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Guide to the Leverett G. Davis, Jr. Papers, 1946-1975
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Table of contents What's This?
  • Descriptive Summary
  • Administrative Information
  • Biography

  • Descriptive Summary

    Title: Leverett G. Davis, Jr. Papers,
    Date (inclusive): 1946-1975
    Creator: Davis, Leverett G.
    Extent: Linear feet: 2
    Repository: California Institute of Technology. Archives.
    Pasadena, California 91125
    Language: English.

    Administrative Information

    Access

    Collection is open for research.

    Publication Rights

    Copyright has not been assigned to the California Institute of Technology Archives. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Head of the Archives. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the California Institute of Technology Archives as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained by the reader.

    Preferred Citation

    [Identification of item, Box and file number], Leverett G. Davis, Jr. Papers, Archives, California Institute of Technology.

    Biography

    Leverett G. Davis, Jr. was born on March 3, 1914 in Elgin, Illinois. He did his undergraduate work at both the University of Washington and Oregon State College. His graduate work was done in physics at Caltech, where he received his doctorate in 1941. He remained at Caltech as a faculty member until his retirement in 1981.
    His papers cover the period from 1946 to 1975. They are representative of his scientific work in the field of astrophysics, his contributions within the Division of Physics, Math and Astronomy, and his professional activities as a consultant to NASA and a participant in the early unmanned space missions, specifically the Mariner mission to Venus in the early 1960s.