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Guide to the Gayle Morrison Files on Southeast Asian Refugees, 1969-2001
MS-SEA014  
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Collection Overview
 
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Description
This collection contains materials acquired by Gayle Morrison during the time she served with the Lao Family Community, Inc., and the Governor's Task Force regarding issues of Southeast Asian refugees living both in the United States and in camps located in Southeast Asia. Materials relating to the Lao Family Community and the Governor's Task Force include correspondence and information on agencies at the local, state, and federal level. The agencies and services included in the collection deal with the issues and challenges Southeast Asian refugees face living in the United States and ways of helping the refugees adapt to their new home and surroundings.
Background
Gayle Morrison has been active in several organizations working with Southeast Asians since the 1970s. She earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Sociology from California State University in Fullerton, California, in 1972. She then went on to receive a Master of Arts degree in Educational Counseling and Psychology in 1976 from Chapman University in Orange, California. She began her involvement with Southeast Asian organizations by working in the Home Support Program in Orange County. This program sent counselors into the homes of Southeast Asians where they educated members of the household in areas such as health care.
Extent
7.2 linear feet 9 boxes and 7 oversize folders 7 digitized images
Restrictions
Property rights reside with the University of California. Literary rights are retained by the creators of the records and their heirs. For permissions to reproduce or to publish, please contact the Head of Special Collections and University Archives.
Availability
Collection is open for research. Access to files covered by California personnel records legislation is restricted for 50 years from the latest date of the materials in those files. Access to medical records is restricted for 100 years from the latest date of the materials in those files. Restrictions are noted at the file level.