Allen from a slave boy to the First Bishop of African Methodist Episcopal Church, a drama in four acts. Philadelphia: A.M.E. Book Concern, 1934.

Box 1, Folder 78

Baxter, Daniel Minort.

Has the Negro's freedom paid? Philadelphia: A.M.E. Book Concern, 1925.

Note

2 copies
Box 1, Folder 79

Bayard, James A.

Speech of Hon. James A. Bayard, of Delaware, in the Senate of the U.S., March 22, 1858, on the bill for the admission of Kansas into the Federal Union under the Lecompton Constitution. [S.l.]: [Polkinhorn's Steam Printing], [1858].

Box 1, Folder 80

Carmichael, Stokely, et al.

Black power dokumentation: Stokely Carmichael, Rap Brown, Malcolm X. Berlin: Oberbaumpresse, [196-?].

Box 1, Folder 81

Behind the Harlem riots. New York: Spartacist, [1964].

Box 1, Folder 82

Bemis, George.

Hasty recognition of rebel belligerency and our right to complain of it. Boston: A. Williams & Co., 1865.

Box 1, Folder 83

Benedict, Joseph.

Speech of Hon. J. Benedict, delivered in the assembly, February 19, 1851, on the Compromise Resolutions, offered by Mr. Varnum of New York. [S.l.]: [s.n.], [1851].

Box 1, Folder 84

Bennett, Lerone.

"Tea and sympathy: liberals and other white hopes." In The Negro mood.New York: Ballantine, 1964.

Box 1, Folder 85

Berrien, John MacPherson.

Speech of Mr. Berrien, of Georgia, on the Regiment Bill. Washington: J.T. Towers, 1848.

Box 1, Folder 86

Berry, Henry.

The speech of Henry Berry (of Jefferson) in the House of Delegates of Virginia, on the abolition of slavery. [Richmond]: [s.n.], [1832].

Box 1, Folder 87

Newman, Louis C. [Biblicus].

The Bible view of slavery reconsidered: a letter to the Right Rev. Bishop Hopkins. 2d ed. Philadelphia: H.B. Ashmead, 1863.

Box 1, Folder 88

Berry, A.W., et al.

The road to liberation for the Negro people. New York: Workers Library Publishers, 1937.

Box 1, Folder 89

Bethune, Mary McLeod.

Address delivered by Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune at a Stop Hitler Rally in Washington, D.C., on Sunday, Oct. 27. [New York]: [s.n.], [194-].

Box 1, Folder 90

Bettelheim, Bruno.

Overcoming prejudice. Chicago: Science Research Associates, 1953.

Box 1, Folder 91

Bigler, William.

Speech of Hon. Wm. Bigler, of Pennsylvania, on Kansas affairs: delivered in the Senate, December 21, 1857. [Washington]: [s.n.], [1857?].

Box 1, Folder 92

Bishop Tuttle School.

Bulletin, 1939-1940. Raleigh, N.C.: Bishop Tuttle School, [1940].

Box 1, Folder 93

Analavage, Robert.

Black and white divided: Laurel strike is broken. Boston: New England Free Press, [196-].

Box 1, Folder 94

Blair, Montgomery.

Speeches of Hon. Montgomery Blair. [S.l.]: H. Polkinhorn & Son, [1865].

Box 1, Folder 95

Ashmun, George.

Speech of Mr. Ashmun, of Massachusetts, upon the President's message upon the Texas boundary and the bill for its settlement, in the House of Representatives, August 14, 1850. Washington: Gideon & Co., 1850.

Box 1, Folder 96

Black fire 3. San Francisco: San Francisco State College, Black Student Union, 1970.

Box 1, Folder 97

Blake, Harrison G.

Equality of rights in the territories: speech of Harrison G. Blake, of Ohio. [Washington?]: Scammell & Co., 1860.

Box 1, Folder 98

Blind Tom: The great Negro pianist. [S.l.]: [s.n.], [186-].

Box 1, Folder 99

Blose, David T.

Statistics of the Negro race, 1927-1928. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1931.

Box 1, Folder 100

Blose, David T., and Ambrose Caliver.

Statistics of the education of Negroes 1929-30 and 1931-32. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1936.

Box 1, Folder 101

Blose, David T., and Ambrose Caliver.

Statistics of the education of Negroes 1933-34 and 1935-36. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1939.

Box 1, Folder 102

Boardman, Helen, and Martha Gruening.

Who is the N.A.A.C.P.? New York: Academy Press, 1935.

Box 1, Folder 103

Bohannan, William E.

A letter to American Negroes. New York: Pioneer Publishers, 1948.

Box 1, Folder 104

Bolsover, Phil.

No colour bar for Britain. London: Communist Party, 1955.

Box 1, Folder 105

Bolte, Charles G., and Louis Harris.

Our Negro veterans. [New York]: Public Affairs Committee, 1947.

Box 1, Folder 106

Boone, Theodore S.

Some Negro Baptist remarkables of Georgia. Atlanta: National Baptist Convestion, [1946].

Box 1, Folder 107

Borneman, Ernest.

A critic looks at jazz. London: Jazz Music Books, 1946.

Box 1, Folder 108

Bousfield, M.O.

"The Negro home and the health education program." Reprinted from The Journal of Negro Education.[July 1937].

Box 1, Folder 109

Boutelle, Paul, et al.

The Black uprisings. New York: Socialist Workers Party, 1967.

Box 1, Folder 110

Boutelle, Paul.

The case for a Black Party. New York: Socialist Workers Party, 1968.

Note

2 copies
Box 1, Folder 111

Boutelle, Paul, et al.

Murder in Memphis: Martin Luther King and the future of the Black liberation struggle. New York: Merit Publishers, 1968.

Box 1, Folder 112

Boutwell, George S.

Emancipation: its justice, expediency and necessity, as the means of securing a speedy and permanent peace. Boston: Wright & Potter, [1861].

Box 1, Folder 113

Boutwell, George S., et al.

Remarks of Hons. G.S. Boutwell, B.F. Butler, and Thomas Williams on the President's veto of the Reconstruction Bill; delivered in the House of Representatives, July 19, 1867. Washington, [D.C.]: Congressional Globe Office, 1867.

Box 1, Folder 114

Boutwell, George S.

Reconstruction, its true basis: speech of Hon. George S. Boutwell at Weymouth, Mass., July 4, 1865. Boston: Wright & Potter, 1865.

Box 1, Folder 115

Black Panther Party.

Hands off Aaron Dixon. Seattle: Aaron Dixon Defense Fund, 1968.

 

Box 2

Box 2, Folder 1

Boyer, Richard Owen.

Hold high the torch! New York: New Century Publishers, 1951.

Box 2, Folder 2

Boyer, Richard Owen.

Pettis Perry: the story of a working class leader. New York: Self Defense Committee of the 17 Smith Act Victims, 1952.

Box 2, Folder 3

Braden, Anne.

House Un-American Activities Committee: bulwark of segregation. Los Angeles: National Committee to Abolish the House Un-American Activities Committee, [1964?].

Box 2, Folder 4

Bradley, Hugh.

Next steps in the struggle for Negro freedom. New York: New Century Publishers, 1953.

Box 2, Folder 5

Bragg, George Freeman.

Virginians and church work among the colored race. Baltimore: G.F. Bragg, 1937.

Box 2, Folder 6

Breitman, George, and Herman Porter.

The assassination of Malcolm X. New York: Merit Publishers, 1969.

Box 2, Folder 7

Breitman, George.

Jim Crow murder of Mr. and Mrs. Harry T. Moore. New York: Pioneer Publishers, 1952.

Box 2, Folder 8

Breitman, George.

How a minority can change society: the real potential of the Afro-American struggle. New York: Merit Publishers, 1968.

Box 2, Folder 9

Breitman, George.

Black nationalism and socialism. New York: Merit Publishers, 1969.

Box 2, Folder 10

Brenner, Anita, and S.S. Winthrop.

Tampa's reign of terror. New York: International Labor Defense, [193-].

Box 2, Folder 11

British Guiana. London: L.R.D. Publications, Ltd., 1953.

Box 2, Folder 12

Not just peanuts: the story of Britain's great agriculture experiment in East Africa. New York: British Information Services, 1948.

Box 2, Folder 13

Bronx Conference for Racial and Religious Unity.

The Bronx speaks out for racial and religious unity. Bronx, N.Y.: Bronx Conference for Racial and Religious Unity, [194-].

Box 2, Folder 14

Brooks, Viola M.

Freedom schools. Los Angeles: Operation Education, Operation Bootstrap, 1968.

Box 2, Folder 15

Browder, Earl.

The Communist Party and the emancipation of the Negro people. New York: Communist Party, 1934.

Box 2, Folder 16

Brower, Leon.

"Negroes during the depression in Kanawha County, West Virginia." Reprinted from The Social Service Review 10:4.[December 1936].

Box 2, Folder 17

Brown, Earl Louis, and George R. Leighton.

The Negro and the war. New York: Public Affairs Committee, Inc., 1942.

Box 2, Folder 18

Brown, Earl Louis.

Why race riots? Lessons from Detroit. New York: Public Affairs Committee, Inc., 1944.

Box 2, Folder 19

Brown, Jean Collier.

The Negro woman worker. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1938.

Note

2 copies
Box 2, Folder 20

John Brown Memorial Association.

John Brown in bronze. Lake Placid, N.Y.: John Brown Memorial Association, 1935.

Box 2, Folder 21

Brown, Lloyd L.

Stand up for freedom! The Negro people vs. the Smith Act. New York: New Century Publishers, 1952.

Box 2, Folder 22

Browne, Robert S., and Robert Vernon.

Should the U.S. be partitioned into two separate and independent nations--one a homeland for white Americans and the other a homeland for black Americans? New York: Merit Publishers, 1968.

Box 2, Folder 23

Miss Martha Browlow; or, the heroine of Tennessee. [S.l.]: [s.n.], [18--].

Box 2, Folder 24

Bryant, Joseph G.

Stepping back. Philadelphia: A.M.E. Book Concern, [19--].

Box 2, Folder 25

Burma, John H.

How to understand the Negro problem. Girard, Kans.: Haldeman-Julius Publications, 1943.

Box 2, Folder 26

Burnham, Louis.

Behind the lynching of Emmet Louis Till. New York: Freedom Associates, Inc., 1955.

Box 2, Folder 27

Bush, Olivia Ward.

Memories of Calvary. Boston: A.M.E. Book Concern, [18--?].

Box 2, Folder 28

Bushnell, Horace.

A discourse on the slavery question. Hartford: Case, Tiffany & Co., 1839.

Box 2, Folder 29

Busia, K.A.

The African consciousness. New York: American-African Affairs Association, 1968.

Box 2, Folder 30

Butler, D.E.

Pulpit, pew, public. [S.l.]: [s.n.], 1919.

Box 2, Folder 31

Butler, Frank.

Randolph Turpin, Sugar Ray Robinson: their story in pictures. England: Jarrold & Sons, Ltd., [195-].

Box 2, Folder 32

Cadbury, Henry J.

"Negro membership in the Society of Friends." Reprinted from The Journal of Negro History 21:2.[April 1936].

Box 2, Folder 33

Caliver, Ambrose.

Sources of instructional materials on Negroes. Washington, D.C.: National Education Association of the United States, 1946.

Box 2, Folder 34

Caliver, Ambrose.

Fifty years of progress in public education. Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh Courier, 1950.

Box 2, Folder 35

Caliver, Ambrose.

Bibliography on education of the Negro: comprising publications from January, 1928 to December, 1930. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1931.

Box 2, Folder 36

Callender, David M.

Anti-I.S.A. Struggle. Port-of-Spain: Workers Publications, [1969?].

Box 2, Folder 37

Carmichael, Stokely, and Charles V. Hamilton.

"America's racial crisis." Excerpts from Black power: the politics of liberation in America.New York: Random House, 1967.

Box 2, Folder 38

Carmichael, Stokely.

"What we want." In New York Review of Books.[196-?].

Box 2, Folder 39

Carter, Elmer A.

"Practical considerations of anti-discrimination legislation: experience under the New York law against discrimination." Reprinted from Cornell Law Quarterly 40:1.[Fall 1954].

Box 2, Folder 40

Carter, Elmer A.

"The New York Commission succeeds." Reprinted from Interracial Review.[November 1947].

Box 2, Folder 41

Carver, George W.

The Farmer's Almanac. 2d ed., revised. Tuskegee, Ala.: Tuskegee Institute, 1940.

Box 2, Folder 42

Carver, George W.

Can live stock be raised profitably in Alabama? Tuskegee, Ala.: Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute, 1936.

Box 2, Folder 43

Carver, George W.

The pickling and curing of meat in hot weather. 2d ed. Tuskegee, Ala.: Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute, 1925.

Box 2, Folder 44

Carver, George W.

The raising of hogs. Tuskegee, Ala.: Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute, 1935.

Box 2, Folder 45

Latham, R.O.

Paints or peanuts? London: Edinburgh House Press, 1949.

Box 2, Folder 46

Carver, George W.

How to grow the peanut and 105 ways of preparing it for human consumption. 8th ed. Tuskegee, Ala.: Tuskegee Institute, 1942.

Box 2, Folder 47

Carver, George W.

Some ornamental plants of Macon County, Alabama. Tuskegee, Ala.: Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute, 1909.

Box 2, Folder 48

Casimir, J.R. Ralph.

Dominica. Roseau, Dominica, British West Indies: J.R.R. Casimir, 1968.

Box 2, Folder 49

Casimir, J.R. Ralph.

The Negro speaks. Roseau, Dominica, British West Indies: J.R.R. Casimir, 1969.

Box 2, Folder 50

Casimir, J.R. Ralph.

A little kiss. Roseau, Dominica, British West Indies: J.R.R. Casimir, 1968.

Box 2, Folder 51

Casimir, J.R. Ralph.

Africa arise. Roseau, Dominica, British West Indies: J.R.R. Casimir, 1967.

Box 2, Folder 52

Cayton, Horace R.

"Negro housing in Chicago." Social Action 6:4. [April 1940].

Box 2, Folder 53

Channing, William E.

The duty of the free states, or remarks suggested by the case of the Creole. Boston: William Crosby & Co., 1842.

Box 2, Folder 54

An Abolitionist.

Extracts from remarks on Dr. Channing's Slavery. Boston: D.K. Hitchcock, 1836.

Box 2, Folder 55

Charles, Bertram.

The end of the affair. Georgetown, Guyana: Related Arts Group, [1968?].

Box 2, Folder 56

Cheever, Henry T.

A tract for the times, on the question, is it right to withhold fellowship from churches or from individuals that tolerate or practise slavery? New York: John A. Gray, 1859.

Box 2, Folder 57

Clark, Daniel.

Speech of Hon. Daniel Clark, of New Hampshire, on the proposed amendment of the Constitution, forever prohibiting slavery in the United States, and all places under their jurisdiction. [Washington]: [L. Towers & Co.], [1864?].

Box 2, Folder 58

Clay, Henry.

Speech of the Hon. Henry Clay, of Kentucky, on presenting his resolutions on the subject of slavery. New York: Stringer & Townsend, 1850.

Box 2, Folder 59

Clay, Henry.

Speech of Mr. Clay, of Kentucky, in support of his propositions to compromise on the slavery question. [Washington]: Towers, 1850.

Box 2, Folder 60

Claege, Albert, and George Breitman.

Myths about Malcolm X. New York: Merit Publishers, 1968.

Box 2, Folder 61

The Coalition of the Democracy and the Abolitionists in opposition to the administration of Gen. Taylor. [S.l.]: [S.n.], [185-].

Box 2, Folder 62

Cobb, W. Montague.

Medical care and the plight of the Negro. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, 1947.

Box 2, Folder 63

Colfax, Schuyler.

The "laws" of Kansas: speech of Schuyler Colfax, of Indiana, in the House of Representatives, June 21, 1856. Washington, D.C.: Buell & Blanchard, 1856.

Box 2, Folder 64

Colman, Louis.

Night riders in Gallup. New York: International Labor Defense, 1935.

Box 2, Folder 65

Colvig, Richard.

Black music: a checklist of books. Oakland, Calif.: Oakland Public Library, 1969.

Box 2, Folder 66

Comas, Juan.

Les mythes raciaux. Paris: Unesco, 1951.

Box 2, Folder 67

Committee for Equal Justice for Mrs. Recy Taylor.

The woman next door: a story of unequal justice. New York: Committee for Equal Justice for Mrs. Recy Taylor, [193-?].

Box 2, Folder 68

Committee for GI Rights.

Kangaroo court-martial. New York: Committee for GI Rights, 1969.

Box 2, Folder 69

Committee of Editors and Writers of the South.

Voting restrictions in the 13 southern states. [Atlanta]: Committee of Editors and Writers of the South, [194-].

Box 2, Folder 70

Communist Party. National Campaign Committee.

Communist election platform, adopted by the National Nominating Convention, Chicago, May 28-29, 1932. New York: Workers Library Publishers, 1932.

Box 2, Folder 71

Communist Party.

Race hatred on trial. New York: [Workers Library Publishers], 1948.

Box 2, Folder 72

Communist Party. National Education Department.

The struggle against white chauvinism. New York: Communist Party, 1949.

Box 2, Folder 73

Communist Party. National Committee.

Theoretical aspects of the Negro question in the United States. New York: Communist Party., [1959].

Box 2, Folder 74

Community Relations Service.

The people take the lead, a record of progress in civil rights, 1947 to 1951. New York: Community Relations Service, [195-].

Box 2, Folder 75

Conference on Education and Race Relations.

America's tenth man, a brief survey of the Negro's part in American history. Atlanta: Conference on Education and Race Relations, 1937.

Note

2 copies
Box 2, Folder 76

Woodbey, George W.

Why the Negro should vote the Socialist ticket. Chicago: National Office of the Socialist Party, [19--].

Box 2, Folder 77

United States. District Court of Tennessee.

Report of Grand Jury in the matter of the racial disturbance at Colombia, Tennessee. [Tennessee]: [s.n.], [1946].

Box 2, Folder 78

Committee for the Defense of Civil Rights.

Tampa--tar and terror. New York: Committee for the Defense of Civil Rights in Tampa, [193-].

Box 2, Folder 79

CIO Committee to Abolish Racial Discrimination.

Working and fighting together. Washington, D.C.: Congress of Industrial Organizations, 1943.

Box 2, Folder 80

Conrad, Earl.

Harriet Tubman: Negro soldier and abolitionist. New York: International Publishers, 1942.

Box 2, Folder 81

Conrad, Earl, and Eugene Gordon.

Equal justice under law. New York: Committee for Equal Justice for Mrs. Recy Taylor, [194-].

Box 2, Folder 82

Cooper, Peter.

The death of slavery: letter from Peter Cooper to Governor Seymour. New York: Loyal Publication Society, 1863.

Box 2, Folder 83

Corwin, Thomas.

Speech of Hon. Thomas Corwin, of Ohio, in the House of Representatives, Jan. 23 and 24, 1860. Washington, D.C.: Buell & Blanchard, 1860.

Box 2, Folder 84

Council for Democracy.

The Negro in America: how we treat him and how we should. New York: Council for Democracy, 1945.

Box 2, Folder 85

Council for Social Action of the Congregational and Christian Churches.

Towards a new America. New York: Council for Social Action of the Congregational and Christian Churches., [193-?].

Box 2, Folder 86

Cowley, Charles.

The romance of history in "The Black County" and the romance of war in the career of Gen. Robert Smalls, "The hero of the planter." Lowell, Mass.: [s.n.], 1882.

Box 2, Folder 87

Creger, Ralph, and Carl Creeger.

This is what we found. New York: L. Stuart, 1960.

Box 2, Folder 88

Crockett, George W.

Freedom is everybody's job! New York: National Non-Partisan Committee to Defend the Rights of the 12 Communist Leaders, [1949?].

Box 2, Folder 89

Crosswaith, Frank R.

The Negro and socialism. Chicago: Socialist Party of America, [1929?].

Note

2 copies
Box 2, Folder 90

Crosswaith, Frank R., and Alfred Baker Lewis.

True freedon for Negro and white labor. New York: Negro Labor News Service, [1936?].

Box 2, Folder 91

Cruse, Harold, et al.

Marxism and the Negro struggle. New York: Merit Publishers, 1968.

Box 2, Folder 92

Current, Gloster B.

"Martyr for a cause." Reprinted from The Crisis.[February 1952].

Box 2, Folder 93

Damon, Anna.

Victory: decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in the case of Angelo Herndon, April 1937. New York: New York State International Labor Defense, [1937].

Box 2, Folder 94

Darragh, John.

Colour and conscience: a study of race relations and colour prejudice in Birmingham. Great Britain: [s.n.], 1957.

Box 2, Folder 95

Davis, Benjamin J.

In defense of Negro rights. New York: Communist Party, 1950.

Box 2, Folder 96

Davis, Benjamin J.

Must Negro-Americans wait another hundred years for freedom? New York: New Century Publishers, 1963.

Box 2, Folder 97

Davis, Benjamin J.

The Negro people on the march. New York: New Century Publishers, 1956.

Box 2, Folder 98

Davis, Benjamin J.

The path of Negro liberation. New York: New Century Publishers, 1947.

Box 2, Folder 99

Davis, Benjamin J.

Upsurge in the south. New York: New Century Publishers, 1960.

Box 2, Folder 100

Davis, Benjamin J.

Why I am a communist. New York: New Century Publishers, 1947.

Box 2, Folder 101

Davis, Ben Jr.

James W. Ford: what he is and what he stands for. New York: Workers Library Publishers, 1936.

Box 2, Folder 102

Davis, Ben Jr.

The Negro people and the Communist Party. New York: Workers Library Publishers, 1943.

Box 2, Folder 103

Davis, Charles H., Jr.

Black nationalism and the Nation of Islam. Parts I-IV. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1962.

Box 2, Folder 104

Davis, John A.

How management can integrate Negroes in war industries. [Albany?]: New York State War Council, 1942.

Note

2 copies
Box 2, Folder 105

Davis, Michael M.

"Problems of health service for Negroes." Reprinted from The Journal of Negro Education.[July 1937].

Box 2, Folder 106

Davis, Mitchell.

One hundred choice quotations by prominent men and women of the Negro race. Washington, D.C.: M. Davis, 1917.

Box 2, Folder 107

Davis, Benjamin J.

On the struggle for peace and freedom. New York: Jefferson School of Social Science, 1956.

Box 2, Folder 108

Dean, Elwood.

The story of the Trenton Six. New York: New Century Publishers, 1949.

Box 2, Folder 109

Deane, Charles.

The connection of Massachusetts with slavery and the slave-trade. Worchester, Mass.: Charles Hamilton, 1886.

Box 2, Folder 110

Deginga.

What does it mean to be black? Detroit: Committee for Political Development, [197-?].

Box 2, Folder 111

Deginga.

What is freedom? Who is the enemy? Detroit: Committee for Political Development, [197-?].

Box 2, Folder 112

Deming, D.D.

Anti-spoonerism; or, the reactionary forces of the Negro. New York: Ross & Tousey, 1860.

Box 2, Folder 113

Council for Democracy.

The Negro and defense: a test of democracy. New York: Council for Democracy, 1941.

Box 2, Folder 114

Democratic Labour Party.

For a new Trinidad and Tobago: Democratic Labour Party Manifesto 3, "Agriculture." [S.l.]: Rahaman Printers, Ltd., [196-?].

Box 2, Folder 115

Democratic Labour Party.

For a new Trinidad and Tobago: Democratic Labour Party Manifesto 4, "Co-operatives." [S.l.]: Rahaman Printers, Ltd., [196-?].

Box 2, Folder 116

Democratic League.

The slaveholder's conspiracy. [S.l.]: [s.n.], [186-?].

Box 2, Folder 117

Denton, Mrs. Oscar.

Mammy Crittie and Baby Suzon. New York: E.S. Werner, 1896.

Box 2, Folder 118

Donnell, E.J.

Slavery and "protection." New York: E.J. Donnell, 1884.

Note

2 copies
Box 2, Folder 119

Douglass, Frederick.

The Negro people in a democratic war. New York: Workers Bookshop, [19--].

Box 2, Folder 120

Douglass, Frederick.

Negroes and the national war effort. New York: Workers Library Publishers, 1942.

Box 2, Folder 121

Douglass, Frederick.

Oration delivered by Frederick Douglass at the unveiling of the Freedmen's Monument in memory of Abraham Lincoln. New York: Pathway Press, 1940.

Box 2, Folder 122

Dryver, Edward R.

Should the Negro fight for America? Buffalo, N.Y.: E.R. Dryver, [19--].

Box 2, Folder 123

DuBois, W.E.B., and Gus Hall.

"On this first day of October..." Dr. W.E.B. DuBois' application to join the Communist Party and Gus Hall's reply. New York: Communist Party, [196-].

Box 2, Folder 124

DuBois, W.E.B.

I take my stand for peace. New York: Masses & Mainstream, 1951.

Box 2, Folder 125

DuBois, W.E.B.

Peace is dangerous. New York: National Guardian, [1951].

Box 2, Folder 126

Dunlop, John.

Organic sins: or, the iniquity of licensed injustice. Edinburgh: William Oliphant & Sons, 1846.

Box 2, Folder 127

Dewey, Donald.

Four studies of Negro employment in the upper South. Washington, D.C.: National Planning Association, 1953.

Box 2, Folder 128

Embree, Edwin R.

Julius Rosenwald Fund: review for the two-year period, 1938-1940. Chicago: Julius Rosenwald Fund, 1940.

 

Box 3

Box 3, Folder 1

Etheridge, Emerson.

Speech of Emerson Etheridge of Tennesee, on the revival of the Africa slave-trade, and the President's message, delivered in the House of Representatives of the United States, Feb. 21, 1857. Washington, D.C.: [s.n.], 1857.

Box 3, Folder 2

Belisle, John, and George Novack.

Black slavery and capitalism; and, The rise and fall of the cotton kingdom, the ultimate stage of chattel slavery in the South. New York: Socialist Workers Party, 1968.

Box 3, Folder 3

Glenton, Mary V.

Story of a hospital. Hartford: Church Missions Publishing Co., 1937.

Box 3, Folder 4

Goldner, Sanford.

The Jewish people and the fight for Negro rights. Los Angeles: Committee for Negro-Jewish Relations, 1953.

Box 3, Folder 5

Hugh Gordon Book Store.

Black freedom is your responsibility! Los Angeles: [s.n.], [196-?].

Box 3, Folder 6

Govern, Rena Greenlee.

Democracy's task. [S.l.]: R.G. Govern, 1945.

Box 3, Folder 7

Granger, Lester B., and T. Arnold Hill.

Occupational opportunities for Negroes. New York: National Urban League, 1937.

Box 3, Folder 8

Green, James J.

Wendell Phillips. New York: International Publishers, 1943.

Box 3, Folder 9

Garrett, Henry E.

How classroom desegregation will work. Richmond: Patrick Henry Press, [196-].

Box 3, Folder 10

Georges, Guy D.

Poeme d'amour pour un amour inconnu. Port-au-Prince, Haiti: S.L. Gaston, 1967.

Box 3, Folder 11

Georges, Guy D.

L'immense profondeur. Port-au-Prince, Haiti: S.L. Gaston, 1965.

Box 3, Folder 12

Georgia Committee on Interracial Cooperation.

"An astounding situation." Reprinted from The Southern Frontier.[January 1940].

Box 3, Folder 13

Gilligan, Francis.

Negro workers in free America. New York: Paulist Press, 1939.

Box 3, Folder 14

Gilmer, John A.

State of the Union: speech of Hon. John A. Gilmer, of North Carolina, delivered in the House of Representatives, Jan. 26, 1861. Washington, D.C.: H. Polkinhorn, 1861.

Box 3, Folder 15

Giddings, Joshua Reed.

Speech of Mr. Giddings, of Ohio, on his motion to reconsider the vote taken upon the final passage of the "Bill for the relief of the owners of slaves lost from on board the Comet and Encomium", House of Representatives, Feb. 13, 1843. Washington, D.C.: Buell & Blanchard, 1843.

Box 3, Folder 16

Ford, James W.

The Negro people and the new world situation. New York: Workers Library Publishers, 1941.

Box 3, Folder 17

Ford, James W.

Imperialism destroys the people of Africa. New York: Communist Party., [193-].

Box 3, Folder 18

Ford, James W.

The right to revolution for the Negro people. New York: Communist Party, [193-].

Box 3, Folder 19

Giddings, Joshua Reed.

Baltimore platforms--slavery question: speech of Hon. Joshua R. Giddings of Ohio, in the House of Representatives, June 23, 1852. New York: Buell & Blanchard, [1852].

Box 3, Folder 20

Filley, Jane, and Therese Mitchell.

Consider the laundry workers. New York: League of Women Shoppers, Inc., 1937.

Box 3, Folder 21

Ford, James W.

Hunger and terror in Harlem: the causes and the remedies for the March 19th outbreak in Harlem. New York: Communist Party, [1935].

Box 3, Folder 22

Ford, James W.

Economic struggle of Negro workers. New York: Provisional International Trade Union, Committee of Negro Workers, 1930.

Box 3, Folder 23

Ford, James W.

Anti-semitism and the struggle for democracy. New York: National Council of Jewish Communists, [1938].

Box 3, Folder 24

Fisher, Lloyd.

The problem of violence: observations on race conflict in Los Angeles. [San Francisco]: National Council on Race Relations, [194-].

Box 3, Folder 25

Finch, Amanda.

Back trail: a novella of love in the south. New York: William-Frederick Press, 1951.

Box 3, Folder 26

Friedel, L.M.

The Bible and Negro spirituals. [S.l.]: [s.n.], 1947.

Box 3, Folder 27

Ford, James W., et al.

Communists in the struggle for Negro rights. New York: New Century Publishers, 1945.

Box 3, Folder 28

Ford, James W.

The Communists and the struggle for Negro liberation. New York: Communist Party, [193-].

Box 3, Folder 29

Ford, James W.

Negro's struggle against imperialism. New York: Provisional International Trade Union, Committee of Negro Workers, 1930.

Box 3, Folder 30

Foster, William Z., and James W. Ford.

Foster and Ford for food and freedom. New York: Workers Library Publishers, 1932.

Box 3, Folder 31

Forman, James.

Control, conflict, and change: the underlying concepts of the Black Manifesto. Detroit: Black Star, 1970.

Box 3, Folder 32

Ford, James W.

Win progress for Harlem. New York: Communist Party, [1939?].

Box 3, Folder 33

Ford, James W.

The war and the Negro people. New York: Workers Library Publishers, 1942.

Box 3, Folder 34

Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America.

Practice brotherhood now! New York: Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America., 1948.

Box 3, Folder 35

National Negro Congress.

Fight for Negro rights! Official Program, Feb. 14, 15, 16, 17, 1936, Chicago. [S.l.]: Stern Printing Co., 1936.

Box 3, Folder 36

Felps, Jettie.

Our land and homes. Burnet, Tex.: [S.n.], [194-?].

Box 3, Folder 37

Negro Americans take the lead: a statement on the crisis in American civilization. Detroit: Facing Reality Publishing Committee, 1964.

Note

2 copies
Box 3, Folder 38

Hancock.

A letter to the Hon. Samuel A. Eliot, representative in Congress from the city of Boston, in reply to his apology for voting for the Fugitive Slave Bill. Boston: William Crosby & H.P. Nichols, 1851.

Box 3, Folder 39

Harap, Louis, and L.D. Reddick.

Should Negroes and Jews unite? [S.l.]: Negro Publication Society, 1943.

Box 3, Folder 40

Harding, Philip M.

Harlem interior: three poems. Teaneck, N.J.: Blockprint Press, [196-?].

Box 3, Folder 41

Harlem Defense Council.

Police terror in Harlem. New York: Harlem Defense Council, [196-].

Box 3, Folder 42

Harewood, Leroy.

Black power lessness in Barbados. Bridgetown, Barbados: Black Star, 1968.

Box 3, Folder 43

Operation Education, Operation Bootstrap, Inc.

What's wrong with the world? Los Angeles: John Henry and Mary Louisa Dunn Bryant Foundation., 1967.

Box 3, Folder 44

Harrington, Michael.

The politics of poverty. New York: League for Industrial Democracy, 1965.

Box 3, Folder 45

Harris, Eugene.

Two sermons on the race problem, addressed to young colored men, by one of them. Nashville: [Fisk University?], 1895.

Box 3, Folder 46

Ferguson, George Oscar.

"The psychology of the Negro: an experimental study." Reprinted from Archives of Psychology 36.[April 1916].

Box 3, Folder 47

Hall, Gus.

Racism: the nation's most dangerous pollutant. New York: New Outlook Publishers, 1971.

Box 3, Folder 48

Hall, Gus.

Marxism and Negro liberation. New York: New Century Publishers, 1951.

Box 3, Folder 49

Hall, Gus.

Negro freedom is in the interest of every American. New York: New Currents, 1964.

Box 3, Folder 50

Hall, Nathaniel.

Two sermons on slavery and its hero-victim. Boston: John Wilson & Sons, 1859.

Box 3, Folder 51

Hall, Rob Fowler.

A message to the south. Birmingham: Alabama State Committee Communist Party, [1949?].

Box 3, Folder 52

Hall, Rob Fowler.

FEPC: how it was betrayed, how it can be saved. New York: New Century Publishers, 1950.

Box 3, Folder 53

Haynes, George E.

The trend of the races. New York: Council of Women for Home Missions, 1922.

Box 3, Folder 54

Hathaway, C.A.

Who are the friends of the Negro people? New York: Workers Library Publishers, 1932.

Box 3, Folder 55

Hertslet, Lewis E.

Curse of Ham. Cape Town, South Africa: African Bookman, 1946.

Box 3, Folder 56

Hayden, Tom.

Revolution in Mississippi. New York: Students for Democratic Society, 1962.

Box 3, Folder 57

Hollo, Anselm, ed.

Negro verse selected by Anselm Hollo. London: Vista Books, 1964.

Box 3, Folder 58

Hill, Herbert.

The racial practices of organized labor--in the age of Gompers and after. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, 1965.

Box 3, Folder 59

Hill, Herbert.

"A record of Negro disfranchisement." Reprinted from Midstream, a Quarterly Jewish Review.[1957].

Box 3, Folder 60

Hirsch, Carl.

Terror at Trumbull. New York: New Century Publishers, 1955.

Box 3, Folder 61

Holland, Denys C.

Our freedom is not for them. England: Union of Democratic Control, 1955.

Box 3, Folder 62

Hill, Herbert.

"Recent effects of racial conflict on southern industrial development." Reprinted from PHYLON, the Atlanta University Review of Race and Culture.[1959].

Box 3, Folder 63

Haynes, Elizabeth Ross.

The black boy of Atlanta: a fullsize biography of one of the greatest men of this country, Major Richard Robert Wright. Boston: House of Edinboro, [195-].

Box 3, Folder 64

Haywood, Harry, and M. Howard.

Lynching. New York: International Publishers, 1932.

Box 3, Folder 65

Herndon, Angelo.

The Scottsboro boys. New York: Workers Library Publishers, 1937.

Box 3, Folder 66

Herrnstein, Richard.

"I.Q." Reprinted from Atlantic Monthly.[1971].

Box 3, Folder 67

Henningsen, C.F.

Letter from Gen. C.F. Henningsen, in reply to the letter of Victor Hugo on the Harper's Ferry Invasion. New York: Davies & Kent, 1860.

Box 3, Folder 68

Highlander Folk School.

A guide to community action for public school integration. Monteagle, Tenn.: Highlander Folk School, [1955].

Box 3, Folder 69

Haywood, Harry.

The south comes north in Detroit's own Scottsboro case. New York: National Office League of Struggles for Negro Rights, [193-?].

Box 3, Folder 70

Height, Dorothy I., ed.

The core of America's race problem. New York: Woman's Press, 1945.

Box 3, Folder 71

Herndon, Angelo.

You cannot kill the working class. New York: International Labor Defense and League of Struggle for Negro Rights, [193-?].

Box 3, Folder 72

Hightower, Estelle.

Race relations in the south. New York: Columbia University, 1942.

Box 3, Folder 73

Hill, Herbert.

"The Communist Party--enemy of Negro equality." Reprinted from The Crisis.[1951].

Box 3, Folder 74

Hill, Herbert.

"The ILGWU--fact and fiction, a reply to Gus Taylor." Reprinted from New Politics.[Winter 1963].

Box 3, Folder 75

Hill, Herbert.

"The ILGWU today--the decay of a labor union." Reprinted from New Politics.[1962].

Box 3, Folder 76

Hill, Herbert.

"Labor unions and the Negro." Reprinted from Commentary.[December 1959].

Box 3, Folder 77

Hill, Herbert.

"Racial inequality in employment: the patterns of discrimination." Reprinted from The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 357.[January 1965].

Box 3, Folder 78

Horne, Frank.

Haverstraw. London: Paul Breman, 1963.

Box 3, Folder 79

Hyman, Herbert H., and Paul B. Sheatsley.

"Attitudes toward desegregation." Reprinted from Scientific American 195:6.[December 1956].

Box 3, Folder 80

Huff, William Henry.

From deep within. Chicago: Dierkes Press, 1951.

Box 3, Folder 81

Hood, Robin.

Industrial social security in the South. Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina Press, 1936.

Box 3, Folder 82

Hubbard, H.J.M.

Venezuelan border issue and occupation of Ankoko; a sell-out by the coalition government. [Georgetown, Guyuana]: [People's Progressive Party], [1967].

Box 3, Folder 83

Hugo, Victor, et al.

Letters on American slavery from Victor Hugo, de Tocqueville, Emile de Girardin, Carnot, Passy, Mazzini, Humboldt, O. Lafayette, &c. Boston: American Anti-Slavery Society, 1860.

Box 3, Folder 84

Humphrey, John D.

Godliness, equality, freedom. [Port-of-Spain, Trinidad]: J.D. Humphrey, [196-].

Box 3, Folder 85

Humphrey, John D.

Trinityism (Revolution of Peace) and Trinidad and Tobago. [Port-of-Spain, Trinidad]: [J.D. Humphrey], [1964].

Box 3, Folder 86

Horton, James E.

The Scottsboro Case: the opinion of Judge James E. Horton. New York: Scottsboro Defense Committee, 1936.

Box 3, Folder 87

Hubbard, Elbert.

Little journeys to the homes of eminent orators, [Henry Ward] Beecher. East Aurora, N.Y.: Roycrofters at the Shop, 1903.

Box 3, Folder 88

Jacques, Truman M.

Black appreciation test. [S.l.]: [s.n.], [196-?].

Box 3, Folder 89

North Carolina Historical Society.

The free Negro in North Carolina, and Some colonial history of Craven County. Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina, 1920.

Box 3, Folder 90

Inez M. Boddy, et al.

Index to selected Negro periodicals received in the Hallie Q. Brown Library. Wilberforce, Ohio: College of Education and Industrial Arts, 1950.

Box 3, Folder 91

Ivy, A.C., and Irwin Ross.

Religion and race: barriers to college? New York: Public Affairs Committee., 1949.

Box 3, Folder 92

International Labor Defense.

Mr. President : Free the Scottsboro boys! New York: International Labor Defense, 1934.

Box 3, Folder 93

Independent Service for Information on the Vienna Youth Festival.

A review of Negro segregation in the United States. Cambridge: Independent Service for Information on the Vienna Youth Festival, 1959.

Box 3, Folder 94

Carrere, Mentis.

It's all south. Part 2. Los Angeles: John Henry and Mary Louise Dunn Bryant Foundation, 1966.

Box 3, Folder 95

International Labor Defense and National Negro Congress.

It is against the law. New York: International Labor Defense and National Negro Congress, 1945.

Box 3, Folder 96

Nelson, Edward L.

Notes and data on the Negro people in the United States. New York: International Workers Order, [1949].

Box 3, Folder 97

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

The year of jubilee: NAACP report for 1959. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People., 1960.

Box 3, Folder 98

Johnson, Grace Hays.

"Phases of cultural history of significance for Negro students." Reprinted from The Journal of Negro History 22:1.[January 1937].

Box 3, Folder 99

Jackson, Frances.

Letter from Frances Jackson. Boston: Andrews, Prentiss & Studley, 1844.

Box 3, Folder 100

Jackson, John G.

Christianity before Christ. New York: Blyden Society, 1938.

Box 3, Folder 101

Jesse, Charles.

Sketch for a life of H.H. Breen, F.S.A. (1805-1881). Castries, St. Lucia, West Indies: St. Lucia Archaeological and Historical Society, 1968.

Box 3, Folder 102

Jagan, Cheddi.

Border conspiracy exposed. [Lacytown, Guyana]: People's Progressive Party, [1968].

Box 3, Folder 103

Jagan, Cheddi.

Caribbean unity and Carifta. [Lacytown], Guyana: People's Progressive Party, [1968].

Box 3, Folder 104

Jagan, Cheddi.

Socialism for Guyana. [Lacytown, Guyana]: People's Progressive Party, [1968].

Box 3, Folder 105

U.C.A.P.A.W.A.-C.I.O., Local 313.

Down with starvation wages in South-East Missouri. [Lilbourn, Missouri?]: U.C.A.P.A.W.A.-C.I.O., Local 313, [194-].

Box 3, Folder 106

Native Son.

"My friends": a fireside chat on the war. New York: Workers Party, 1940.

Box 3, Folder 107

Charles Spurgeon Johnson: a bibliography. Nashville: Fisk University Library, 1947.

Box 3, Folder 108

Johnson, Charles S.

The economic status of Negroes. [Nashville]: Fisk University Press, 1933.

Box 3, Folder 109

Jackson, E.J.

The A.M.E. layman. [West Palm Beach, Fla.]: [s.n.], [19--?].

Box 3, Folder 110

Johnson, Howard.

"The Negro veteran fights for freedom!" Reprinted from Political Affairs.[May 1947].

Box 3, Folder 111

Kupferberg, Tuli.

The Mississippi (A study of the white race). New York: Birth Press, 1962.

Box 3, Folder 112

Johnson, J.R.

Why Negroes should oppose the war. New York: Pioneer Publishers, [194-].

Box 3, Folder 113

Jacobs, Jim.

Black workers set the pace. Boston: New England Free Press, 1969.

Box 3, Folder 114

Jackson, Esther Cooper.

This is my husband: fighter for his people, political refugee. New York: National Committee to Defend Negro Leadership, 1953.

Box 3, Folder 115

Jones, Eugene Kinckle.

Twenty years after: a record of accomplishments of the National Urban League during 1929. New York: National Urban League, 1930.

Box 3, Folder 116

Johnson, Tom.

The Reds in Dixie. New York: Workers Library Publishers, 1935.

Box 3, Folder 117

Joint Committee to Aid the Herndon Defense.

Wisdom, justice and moderation: the case of Angelo Herndon. [New York]: Joint Committee to Aid the Herndon Defense, 1935.

 

Box 4

Box 4, Folder 1

United States. Public Health Service.

National Negro Health Week. 26th observance, March 31-April 7, 1940. [Washington, D.C.]: [U.S. Government Printing Office], 1940.

Box 4, Folder 2

National Negro Congress.

Resolutions of the National Negro Congress held in Chicago, Ill., February 14, 15, 16, 1936. [Chicago?]: National Negro Congress, [1936?].

Box 4, Folder 3

National Negro Congress.

Official proceedings of the National Negro Congress, February, 14, 15, 16, 1936, Chicago. Washington, D.C.: National Negro Congress, [1936?].

Box 4, Folder 4

National Negro Congress.

Proceedings of the Conference on Postwar Employment. New York: National Negro Congress, 1945.

Box 4, Folder 5

National Negro Congress.

A petition...to the United Nations on behalf of 13 million oppressed Negro citizens of the United States of America. [New York]: [National Negro Congress], [1946?].

Box 4, Folder 6

National Negro Congress.

Negro workers after the war. New York: National Negro Congress, 1945.

Box 4, Folder 7

McNeilly, James H.

Religion and slavery: a vindication of the Southern churches. Nashville: Publishing House of the M.E. Church, South, 1911.

Box 4, Folder 8

National Urban League.

The National Urban League's work in 1940. New York: National Urban League, [1941].

Box 4, Folder 9

National League on Urban Conditions Among Negroes.

Bulletin, vol. 2, no. 3, March, 1913. New York: National League on Urban Conditions Among Negroes, 1913.

Note

serial
Box 4, Folder 10

National Political Action Committee, C.I.O.

The Negro in 1944. New York: National Political Action Committee, C.I.O., [1944?].

Box 4, Folder 11

National Negro Congress.

Negro people will defend America. New York: National Negro Congress, [1941?].

Box 4, Folder 12

National League on Urban Conditions Among Negroes.

A challenge to democracy. Bulletin, vol. 7, no. 1, November, 1917. New York: National League on Urban Conditions Among Negroes, 1917.

Box 4, Folder 13

National Urban League.

The forgotten tenth: an analysis of unemployment among Negroes in the United States and its social costs: 1932-1933. New York: National Urban League, 1933.

Box 4, Folder 14

National Labor Service.

Discrimination costs you money. New York: National Labor Service, [19--].

Box 4, Folder 15

National CIO Committee to Abolish Discrimination.

Report of the National CIO Committee to Abolish Discrimination. Washington, D.C.: National CIO Committee to Abolish Discrimination, 1946.

Box 4, Folder 16

National Committee for Justice in Columbia, Tennessee.

Terror in Tennessee. New York: National Committee for Justice in Columbia, Tennessee, [194-].

Box 4, Folder 17

National Conference on Fundamental Problems in the Education of Negroes, Committee on Finance.

School money in black and white. Chicago: Julius Rosenwald Fund, [1934?].

Box 4, Folder 18

Socialist Workers Party.

A transitional program for black liberation. New York: Merit Publishers, 1969.

Box 4, Folder 19

National Federation for Constitutional Liberties.

Everybody's business: a summary of New York State anti-discrimination laws and how to use them. New York: National Federation for Constitutional Liberties, 1946.

Box 4, Folder 20

United States. National Youth Administration.

The tenth youth. Washington, D.C.: National Youth Administration, 1938.

Box 4, Folder 21

National Negro Business Leagues.

Annual convention in Detroit, souvenir program of convention and exhibition, Aug. 27-30 and Aug. 25, Sept. 1, 1940. [Detroit?]: National Negro Business League, 1940.

Box 4, Folder 22

United States. Commission on Civil Rights. Mississippi Advisory Committee.

Administration of justice in Mississippi. [Washington, D.C.]: Mississippi Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, 1963.

Box 4, Folder 23

Mississippi State Junior Chamber of Commerce.

Oxford: a warning for Americans. Jackson, Miss.: Mississippi State Junior Chamber of Commerce., 1962.

Box 4, Folder 24

Merriam, Eve.

Montgomery, Alabama, Money, Mississippi and other places. New York: Cameron Associates, 1956.

Box 4, Folder 25

Minor, Robert.

Tell the people how Ben Davis was elected. New York: New Century Publishers, 1946.

Box 4, Folder 26

Minnesota. Governor's Interracial Commission.

The Negro worker in Minnesota. [Minnesota?]: Governor's Interracial Commission, 1945.

Box 4, Folder 27

Montagu, Ashley.

"Problems and methods relating to the study of race." Reprinted from Psychiatry: Journal of the Biology and Pathology of Interpersonal Relations 3:4.[November 1940].

Box 4, Folder 28

[Miller, Charles].

Gerrit Smith and the vigilant association of the city of New York. New York: John A. Gray, Printer, 1860.

Box 4, Folder 29

Milholland, John E.

The Negro and the Nation: an address to the National Negro Business League in convention assembled at New York, Aug. 16,17,18, 1905. New York: Moore Printing Co., 1906.

Box 4, Folder 30

Morton, O.P.

Reconstruction: speech of Hon. O.P. Morton, in the U.S. Senate, January 24, 1868, on the constitutionality of the reconstruction acts. [Washington, D.C.]: [Chronicle], [1868].

Box 4, Folder 31

Giddings, Joshua Reed.

Speech of Mr. Giddings, of Ohio, upon the bill to supply the deficience of appropriations for the year ending June 30, 1848. Washington, D.C.: J. & G.S. Gideon, 1848.

Box 4, Folder 32

Reade, Thaddeus Constantine.

Sketch of the life of Samuel Morris. [Upland, Ind.]: [s.n.], [1896].

Box 4, Folder 33

Miller, Samuel.

A sermon preached at Newark, Oct. 22, 1823, before the synod of New Jersey, for the benefit of the African school, under the care of the synod. Trenton, N.J.: George Sherman, 1823.

Box 4, Folder 34

Morgan, Edwin, V.

Slavery in New York. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1898.

Box 4, Folder 35

Murray, Pauli, and Murray Kempton.

"All for Mr. Davis": the story of sharecropper Odell Waller. New York: Workers Defense League, [194-].

Box 4, Folder 36

Morant, G.M.

The significance of racial differences. Paris: UNESCO, 1952.

Box 4, Folder 37

Montagu, Ashley.

What we know about "race": teacher's supplement. New York: One Nation Library, [195-?].

Box 4, Folder 38

Morris Joe Alex.

"The truth about the Florida race troubles." Reprinted from The Saturday Evening Post.1952.

Box 4, Folder 39

United States. Senate.

Memorial of the trustees of the Peabody Educational Fund with a report of their committee on the subject of the education of the colored population of the southern states. Washington, D.C.: [s.n.], [1880].

Box 4, Folder 40

Kharusi, Ahmed Seif.

The agony of Zanzibar: a victim of the new colonialism. Surrey, England: Foreign Affairs Publishing Co., 1969.

Box 4, Folder 41

Committee to Defend the Panthers.

Lonnie McLucas, a true revolutionary! New York: Committee to Defend the Panthers, [197-].

Box 4, Folder 42

McWilliams, Carey.

"Race discrimination--and the law." Reprinted from Science and Society 9:1.1945.

Box 4, Folder 43

MacDonald Dwight.

The war's greatest scandal! The story of Jim Crow in uniform. New York: March on Washington Movement, [1943].

Note

2 copies
Box 4, Folder 44

Giddings, Joshua Reed.

The conflict between religious truths and American infidelity: speech of Mr. Giddings, of Ohio, upon the issues pending before the American people in regard to freedom and slavery. Washington, D.C.: Buell & Blanchard, [1856].

Box 4, Folder 45

Mayhew, Howard.

Racial terror at Trumbull Park, Chicago. New York: Pioneer Publishers, 1954.

Box 4, Folder 46

Mann, Charles P.

Stalin's thought illuminates problems of Negro freedom struggle. New York: Communist Party, 1953.

Box 4, Folder 47

Marsh, Leonard.

A bake-pan for the doughfaces. Burlington, Vt.: C. Goodrich, 1854.

Box 4, Folder 48

Mayer, Thomas F.

"The position and progress of black America: some pertinent statistics." Reprinted from Bulletin of the Ann Arbor Citizens for New Politics.[November 1967].

Box 4, Folder 49

McAfee, Kathy.

"Black brothers have a better idea." Reprinted from The Movement.[August 1969].

Box 4, Folder 50

Mayer, Edith H.

Our Negro brother. New York: Shady Hill Press, 1945.

Box 4, Folder 51

Mayer, Milton Sanford.

These few. Chicago: Human Events Associates, 1947.

Box 4, Folder 52

L'abbé Maury aux Enfers.

Les Delassemens comiques ou sa deuxieme lettre au clerge. [S.l.]: [s.n.], [18--?].

Box 4, Folder 53

Mann, Horace.

Speech of Horace Mann of Massachusetts, on the subject of slavery in the territories, and the consequences of a dissolution of the Union, delivered in the U.S. House of Representatives, Feb. 15, 1850. Boston: Redding & Co., 1850.

Box 4, Folder 54

Marshall, Horace.

Police brutality: lynching in the Northern style. New York: Office of Councilman Benjamin J. Davis, [1947?].

Box 4, Folder 55

Marshall, Thurgood.

Report on Korea: the shameful story of the courts martial of Negro GI's. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, 1951.

Box 4, Folder 56

McFarland, H.S.

To my country. [S.l.]: H.S. McFarland, 1953.

Box 4, Folder 57

Mann, Horace.

Speech of Mr. Horace Mann, of Mass., on the right of Congress to legislate for the territories of the U.S. and its duty to exclude slavery therefrom, delivered in the House of Representatives, in committee of the whole, June 30, 1848. Washington, D.C.: J. & G.S. Gideon, 1848.

Box 4, Folder 58

McCulloch, Margaret Callender.

Segregation, a challenge to democracy. Nashville: Fisk University, 1950.

Box 4, Folder 59

MacLean, Malcolm S.

Higher education and the Negro. [S.l.]: American Council on Education, [193-].

Box 4, Folder 60

A thrilling narrative from the lips of the sufferers of the late Detroit riot. Hattiesburg, Miss.: Book Farm, 1945.

Box 4, Folder 61

Lightfoot, Claude M.

Black America and the world revolution. New York: New Outlook, 1970.

Box 4, Folder 62

Little, Kenneth.

Race and society. Paris: Unesco, 1952.

Box 4, Folder 63

Lewis, John L.

Equal opportunity. [Washington, D.C.]: National Negro Congress, 1940.

Box 4, Folder 64

Winston, Henry, et al.

Negro liberation, a goal for all Americans. New York: New Currents Publishers, 1964.

Box 4, Folder 65

Lightfoot, Claude M.

Turning point in freedom road: the fight to end Jim Crow now. New York: New Century Publishers, 1962.

Box 4, Folder 66

Lightfoot, Claude M.

"Not guilty!" New York: New Century Publishers, 1955.

Box 4, Folder 67

League of Struggle for Negro Rights.

Equality, land and freedom: a program for Negro liberation. New York: League of Struggle for Negro Rights, 1933.

Box 4, Folder 68

Lightfoot, Claude M.

An American looks at Russia. New York: New Century Publishers, 1951.

Box 4, Folder 69

Lee, Alfred McClung.

Race riots aren't necessary. [New York]: Public Affairs Committee, Inc., 1945.

Box 4, Folder 70

Lester, Julius.

The angry children of Malcolm X. Boston: New England Free Press, [1966?].

Box 4, Folder 71

Lightfoot, Claude M.

The Civil War and Black liberation today. New York: New Outlook Publishers, 1969.

Box 4, Folder 72

League of Struggle for Negro Rights.

They shall not die! New York: Workers' Library Publishers, 1932.

Box 4, Folder 73

Lee, Kendrick.

"Federal protection of civil liberties." Editorial Research Reports 1:2. [January 1947].

Box 4, Folder 74

Lessons from the damned: class struggle in the Black community. Washington, N.J.: Times Change Press, 1973.

Box 4, Folder 75

Low, Nat.

The Negro in sports. San Francisco: The Daily People's World, [194-].

Box 4, Folder 76

Lawson, Elizabeth.

Twenty years on the chain gang? New York: International Labor Defense, 1935.

Box 4, Folder 77

[Locke, David Ross].

The impendin crisis uv the dimocracy, bein a breef and concise statement uv the past experience, present condishun and fucher hopes uv the dimokratic party. New York: American News Co., [1868].

Box 4, Folder 78

Laidler, Harry Wellington, ed.

The role of the races in our future civilization: symposium. New York: League for Industrial Democracy, 1942.

Box 4, Folder 79

Lawson, Elizabeth.

Thaddeus Stevens. New York: International Publishers, 1942.

Box 4, Folder 80

Labour Party.

Time for a change: Manifesto of the Labour Party, General Election 1966. [Kingstown, St. Vincent, England]: [Reliance Printery], 1966.

Box 4, Folder 81

Lawson, Elizabeth.

The jobless Negro. New York: Workers Library Publishers, 1933.

Box 4, Folder 82

Lord, John C.

"The higher law" in its application to the Fugitive Slave Bill. A sermon on the duties men owe to God and to governments. New York: Union Safety Committee, 1851.

Box 4, Folder 83

Langston, J.M.

Equality before the law: oration delivered by Prof. J.M. Langston, of Howard University, Washington, D.C. at the Fifteenth Amendment celebration, held in Oberlin, Ohio, Thursday, May 14, 1874. Oberlin, Ohio: Pratt & Battle, 1874.

Box 4, Folder 84

Louisiana. Supreme Court.

Carrie W. Whitmeyer vs. Liberty Industrial Life Insurance Company, Inc. New Orleans: Montgomery-Andree Printing Co., Inc., [19--].

Box 4, Folder 85

Latimer, Catherine A.

The Negro - a selected bibliography. New York: New York Public Library, [194-].

Box 4, Folder 86

Laurens, Henry.

A South Carolina protest against slavery: being a letter from Henry Laurens, second president of the Continental Congress, to his son, colonel John Laurens, dated Charleston, S.C., August 14th, 1776. New York: G.P. Putnam, 1861.

Box 4, Folder 87

Scottsboro Defense Committee.

Scottsboro, a record of a broken promise. New York: Scottsboro Defense Committee, [1938].

Box 4, Folder 88

Scottsboro Defense Committee.

Four free, five in prison - on the same evidence. [New York]: Scottsboro Defense Committee, [193-].

Box 4, Folder 89

Scottsboro Defense Committee.

Scottsboro: the shame of America. New York: Scottsboro Defense Committee, 1936.

Box 4, Folder 90

[Schneider, Isidor].

The story of Scottsboro. New York: International Labor Defense, [1933?].

Box 4, Folder 91

Samuels, Linda.

An exhibit on the races of mankind. Nashville: Hemphill Press, 1946.

Box 4, Folder 92

Saunders, John, and Albert Parker.

The struggle for Negro equality: program of the Socialist Workers Party. New York: Pioneer Publishers, 1943.

Box 4, Folder 93

Saunders, John, and Albert Parker.

The struggle for Negro equality. 3d ed. New York: Pioneer Publishers, 1945.

Box 4, Folder 94

Schuler, Wolfgang.

"Apartheid" regiert Sudafrika. Berlin: Dietz Verlag, 1961.

Box 4, Folder 95

Sanders, Wiley Britton.

Negro child welfare in North Carolina: a Rosenwald study. Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina Press, 1933.

Box 4, Folder 96

Smith, Charles U., and Lewis M. Killian.

The Tallahassee bus protest. New York: Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, 1958.

Box 4, Folder 97

Smith, Elmer Richard.

Race and democracy, an anthropologist's view. [S.l.]: [s.n.], 1944.

Box 4, Folder 98

Smith, Gerrit.

To the religious newspaper reviewers of my recent discourse. Peterboro, N.Y.: [s.n.], 1859.

Box 4, Folder 99

Smith, Gerrit.

No slavery in Nebraska, no slavery in the nation, slavery an outlaw: speech of Gerrit Smith on the Nebraska Bill in Congress, April 6, 1854. Washington, D.C.: Buell & Blanchard, [1854?].

Box 4, Folder 100

Smith, Gerrit.

Substance of the speech made by Gerrit Smith, in the capitol of the state of New York, March 11th and 12th, 1850. 2d ed. Syracuse, N.Y.: V.W. Smith & Co., 1850.

Box 4, Folder 101

Smith, Lillian E.

"There are things to do." Reprinted from South Today.[Winter 1942].

Box 4, Folder 102

Smith, Lillian E.

The white Christian and his conscience. Clayton, Ga.: South Today, [194-].

Box 4, Folder 103

Smith, Lillian E., and Paula Snelling.

"Buying a new world with old Confederate bills." Reprinted from South Today.[Winter 1942].

Box 4, Folder 104

Statistics of education of the Negro race 1925-26. [S.l.]: [s.n.], [192-].

Box 4, Folder 105

Stillé, Charles J.

Northern interests and southern independence: a plea for united action. Philadelphia: William S. & Alfred Martien, 1863.

Box 4, Folder 106

Seward, William Henry.

In the Supreme Court of the United States, John Van Zandt, ad sectum Wharton Jones; argument for the defendent. Albany, N.Y.: Weed and Parsons, 1847.

Box 4, Folder 107

Simon, Caroline K.

"People: individuals or stereotypes?" Reprinted from Trade Union Courier.[March 1948].

Box 4, Folder 108

Sheldon, George.

"Negro slavery in old Deerfield." Reprinted from New England Magazine.[March 1893].

Box 4, Folder 109

Shaffer, Helen B.

"Negro employment." Editorial Research Reports 11:5. [August 1959].

Box 4, Folder 110

Slavery in America. [S.l.]: [s.n.], [184-].

Box 4, Folder 111

Simon, Caroline K.

"Causes and cure of discrimination." Reprinted from New York Times Magazine.[May 1949].

Box 4, Folder 112

Small, Sasha.

Hell in Georgia. New York: International Labor Defense, 1935.

Box 4, Folder 113

Stillé, Charles J.

How a free people conduct a long war: a chapter from English history. Philadelphia: William S. & Alfred Martien, 1863.

Box 4, Folder 114

Small, Sasha.

Scottsboro, act three. New York: International Labor Defense, 1934.

Box 4, Folder 115

Spooner, Lysander.

The unconstitutionality of slavery. Boston: Bela Marsh, 1846.

Box 4, Folder 116

Sprigle, Ray.

In the land of Jim Crow. Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh Post Gazette, 1948.

Box 4, Folder 117

Stanly, Edward.

Speech of Edward Stanly, of N. Carolina, exposing the causes of the slavery agitation, delivered in the House of Representitives, March 6, 1850. [Washington, D.C.]: [Gideon & Co.], [1850].

Box 4, Folder 118

Stanton, Henry B.

Remarks of Henry B. Stanton, in the representatives' hall, on the 23rd and 24th of Feb. 1837, before the committee of the House of Representatives of Mass., to whom was referred sundry memorials on the subject of slavery. Boston: Isaac Knapp, 1837.

Box 4, Folder 119

Stewart, Maxwell S.

The Negro in America. New York: Public Affairs Committee, Inc., 1944.

Box 4, Folder 120

Stewart, Alvan.

A legal argument before the Supreme Court of the state of New Jersey, at the May term, 1845, at Trenton, for the deliverance of four thousand persons from bondage. New York: Finch & Weed, 1845.

Box 4, Folder 121

Southern Negro Youth Congress.

Proclamation of southern Negro youth for freedom, equality and opportunity. Richmond, Va.: Southern Negro Youth Congress, [19--].

Box 4, Folder 122

Socialist Workers Party.

The class-struggle road to Negro equality. New York: Pioneer Publishers, 1957.

Box 4, Folder 123

Socialist Party.

Why Negroes should be socialists. Chicago: Socialist Party, [19--].

Box 4, Folder 124

Southern Conference for Human Welfare.

The truth about Colombia, Tennessee cases. Nashville: Southern Conference for Human Welfare, [194-].

Box 4, Folder 125

Socialist Workers Party.

Freedom now. New York: Pioneer Publishers, 1963.

 

Box 5

Box 5, Folder 1

Taylor, John V.

Black and white. London: SCM Press, Ltd., 1958.

Box 5, Folder 2

Travis, M.E.

Now is the time. Detroit: National Negro Labor Council, [1951?].

Box 5, Folder 3

Thayer, M. Russell.

A reply to Mr. Charles Ingersoll's `Letter to a friend in a slave state'. Philadelphia: C. Sherman & Son, 1862.

Box 5, Folder 4

Tobitt, Janet E.

A book of Negro songs. Pleasantville, N.Y.: J.E. Tobitt, 1950.

Box 5, Folder 5

Trade Union Youth Committee for the Freedon of Lieut. Gilbert.

Jim Crow "justice" in Korea. New York: Trade Union Youth Committee for the Freedom of Lieut. Gilbert, [195-].

Box 5, Folder 6

Trumbull, Lyman.

Remarks of Hon. Lyman Trumbull, of Illinois, on seizure of arsenals at Harper's Ferry, Va., and Liberty, Mo., and in vindication of the Republican Party and its creed, in response to Senators Chesnut, Yulee, Saulsbury, Clay, and Pugh delivered in the United States Senate, December 6, 7 and 8, 1859. Washington, D.C.: Buell & Blanchard, 1859.

Box 5, Folder 7

The tables turned: a letter to the Congregational Association of New York. Boston: Crocker & Brewster, [1855].

Box 5, Folder 8

Tillman, Katherine D.

Aunt Betsy's Thanksgiving. Philadelphia: A.M.E. Book Concern, [19--?].

Box 5, Folder 9

Tanneyhill, Ann.

From school to job: guidance for minority youth. [New York]: Public Affairs Committee, Inc., 1953.

Box 5, Folder 10

Thomas, Julius.

Adjustment of Negro veterans: a report of the adjustment problems of Negro veterans in fifty cities. New York: National Urban League, 1946.

Box 5, Folder 11

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

NAACP acclaimed by distinguished Americans. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, 1955.

Box 5, Folder 12

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

New threat to civil liberties: NAACP annual report, 48th year. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People., 1956.

Box 5, Folder 13

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

It can be done! New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People., [1955].

Box 5, Folder 14

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

The Jim Crow school north and west. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People., 1962.

Box 5, Folder 15

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

Can the states stop lynching? New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People., [1937?].

Box 5, Folder 16

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

Food costs more in Harlem: a comparative survey of retail food prices. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People., [1939?].

Box 5, Folder 17

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

The day they changed their minds. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People., 1960.

Box 5, Folder 18

Mailer, Norman.

The white negro. San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1957.

Box 5, Folder 19

Kingston, Steve.

Frederick Douglass, abolitionist, liberator, statesman. Brooklyn: National Negro Congress, [1941?].

Box 5, Folder 20

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

The fortieth year in the crusade for civil rights: NAACP annual report for 1948. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People., [1948].

Box 5, Folder 21

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

The march to freedom: NAACP report for 1962. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People., 1962.

Box 5, Folder 22

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

Annual convention resolutions, NAACP 53rd, July 2-July 8, 1962, Atlanta, Ga. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People., [1962].

Box 5, Folder 23

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

Progress and reaction, 1955, NAACP annual report, 47th year. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, 1956.

Box 5, Folder 24

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

1951: the year of the hate bomb: NAACP annual report, 43rd year. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, 1952.

Box 5, Folder 25

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

The fantastic case of the Trenton Six. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Legal Defense and Educational Fund, 1951.

Box 5, Folder 26

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

"Equal justice under law." New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Legal Defense and Educational Fund, 1945.

Box 5, Folder 27

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

Stop this murder! New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Legal Defense and Educational Fund, 1951.

Box 5, Folder 28

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

Terror in Tennessee. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Legal Defense and Educational Fund, [194-].

Box 5, Folder 29

Knight, Edgar W.

"An early case of opposition in the South to Northern textbooks." Reprinted from The Journal of Southern History 13:2.[May 1947].

Box 5, Folder 30

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

...that they shall not have died in vain. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, [1952].

Box 5, Folder 31

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

NAACP: its program and objectives. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, [1956].

Box 5, Folder 32

"School improvement issue." The K.N.E.A. Journal. [March 1937].

Box 5, Folder 33

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

Segregation: disgrace of democracy. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, [1954].

Box 5, Folder 34

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

Target for 1963: goals of the fight for freedom. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, [1954].

Box 5, Folder 35

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

"The NAACP and the Communists." Reprinted from The Crisis.[March 1949].

Box 5, Folder 36

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

The lynching of Claude Neal. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, [1937].

Box 5, Folder 37

United Automobile, Aircraft and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW-CIO).

"to unite...regardless" Detroit: UAW-CIO, International Education Department, [194-].

Box 5, Folder 38

United States. Commission on Civil Rights.

Civil rights under Federal programs: an analysis of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, 1965.

Box 5, Folder 39

[Evans, James C.].

Integration in the armed services: a progress report. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Defense, Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense, 1955.

Box 5, Folder 40

UNESCO.

UNESCO and its programme: the race question. Paris: UNESCO, [1950].

Box 5, Folder 41

United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America.

Organized labor and the black worker. New York: United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America, [1967].

Box 5, Folder 42

"The American Negro." United Asia 5:3. [June 1953].

Box 5, Folder 43

Kahn, Albert E.

Agents of peace. [S.l.]: The Hour Publishers, [195-].

Box 5, Folder 44

United States. Department of Agriculture.

Participation of Negro children in school lunch programs. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, 1951.

Box 5, Folder 45

United States. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census.

The Negro and the 1940 census. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, [1940].

Box 5, Folder 46

United States. Commission on Civil Rights.

The National Conference and the reports of the State Advisory Committees to the United States Commission on Civil Rights. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1960.

Box 5, Folder 47

United States. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Education.

Survey of Negro colleges and universities; section of Bulletin, 1928, no.7, chapter IV: Alabama. Washington D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1928.

Box 5, Folder 48

United States. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Education.

Survey of Negro colleges and universities; section of Bulletin, 1928, no. 7, chapter V: Arkansas. Washington D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1928.

Box 5, Folder 49

United States. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Education.

Survey of Negro colleges and universities; section of Bulletin, 1928, no. 7, chapter VI: Delaware and Maryland. Washington D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1928.

Box 5, Folder 50

United States. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Education.

Survey of Negro colleges and universities; section of Bulletin, 1928, no. 7, chapter VIII: Florida. Washington D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1928.

Box 5, Folder 51

United States. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Education.

Survey of Negro colleges and universities; section of Bulletin, 1928, no. 7, chapters I, II, and III: Introduction, control and finance, education service. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1928.

Box 5, Folder 52

United States. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Education.

Survey of Negro colleges and universities; section of Bulletin, 1928, no. 7, chapter X: Kentucky. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1928.

Box 5, Folder 53

United States. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Education.

Survey of Negro colleges and universities; section of Bulletin, 1928, no. 7, chapter XII: Mississippi and Oklahoma. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1928.

Box 5, Folder 54

Gordon, Eugene, and Cyril Briggs.

The position of Negro women. New York: Workers Library Publishers, 1935.

Box 5, Folder 55

Kester, Howard.

"To establish justice..." sharecroppers under Planters' Law. New York: Workers Defense League, [1940].

Box 5, Folder 56

McGee, Rosalie.

Mrs. McGee's own story: speech delivered at the Abyssinian Baptist Church, New York City, April 1, 1951. New York: Harlem Civil Rights Congress, [195-].

Box 5, Folder 57

Giovanni, Nikki.

Black judgement. Detroit: Broadside Press, 1968.

Box 5, Folder 58

National Editorial Board of News and Letters.

American civilization on trial: the Negro as touchstone of history. Detroit: News and Letters, 1963.

Box 5, Folder 59

Shields, Art.

The killing of William Milton. New York: Daily Worker, 1948.

Box 5, Folder 60

Lightfoot, Claude M.

Black power and liberation: a Communist view. New York: New Outlook Publishers, 1967.

Box 5, Folder 61

United States. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Education.

Survey of Negro colleges and universities. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1928.

Box 5, Folder 62

Davis, James P.

Success stories, Negro farmers. Little Rock, Ark.: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Production and Marketing, 1952.

Box 5, Folder 63

United States. Congress. House. Committee on Un-American Activities.

The American Negro in the Communist Party. Washington, D.C.: [U.S. Government Printing Office], 1954.

Box 5, Folder 64

Warnshuis, A.L., et al.

The slavery convention of Geneva, September 25, 1926: text of the General act for the repression of African slave trade, July 2, 1890. New York: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, [1928].

Box 5, Folder 65

[Davis, Francis E.].

The Boston drama. Boston: Urban League of Greater Boston, Inc., 1950.

Box 5, Folder 66

[Ringe, Helen H.].

Negroes in the United States: their employment and economic status. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1952.

Box 5, Folder 67

"Jazz music: a tribute to Huddie Ledbetter." Jazz Music Books. [April 1946].

Box 5, Folder 68

Vermont. General Assembly. House of Representatives.

Report of the Select Committee on Slavery, the Dred Scott decision, and the action of the Federal Government thereon, submitted Thursday, Nov. 18, 1858. Montpelier, Vt.: E.P. Walton, 1858.

Box 5, Folder 69

Watson, Thomas E.

The African. [S.l.]: T.E. Watson, 1912.

Box 5, Folder 70

Washington, Booker T.

Address of Booker T. Washington: delivered at the alumni dinner of Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., June 24, 1896: after receiving the honorary degree of "Master of Art." Tuskegee, Ala.: Tuskegee Institute Steam Print, 1901.

Box 5, Folder 71

Jackson, Luther P.

The voting status of Negroes in Virginia. Petersburg, Va.: Virginia Voters League, 1947.

Box 5, Folder 72

Washington, Booker T.

Some European observations and experiences. Tuskegee, Ala.: Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute, [1899?].

Box 5, Folder 73

Mao, Tse-tung.

Statement calling on the people of the world to unite to oppose racial discrimination by U.S. imperialism and support the American Negroes in their struggle against racial discrimination. Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1964.

Box 5, Folder 74

Klineberg, Otto.

Race and psychology. Paris: UNESCO, [1952].

Box 5, Folder 75

Washington, Booker T.

Negro education not a failure: address by Booker T. Washington in the concert hall of Madison Square Garden, New York, Lincoln's birthday, February 12, 1904. Tuskegee, Ala.: Tuskegee Institute Steam Print, 1904.

Box 5, Folder 76

Vernon, Robert.

The black ghetto. New York: Merit Publishers, 1968.

Box 5, Folder 77

Washington, Booker T.

"Some reports of a trip made by Booker T. Washington of Tuskegee Institute through the state of Tennessee Nov. 18-28, 1909." Reprinted from The New York Evening Post.[1909].

Box 5, Folder 78

Washington, Booker T.

Team work. Tuskegee, Ala.: Tuskegee Institute, 1941.

Box 5, Folder 79

Washington, Booker T.

"Industrial education and the public schools." Reprinted from Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science.[September 1913].

Box 5, Folder 80

Washington, Booker T.

How to build up a good school in the South. Tuskegee, Ala.: [s.n.], [19--?].

Box 5, Folder 81

Washington, Booker T.

Education of the Negro. [Albany, New York]: [J.B. Lyon Co.], [1899].

Box 5, Folder 82

Waite, Edward F.

"The Negro in the Supreme Court." Reprinted from Minnesota Law Review 30.[1946].

Box 5, Folder 83

Washington, Booker T.

"The Negro in business." Reprinted from The Colored American Magazine.[1906].

Box 5, Folder 84

Washington, Booker T.

An open letter to the Louisiana Constitutional Convention, February 19th, 1898. Tuskegee, Ala.: Tuskegee Institute, 1900.

Box 5, Folder 85

Washington, Booker T.

Progress of the American Negro. Tuskegee, Ala.: Tuskegee Institute Press, [1895?].

Box 5, Folder 86

Washington, Booker T.

The rights and duties of the Negro. [S.l.]: [s.n.], [1903?].

Box 5, Folder 87

Washington, Booker T.

The fruits of industrial training. Tuskegee, Ala.: Tuskegee Institute, 1910.

Box 5, Folder 88

Washington, Booker T.

Address of Booker T. Washington before the National Educational Association, St. Louis, Mo., June 30, 1904. Tuskegee, Ala.: Tuskegee Institute Steam Print, [1904].

Box 5, Folder 89

Watson, Willie Mae.

We honor them. Vol. 1. Syracuse, N.Y.: New Readers Press, 1964.

Box 5, Folder 90

Walters, Robert J.

As the pendulum swings...A study of the radical trend in the civil rights movement. [Los Angeles]: R.J. Walters, [1965].

Box 5, Folder 91

Washington, Booker T.

Education not exclusive: extracts from an address to Tuskegee students. Tuskegee, Ala.: Tuskegee Institute, [19--?].

Box 5, Folder 92

Sobel, Irwin, et al.

The Negro in the St. Louis economy, 1954. St. Louis: Urban League of St. Louis, 1954.

Box 5, Folder 93

Washington, Booker T.

Keeping in repair. [Tuskegee, Ala.]: Tuskegee Institute, [19--?].

Box 5, Folder 94

Wesson, William H.

Negro employment practices in the Chattanooga area. Washington, D.C.: National Planning Association, 1954.

Box 5, Folder 95

Westerman, George W.

Toward a better understanding. [Panama?]: [s.n.], 1946.

Box 5, Folder 96

Waxman, Julia.

Race relations: a selected list of readings on racial and cultural minorities in the United States, with special emphasis on Negroes. Chicago: Julius Rosenwald Fund, 1945.

Box 5, Folder 97

Wedlock, Lunabelle.

"The reaction of Negro publications and organizations to German anti-semitism." Howard University Studies in the Social Sciences 3:2. [1942].

Box 5, Folder 98

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Labor Department.

The Negro wage earner and apprenticeship training programs. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, [196-?].

Box 5, Folder 99

National Urban League.

Racial aspects of reconversion. New York: National Urban League, 1945.

Box 5, Folder 100

[Addicts Rehabilitation Center].

A report on drug addiction in Central Harlem. [New York]: Manhatten Christian Reformed Church, [196-].

 

Box 6

Box 6, Folder 1

United States. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census.

1950 United States census of population, non-white population by race. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1953.

Box 6, Folder 2

Weaver, Robert C.

"The Negro comes of age in industry." Reprinted from The Atlantic 172:3.[September 1943].

Box 6, Folder 3

Africa Today 16:1. [February/March 1969].

Box 6, Folder 4

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Black power: S.N.C.C. speaks for itself. Boston: New England Free Press, [196-].

Box 6, Folder 5

Brewer, Curtis.

Public school segregation and the Supreme Court decision. [S.l.]: [s.n.], [195-].

Box 6, Folder 6

Brown, G. Gordon.

Recreational facilities and Negro-white relations in Philadelphia. Philadelphia: Bureau of Municipal Research, 1947.

Box 6, Folder 7

Brown, Ina Corinne.

Socio-economic approach to educational problems. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Office of Education, Federal Security Agency, 1942.

Box 6, Folder 8

Caliver, Ambrose.

Education of Negro leaders: influences affecting graduate and professional studies. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Office of Education, Federal Security Agency, 1949.

Box 6, Folder 9

United States. Federal Works Agency.

Jobs for American workers: the Negro in the government's work program. [Washington, D.C.]: Federal Works Agency, [1940?].

Box 6, Folder 10

Gillard, John T.

The Negro American: a mission investigation. [Cincinnati]: Catholic Students' Mission Crusade, 1935.

Box 6, Folder 11

Campus Mirror 16:8. [Atlanta]: [Spelman College], [June 1940].

Box 6, Folder 12

Detroit (Mich.). Mayor's Interracial Committee.

Annual report, Mayor's Interracial Committee. Detroit: [s.n.], 1949.

Box 6, Folder 13

Grunsfeld, Mary-Jane.

Negroes in Chicago. [Chicago]: [Mayor's Committee on Race Relations], [1944].

Box 6, Folder 14

Henderson, Elmer W.

"Negroes in government employment." Reprinted from Opportunity; Journal of Negro Life.[July 1943].

Box 6, Folder 15

Hill, Herbert.

No harvest for the reaper: the story of the migratory agricultural worker in the United States. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, [1959?].

Box 6, Folder 16

Melchor, Beulah H.

Presenting, The land possesions of Howard University. Washington, D.C.: [s.n.], [194-].

Box 6, Folder 17

Yergan, Max.

Negro America and the war for survival. [Los Angeles]: People's World, [1942].

Box 6, Folder 18

Giddings, Joshua Reed.

Payment for slaves: speech of Mr. J.R. Giddings, of Ohio, on the bill to pay the heirs of Antonio Pacheco for a slave sent west of the Mississippi with the Seminole Indians in 1838. Washington, D.C.: Buell & Blanchard, 1849.

Box 6, Folder 19

X, Marvin.

The black bird: a parable for black children. Fresno, Calif.: Al Kitab Sudan, 1968.

Box 6, Folder 20

Yeates, Mary.

Discrimination against colored people. London: W.F.T.U. Publications Ltd., [1950?].

Box 6, Folder 21

Woofter, Thomas Jackson, and A.E. Fisher.

The plantation South today. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1940.

Box 6, Folder 22

Winston, Henry.

Fight racism--for unity and progress! New York: New Outlook Publishers, 1971.

Box 6, Folder 23

Winston, Henry.

Black Americans and the Middle East conflict. New York: New Outlook Publishers, 1970.

Box 6, Folder 24

Winston, Henry.

Character building and education in the spirit of socialism. New York: New Age Publishers, 1939.

Box 6, Folder 25

Winston, Henry.

Life begins with freedom. New York: New Age Publishers, 1937.

Box 6, Folder 26

Yergan, Max.

Africa in the war. New York: Council on African Affairs, [194-?].

Box 6, Folder 27

Yergan, Max, and Paul Robeson.

The Negro and justice: a plea for Earl Browder. New York: Citizens' Committee to Free Earl Browder, 1941.

Box 6, Folder 28

Winston, Henry.

What it means to be a Communist. New York: New Century Publishers, 1951.

Box 6, Folder 29

Winston, Henry, et al.

Negro freedom: a goal for all Americans. New York: New Currents Publishers, 1964.

Box 6, Folder 30

Winston, Henry.

Negro-white unity: key to full equality, Negro representation, economic advance of labor, black and white. New York: New Outlook Publishers, 1967.

Box 6, Folder 31

Yergan, Max.

Democracy and the Negro people today. [Washington, D.C.]: National Negro Congress, [1940].

Box 6, Folder 32

Wright, R.R.

The Negro problem. Philadelphia: A.M.E. Book Concern, 1911.

Box 6, Folder 33

Wyer, Samuel S.

Digest of Myrdal's "An American Dilemma" Columbus, Ohio: Columbus Council for Democracy, 1944.

Box 6, Folder 34

Williams, Henry Llewellyn.

The Moko Marionettes. New York: De Witt, 1880.

Box 6, Folder 35

Williams, Henry Llewellyn.

Bobolino, the black bandit. New York: De Witt, 1880.

Box 6, Folder 36

Gondor, Emery I.

Ten little colored boys. New York: Howell, Soskin Publishers, 1942.

Box 6, Folder 37

Wilkerson, Doxey A.

The Negro people and the Communists. New York: Workers Library Publishers, 1944.

Box 6, Folder 38

Oneal, James.

The next emancipation. New York: Negro Labor News Service, 1929.

Box 6, Folder 39

Wilkinson, Byron M.

Fusion of the races or, a mongrel America tomorrow. Richmond, Va.: Hatcher Memorial Baptist Church, [1965?].

Box 6, Folder 40

Wilkins, Roy.

Rape: a case history of murder, terror and injustice visited upon a Negro community. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Legal Defense and Educational Fund., [194-].

Box 6, Folder 41

Williams, Eric.

"Reflections on the Industrial Stabilisation Bill." Reprinted from The Nation.[April 1965].

Box 6, Folder 42

Williams, Eric.

Tagore centenary celebration address. [Trinidad]: [Government Printing Office], [1961].

Box 6, Folder 43

Williams, Chancellor.

And if I were white: a reply to the If I were a Negro series by prominent white writers. Washington, D.C.: Shaw Publishing Company, 1946.

Box 6, Folder 44

Wilkins, Marjorie V.

"Pioneer in human relations." Reprinted from New York State Education.[February 1949].

Box 6, Folder 45

Wilkins, Roy.

Forty years of the NAACP. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, 1949.

Box 6, Folder 46

New York Council of the Arts, Sciences and Professions. Equal Rights Committee.

Who killed the Moores? New York: Equal Rights Committee, [195-].

Box 6, Folder 47

Whitman, Howard.

"Washington--disgrace to the nation." Reprinted from The Woman's Home Companion.[February 1950].

Box 6, Folder 48

White, C.

The Virginia mummy: a Negro farce. Lebanon, Ohio: March Brothers, [18--?].

Box 6, Folder 49

Whipple, Charles K.

The non-resistance principle: with particular application to the help of slaves by abolitionists. Boston: R.F. Wallcut, 1860.

Box 6, Folder 50

Whipple, Charles K.

The family relation, as affected by slavery. Cincinnati: American Reform Tract and Book Society, 1858.

Box 6, Folder 51

Williams, John Henry.

A Negro looks at war. New York: Workers Library Publishers, 1940.

Box 6, Folder 52

Williams, Julian E.

The Black Panthers are not Black... they are Red! Tulsa, Okla.: Christian Crusade Publications, 1970.

Box 6, Folder 53

Williams, Julian E.

Burn, baby, burn! Is your city next? [Tulsa, Okla.]: Christian Crusade Publications, [196-].

Box 6, Folder 54

Wilson, Abraham.

"The proposed legislative death knell of private discriminatory employment practices." Reprinted from Virginia Law Review 31:4.[September 1945].

Box 6, Folder 55

Williams, Robin M.

The reduction of intergroup tensions: a survey of research on problems of ethnic, racial, and religious group relations. New York: Social Science Research Council, 1947.

Box 6, Folder 56

Giddings, Joshua Reed.

Speech of the Hon. Joshua R. Giddings, of Ohio, delivered in the House of Representatives, Concord, N.H., on the evening of June 29, 1847; proceedings of the N.H. legislature on the subject of slavery. Concord, N.H.: Democrat and Freeman Press, 1847.

Box 6, Folder 57

White, Walter.

"The Negro and the Supreme Court." Reprinted from Harper's Magazine.[January 1931].

Box 6, Folder 58

White, Charles.

Free Angelo Herndon. New York: Youth Publishers, 1934.

Box 6, Folder 59

Wilber, Mark D.

Speech of Hon. Mark D. Wilber, of Dutchess County, on the bill ratifying the constitutional amendment prohibiting slavery, in Assembly, March 2, 1865. [S.l.]: Union State Central Committee, [1865?].

Box 6, Folder 60

Wilson, Henry.

Territorial slave code: speech of Hon. Henry Wilson, of Massachusetts, delivered in the Senate of the United States, January 25, 1860. [S.l.]: [s.n.], [1860?].

Box 6, Folder 61

Wilkerson, Doxey A.

Why Negroes are joining the Communist Party. New York: Communist Party, 1946.

Box 6, Folder 62

Brown, John.

Words of John Brown. Boston: Directors of the Old South Work, [18--].

Box 6, Folder 63

New England Anti-Slavery Almanac for 1841. Boston: J.A. Collins, 1841.

Box 6, Folder 64

[Communist Party].

The program of struggle of the Negro people, for bread and work, for equal rights, for defense of Ethiopia. [S.l.]: [s.n.], [19--].

Box 6, Folder 65

Bassett, Theodore, et al.

Is Japan the champion of the colored races? The Negro's stake in democracy. New York: Workers Library Publishers, 1938.

Box 6, Folder 66

International Workers Order.

Negro History Week Bulletin. New York: International Workers Order, 1946.

Box 6, Folder 67

Chicago. Mayor's Commission on Human Relations.

Race relations in Chicago. Chicago: Mayor's Commission on Human Relations, 1945.

Box 6, Folder 68

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

An American tragedy: the story of Jesse Dukes. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Legal Defense and Educational Fund, [195-].

Box 6, Folder 69

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Ad Hoc Committee for Justice in the Christianii Case.

Why the killing of Enus L. Christianii? New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, [195-].

Box 6, Folder 70

United States. Congress. House of Representatives.

Civil rights: memorial of National Convention of Colored Persons, praying to be protected in their civil rights. [S.l.]: [s.n.], 1873.

Box 6, Folder 71

National Education Association. Center for Human Relations.

"We've promises to keep..." Washington, D.C.: National Education Association, 1970.

Box 6, Folder 72

National Education Association. Commission on the Defense of Democracy through Education.

More--than tolerance: suggestions to teachers on inter-group education. Washington, D.C.: National Education Association, 1946.

Box 6, Folder 73

Nelson, Truman.

People with strength in Monroe, North Carolina. [Monroe, N.C.]: Committee to Aid the Monroe Defendants, [1963].

Box 6, Folder 74

Newberry, Mike.

The cruel and unusual punishment of Henry Winston. New York: Harlem Committee to Free Henry Winston, [1960?].

Box 6, Folder 75

Giddings, Joshua Reed.

Slavery in the territories: speech of Hon. J.R. Giddings, of Ohio, in the House of Representatives, Monday, March 18, 1850, in Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union, on the President's message transmitting the Constitution of California. [Washington, D.C.]: Buell & Blanchard, [1850].

Box 6, Folder 76

Baraka, Imamu Amiri.

A black value system. Newark, N.J.: Jihad Productions, 1969.

Box 6, Folder 77

Kempton, Murray, and David Shimkin.

Panther 21: strangers to justice. New York: Committee to Defend the Panther 21, 1970.

Box 6, Folder 78

New York Public Library.

The Negro--a selected bibliography. New York: New York Public Library, [193-].

Box 6, Folder 79

[New York]. State Commission Against Discrimination.

Chapter 118. [New York]: [s.n.], [1945?].

Box 6, Folder 80

New York State Association of Elks.

This is the law. New York: New York State Association of Elks, Civil Liberties Department, 1945.

Box 6, Folder 81

New York. State Commission Against Discrimination.

An equal chance. New York: N.Y. State Commission Against Discrimination, [194-].

Box 6, Folder 82

New York. State Commission Against Discrimination.

Educational aids available to community groups. New York: N.Y. State Commission Against Discrimination, [194-].

Box 6, Folder 83

New York. State Commission Against Discrimination.

Inside facts. New York: N.Y. State Commission Against Discrimination, 1948.

Box 6, Folder 84

New York. State Commission Against Discrimination.

1948 report of progress. New York: N.Y. State Commission Against Discrimination, 1948.

Box 6, Folder 85

New York. State Commission Against Discrimination.

Report of progress, 1958. New York: N.Y. State Commission Against Discrimination, 1958.

Box 6, Folder 86

[New York. Temporary Commission on the Condition of the Urban Colored Population.].

[Report]. [New York]: [s.n.], [1938?].

Box 6, Folder 87

Senior, Clarence.

Implications of population redistribution. New York: National Association of Intergroup Relations Officials, 1957.

Box 6, Folder 88

Nkrumah, Kwame.

Peace! The world from African eyes: address by Osgayefo Dr. Kwame Nkrumah, President of the Republic of Ghana. Chicago: Afro-American Heritage Association., [1960].

Box 6, Folder 89

North, Joseph.

Lynching Negro children in Southern courts. New York: International Labor Defense, [193-].

Box 6, Folder 90

Nott, Samuel.

The present crisis: with a reply and appeal to European advisors, from the sixth edition of Slavery and the Remedy. Boston: Crocker & Brewster, 1860.

Box 6, Folder 91

Nzuji, Clémentine.

Kasala, poemes. Kinshasa [Republic of the Congo]: Mandore, 1969.

Box 6, Folder 92

Loyal Publication Society.

Opinions of the early Presidents, and of the Fathers of the Republic, upon slavery. New York: Wm. C. Bryant & Co., 1863.

Box 6, Folder 93

Ofari, Earl.

Black liberation (cultural and revolutionary nationalism). Ann Arbor: Radical Education Project, [196-?].

Box 6, Folder 94

Oliver, M.

Kansas investigation: minority report of the Kansas Investigating Committee, of the House of Representatives, by Hon. M. Oliver, of Missouri. Washington, D.C.: Union Office, 1856.

Box 6, Folder 95

Oneal, James.

The next emancipation. 2d ed. New York: Emancipation Publishing Co., 1922.

Box 6, Folder 96

O'Rielly, Henry.

Origin and objects of the slaveholders' conspiracy against democratic principles, as well as against the National Union, illustrated in the speeches of Andrew Jackson Hamilton. New York: Baker & Godwin, 1862.

Box 6, Folder 97

Orlansky, Harold.

The Harlem riot, a study in mass frustration. New York: Social Analysis, 1943.

Box 6, Folder 98

Wilkerson, Doxey A.

The people versus segregated schools. New York: New Century Publishers, [195-].

Box 6, Folder 99

Seward, William Henry.

The irrepressible conflict: a speech by William H. Seward, delivered at Rochester Monday, October 25, 1858. New York: New York Tribune, [1858?].

Box 6, Folder 100

Parham, Bettie Esther.

"How the conservative Negro intellectual of the South feels about racial segregation." Reprinted from Social Forces 14:2.[December 1935].

Box 6, Folder 101

Parker, Albert.

Defend the Negro sailors of the U.S.S. Philadelphia. New York: Pioneer Publishers for the Socialist Workers Party, [194-].

Box 6, Folder 102

Parker, Theodore.

The new crime against humanity: a sermon, preached at the Music Hall, in Boston, on Sun., June 4, 1854. Boston: Benjamin B. Mussey & Co., 1854.

Box 6, Folder 103

Passage, W.W.

Eugene V. Debs on "The Color Question." New York: Wilshire Book Co., [1909?].

Box 6, Folder 104

Paton, Alan.

"The Negro in America today." Reprinted by the NAACP from Collier's.[October 1954].

Box 6, Folder 105

Patterson, William H.

Sikeston--Hitlerite crime against America. St. Louis: Communist Party, 1942.

Box 6, Folder 106

Patterson, William L.

Ben Davis: crusader for Negro freedom and socialism. New York: New Outlook Publishers, 1967.

Box 6, Folder 107

Patton, Robert W.

An inspiring record in Negro education. New York: National Council Protestant Episcopal Church, [1940].

Box 6, Folder 108

Parker, Albert.

The Negro march on Washington. New York: Pioneer Publishers, [193-?].

Box 6, Folder 109

People's National Movement.

General elections manifesto, 1966. [Port-of-Spain, Trinidad]: [P.N.M. Publishing Co., Ltd.], 1966.

Box 6, Folder 110

[Simmons, G.F.].

Review of the remarks on Dr. Channing's "Slavery," by a citizen of Massachusetts[James Trecothick Austin]. Boston: James Monroe and Company, 1836.

Box 6, Folder 111

Wells, Wesley Robert.

Letters from the death house. Los Angeles: Civil Rights Congress, [195-].

Box 6, Folder 112

People's Progressive Movement.

The People's Progressive Movement present their manifesto and candidate, Glenroy Straughn in the bye-election in the City of Bridgetown for the Barbados House of Assembly, May 1969. Bridgetown, Barbados: Black Star, 1969.

Box 6, Folder 113

Pepper, John.

American Negro problems. New York: Workers Library Publishers, 1928.

Note

2 copies
Box 6, Folder 114

Perlo, Victor.

"Trends in the economic status of the Negro people." Reprinted from Science and Society 16:2.[Spring 1952].

Box 6, Folder 115

Perry, Pettis.

The Communist Party: vanguard fighter for peace, democracy, security, socialism. New York: New Century Publishers, 1953.

Box 6, Folder 116

Perry, Pettis.

Pettis Perry speaks to the Court. New York: New Century Publishers, 1952.

Box 6, Folder 117

Perry, Pettis.

Negro representation--a step towards Negro freedom. New York: New Century Publishers, 1952.

Box 6, Folder 118

Perry, Pettis.

The November elections and the struggle for jobs, peace, equal rights and democracy. New York: New Century Publishers, 1954.

Box 6, Folder 119

Perry, Pettis.

The party of Negro and White. New York: New Century Publishers, 1953.

Box 6, Folder 120

Williams, Chas. H.

The race problem. [S.l.]: [s.n.], 1897.

 

Box 7

Box 7, Folder 1

Raymond, Henry J.

Disunion and slavery: a series of letters to Hon. W.L. Yancey, of Alabama. [New York?]: [s.n.], [1861?].

Box 7, Folder 2

[Reddick, Lawrence Dunbar].

"The Negro in the United States Navy during World War II." Reprinted from The Journal of Negro History 32:2.[April 1947].

Box 7, Folder 3

Reddick, Lawrence Dunbar.

The world view of the Negro question. New York: New School for Social Research, [19--].

Box 7, Folder 4

Reid, Ira De A.

Adult education among Negroes. Washington, D.C.: Associates in Negro Folk Education, 1936.

Box 7, Folder 5

Republican Club.

Race discrimination. New York: Republican Club, 1908.

Box 7, Folder 6

Richardson, E.C.

Onward Trinidad: the solution to our economic and social problems. [Port-of-Spain]: [Enterprise Electric Printery], [196-].

Box 7, Folder 7

Johnson, J.R.

Marxism and the intellectuals. Detroit: Facing Reality Publishing Committee, 1962.

Box 7, Folder 8

Richardson, E.C.

Trinidad, revolution or evolution: a critical analysis. Port-of-Spain: E.C. Richardson, [1962?].

Box 7, Folder 9

Roberts, Dick.

The fraud of Black capitalism. New York: Pathfinder Press, 1970.

Box 7, Folder 10

Roberts, James.

The narrative of James Roberts, soldier in the Revolutionary war and at the Battle of New Orleans. Hattiesburg, Miss.: Book Farm, 1945.

Box 7, Folder 11

Robeson, Paul.

The Negro people and the Soviet Union. New York: New Century Publishers, 1950.

Box 7, Folder 12

Johnston, Percy Edward.

Six cylinder Olympus. New York: Jupiter Hammon Press, 1964.

Box 7, Folder 13

Robeson, Paul.

Forge Negro-labor unity for peace and jobs. New York: Harlem Trade Union Council, 1950.

Box 7, Folder 14

Robeson, Mrs. Paul.

What do the people of Africa want? [New York]: Council on African Affairs, Inc., [1945].

Box 7, Folder 15

Rogers, J.A.

One hundred amazing facts about the Negro with complete proof. New York: Futuro Press, Inc., 1957.

Box 7, Folder 16

Rogers, J.A.

The five Negro Presidents, according to what people said they were. New York: Helga M. Rogers, 1965.

Box 7, Folder 17

Johnson, Kathryn M.

The dark race in the dawn. New York: William-Frederick Press, 1948.

Box 7, Folder 18

Ross, Irwin.

The Communists: friends or foes of civil liberties? [New York]: American Jewish Committee, 1950.

Box 7, Folder 19

Rotnem, Victor W.

"The federal civil right `not to be lynched'." Reprinted from Washington University Law Quarterly 28:2.[February 1943].

Box 7, Folder 20

Ruffin, Frank G.

The Negro as a political and social factor. Richmond, Va.: J.W. Randolph & English, 1888.

Box 7, Folder 21

Ruffner, Henry.

An address to the people of West Virginia: shewing that slavery is injurious to the public welfare, and that it may be gradually abolished, without detriment to the rights and interests of slaveholders. Bridgewater, Va.: Green Bookman, 1933.

Box 7, Folder 22

Russo, Pasquale.

Ku Klux Klan, church and labor. Chicago: P. Russo, 1923.

Box 7, Folder 23

Rustin, Bayard.

Report on Montgomery, Alabama. New York: War Resisters League, 1956.

Box 7, Folder 24

Johnson, Oliver.

The abolitionists vindicated in a review of Eli Thayer's paper on the New England Emigrant Aid Company. Worcester, Mass.: Franklin P. Rice, 1887.

Box 7, Folder 25

Prime Minister's broadcast to the Nation on the unemployment situation in Trinidad and Tobago, 5th April, 1967. Trinidad: Government Printery, 1967.

Box 7, Folder 26

Review of Wilson on missions. [S.l.]: [s.n.], [18--].

Box 7, Folder 27

New York. Congress. House of Representatives.

Slavery: resolutions of the Legislature of New York, in favor of a provision, in the establishment of territorial governments over New Mexico and the Californias, prohibiting slavery therein so long as the same may remain territories. [New York]: Tippin & Streeper, 1848.

Note

2 copies
Box 7, Folder 28

Nkrumah, Kwame.

The way out, together with "Civilian rule" fraud; and, A call for positive action and armed struggle. London: Panaf Publications Limited, 1968.

Box 7, Folder 29

Ovington, Mary White.

Phillis Wheatley. New York: Schulte Press, 1932.

Box 7, Folder 30

Patterson, William L.

We demand freedom! New York: Civil Rights Congress, 1951.

Box 7, Folder 31

Parker, Albert.

The march on Washington one year after. New York: Pioneer Publishers, 1942.

Box 7, Folder 32

Parker, Albert.

Negroes in the post-war world. New York: Pioneer Publishers, 1943.

Note

2 copies
Box 7, Folder 33

Jones, Claudia.

Lift every voice--for victory! New York: New Age Publishers, Inc., 1942.

Box 7, Folder 34

[Jones, Thomas H.].

The experience of Thomas H. Jones, who was a slave for forty-three years. Worcester [Mass.]: Henry J. Howland, [1857].

Box 7, Folder 35

Johnson, James Weldon.

"Lynching: America's national disgrace." Reprinted from Current History.[January 1924].

Box 7, Folder 36

Jones, Claudia.

"An end to the neglect of the problems of the Negro woman!" Reprinted from Political Affairs.[June 1949].

Box 7, Folder 37

Jones, Lewis, and Stanley Smith.

Tuskegee, Alabama: voting rights and economic pressure. New York: Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, 1958.

Box 7, Folder 38

Joyce, Frank.

An analysis of American racism. Boston: New England Free Press, [196-?].

Box 7, Folder 39

Kirkland, Charles P.

A letter to the Hon. Benjamin R. Curtis, late judge of the Supreme Court of the United States, in review of his recently published pamphlet on the "Emancipation Proclamation" of the President. 2d ed. New York: Anson D. F. Randolph, 1863.

Box 7, Folder 40

Kelley, William D.

Remarks of Hon. William D. Kelley, of Pennsylvania, in support of his proposed amendment to the bill "To guaranty to certain states whose governments have been usurped or overthrown a republican form of government"; delivered in the House of Representatives, January 16, 1865. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Globe Office, 1865.

Box 7, Folder 41

Breitman, George, and George Novack.

Black nationalism and socialism. New York: Merit Publishers, 1968.

Box 7, Folder 42

Embree, Edwin R.

Julius Rosenwald Fund: review for the two-year period 1940-1942. Chicago: [s.n.], 1942.

Box 7, Folder 43

The end of the irrepressible conflict, by a merchant of Philadelphia. Philadelphia: King & Baird Printers, 1860.

Box 7, Folder 44

Edwards, Harry Stillwell.

Eneas africanus. Macon, Ga.: J.W. Burke Co., 1922.

Box 7, Folder 45

Edwards, Harry Stillwell.

Eneas africanus. Macon, Ga.: J.W. Burke Co., 1924.

Box 7, Folder 46

Eckstein, Otto.

Education, employment and Negro equality. [Washington, D.C.]: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1968.

Box 7, Folder 47

Etheridge, Frank Oscar.

What became of race prejudice? [S.l.]: [s.n.], 1942.

Box 7, Folder 48

Nzuji, Clémentine.

Murmures; poémes. [République Démocratique du Congo]: [Office National de la Recherche et du Développement], [19--].

Box 7, Folder 49

Endore, Guy.

The crime at Scottsboro. Hollywood, Calif.: Hollywood Scottsboro Committee, [193-].

Box 7, Folder 50

Eleazer, Robert B.

Singers in the dawn: a brief anthology of American Negro poetry. Atlanta: Conference on Education and Race Relations, 1935.

Box 7, Folder 51

Council on African Affairs.

Resistance against fascist enslavement in South Africa. New York: New Century Publishers, 1953.

Box 7, Folder 52

Spirer, Jess.

"Negro crime." Reprinted from Comparative Psychology Monographs 16:2.[June 1940].

Box 7, Folder 53

Spears, J.R.

"The slave trade in America." Scribner's Magazine 28:1. [July 1900].

Box 7, Folder 54

Sumner, Charles.

Slavery and the rebellion, one and inseparable, speech of Hon. Charles Sumner, before the New York Young Men's Republican Union, at Cooper Inst., N.Y., on Nov. 5, 1864. Boston: Wright & Potter, 1864.

Box 7, Folder 55

Stow, Horatio J.

The encroachments and exactions of slavery: speech of the Hon. Horatio J. Stow, of Niagara County. [S.l.]: [s.n.], [1858].

Box 7, Folder 56

Sugar, Maurice.

A Negro on trial for his life: the frame-up of James Victory exposed! Detroit: Committee for Maurice Sugar for Judge of Recorder's Court, 1935.

Box 7, Folder 57

Storey, Moorfield.

The Negro question: an address delivered before the Wisconsin Bar Association. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, [1918].

Box 7, Folder 58

[Randolph, Leonard].

All you could wish for a quarter. Richmond, Va.: Saint Luke Press, 1925.

Box 7, Folder 59

[Randolph, Leonard].

White supremacy and company. New York: New York Age Press, [192-?].

Box 7, Folder 60

Sumner, Charles.

Speech of Hon. Charles Sumner, of Massachusetts, on the abolition of slavery in the District of Colombia, delivered in the Senate of the U.S., March 31, 1862. [Washington, D.C.]: [s.n.], [1862].

Box 7, Folder 61

Sumner, Charles.

The equal rights of all: the great guarantee and present necessity, for the sake of security, and to maintain a Republican government: speech of Hon. Charles Sumner, of Massachusetts, in the U.S. Senate, February 6 and 7, 1866. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Globe Office, 1866.

Box 7, Folder 62

Sumner, Charles.

The promises of the Declaration of Independence: eulogy on Abraham Lincoln, delivered before the municipal authorities of the city of Boston, June 1, 1865. Boston: Ticknor & Fields, 1865.

Box 7, Folder 63

Newton, Huey P.

Huey Newton talks to the movement about the Black Panther Party, cultural nationalism, SNCC, liberals and white revolutionaries. New York: Students for a Democratic Society, [1969?].

Box 7, Folder 64

Sumner, Charles.

Independence of Hayti and Liberia: speech of Hon. Charles Sumner of Massachusetts, on the bill to authorize the appointment of diplomatic representatives to the republics of Hayti and Liberia. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Globe Office, 1862.

Box 7, Folder 65

The third world, 73. Edinburgh: World Development Movement, 1973.

Box 7, Folder 66

Perry, Pettis.

White chauvinism and the struggle for peace. New York: New Century Publishers, 1952.

Box 7, Folder 67

Peters, Paul.

Eight who lie in the death house. [S.l.]: National Committee for the Defense of Political Prisoners, [193-].

Box 7, Folder 68

Phillips, Ulrich B.

"The economic cost of slave holding in the cotton belt." Reprinted from Political Science Quarterly 20:2.[1905].

Box 7, Folder 69

Wentworth, Franklin H.

Wendell Phillips: an address by Franklin H. Wentworth. New York: Socialist Literature Co., [1906].

Box 7, Folder 70

Phillips, Wendell.

On slave hunting in the Old Bay State: speech of Wendell Phillips, Esq., before the Committee...in the House of Representatives, Feb. 17, 1859. Boston: R.F. Wallcut, 1859.

Box 7, Folder 71

Phillips, Wendell.

Review of Webster's speech on slavery. Boston: American Anti-Slavery Society, 1850.

Box 7, Folder 72

Pipkin, Charles W.

Social legislation in the south. Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina Press, 1936.

Box 7, Folder 73

Podbrey, Pauline.

Famous American Negroes. Cape Town, South Africa: African Bookman, 1944.

Box 7, Folder 74

[Hammond, S.A.].

The preservation of democracy in Barbados; edited extracts from an essay competition. [S.l.]: Advocate, [1967].

Box 7, Folder 75

President's Committee on Government Contracts.

Third annual report on equal job opportunity. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1956.

Box 7, Folder 76

Preston, Robert L.

Southern miscellanies. Leesburg, Va.: R.L. Preston, 1919.

Box 7, Folder 77

Price, Margaret.

The Negro and the ballot in the south. Atlanta: Southern Regional Council, 1959.

Box 7, Folder 78

Progressive Labor Party.

Black and white construction workers divided by the bosses. Boston: New England Free Press, [1970].

Box 7, Folder 79

Quincy, Josiah.

Address illustrative of the nature and power of the slave states, and the duties of the free states; delivered at the request of inhabitants of the town of Quincy, Mass., on Thurs., June 5, 1856. Boston: Ticknor & Fields, 1856.

Box 7, Folder 80

Randolph, A. Phillip, and Norman Thomas.

Victory's victims? The Negro's future. New York: Socialist Party, [1943?].

Box 7, Folder 81

Raushenbush, Winifred.

How to prevent a race riot in your home town. New York: American Civil Liberties Union, Committee on Race Discrimination, [1943].

Box 7, Folder 82

Raymond, Harry.

Dixie comes to New York: story of the Freeport GI slayings. New York: Daily Worker, 1946.

Box 7, Folder 83

Raymond, Harry.

The Ingrams shall not die! Story of Georgia's new terror. New York: Daily Worker, 1948.

Box 7, Folder 84

Raymond, Harry.

Save Willie McGee. New York: New Century Publishers, 1951.

Box 7, Folder 85

Fowler, Orin.

Slavery in California and New Mexico, speech of Mr. Orin Fowler of Massachusetts, in the House of Representatives, Mar. 11, 1850. [S.l.]: Buell & Blanchard, 1850.

Box 7, Folder 86

King, Martin Luther, Jr.

A drum major for justice. Bushy Heath, England: Taurus Press, [196-].

Box 7, Folder 87

Webster, Daniel.

Speech of the Hon. Daniel Webster, upon the subject of slavery, delivered in the United States Senate on Thursday, March 7, 1850. Boston: Hotchkiss & Co., 1850.

Box 7, Folder 88

Washington, Booker T.

Industrial training for the Negro. [Tuskegee, Ala.]: Tuskagee Institute Steam Print, 1904.

Box 7, Folder 89

Ovington, Mary White.

How the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People began. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, 1914.

Box 7, Folder 90

Richardson, Beulah.

A black woman speaks...of white womanhood, of white supremacy, of peace. New York: American Women for Peace, 1951.

Box 7, Folder 91

New England Anti-Slavery Society.

Constitution of the New-England Anti-Slavery Society, with an address to the public. Boston: Garrison & Knapp, 1832.

Box 7, Folder 92

Peck, James.

Louisiana--summer, 1964: the students report to their hometowns. New York: Congress of Racial Equality, 1964.

Box 7, Folder 93

Douglass, Frederick.

Frederick Douglass: selections from his writings. New York: International Publishers, 1945.

Box 7, Folder 94

United Public Workers of America.

Jim Crow discrimination against U.S. employees in the Canal Zone. New York: United Public Workers of America, [194-?].

Box 7, Folder 95

Forman, James.

Liberation will come from a black thing. [Chicago]: [Students for a Democratic Society], [196-].

Box 7, Folder 96

Congress of Racial Equality.

The blackboard and the ballot. New York: Congress of Racial Equality, [195-?].

Box 7, Folder 97

Holden, Anna.

A first step toward school integration. New York: Congress of Racial Equality, 1958.

Box 7, Folder 98

Peck, James.

Cracking the color line: non-violent direct action methods of eliminating racial discrimination. New York: Congress on Racial Equality, 1960.

Box 7, Folder 99

Hastie, William H.

On clipped wings: the story of Jim Crow in the Army Air Corps. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, 1943.

Box 7, Folder 100

Jones, Claudia.

Jim-Crow in uniform. New York: New Age Publishers, 1940.

Box 7, Folder 101

Jackson, Charles.

A practical program to kill Jim Crow. 2d ed. New York: Pioneer Publishers, 1945.

Box 7, Folder 102

Hamilton, Mary, et al.

Freedom riders speak for themselves. Detroit: News & Letters, 1961.

Box 7, Folder 103

Winston, Henry.

Old Jim Crow has got to go! New York: New Age Publishers, 1941.

Box 7, Folder 104

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

1963 annual report. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Legal Defense and Educational Fund, 1963.

Box 7, Folder 105

Newton, Huey P.

The genius of Huey P. Newton, Minister of Defense, Black Panther Party. San Francisco: Black Panther Party, Ministry of Information, 1970.

Box 7, Folder 106

Young Peoples Socialist League.

Jim Crow is the enemy. New York: Young Peoples Socialist League, [194-].

Box 7, Folder 107

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

How about a decent school for me? New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, [194-].

Box 7, Folder 108

Progressive Party.

Jim Crow must go! New York: Progressive Party, [194-?].

Box 7, Folder 109

Williams, Robert F.

Listen, brother! New York: World View Publishers, 1968.

Box 7, Folder 110

Rorty, James.

Brother Jim Crow. New York: Post War World Council, 1943.

Box 7, Folder 111

Robeson, Paul.

For freedom and peace: address by Paul Robeson at Welcome Home Rally, New York, June 19, 1949. New York: Council on African Affairs, [1949?].

Box 7, Folder 112

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

24th annual report. New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, 1933.

Box 7, Folder 113

New Hampshire. Congress. House of Representatives.

Extinction of slavery: resolutions of the Legislature of New Hampshire, relative to slavery in the District of Columbia and territories belonging or which may hereafter belong to the United States. [New Hampshire]: [s.n.], 1846.

Box 7, Folder 114

Revolutionary Workers League.

The Negro under capitalism. Detroit: Demos Press, [1933].

Box 7, Folder 115

Paton, Alan.

"The Negro in America today." Reprinted from Collier's.[October 1954].

Box 7, Folder 116

Selsam, Howard.

The Negro people in the United States: facts for all Americans. New York: Jefferson School of Social Science, 1953.

Box 7, Folder 117

Wright, Harry L.

A survey of veterans services for Negroes in Arkansas. Atlanta: Southern Regional Council, 1946.

Box 7, Folder 118

Wright, Elizur.

The sin of slavery, and its remedy; containing some reflections on the moral influence of African colonization. New York: E. Wright, Jr., 1833.

Box 7, Folder 119

[National Agricultural Workers Union].

The disinherited speak: letters from sharecroppers. New York: Workers Defense League for the Southern Tenant Farmers Union, [1936?].

Box 7, Folder 120

Woodson, Carter G.

"Ten years of collecting and publishing the records of the Negro." Reprinted from The Journal of Negro History 10:4.[October 1925].

Box 7, Folder 121

Workers and Farmers Party.

It is time for a change: Workers and Farmers Party 1966 election manifesto. Port-of-Spain: Workers and Farmers Party, [1966].

Box 7, Folder 122

United States. Work Progress Administration. Georgia.

Father-son occupations among Negroes in Atlanta, Georgia. A supplementary study of occupational characteristics of white collar and skilled Negro workers in five cities of Georgia. [Atlanta]: Work Progress Administration of Georgia, 1937.

Box 7, Folder 123

Farmer, James.

Are white liberals obsolete in the black struggle? Philadelphia: Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, 1968.