Finding Aid for the Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts Collection - Library Special Collections, ca. 1198-1616

Processed by Mirella Ferrari and Richard H. Rouse; machine-readable finding aid created by Caroline Cubé.
UCLA Library Special Collections
Room A1713, Charles E. Young Research Library
Box 951575
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1575
Email: spec-coll@library.ucla.edu
URL: http://www.library.ucla.edu/libraries/special/scweb/
© 2005
The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.


Descriptive Summary

Title: Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts Collection - Library Special Collections
Date (inclusive): ca. 1198-1616
Collection number: medspeci
Collector: Ferrari, Mirella.
Abstract: This finding aid lists the Medieval and Renaissance manuscripts holdings of the Department of Special Collections as cited in Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts at the University of California, Los Angeles (1991), compiled by Mirella Ferrari and edited by R.H. Rouse (Call Number - Z6621 C123m 1991). The catalog identifies the contents, illumination, physical makeup, binding, and provenance for all Medieval and Renaissance manuscripts in the UCLA library system. These manuscripts can be found in the Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library's History and Special Collections Division, the John E. Anderson Graduate School of Management Library's Robert E. Gross collection of Rare Books in Business and Economics, the Music Library's Hathaway Collection, and UCLA Library Special Collections. The various Indexes are brief lists of all manuscripts in the UCLA library system while the Container List consists only of the holdings in UCLA Library Special Collections.
Language: Finding aid is written in English.
Language of the Material: Materials are in English.
Repository: University of California, Los Angeles. Library Special Collections.
Los Angeles, California 90095-1575
Physical location: Materials located at the Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library's History and Special Collections Division, the John E. Anderson Graduate School of Management Library's Robert E. Gross collection of Rare Books in Business and Economics, the Music Library's Hathaway Collection, and UCLA Library Special Collections. Some materials are stored off-site at SRLF. Advance notice is required for access to those items in the collection. For items listed in the Container List please contact the UCLA Library Special Collections Reference Desk for paging information. For all other items listed in the various Indexes as not part of UCLA Library Special Collections, please contact the specified repository for more information.
Selected digitized images from this collection.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Open for research. STORED OFF-SITE AT SRLF. Advance notice is required for access to the collection. Please contact UCLA Library Special Collections for paging information.

Restrictions on Use and Reproduction

Property rights to the physical object belong to the UC Regents. Literary rights, including copyright, are retained by the creators and their heirs. It is the responsibility of the researcher to determine who holds the copyright and pursue the copyright owner or his or her heir for permission to publish where The UC Regents do not hold the copyright.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts Collection - Library Special Collections. UCLA Library Special Collections, Charles E. Young Research Library, UCLA.

History

The present catalog, begun over a decade ago, stands at the beginning of modern cataloging of medieval manuscripts in North America. Its completion may serve as the occasion to pause for a moment and examine the beginnings and progress to date of manuscript cataloging in America, as well as to offer some comment on what it has taught us and how best to continue. 1
By “modern” cataloging is meant the writing of catalogs that can stand comparison with those of European national collections, such as the catalog of the Prussian State Library by Rose, that of the Royal Collection in the British Library by Warner and Gilson, the still-growing catalog of the Latin manuscripts at the Bibliothéeque nationale, and the catalogs of various portions of the Vatican Library, such as the Vaticani latini by Pelzer and Ruysschaert and the Reginenses by Wilmart. 2 These works distinguish themselves from earlier catalogs by the fact that they involve extensive research into the identity of the contents, illumination, physical makeup, binding, and provenance of the manuscripts they describe.
The manuscript collections of North America are at the same time substantial and dispersed. In this they are no different from the collections of any European country, save in degree: Europe's collections are larger, North America's collections more widely dispersed. Institutional cataloging of the great collections in Europe has moved at a slow but assured pace. Cataloging of smaller collections has been largely haphazard. In Germany after World War II, at the urging of Bernhard Bischoff the program for catalogs of state libraries was begun, providing scholars with modern catalogs of the libraries of Frankfurt, Stuttgart, and Nurnberg, among others. In England, N.R. Ker saw the cataloging of undescribed manuscripts in small collections as a major desideratum, and undertook to do it himself. Ker was part of that generation of English medievalists, formed in the 1930s, who shared a belief in the importance of the written page and who, when something needed doing, got up and did it. To them, knowledge of the medieval past lay in an understanding of its surviving manuscripts and, therefore, these were to be sought out and cataloged; order, in the form of bibliographic control, was gradually to be imposed upon chaos. This message was firmly transmitted to anyone who listened. Following in the footsteps of M.R. James, any scholar possessed of reasonable curiosity would find an interesting collection of manuscripts to describe. R.A.B Mynors explored Bishop Gray's manuscripts in Balliol College; Malcolm Parkes described the liturgical manuscripts at Keble College; and Ian Doyle with Alan Piper is cataloging the manuscripts of Bishop Cosin's library in Durham. 3 In California also, cataloging began as an individual effort, involving a number of scholars working in undescribed, isolated, and largely overlooked collections.
At the first and simplest level was the undertaking by Dennis Dutschke, and later also by Consuelo Dutschke, of a general survey of manuscripts on the West Coast, ranging from Mount Saint Angel Abbey in Oregon to the San Diego Public Library. The initial intent was to present the results of the survey as a handlist, but in time the Dutschkes agreed that only a more thorough examination of the manuscripts would be of valid service to the academic community.
The author of the present catalog, Mirella Ferrari, a member of the faculty of Classical Philology at the Università cattolica del Sacro cuore in Milan, was brought to UCLA in the spring quarter of 1977 by the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies to catalog the medieval and renaissance manuscripts then in the university's libraries. Her mentor, Giuseppe Billanovich, who had spent a term at UCLA as visiting professor, had seen the body of uncataloged manuscripts and recommended to Fredi Chiappelli, then director of the Center, that Ferrari be invited for the task.
The opportunity to have a knowledgeable manuscript scholar as a colleague at UCLA and to assist her in whatever way possible with the library and the manuscripts was a great stimulus to catalog locally in Southern California and, in turn, to encourage cataloging in American collections generally. Ferrari delayed her return to Italy, and in the summer of 1977 she, Consuelo Dutschke, and I began with the Claremont Libraries, which housed the very sort of interesting but hitherto ignored collection endemic to the United States. Much of the summer went to the task. Undertaken at our own expense as an enjoyable experiment without deadlines or semi-annual progress reports, the catalog, frequently set aside when more urgent things came along, was finally completed and published in 1986, as the first volume in a series devoted to catalogs of manuscripts in California institutional libraries both private and public. 4
In the late 1960s and '70s, with the prospect of the computer on the horizon, the production of a second supplement to De Ricci's Census 5 was frequently put forward as a worthy undertaking at meetings of the Medieval Academy's Standing Committee for Centers and Regional Associations (CARA). From the enormous effort it had cost W.H. Bond to produce the first supplement to De Ricci, however, it was obvious that the obstacles lying in the way of such a large undertaking made these suggestions impracticable. For one person, working for a research center or alone, however well equipped with research assistants, to catalog not only the new acquisitions of the Morgan, the Beinecke, and the Houghton but also the numerous uncataloged manuscripts in smaller out-of-the-way collections of manuscripts scattered across America, was impossible unless the researcher wanted to consecrate a lifetime to this task—which usually turned out not to be the case. An application to the NEH with the blessing of the Academy was the customarily preferred solution to the problems of financial support. There was a firm conviction in those heady days that a combination of graduate research assistants, computers, and NEH funding could produce manuscript descriptions. The essential missing ingredient, the broadly learned and well-trained cataloger willing to slog away at this task for years on end, was seldom mentioned. There were capable people on the scene, but the older among them already had too many irons in the fire to allow them to begin again, while younger scholars would have been ill advised to invest much effort on catalogs given that manuscript cataloging unfortunately counted little in hiring or tenure decisions. America did not and does not have a tax-funded Federal Academy of Sciences, like France's Centre national de recherche scientifique or West Germany's Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, to support a cadre of full-time catalogers.
What was needed was a means of encouraging able younger scholars with secure positions to catalog defined collections in their own universities. The way to do this was to create a community of catalogers, who would work individually on collections of their choice with the support of the Endowment, who would share their knowledge and areas of first-hand observation with other catalogers, and who together would establish standards through practical experience. The human factor, the quality and motivation of the individual cataloger, was most important.
In the 1970s, the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) became interested in developing programs to make collections of primary sources in North America better known Margaret Childs, then director of the Research Tools Program, expressed an interest in supporting the cataloging of manuscript collections. The first large collection to be described with NEH support was the Huntington Library, which had applied in 1974 for a grant to prepare guides to its extensive and varied manuscript collections. Its curator of manuscripts Jean Preston left in 1977 for Princeton, and the new curator Mary Robertson sought advice on the guide to the medieval manuscripts. Consuelo Dutschke of UCLA was invited to prepare the catalog, even though it would mean putting off completion of the Claremont catalog for a number of years. Dutschke's catalog of the medieval manuscripts at the Huntington appeared in two volumes in 1989, Shortly after the Huntington catalog was under way, the Endowment awarded the Newberry Library a grant to catalog its medieval manuscripts, the project to be carried out by Paul Saenger. The Newberry adopted the format for description that had been developed for the Claremont and Huntington catalogs, and Consuelo Dutschke and I served as editorial consultants. The major East Coast libraries also benefited from NEH-supported cataloging. In 1982, Barbara Shailor was awarded the first in a series of NEH grants to catalog the manuscripts of the Beinecke Library at Yale, a task begun by Cora Lutz in 1969. The Endowment's Research Tools Program under Margaret Childs was again instrumental in seeing that the catalog would adopt the format for description employed in the other cataloging projects that the Program funded, and Consuelo Dutschke and I again served as editorial consultants. More recently, the Houghton Library of Harvard University, at the initiative of Larry Dowler (formerly of the Beinecke Library), undertook to catalog its medieval manuscripts. Laura Light of UCLA was selected as cataloger, and after a time the Library was granted NEH support. Barbara Shailor, Consuelo Dutschke, and I have served as editorial consults. Dutschke is now cataloging the manuscripts of the Bancroft Library, Berkeley, with NEH support. The Bancroft catalog will form the third volume in the present series of catalogs of medieval manuscripts in California institutions. 6
The detailed cataloging of manuscripts with NEH support was not limited to manuscripts in America, but was already being applied to American collections of microfilms of manuscripts in European libraries. In the late 1960s, the Hill Monastic Manuscript Library of St. John's University in Minnesota decided to catalog, as well as to microfilm. As the member of the External Advisory Board familiar with cataloging, I worked with the catalogers, Donald Yates and later Hope Mayo, in devising a format for describing manuscripts from microfilm. Catalogs of the manuscripts of Herzogenburg and Tarragona have been published. The Ambrosiana Microfilm Library at the Medieval Institute, University of Notre Dame, in 1980 embarked on a catalog of the filmed Ambrosiana manuscripts, with NEH support and an able cataloging team headed by Christine Eder and later Donald Yates. Leonard Boyle OP and I served as advisors, and the cataloging format adopted was that which had been successfully employed by Yates at the Hill Library. The dismantling of that project by Ralph McInerney, then director of the Institute, was a great loss. The catalog project has recently been resuscitated by Louis Jordan, and volumes have begun to appear. 7
Not all modern cataloging in America found its origins in the community of catalogers described above. The first catalog of an American collection done in modern form was begun in 1982 by Lilian Randall at the Walters Art Gallery in Baltimore, with the support of the Kress Foundation and NEH. Randall, whose first volume appeared in 1989, brought both Barbara Shailor and me into contact with the Walters project, and she adopted a format similar to that used in the NEH-supported catalogs described above. In 1980, the Library of Congress decided to prepare a catalog of its medieval manuscripts.
The project, supported by the Library rather than by NEH, has, nevertheless, also been in informal contact with various of the catalogers mentioned above, in particular Donald Yates, Lilian Randall, and me, and has followed something of the basic format of description adopted by the NEH catalogs. The first volume, by Svato Schutzner, appeared in 1989. 8 These catalogs are a testimony to the cooperation of scholars, libraries, and the federal government.
From time to time it has been suggested that the community of scholars who catalog manuscripts develop a model format for description. An agreed-upon form would simplify the National Endowment's work and ensure a certain standard and uniformity of description. While this is an appealing notion, it has been resisted, and rightly so, for several reasons. As manuscripts are each unique items, a degree of flexibility is required in the way they are to be described. A fixed format, like a form to be filled in, tends to make one force the manuscript to fit the format. The form of N.R. Ker's descriptions is constantly adapted to suit the needs of the manuscript being described; for Ker, practicality and common sense overruled system and consistency every time. Catalogers, also, are each unique people who bring to their task specific insights, the expression of which should be allowed. Lastly, to establish a format for description inevitably freezes the format; it implies that we have determined the best way of describing what we see, and it is doubtful that this is so. There are a number of areas where the method of description will change, one hopes for the better. The cataloger's treatment of a manuscript's illumination and decoration has changed from being largely ignored, to being described as part of the physical make-up on a par with the dimensions and number of columns, to now receiving a separate section of its own. At present the treatment of binding fragments in a catalog description appears sometimes with the contents, sometimes in the binding section. The increased use of photographs to supplement words will certainly influence the form of future descriptions. Each of the American catalogs mentioned in this essay is based on the same basic model, yet each has adapted the model in one way or another to suit the specific situation.
To catalog in depth has always required serious justification. Libraries and funding agencies ask, why spend three years describing 150 manuscripts when a brief contents list of the 150 could be prepared in six months? For the most part, American manuscript collections are not large enough to make this a serious problem. Both Consuelo Dutschke and Barbara Shailor have cataloged collections of 350 and 500 manuscripts in a reasonable time. The question itself, however, is poorly put, since it implies that one must choose one or the other, catalog or handlist. In fact, what one wants for massive collections such as the Hill Monastic Manuscript Library or the large European libraries, is both. A short-form inventory of known contents, rapidly produced, on-line so as to be constantly updatable, will satisfy the basic needs of users. The inventory can be followed by the in-depth research catalog moving at its own pace.
National organizations of archivists and rare book librarians at present are expressing increasing interest in establishing a format for an on-line system of cataloging manuscripts. For the most part, these organizations are concerned with box-level descriptions of papers and, on occasion, modern bound manuscripts, where problems of identifying the contents are minimal and materials can be cataloged without leaving one's desk. The system under consideration, however, would theoretically be competent to receive indexable descriptions of any type of manuscript—including medieval documents and bound volumes. To date, no cataloger of medieval and renaissance manuscripts nor, indeed, any other medieval or renaissance scholar has been asked to participate in such a project. One hopes that situation will change—that those who catalog medieval and renaissance manuscripts will be consulted about the problems encountered in preparing descriptions, and that students of the Middle Ages and Renaissance will be asked what information they hope to find in a description. Data banks and on-line access hold great promise, but only if the information that goes into them is produced by competent and informed people. This is a time when the relationship between librarian and scholar needs to be one of interested and active cooperation, rather than protectionism and mutual exclusion. 9
America has an abundance of medieval and renaissance manuscripts dispersed in numerous libraries across the country. Some libraries such as the J. Pierpont Morgan, the Houghton, and the Beinecke contain a thousand or more bound manuscripts. Others contain from several hundred to just a handful, and many contain only one manuscript or a few leaves. The manuscript holdings of the majority of these libraries have never been accurately described. This is in large part because the holdings are not substantial enough to permit the libraries in question to support curators of early manuscripts, and because accurate description requires specialized training in languages, scripts, textual history, art history, binding, and the history of collections, which neither general rare book librarians nor general medievalists have. Today, only four American institutions—the Beinecke Library, the Walters Gallery, the Morgan Library, and the Getty Museum—have curators of medieval and renaissance manuscripts. In addition, few manuscript librarians in American libraries, even the curators in the four institutions named above, can afford the time, above and beyond their normal curatorial duties, to engage in detailed cataloging of their collections. American librarians have been able to do little more than register the acquisition of medieval materials in the accession file, using information supplied by the bookseller. While this may be adequate for printed books (though it eliminates the recording of copy-specific information), it is not satisfactory for medieval and renaissance manuscripts, since too many book dealers, Sotheby's descriptions excepted, provide at best a rudimentary identification of the contents, often repeated from the previous dealer's description and not infrequently misleading. The establishment of national on-line data bases like RLIN does not solve the dilemma either, because a manuscript must first be cataloged by a competent scholar before there is accurate data to enter. This situation is not unique to medieval and renaissance manuscripts; it must exist to one degree or another in any area—e.g., oriental literature, history of science—that requires specialized knowledge.
The prospect for bibliographic control is particularly dim in the case of the library, no matter how large, that has only one or two manuscripts. An item alone, without a context in which to be used, is generally ignored: For example, the State Historical Society of Wisconsin possesses a large and remarkable thirteenth-century Bible, which had belonged to a Midwestern farm family for over a century before it was given to the Society; the University of British Columbia has one medieval manuscript, a fifteenth-century copy of Cicero's Prior Academics; Los Angeles Public Library has an early thirteenth-century manuscript of Peter Comestor's Bible history; and Pasadena Public Library had, until it was stolen in 1984, a fifteenth-century Rouen book of hours, which was one of six Rouen horae available for comparative study in Greater Los Angeles. 10
This problem, that medieval and renaissance manuscripts are broadly scattered among libraries unequipped and unstaffed to deal with them, makes cataloging uniquely difficult in America. The solution, cataloging done by manuscript scholars, can be sought in two ways. One solution lies in the willingness and ability of the library to enlist the cooperation of subject specialists from among its university faculty, scholars who have a vivid interest in the rare books and manuscripts of a given field. The benefits of such cooperation can be seen in the example of Cornell University, where the late George Healey, Professor of English Literature and distinguished Wordsworth bibliographer, was named curator of the university's Wordsworth Collection and then Curator of Rare Books, Many North American universities both public and private have on their faculties—whether in English literature, art history, classics, or history—scholars interested in and capable of developing a manuscript collection for research and study. They are a resource for librarians to draw on in developing university collections in the most effective way. In other cases, where the faculty interest is lacking, the appropriate solution would be cataloging by external scholars, funded by either the holding library or the National Endowment. In this fashion, the medieval and renaissance manuscripts in American libraries can be cataloged, and the scholarship of research catalogers, following in the footsteps of Wilmart and Ker, can be properly valued by their fellow medieval and renaissance scholars.
Perhaps the time will come for an idea once considered but dismissed as premature: appealing to the Endowment or another agency to fund a program which would provide three years' support to a set number of postdoctoral scholars to attend a summer institute in manuscript description and then to catalog a collection of manuscripts in their home state. A group of experienced specialists in liturgy, illumination, canon law, and other specific areas including vernacular languages would be available for consultation. The descriptions would be entered in a single data bank which would in time become the central record (catalog) of manuscripts in American collections. An editorial team would review descriptions and assist in seeing the published volumes through the press in a national catalog series which would replace De Ricci and the Supplement and which could be periodically updated from its computer base. If this or something similar is done, I trust that one will have learned from the catalogs described above that the scholarly value of the descriptions produced depends almost entirely on the quality of the cataloger.
The descriptions in the following catalog were prepared by Mirella Ferrari during her visit to UCLA in the spring of 1977. Working at a pace that would put most of us to shame, Ferrari prepared descriptions of the 65 manuscripts and 150 leaves described in this volume in less than six months. This is all the more remarkable because it was accomplished before the availability of computers. Manually produced, a preliminary version of the catalog was published in off-set form in 1978 from a text typed on an electric typewriter by Abigail Bok. The purpose of this version was to make Ferrari's work available to students and faculty using the library, as well as to provide the other University of California libraries with a record of UCLA's holdings. 11
In the ten years which have passed since she returned to Italy, these manuscripts and Ferrari's descriptions have served UCLA graduate seminars and visiting scholars. Not surprisingly, in this time additional texts and provenances have been identified. The entire catalog has been edited, new information added, some entries expanded or corrected, the introductions updated, a list of additional acquisitions for the years 1978-1990 added, and the whole supplied with new indexes. It can be said that the original catalog has held up well to scrutiny, a testimony to the author's learning and energy.
The production of this volume was completed as it was begun, namely, without extramural funding or cost to the University Library. The Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies has contributed the cost of photography, copyediting, and composition, as well as that of the initial cataloging in having brought Mirella Ferrari to UCLA. I am grateful to its successive directors Fredi Chiappelli and Michael Allen for their continued support of the catalog program.
The staffs of the UCLA libraries whose manuscripts are described in this volume could not have been more helpful. I want in particular to thank Anne Caiger, Katharine Donahue, Simon Elliott, Joyce Ludmer, Jeffrey Rankin, Victoria Steele, and David Zeidberg for their professional help and good will. Behind them, of course, stand their predecessors, the great library builders m whose days these manuscripts were acquired, and the donors of three great collections. I am speaking of Wilbur Smith (first librarian of Special Collections), Lawrence Clark Powell, Robert Vosper, Dr. Franklin Murphy, Dr. John Benjamin, and the late Dr. Elmer Belt.
My thanks to a discerning friend of many years who has again enhanced a volume of this series by the contribution of a color frontispiece.
I am grateful to the following individuals for their considerate help. John Bernhardt read each of the manuscripts to check for typographical errors. My fellow series editors Consuelo Dutschke and Dennis Dutschke have read the whole of the catalog at various stages, and each has contributed information to a number of descriptions. Terry Nixon prepared the indexes, as he did those to the Claremont volume.
This volume is dedicated to two scholar librarians, Edward Shreeves and Brooke Whiting, friends who shared with me their enjoyment of medieval manuscripts and early printed books.
R.H.R.

UCLA

January 1990
1. Regarding the history and growth of manuscript studies in America, see R.H. Rouse, “Latin Paleography and Manuscript Studies in North America,” in Un secolo di paleografia e diplomatica (1887-1986), ed. A. Petrucci and A. Pratesi (Rome, 1988) pp.307-327
2. Valentin Rose, Verzeichniss der lateinischen Handschriften der kgl. Bibliothek zu Berlin, 3 vols., (Berlin 1893-1919); G F. Warner and J.P. Gilson, Catalogue of Western Manuscripts in the Old Royal and King's Collections, 4 vols. (London, 1921); Catalogue général des manuscripts latins . . . . ed. Ph. Lauer el al, (Paris, 1939- ); A. Pelzer. J. Ruysschaert, et al., Codices Vaticani latini (Vatican City, 1902-[1988]); A. Wilmart, Codices reginenses latini, 2 vols. (Vatican City, 1937-1945).
3. N.R. Ker, Medieval Manuscripts, in British Libraries, 3 vols. (Oxford, 1969-1983); R.A.B. Mynors, Catalogue of the Manuscripts of Balliol College, Oxford (Oxford, 1963); M.B. Parkes, The Medieval Manuscripts of Keble College, Oxford (London, 1979).
4. C.W. Dutschke and R.H. Rouse, with Mirella Ferrari, Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts in the Claremont Libraries (Berkeley 1986), vol.1 of the present series.
5. Seymour De Ricci, Census of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts in the United States and Canada, 3 vols. (1935-1940; reproduced New York, 1961); and C.U. Faye and W.H. Bond, Supplement to the Census of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscript in the United States and Canada (New York, 1962).
6. C.W. Dutschke, with R.H. Rouse, Guide to Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts in the Huntington Library, 2 vols. (San Marino, California, 1989); P. Saenger, A Catalogue of the Pre-1500 Western Manuscript Books at the Newberry Library (Chicago 1989); B.A. Shailor, Catalogue of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University (Binghamton, New York, 1984- ).
7. Descriptive Inventories of Manuscripts Microfilmed for the Hill Monastic Manuscripts Library (Collegeville, Minnesota, 1981- ); Louis Jordan et al., Inventory of Western Manuscripts in the Biblioteca Ambrosiana, from the Medieval Institute of the University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, 1984- ).
8. Lilian M. C. Randall, Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts in the Walters Art Gallery (Baltimore, 1988- ); Svato Schutzner, Medieval and Renaissance Manuscript Books in the Library of Congress: A Descriptive Catalog (Washington 1989- ).
9. An equally pressing need is for on-line cataloging of incunabula. A generally agreed-upon form of description does not exist. For some comments on one aspect, see R.H. Rouse, “Copy-Specific Features of the Printed Book: What to Record and Why,” in Bibliography and the Study of Fifteenth-Century Civilization, ed. Lotte Hellinga, British Library Occasional Papers (London, 1987) pp.202-215.
10. See R.H. Rouse, “Medieval Manuscripts and Early Printed Books in Los Angeles,” in A Bibliophile's Los Angeles: Essays for the International Association of Bibliophiles on the Occasion of Its XIVth Congress, 30 September-11 October 1985 , ed. John Bidwell (Los Angeles, 1985) pp.43-80.
11. Mirella Ferrari, Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts at the University of California, Los Angeles; Preliminary Descriptions (Los Angeles 1978).

Introduction

This catalog contains descriptions of the medieval and renaissance manuscripts in Latin script that are scattered among the libraries of the University of California, Los Angeles. On the example of P.O. Kristeller's Iter italicum, A.D. 1600 has been taken as the upper boundary of the Renaissance. The manuscripts described here are those written in western Europe in a Latin alphabet, without regard to language; at least eleven European languages are represented among the UCLA manuscripts. Manuscripts in Greek and other Eastern European scripts have been excluded, as have the sixteenth-century Mexican manuscripts in the Charles E. Young Research Library.
The method of description and the arrangement of the present catalog are basically those set forth by N.R. Ker on pages vii-xiii of his Medieval Manuscripts in British Libraries, vol.1 (Oxford, 1969). Abbreviations, signs, and formulas, at times different from Ker's, are given in full in the list below. But a further word of explanation is needed: this catalog was written primarily for teaching purposes, and is designed to introduce students to the manuscripts. Hence, the descriptions may seem lengthy and on occasion repetitive to scholarly readers: for example, I have noted the system of ruling in the description of each tenth-and eleventh-century item (e.g., ruled with drypoint); and I have generally given a double nomenclature for the script, a description in English and the technical name in Latin (e.g., gothic bookhand in liturgical style, littera textualis formata). In describing the script, moreover, I have often mentioned features which are normally found in a given type of hand (e.g., in twelfth-century ordinary minuscule d always appears in two forms, uncial and upright), whereas catalogs usually record only exceptional features.
I should like to thank especially Fredi Chiappelli, Director of the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, who took the initiative in arranging my visit to California to work on this catalog and encouraged me at all stages. I am grateful to Dean Robert Hayes and to the Graduate School of Library and Information Science, who received me as a visiting professor; and to the librarians and staff of the campus libraries, who put at my disposal their materials cataloged and uncataloged, and without whose patience and assistance I could hardly have completed this work, especially Victoria Erpelding and Joyce Pellerano Ludmer (the Elmer Belt Library of Vinciana), Sandra Colville-Stewart (the Biomedical Library), Charlotte Georgi (the Anderson Graduate School of Management Library), Marsha Berman (the Music Library), and Brooke Whiting (the Department of Special Collections of the Charles E. Young Research Library). For the descriptions of eight medieval manuscripts in the Research Library I should like to thank the graduate students in R.H. Rouse's paleography course (History 224), whose descriptions, prepared as part of their course work, I used with profit; they are Leila Berner, John Bernhardt, Consuelo Dutschke, Susan Fuller, Jerry Kitzman, and Kathleen McDonough. Anna M. De Vore played a major role in describing the Research Library's collection of loose leaves. I am grateful to Eva Beyer and Abigail Bok who, while carefully typing my work, also took care to edit my English. It is difficult to say how much this catalog owes above all to the friendly help of Professor Richard H. Rouse of the Department of History; he made his advice, criticisms, and suggestions as well as his time freely available to me, from my first day in California, when he introduced me to the Department of Special Collections, to the last day of proofreading. I should like to thank him for everything and acknowledge my debt of gratitude.
M.F.

Los Angeles, 1977

Index 1: Repository

Note

List of Manuscripts in the UCLA Library System organized by repository.
The Elmer Belt Library of Vinciana
  • no.35) Leonardo da Vinci, Trattato della pittura, Italy, 1582, in Italian
  • no.65) Michelangelo Buonarroti, Ricordo, Italy, 1533
  • no.66) Pietro da Vinci, notarized deed, Italy, 1459
  • no.67) Petrus de Crescentiis, Ruralium commodorum libri, Italy, 1466
  • no.68) “Raffaello Sanzio,” forgeries, Italy(?), s. XIX(?)
  • no.70) Bartolomeo Ammannati, letter, Italy, 1570
  • no.73) Breviary, s. XVIII/XIX(?)
The Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library: History and Special Collections Division
  • Benjamin 1) Medical miscellany, Italy, s. XV 2
  • Benjamin 3) Bernard of Gordon, fragment, France, s. XIV 1
  • Benjamin 4) Conoximent de las orines, Libre de reseptes, Catalonia, 1466, in Catalan
  • Benjamin 5) Recipes, Germany, s. XV med, in German
  • Benjamin 8) Sebastian Jäger, Artzney Buech, Austria, 1580, in German
  • Benjamin 9) Medical miscellany, Germany, s. XV med, in German
  • Benjamin 10) Medical miscellany, Czechoslovakia, s. XV med, partly in Czech
  • Benjamin 11) Medical miscellany, Germany, s. XV med, partly in German
  • Benjamin 12) Medical miscellany, Italy, s. XV 2, partly in Italian
  • Benjamin 13) Medical and scientific miscellany, Italy, s. XV 2
  • Benjamin WZ240/P719L/1553) Rare Liber amicorum, Germany, S. XVI med
The John E. Anderson Graduate School of Management Library
  • Gross 1) Statutes of a mercantile court, Italy, 1577, in Italian
  • Gross 2) Business arithmetic, Italy, s. XVI 2, in Italian
  • Gross 3) Della Stufa account book, Italy, 1581-1590, in Italian
  • Gross 4) Commercial treatises, England, s. XVI 2 1 leaf
The Music Library
  • Hathaway 1-24) 24 fragments of music, s. XI-XV
The Charles E. Young Research Library: Department of Special Collections
  • Collection 100, Box 30: Letters, Germany, s. XVI
  • Collection 100, Box 102: Francesco Maria Della Rovere, letter, Italy, 1522, in Italian
  • Collection 100, Box 113/14: Delfino charters and cartulary, Italy, s. XIII-XVII
  • Collection 100, Box 178: Letters, etc., Italy and Spain, s. XIV 2 and XVI 2
  • 170/no.15) Francesco Berni, Life of Pietro Aretino, Italy, s. XVI 2, in Italian
  • 170/no.20) Breviary, Flanders, s. XVI in
  • 170/no.21) Nicholaus Cusanus, De visione dei, Germany, s. XV 2
  • 170/no.22) Pseudo Augustine, sermons, Italy, s. XV 2
  • 170/no.26) Book of hours, France, s. XV in
  • 170/no.43) Martyrology, Italy, s. XV 1
  • 170/no.49) Breviary, Paris, s. XV med
  • 170/no.50) Book of hours, France, s. XV 2
  • 170/no.55) Handbook of chronology, France, s. XVI 2
  • *170/no.84) Life of Jesus, France, s. XV 2, in French
  • 170/no.87) Medical notebook, Italy, s. XVII, in Italian
  • 170/no.199) Jacobus de Voragine, Legenda aurea, France, s. XV med
  • *170/no.281) Life of Cosimo I de' Medici, Italy, 1574/1587, in Italian
  • *170/no.282) Carlo de' Medici, account book, Italy, 1535-1536
  • *170/no.292) Tristano Caracciolo, works, Italy, s. XVII
  • 170/no.307) Ordinances of the Confraternity of St. Julian in Teruel, Spain, 1440-1574, in Spanish
  • *170/322) Paul of Venice, Summa naturalium, Italy, 1421
  • 170/no.323) Inventory of the library of Antoine IV Ebrard de Saint-Sulpice, bishop of Cahors, France, 1589, in French
  • 170/no.331) Stephen Langton, Interpretations of Hebrew names, England or France, s. XIII med
  • 170/no.348) Bible, Spain, s. XIII med
  • 170/no.358) Engineer's sketchbook, Italy, s. XVI 2, and France, s. XVII 2
  • * 170/380) Venetian ambassadors' reports, papal conclaves, Italy, s. XVI-XVII 1
  • 170/no.382) Jacobus de Voragine, sermons, Italy, s. XIV 2
  • 170/no.442) Gregory the Great, Dialogues, Italy, s. XV ex, in Italian
  • 170/no.521) Antiphonal, Italy, s. XV 1
  • * 170/524) Rasis, Liber Almansoris, fragment, Italy, s. XIII 2
  • 170/no.525) Diego Hurtado de Mendoza, De la guerra de Granada, Spain, s. XVI-XVII, in Spanish
  • * 170/no.527) Missal and records of Uckerath, Germany, s. XII-XVI
  • 170/no.529 Laurence Nowell, commonplace book, England, s. XVI med
  • Collection 902 Orsini family, archives, Italy, s. XIV-XX
  • Collection 952, Box 1: Giugni family, account book, Italy, 1580-1586
  • Collection 952, Box 2: Accounts, Italy, s. XVI-XVII
  • Collection 952, Box 3: Carlo di Andrea Cambini, account book, Italy, 1556-1616
  • Collection 952, Box 4: Biagio Castellani, notarial register, Italy, 1382-1391
  • Collection 952, Box 5: Sienese fiscal records, Italy, 1601-1615
  • Collection 953, Box 1.3: Neapolitan miscellany, Italy, s. XVI
  • Collection 968, Box 1.71: Pierre Gautier, miscellany, France, 1572-1575
  • Collection 1033: Antiphonals, leaves, Italy or Spain, s. XVI
  • Collection 2070: 16 dated documents, 1198-1585
  • ***170/403 (10 oversized ringed binders): Collection of loose leaves, s. IX-XV

Index 2: Place and Date

Note

Manuscripts in the UCLA Library System organized by place and date.
Austria 1368
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 16; Neuenstadt
1580
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 8 (Vienna)
Belgium ca. 1564
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - PA6648.P6A17 1527 (Appendix)
1633
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.14 (Appendix; Mechelen)
Catalonia 1466
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 4
Czechoslovakia s. XV med
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 10 (Prague?)
England s. XIII med
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.331 (or France?)
1449
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.615 (Appendix)
s. XV
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.621 (Appendix)
1521
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 11
1550
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 12
ca. 1560-ca. 1571
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.529
1585
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 13
after 1587
Contributing Institution: Management, Gross 4
ca. 1595
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.412 (Appendix)
Flanders s. XVI in
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.20
1521
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100), Box 30 (item 1; Mons, Hainaut)
France ca. 1240-1260
Contributing Institution: Grunwald, s.n. (Appendix; Paris)
s. XIII med
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.558 (Appendix; southern)
s. XIII 2
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.620 (Appendix)
s. XIII ex
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, MS Coll. 82 (Appendix; Figeac)
ca. 1311-1325
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 3 (Paris?)
1346
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 8
1405
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 9; Paris
1412
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100) Box 178 no.i (Appendix; Paris)
s. XV med
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.49 (Paris)
s. XV med
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.199 (northern)
s. XV 2
Contributing Institution: Belt 37 (Appendix; Rouen)
s. XV 2
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.50
s. XV 2 or XV ex
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*84 (northern)
1478
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 10; Paris
s. XV ex
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.633 (Appendix; southwest)
s. XVI in
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.26
1523
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - *(Appendix)
1558
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 14; Paris
1572-1575
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - L'Enseignement de l'Université du Collège de France et des collèges à Paris (Collection 968), Box 1, no.71 (Paris and Orléans)
s. XVI 2
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.55 (northern)
1589
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.323 (Cahors)
s. XVII
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.366 (Appendix; St. Denis)
s. XVII 2
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.358 (part II)
Germany s. XII 1
Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 4
s. XII med or XII 2
Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 13
s. XII ex
Contributing Institution: Grunwald, s.n. (Appendix; southern)
s. XII ex
Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 11 (or Switzerland?)
s. XII-XIII
Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 7 (Rhineland)
s. XII-XIII
Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 19, 20
s. XII-XVI
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*527 (Uckerath)
s. XIII 1
Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 10 (or Switzerland?)
s. XIII 1
Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 23
s. XIII
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*575 (Appendix)
s. XIII-XIV
Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 17 (Rhineland?)
s. XIV
Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 5
s. XIV
Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 14
s. XIV
Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 22
s. XIV-XV
Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 15 (Rhineland?)
s. XIV-XV
Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 18
s. XV 1
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.574 (Appendix; Cologne)
s. XV 1
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.597 (Appendix)
s. XV 1
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.656 (Appendix)
s. XV med
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 5
s. XV med
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 9
s. XV med
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 11
s. XV med
Contributing Institution: Grunwald, s.n. (Appendix; southern)
s. XV med
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - BV4209 S97 1508 (Appendix)
s. XV
Contributing Institution: Biomedical *WZ230 A743b 1485 (Appendix; Nürnberg)
s. XV
Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 16
s. XV
Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 24 (or Low Countries?)
s. XV
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.594 (Appendix)
s. XV
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.616 (Appendix)
s. XV
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.617 (Appendix)
1464
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.572 (Appendix)
s. XV 2
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.21
1476
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.598 (Appendix)
1476-1478
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.642 (Appendix; western)
s. XV ex
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.584 (Appendix; Bavaria)
s. XV ex
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - *A1 T36su (Appendix)
s. XVI med
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - 112559 (Appendix)
1559-1562
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin WZ240 P719L 1553 RARE
1570
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100), Box 30 (item 4; Speyer)
1590-1600
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*352 (Appendix; Nürnberg)
1600
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*351 (Appendix; Nürnberg)
ca. 1610
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*353 (Appendix; Nürnberg)
ca. 1610
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*354 (Appendix; Nürnberg)
s. XVII 1
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*355 (Appendix; Nürnberg)
Germany (?) s. XVI
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100), Box 30 (items 2, 3)
Italy s. XIII 1
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.583 (Appendix; southern)
s. XIII-s. XVII
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100), Boxes 113/114 (Veneto)
s. XIII 2
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*524
1311
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of material about the Orsini family (Collection 902), Box 533 no.i (Appendix; Volterra)
1313
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 2; Pisa
1350
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 3; Pisa
s. XIV
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, MS Coll. 71 (Appendix)
s. XIV
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.623 (Appendix)
s. XIV-s. XX
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of material about the Orsini family (Collection 902)
1353
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of material about the Orsini family (Collection 902), Box 533 no.ii (Appendix)
1358
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 4; Florence
s. XIV 2
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100), Box 178 (item 1; central)
s. XIV 2
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.382
1378
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 5; Padua
1382-1391
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 4 (Pistoia)
s. XIV/XV in
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.546 (Appendix; Florence?)
1411
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 6; Poggibonsi
1421
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*322 (Rimini)
s. XV 1
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.43 (northern)
s.XV 1
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.521
1426
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.547 (Appendix)
1440
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.589 (Appendix; Sulmona)
1447
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.553 (Appendix; Venice)
s. XV med
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.560 (Appendix; northern)
s. XV med
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.627 (Appendix; Ferrara)
s. XV med/XV 2
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.22
s. XV
Contributing Institution: Management TN241 U82 1616
s. XV
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.592 (Appendix)
s. XV
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.595 (Appendix)
s. XV
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - A1 B456 1495 (Appendix)
1459
Contributing Institution: Belt 66 (Florence)
ca. 1460-1465
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.593 (Appendix; Naples?)
1466
Contributing Institution: Belt 67 (Bergamo)
ca. 1473-1476
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 13 (Tuscany)
s. XV 2
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 1 (Bergamo)
s. XV 2(?)
Contributing Institution: Biomedical Benjamin 12 (Lombardv)
s. XV 2
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.559 (Appendix)
s. XV 2
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.638 (Appendix)
s. XV 2
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.653 (Appendix)
s. XV 2
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - *A1 D621v 1475 (Appendix)
s XV 2
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - *A1 J83d 1486 (Appendix)
1478
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.635 (Appendix; Fondi)
1481-1491
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 7; Piacenza
s. XV ex
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.442 (Veneto)
s. XV ex
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.643 (Appendix; Venice?)
s. XV-XVI
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.551 (Appendix)
1507-1513
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.634 (Appendix; Rome?)
ca. 1510
Contributing Institution: Belt D 2 (Appendix)
1522
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100), Box 102 (Mantua)
ca. 1525-1535
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.626 (Appendix; Rome?)
s. XVI 1
Contributing Institution: Belt D 3 (Appendix)
1531-1647
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 2 (item 2: Florence)
1533
Contributing Institution: Belt 65
1535-1536
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*282 (Tuscany)
1540-1546
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 2 (item 1; Tuscany, Lucca?)
1550
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 15; Rome, St. Peter
s. XVI med
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - *Z233 A4T34 (Appendix)
s. XVI
Contributing Institution: Belt D 19 (Appendix)
s. XVI
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of material about the history of Naples (Collection 953), Box 1, no.3 (Naples?)
s. XVI
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Manuscript Leaves of Music (Collection 1033), item 1; or Spain[?]
1553-s. XVII med
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.624 (Appendix; Rome)
1556-1616
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 3 (Florence)
ca. 1562
Contributing Institution: Belt D 1 (Appendix)
1570
Contributing Institution: Belt 70 (Florence)
1574-1587
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*281 (Tuscany)
s. XVI 2
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.15
s. XVI 2
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.358 (part I)
s.XVI 2
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.561 (Appendix)
1577
Contributing Institution: Management, Gross 1 (Florence)
1578-1584
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 6 (Appendix: Tuscany, Garbo?)
before ca. 1580
Contributing Institution: Management Gross 2 (Venice)
1580-1586
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 1 (Tuscany. Garbo?)
1581-1590
Contributing Institution: Management, Gross 3 (Florence)
1582
Contributing Institution: Belt 35
s. XVI-XVII
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*380 (part 1)
ca. 1600
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.543 (Appendix; Padua?)
ca. 1600-1610
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.622 (Appendix; Florence)
1601-1615
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 5 (Siena)
s. XVII 1
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*380 (parts 2. 3)
s. XVII
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.87 (olim 85)
s. XVII
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*292 (southern?)
Low Countries s. XIV
Contributing Institution: Music Hathaway 12
s. XIV 1
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100), Box 178 no.ii (Appendix)
s. XV in
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.542 (Appendix)
before 1477
Contributing Institution: Grundwald, s.n. (Appendix)
s. XV
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.596 (Appendix)
s. XV
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.630 (Appendix; Delft)
Low Countries(?) s. XIV
Contributing Institution: Music Hathaway 21
Poland 1405
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.552 Appendix: Poznan)
Spain 1093-1133(?)
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100), no.***179 (Appendix; Caaveirn, Galioia)
1198
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 1; Salamanca
s. XIII in
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.648 (Appendix; northern)
s. XIII med
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.348
1440-1574
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.307 (Teruel)
1539
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.***652 (Appendix)
s. XVI-XVIII
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.***651 (Appendix)
1562
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100), Box 178 (item 2)
1575
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100), Box 178 (item 3)
1590
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.550 (Appendix)
s. XVI-XVII
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.525
1762
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.***72 (Appendix)
Spain (?) s. XVI ex
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Manuscript Leaves of Music (Collection 1033), item 2
Switzerland s. XII 1
Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 8
Switzerland(?) s. XI
Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 1,2,3
s. XII 1
Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 9
s. XII
Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 6
Unknown s. XVIII-XIX (?)
Contributing Institution: Belt 73
s. XIX (?)
Contributing Institution: Belt 68

Index 3: Secundo Folio

Note

Manuscripts by Secundo Folio in the UCLA Library System.
A conference of weyhtes
Contributing Institution: Management, Gross 4
Abinaam parts mei
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.331
actencum nessele
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 9 (f.1)
alteritate capitulum 14
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.21 [chapter list]
amunt corn se
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 4
Andreas in Achaia consistens
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.199
Apud Ephesum natale
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.43 (text)
Asperagy
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 12
asplenis kleyne
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 9 (f. 2)
benedictis si vos
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.21 (text)
che io per la poverta
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.442
Deus misereatur nostri
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.20
die erste frag
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 8
et cum volueris
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 1
et debelitat nervos
Contributing Institution: Belt 67
ex discipulis suis
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.521
festum sancti Landerici
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.49 (volume II)
ffevrier
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.50 (calendar)
fijo dexare
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.307 (chapter list)
horam nisi casus
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.22
in breviario ultimum
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.49 (volume I, text)
Interlocutori Berni et
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.15
KL Martius habet
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.26 (calendar)
le lxviii e
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*84 (chapter list)
lentes omnia
Contributing Institution: Biomedical Benjamin 13 (f. 2)
Martius apud hebreos
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.43 (calendar)
Nym iii f. salbenbleter
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 11
omnium nostrum salvatoris
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.49 (volume III, text)
plagis est decalogo
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.348
primerament prometemos
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.307 (text)
primus inadentem
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.49 (vol. 1 and 3, calendar)
Recipe
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 5
resta il saper
Contributing Institution: Management, Gross 2
2 4 conclusio corpus naturale
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*322
sempiterne peroptime
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 13 (text)
si potest fieri
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 10
soit neantmoins prudentement
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*84 (text)
[sordida-]rum scilicet vestem nigram
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.382
statuti ma della
Contributing Institution: Management, Gross 1
sue più secrete
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*281
sui eum non receperunt
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.26 (text)
tempus est dimensum
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.55

Index 4: Binding Date

Note

List of Manuscripts in the UCLA Library System organized by binding date.
s. XV
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 9 (Germany)
s. XV
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 10 (Czechoslovakia)
s. XV
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 11 (Germany)
s. XV
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.21 (Germany, Buxheim)
s. XV
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.43 (Italy)
s. XV
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.199 (France)
s. XV (remains)
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.307 (Spain)
s. XV?
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.331
s. XV (remains)
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.348
s. XV-XVI
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 4 (Catalonia)
s. XV-XVI
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 12 (Italy)
s. XVI?
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 5 (Germany)
s. XVI
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 8 (Austria)
s. XVI
Contributing Institution: Management, Gross 1 (Italy)
s. XVI
Contributing Institution: Management, Gross 2 (Italy)
s. XVI
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.20 (Flanders)
s. XVI
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.55 (France)
s. XVI
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*84 (France)
s. XVI
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*281 (Italy)
s. XVI
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*282 (Italy)
s. XVI
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.529 (England)
s. XVI
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 1 (Italy)
s. XVI
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 2 (item 1; Italy)
s. XVI
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 2 (item 2; Italy)
s. XVI
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library 968 bx 1, no.71 (France)
1556
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin WZ240 P719L RARE (Germany)
s. XVI-XVII
Contributing Institution: Management, Gross 4 (England)
s. XVI-XVII
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.26 (France)
s. XVI-XVII
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*322 (Italy)
s. XVI-XVII
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 3 (Italy)
s. XVII
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 13
s. XVII
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.87
s. XVII
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*292
s. XVII
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.358
s. XVII
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*380
s. XVII
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 5
s. XVIII
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 4
s. XVIII
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of material about the history of Naples (Collection 953), Box 1, no.3
s. XVIII-XIX
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.521
s. XIX
Contributing Institution: Belt 35
s. XIX
Contributing Institution: Belt 67
s. XIX
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.15
s. XIX
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.49
s. XIX
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.382
s. XIX
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.442
s. XX
Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 1
s. XX
Contributing Institution: Management, Gross 3
s. XX
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.22
s. XX
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.50
s. XX
Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.323

Abbreviations

  • AS J. Bollandus et al., eds. Acta sanctorum, vols.1- (Antwerp, 1643-).
  • BHL Bibliotheca hagiographica latina antiquœ et mediœ œtatis, 3 vols. (Brussels, 1898-1911).
  • Bond and Faye, Supplement Supplement to the Census of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts in the United States and Canada, originated by C.U. Faye, continued and edited by W.H. Bond (New York, 1962).
  • Briquet C.M. Briquet, Les filigranes, facsimile of the 1907 edition with supplementary material, ed. A. Stevenson, 4 vols. (Amsterdam, 1968).
  • CC Corpus christianorum series latina, vols.1- (Turnhout, 1953- ).
  • Clavis E. Dekkers, ed., Clavis patrum latinorum ed. 2, Sacris erudiri 3 (Bruges, 1961).
  • De la Mare, Lyell Cat. A. C. de la Mare, Catalogue of the Collection of Medieval Manuscripts Bequeathed to the Bodleian Library, Oxford, by James P. R. Lyell (Oxford, 1971).
  • De Ricci, Census S. De Ricci, Census of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts in the United States and Canada, 3 vols. (New York, 1935-1940).
  • Deshusses J. Deshusses, ed., Le sacramentaire grégorien 1: Le supplément d'Aniane (Fribourg/Suisse, 1971).
  • GW Gesamtkatalog der Wiegendrucke, vol. 1- (Leipzig etc., 1925- ).
  • Hain L. Hain, Repertorium bibliographicum . . . , 4 vols. (Berlin, 1925).
  • Hesbert R.J. Hesbert, ed., Corpus antiphonalium officii, 6 vols. (Rome, 1963-1979).
  • Kaeppeli, SOPMA T. Kaeppeli, Scriptores ordinis prædicatorum medii ævi, 3 vols. to date (Rome, 1970- ).
  • “Ketham” Fasciculus medicinæ (Venice: J. & G. de Gregoriis, 1491), printed under the name of Iohannes Ketham.
  • Kristeller, Iter ital. P.O. Kristeller, Iter italicum: A Finding List of Uncatalogued or Incompletely Catalogued Humanistic Manuscripts of the Renaissance. . . , 4 vols. to date (Leiden, 1963- ).
  • Leroquais V. Leroquais, Les livres d'heures manuscrits de la Bibliothèque Nationals, 2 vols. (Paris 1927); Supplément (Mâcon, 1943).
  • Levine P. Levine, “Palaeographic History Illustrated in Manuscript Collection,” UCLA Librarian vol.16, no.6, supplement (1963) pp.49-51.
  • O'Malley and Gnudi C.D. O'Malley and M.T. Gnudi, The John A. Benjamin Collection of Medical History: Catalogue and First Supplement, second printing (UCLA, 1968).
  • PL J.P. Migne, ed., Patrologia latina.
  • RH U. Chevalier, Repertorium hymnologicum, 6 vols. (Louvain, and Brussels, 1892-1921).
  • Schneyer J.B. Schneyer, Repertorium der lateinischen Sermones des Mittelalters, Beiträge zur Geschichte der Philosophie und Theologie des Mittelalters, Texte und Untersuchungen 43, in 9 vols. (Münster, 1969-1980).
  • Sonet J. Sonet, Répertoire d'incipit de prières en ancient français, Société de publications romanes et françaises 54 (Geneva, 1956).
  • Stegmüller F. Stegmüller, Repertorium biblicum medii aevi, 11 vols. (Madrid 1950-1980).
  • Thorndike and Kibre L. Thorndike and P. Kibre, A Catalogue of Incipits of Mediaeval Scientific Writings in Latin, revised edition (Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1963).
  • Walther, Initia H. Walther, Initia carminum ac versuum medii aevi posterioris latinorum (Göttingen, 1959).
  • Walther, Proverbia H. Walthcr, Proverbia sententiaeque latinitatis medii aevi: Lateinische Sprichwörter und Sentenzen des Mittelalters, 6 vols. and, in new series, vols. 7-8 to date (Göttingen, 1963- ).
  • Weale W.H.J. Weale, Bookbindings and Rubbings of Bindings in the National Art Library, South Kensington Museum (London, 1898).
  • Zumkeller A. Zumkeller, Manuskripte von Werken der Autoren des Augustiner-Eremitenordens in mitteleuropäischen Bibliotheken, Cassiciacum 20 (Würzburg, 1966).
Accursius
Adelgundis (30 January)
Adjustus
Aegydius (1 September)
Agapitus (18 August)
Agilulf (9 July)
Alexander
Alexis
All Saints (1 November)
Amandus (25 June)
Andrew (30 November)
Andrew, vigil of (29 November)
Anne
Anniversaries: 20 May (Cistercian)
Ansbert (9 February)
Antony
Apostles
Assumption (15 August)
Audoenus
Audomar and Lambert (17 September)
Augustine, Apostle of the English (27 May)
Austreberta (10 February)
Balbina (31 March)
Balthildis and Radegundis (30 January)
Bartholomew
Bede (26 May)
Berard de Carbio
Bernard of Clairvaux (20 August)
Bernard of Clairvaux, octave (27 August)
Bernardinus (20 May)
Bernardinus, translation of (17 May)
Blasius
Boniface (5 June)
Caecilia (22 November)
Caesarius
Cataldus, bishop of Taranto
Catherine of Alexander (25 November)
Chlodoald and Evurtius (7 September)
Clarus (4 November)
Cuthbert of Lindisfarne (20 March)
Desiderius (23 May)
Dionysius, invention (22 April)
Dionysius, Rusticus, and Eleutherius (9 October)
Dionysius, susceptio reliquiarum of (4 December)
Dominic
Dorothy (6 February)
Edmund Rich (16 November)
Eligius (1 December)
Elisabeth
Eutropius (30 April)
Eventius
Evergisil, translation of (28 March)
Evurtius (7 September)
Exaltation of the Cross (14 September)
Felix, (14 January)
Firminus
Francis of Assisi (4 October)
Geneviève (3 January)
Genevieve, de miraculo ardentium (26 November)
George (23 April)
Gerald (13 October)
Gertrude (17 March)
Gervasius and Protasius (19 June)
Goar (6 July)
Heribert (16 March)
Holy Spirit
Honorina (27 February)
Hubert (3 November)
Innocents (28 December)
Ivo Helory (19 May)
James the Greater (25 July)
Jerome
John the Baptist
John the Baptist, vigil of (23 June)
John the Evangelist (27 December)
Julianus
Kilian (8 July)
Lambert (17 September)
Landericus, bishop (10 June)
Launomar (19 January)
Lawrence
Lawrence, octave of (17 August)
Leonard (6 November)
Leufred (21 June)
Louis IX, king of France (25 August)
Louis of Toulouse (19 August)
Ludger (26 March)
Lupus and Chrodegang (3 September)
Machabees
Magloire (24 October)
Martialis (30 June)
Martin of Tours, translation of (4 July)
Maurice (22 September)
Maurice and his companions (22 September)
Maurilius (13 September)
Maurinus (10 June)
Maurus
Medard (8 June)
Medard and Gildard (8 June)
Mellonius (22 October)
Michael
Nativity of the Virgin (8 September)
Nicasius (11 October)
Nicolas
Oswald (5 August)
Otho
Our Lady of the Snow (5 August)
Pantaleon (28 July)
Patrick
Paul
Peter
Peter and Paul, octave of (6 July)
Philibert (20 August)
Pinnosa, translation of (28 February)
Polychronius (17 February)
Praejectus (25 January)
Presentation of the Virgin (21 November)
Privatus (21 August)
Processus and Martinianus (2 July)
Quiteria
Reparata
Restitutus (3 November)
Robert (29 April)
Romanus (23 October)
Rufina and Secunda (10 July)
Rupert (27 March)
Sequanus (19 September)
Servatius (13 May)
Seven Brothers (10 July)
Severinus
Severus
Sperandeo and Sperandea of Gubbio
Stephen (26 December)
Suitbert (1 March)
Syrus
Taurinus
Theodulus
Thomas of Canterbury
Thuriaf (13 July)
Tiburtius (14 April)
Transfiguration (6 August)
Trinity
Ulric (4 July)
Ursinus (30 December)
Ursinus, translation of (12 June)
Vedast and Amandius (6 February)
Vincent
Vivianus (27 August)
William of Donjeon (10 January)
William of York
Abraham's sacrifice
Adoration of the kings
Adoration of the shepherds
Anna Seeking her lost son Tobias
Annunication
Assumption of the Virgin
Baptism of Christ
Birds
Bishop exorcising a man
Bishop seeing a vision of the Virgin and Child
Christ displaying his wounds to God the Father
Christ in Majesty
Circumcision
Coronation of the Virgin
Creation of Eve
Cross
Crucifix
Crucifixion
Crucifixion of three men in long tunics
Daniel in the lions' den
David and Nathan
David playing the harp
Doctor, talking with patients(?)
Drowning of Pharaoh's army
Female figure
Flight into Egypt
Flowers
Francis of Assisi receiving the stigmata
Fruits
Haloed man being strung up on a pole
Horse's head
Human figure
Human figure, bust
Human figure, profile
Human figure displaying open wounds
Human figure displaying vital organs
Instruments of the Passion
Job on his dung heap
Jonah and the whale
Judas Macchabeus(?)
Last Supper
Nativity
Noah's Ark
Orb
Peacock
Pentecost
Physician talking with patients(?)
Pietà
Rosary
Saint, profile
Saint Paul and the Corinthians
Sainted bishop
Solomon and two youths
Stigmata
Strawberries
Students
Teacher
Three Living and Three Dead
Urine flasks
Vases
Virgin and Child
Virgin and Child sitting on a crescent
Virgin and Child standing on a crescent, in glory
Visitation
Warship
Whale
Woman seeking her lost drachma
Wounds of Christ
Abbey, J.R.
Anne de Polignac
Argilagues, Franciscus. See Franciscus Argilagues
Ascherson, C.S.
Asher, Louis E.
Bach, Herman. See Herman Bach
Baldana, Zuan Maria. See Zuan Maria Baldana
“Bardzhus, J.,”
Barrow, Corby
Belt, Elmer, xv
Benali, Benalio. See Benalio Benali
Benalio Benali
Benjamin, John A., xv
Benjamin, Mrs. John A.
Biagio Castellani, notary
Bloch, E. Maurice
Bolzano, Franciscus de, Master
Bonvin, Iohannes
Bradfer-Lawrence Collection
B.R.N., physician
Brock, Bert J.
Brown, Alfred Jerome
Buckle, Henry Thomas
Bullrich, Eduardo J.
Caliari, Antonio
Cambini family, Florence
Charles II, due de Bourbon and constable of France
Clement XI, pope
Coates, Ronald
Contarini family, Venice
Cruse, D.A.
Dick, Hugh
Drury, Henry
Egc, Otto F.
Espinette, (sieur de l'?)
Feuerlein family
Fischer, Ernst
Folchi, Niccolò di Antonio
Foot, Isaac
Fowles, Mr. Edward
Fowles, Mrs. Edward
Franciscus Argilagues
Gautier, Pierre
Giffard, Thomas
Giugni, Raffaello
Giugni family, Tuscany, Garbo
Greg, Thomas Tylston
Greg, W.W.
Hambuechen, Joseph W.
Hamilton, Sidney G.
Haslewood, Joseph
Hathaway, Mrs. Rebecca
Herman Bach, physician
Hougland, Willard
Huntington, Archer
Huntington, Mrs. Collis P.
Jacob, William. See William Jacob
Jäger, Sebastian
Johannes, Catalan physician
Juel-Jensen, Bent
Kann, Rodolphe
Keuther, Georg, of Königsberg
Kingsley, Kenneth C.
Kingsley, William J.
Kress family
Kühlen, Major
Lambarde, William
Lee, Arthur H., first viscount of Fareham
Lichtenstein, counts of
Loevenich, Karl
Lothian, marquis of
“Macciani,”
McClurkin, J.R.
Martin, Robert Walsingham
Martin, Thomas
Martini, Giuseppe
Meyerstein, Edward Harry William
Minocci family, Siena
Moliné y Brasés, Ernesto
Moretti, Felippo
Moretti, Ottavio
Morrison, Stanley
Nitze, William A.
North, Frederick, fifth earl of Guilford
Nowell, Laurence
Ogden, C.K.
Oliva, Joannes Baptista
Olschki. L.
Orio family, Venice
Orsini family
Pagani, Gregorio
Paladius, Lucretius
Patetta, Fedcrico
Phillipps, Sir Thomas
Polignac, Anne de. See Anne de Polignac
Ridgeway, Lawson
Riese, Edmund M.
“Sabbatino Sabbatini(?)”
Salsa, marquis of
Schedel, Sebastian
Singer, S.W.
Smith, Arthur Barry
Sneyd, Rev. Walter
Stevens, Henry
Swaab, W.H.
Tiberi, Antonio
Tiberi, Bonzuano
Toffholz von Colberg, Karl Freiherr, H.H. Hauptmann
Townsend, George, earl of Leicester
Trostberg, count of. See Wolkenstein
Tucher von Simmelsdorf, C.A.
Uzielli, Giorgio
Varesi, Joseph, R.P.
Vegnauld, F. de
Von Feder Collection
Wakers(?), Anthonius
Walhers(?), See Wakers(?)
Welch, D'Alté A.
Wettengel, Christopher
Wilhelmus Wismeers(?), See Wismeers(?), Wilhelmus
William Jacob, priest in Pufflick, near Utrecht
Wismeers(?), Wilhelmus
Wolkenstein and Trostberg, count of
Zeitlin, Jacob
Zeitlin, Josephine
Zuan Maria Baldana
Albani Library
“Archivio Sornmi Picenardi,”
Avila, Bernardine nuns of St. Mary
Besançon, abbey of Billy
Buren, Society of Jesus
Buxheim, Carthusians
Cologne, Carthusians of St. Barbara
Delft, Augustinian nuns of St. Agnes
Ebersberg, Benedictines of St. Sebastian
Erfurt, Carthusians
Ferrara, Cistercians of San Bartolo
Fondi, abbey of S. Onofrio
Huys, Benedictines
Liesborn, Benedictines
London, St. Bride Foundation Typographical Library
Mainz, Jesuit College
Mechelen (Malines), Convent of Bethanie
Orders, religious: Augustinians
Benedictines
Carthusians
Celestines, Carthusians, Celestines, Cistercians, Dominicans, Franciscans, Society of Jesus
Ostberg, Brethren of the Cross
Paris, Celestines
“Picenardi, Archivio Sommi.” See “Archivio Sommi Picenardi”
St. Christopher, Carthusian house near Ferrara
St. Emmeram, Benedictines
Ste-Croix-sous-Offémont (Île de France), Celestines
Salem, near Heidelberg, Cistercians
Salzburg, Benedictines of St. Peter
S. Maria degli Angeli, Dominican nuns
Sulmona, Franciscans of S. Niccolò
Teruel, confraternity of St. Julian
Uekerath (archdiocese of Cologne), parish church
Vatican Library

Form of Entry

The format used in the descriptions follows that employed by N.R. Ker in Medieval Manuscripts in British Libraries, 3 vols. (Oxford 1969-1983).
1. HEADING. Each entry begins with library and call number, figure number (if any) in this catalog, author and brief title, and place and date. The place and date, when not specified in the manuscript, have been determined by style of script and decoration and, when applicable, by external evidence. Place names refer to geographical regions, rather than to modern political entities. The sigla used for the dates of the manuscripts are on this model: s. XIII in (saeculo XIII ineunte) for the beginning of the thirteenth century; s. XIII 1 for the first half of the century; s. XIII med (sacculo XIII medio) for the middle of the century; s. XIII 2 for the second half of the century; s. XIII ex (saeculo XIII exeunte) for the end of the century; s. XIII-XIV for the turn of the thirteenth to the fourteenth century.
2. CONTENTS. In the case of composite volumes (volumes of two or more originally separate books subsequently bound together), the original books are described first in their contents, then in their physical aspect under roman numerals I and II (etc.). Within the contents section of all manuscripts, the text is broken into arabic-numbered sections for case of reference; the numbered sections, which were fixed by the compilers of this catalog do not always correspond to obvious divisions in the manuscripts (e.g., in long series of prayers in devotional books). A folio is referred to by a numeral alone if a recto is intended, and by a numeral with a lower case “v” for a verso; the form “f. 1r-v” means that both recto and verso of that leaf are considered; “a” and “b” refer to the first and the second column on a given page. In transcription, all abbreviations have been expanded silently. Square brackets signal an offered but uncertain transcription, enclosing either the doubtful words, word, or part of word, or a question mark which refers to the immediately preceding word. Angle brackets occur where no solution for the difficulty is attempted; they may enclose a question mark or a reason for the complete illegibility, such as “<damaged>.” The spelling of the manuscript has been preserved, with “[ sic]” added only when the form of the word seemed unlikely or such as to cause the reader to suspect a typographical error. We have retained the manuscripts' ę/e/æ, as they show relative distance from classical Latin; i/j, however, have been uniformly rendered as i; u/v have been distinguished according to modern use for ease of reading. Proper nouns are capitalized. Rubrics, whether in red ink, underlined, in a display script, or merely distinguished from the main body of the text by a space, are here rendered in italics. In the case of the series of brief texts or excerpts in patristic miscellanies, we have given only the rubric (omitting incipit and explicit of the text); in the case of series of prayers, we have preferred, as an aid to identification, to give a slightly longer incipit and no explicit, since the prayers tend to end with long, and frequently interchangeable, formulas. In liturgical books, saints' names are generally given in the form used by F.G. Holweck, A Biographical Dictionary of the Saints (St. Louis, 1924), a convenient standard. A double diagonal slash // means that a text begins or ends defectively; ellipses signal omitted text. Following each numbered section of the text, where applicable, is a brief bibliographical notice of editions, of lists of manuscripts, of identifying number in the appropriate repertory (e.g., Schneyer, Stegmüller, Walther).
3. PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION. This is arranged in roughly the order in which the book was produced. The term “parchment” is used throughout for all animal skins, since the traditional distinction between parchment and vellum seems to have been based more on quality of preparation than on knowledge of biological differences between sheepskin and calfskin. For manuscripts on paper, we have attempted to identify watermarks according to their similarity, or least dissimilarity, to the tracings in Briquet. The number of leaves is in roman numerals for endleaves, arabic for those of the book itself. Measurements are in millimeters: first, height and width of the book; then, in parentheses, height and width of the ruled space. The numbers are, of course, approximations, since within any book there is considerable variation; we have preferred to measure ruled rather than written space, because it seemed to offer more consistency. The collation uses arabic numerals for the gatherings, with the number of leaves in that gathering in a suprascript arabic numeral; irregularities are given in parentheses, with the number showing the position in the quire of the irregular leaf; thus 1 8( - 6) means a quire of eight leaves of which the sixth is missing; 1 8( + 9) means that the quire of eight leaves has a leaf added in the ninth position, i.e. at the end. Ruling is specified as to device used or color (hard or dry point; lead, i.e. in a scratching gray or black; crayon, i.e. in a scratchy brown; ink; pale red ink); owner-produced manuscripts were often frame ruled, with no horizontal lines to guide the copyist. An effort has been made to distinguish the number of copyists and the leaves copied by each. Scripts are identified by a relatively restricted and simple nomenclature. As regards decoration, the height of initials is given in number of vertical lines of text space occupied; colors are mentioned summarily since their names are too subjective to be of value. The subjects of the miniatures have been given in brief terms and, in the case of liturgical books and particularly books of hours, tied to the text to which they belong, since the two function as a cohesive unit. The binding statement is somewhat more expansive for medieval or renaissance bindings than for early modern or modern bindings.
4. PROVENANCE. This section deals with the origin and subsequent ownership of the manuscript. In it we have summarized the evidence regarding date and place of origin given in the contents and physical description sections.
5. A SECUNDO FOLIO reference (the opening words of the second leaf) is supplied for manuscripts that may have belonged to an institution in the Middle Ages and thus have been listed in a medieval inventory.
6. BIBLIOGRAPHY. The bibliography cited here refers to the manuscript as a whole, rather than to its parts.

UCLA Catalog Record ID

UCLA Catalog Record ID: 1193313 

Container List

 

The Elmer Belt Library of Vinciana

Scope and Content Note

The Belt Library is a collection of manuscripts and printed books pertaining to Leonardo da Vinci and the Italian Renaissance. Assembled by Dr. Belt, the library was moved from his office to the UCLA campus in 1961, and to its present location within the Art Library in the Dickson Art Center in 1966. Portions of the collection remained with Dr. Belt, among them the fifteenth-century French lectionary described in Bond and Faye, Supplement, p.16. The library houses a collection of incunabula and a group of renaissance manuscripts. Besides the materials included below, the Belt Library possesses a seventeenth-century manuscript containing an anonymous treatise in Italian, Modo di fortificare (Belt 72). On the structure and history of the library, see F.L. Finger, Catalogue of the Incunabula in the Elmer Belt Library of Vinciana (Los Angeles, 1971), and Max Marmor, “The Elmer Belt Library of Vinciana,” The Book Collector, vol.38 (1989) pp.321-342.
 

BELT LIBRARY 35. LEONARDO DA VINCI, TRATTATO DELLA PITTURA. Italy, 1582.

Physical Description: Paper, ff. i + 105 + i; 297 × 210 (240 × 140) mm. 27 long lines. Written by one hand in late Italic script; illustrated. The compiler of this manuscript has been identified as Gregorio Pagani, and the date 1582 has been found on the excised second leaf of the manuscript, now in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, drawing no.10506. For a fuller description, see Pedretti, cited below.
Physical Description: Bound in marbled paper over paste boards (s. XIX).

Scope and Content Note

ff. 1-105v: [title page] Discorsi di Lionardo da Vinci sopra la pittura; f. 2, an illustration, missing; ff. 3-96v [text] Il giovane debbe prima . . . sono dopo te; f. 97, errata; f. 97v blank; ff. 98-105v, table of contents; f. 106r-v blank.
For the editions of this work see Steinitz, cited below. The Belt Library owns five other manuscript copies from later centuries (s. XVII-XIX), Manuscripts 33, 34, 36, 40, and 41; cf. Steinitz, no.83-90, 129-134.
Written in Italy in 1582. “J. Bardzhus” (s. XIX) is written inside the back cover.

Bibliography:

K. Trauman Steinitz, Leonardo da Vinci's Trattato della Pittura, Treatise on Painting: A Bibliography of the Printed Editions, 1651-1956 . . ., Library Research Monographs 5 (Copenhagen, 1958) pp.67-70.
C. Pedretti, Leonardo da Vinci: Studies for a Nativity and the “Mona Lisa Cartoon” with Drawings after Leonardo from the Elmer Belt Library of Vinciana: Exhibition in Honour of Elmer Belt, M.D., on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday. Catalogue , UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Publication 6 (Los Angeles, 1973) p.47.
 

BELT LIBRARY 65. MICHELANGELO BUONARROTI, RECORD. Italy, 1533.

Physical Description: Paper, 1 leaf; 43 × 160 mm. 5 long lines, in the hand of Michelangelo. Pasted on a larger sheet which bears the round stamp “Archivio Sommi Picenardi” and a note by Pio Martinucci, “Autografo di Michelangelo Buonarroti, come risulta dal confronto eseguito sul codice num. 3211 esistente in questa biblioteca, il quale contiene le poesie ed alcune lettere scritte di mano di quell'illustre personaggio. In fede. Dalla Biblioteca Vaticana li 15 marzo 1869, Pio Martinucci Secondo Custode,” with round stamp of the Vatican Library. On the verso of the supporting sheet, “Questo ricordo è stato pubblicato dal cav. Gaetano Milanesi a pag. 604 del suo libro: Le lettere di Michelangelo Buonarroti pubblicate coi Ricordi ed i contratti artistici, Firenze, Le Monnier, 1872; e da Aurelio Gotti, a pagina 225 del volume I° dell' opera: Vita di Michelangelo Buonarroti narrata con l'ajuto di nuovi documenti, Firenze, Tip. della Gazzetta d'Italia, 12 sett. 1875.”

Scope and Content Note

recto: Nel mille cinquecento trenta tre. Ricordo come oggi adì 22 di sectembre andai a Santo Miniato al Tedesco a parlare a papa Clemente che andava a Nnizza e in tal dì mi lasciò frate Sebastiano del Piombo un (?) suo cavallo.
Edited by L. Bardeschi and P. Barocchi, I Ricordi di Michelangelo (Florence, 1970) p.278, no.253. They cast doubt on the authenticity of this ricordo, believing that the original was lost; they print the text from Milanesi, cited below.
Gift of Jacob and Josephine Zeitlin, Los Angeles, in honor of Dr. Elmer Belt's eightieth birthday in 1973.

Bibliography:

Milanesi, cited above; Gotti, cited above; “Special Gifts in Honor of Elmer Belt,” UCLA Librarian vol.26 (1973) pp.22-23, plate p.21.
 

BELT LIBRARY 66. DEED NOTARIZED BY PIETRO DI ANTONIO DI SER PIETRO DA VINCI. Italy (Florence), 1459.

Physical Description: Parchment roll, made of two skins sewn together; 842 × 230 mm. Written in a current notarial hand, with the notary's sign across the seam and at the end. On the verso a contemporary register, and an archival note (s. XVIII) in Italian: “Contratto 1458, 8 novembre. A.I.N° 32. Niccolao di Giovanni e Michele di Ugo Vecchietti venderono a Guglielmo Rucellai una casa per rogo di Ser Piero di Antonio da Vinci negli 8 novembre 1458.”

Scope and Content Note

recto: Deed of sale of a house in Florence contracted between Niccolò Giovanni and Michele sons of Ugo di Niccolò de Vecchiettis, and Guglielmo Rucellai. The roll contains the records of the previous acts, begun on 8 November 1458, which led to the final deed on 3 May 1459, “Actum Florentie in populo Sancti Pancratii ac in domo infrascripti Guglielmi cardinalis de Oricellariis.” Notary: Pietro di Antonio di ser Pietro da Vinci, “civis et notarius florentinus imperiali auctoritate iudex ordinarius notariusque publicus,” and father of Leonardo da Vinci.
Gift of the Friends of the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies in honor of Dr. Elmer Belt's eightieth birthday in 1973.

Bibliography:

“Special Gifts in Honor of Elmer Belt,” UCLA Librarian, vol.26 (1973) p.21.
 

BELT LIBRARY 67. PETRUS DE CRESCENTIIS, RURALIUM COMMODORUM LIBRI. Italy (Bergamo), 1466.

Note

Fig. 21
Physical Description: Parchment (ff. 1, 10) and paper ( Cercle, not found in Briquet), ff. iii (modern) + 203 + iiii (modern); 312 × 215 (205/222 × 140) mm. 1-8 10 9 8 10 10 11 9 (no gap in text) 12-20 10 21 6; vertical catchwords, occasionally touched with red at the beginning. 40/42 long lines; bounding lines ruled in lead; text ruled in pale yellow ink. Written in semi-cursive humanistic script with gothic influence; olive brown ink. On f. 1, 8-line initial in purple inhabited by a bust of the author on blue background highlighted in white, in a square gold frame with red, green, and blue conventional foliage extending to the inner and upper margin; in the lower margin, arms in a wreath supported by blue and red leafy branches; 5-line and 2-line initials in plain red, at times with brown flourishes; text initials occasionally touched with red; titles in red minuscule. Extensive contemporary marginalia (particularly in the sections on viticulture on ff. 55v-64v) by at least three hands, one of which enters the note on f. 203r-v. f. 203v is stained and faded; slight mildew damage; last folios show insect damage.
Physical Description: Tooled dark morocco binding (Lothian Library binding) by “Orrock binder Edin.” (s. XIX); on the front and back covers, “L” surmounted by a crown; pastedowns and flyleaves in marbled paper; gilt edges.

Scope and Content Note

1) ff. 1-203: Incipit liber ruralium commodorum a domino Petro de Crescentiis cive Bononie ad honorem omnipotentis Dei et serenissimi regis Karoli et ad utilitatem omnium gentium compilatus . Cum ex virtute prudentie que inter bonum et malum . . . cum avibus domesticatis et retibus diversis et visco. Explicit liber de ruralibus commodis editus a magistro Petro de Cresentiis bononiense et scriptus per me Iohannem filisi [sic] domini Benalii de Benaliis anno currente 1466. Et est domini Benalii de Benaliis civis Pergami et finitus fuit die 20 decembris [Hain no.5826-5832; GW no.7820-7825].

Scope and Content Note

2) f. 203r-v: [note on wine] Ad liberandum vinum cum tota vegete simul et semel ab omni corruptione in omnibus diebus natalibus . . . quam optimum est contra ebrietatem et est medicina de caulibus et se cor . . . (?).
Written for Benalio Benali of Bergamo (his arms on f. 1 bottom: gules, in chief a chevron argent between two cocks argent) by his son Giovanni in 1466; perhaps they are kinsmen of the Bergamo printer-editor Bernardino Benali (ca. 1458-ca. 1543), concerning whom see the Dizionario biografico degli italiani vol.8 (1966) pp.165-167. Belonged in the nineteenth century to the marquis of Lothian: vertical note “Marquis of Lothian” in the outer margin of f. 1, shelfmark “e.5.25” in the upper margin, Lothian binding. Given by the Samuel Kress Foundation and a group of friends of Dr. Elmer Belt in honor of his eightieth birthday in 1973.

Note

Secundo folio: et debelitat nervos
 

BELT LIBRARY 68. SUPPOSED HOLOGRAPH OF RAFFAELLO SANZIO CONCERNING THE BUILDING OF ST. PETER'S IN ROME; SUPPOSED HOLOGRAPH ORDER OF GIULIANO LENO TO THE NOTARY FRANCESCO VIGOROSIS CONCERNING THIS UNDERTAKING. s. XIX?

Physical Description: Paper, 295 × 220 mm.; f. 1, 24 lines with four signatures; f. 2, 11 lines and signature. In the upper righthand corners, foliation by a later hand: f. 1, “279”; f. 2, “280.”

Scope and Content Note

1) f. 1: Yhesus. Facio fede io Raphaello di Gioanni Santi d'Urbino architectore de Santo Piero come maestro Francisco di Domenicho Bonello si convene con Messer Iuliano Leno churatore . . . Io Raphaello ut supra. [Signatures:] Io Domenicho di Francesco Bonello convengo et prometo come di sopra è schritto; Iuliano Leno manu propria; F[rancesco] Vigorosis not[arius] subscripsi.

Scope and Content Note

2) f. 2. Messer Francesco Vigorosis pigliarete una obligatione da messer Domenico Bonello . . . in li termini de prima. Die 1 augusti 1514. Iuliano Leno manu propria.
Both documents are edited with facsimiles by S. Ray, “Il 'gran peso sopra le spalle': Raffaello e la Basilica Vaticana,” L'Architettura, cronache e storia vol.18, no.199 (May 1972) pp.58-60. Among the various anomalies displayed by these two documents, it is not clear that the two signatures (ff. 1, 2) purporting to be those of Iuliano Leno are written by the same hand; it is noteworthy also that Domenico di Francesco Bonello has become “Francesco di Domenico Bonello” in the supposed Raphael text. Concerning the authenticity, see most recently C. L. Frommel, “Die Peterskirche unter Papst Julius II. in Licht neuer Dokumente,” Römisches Jahrbuch für Kunstgeschichte vol.16 (1976) pp.57-136 at 80 no.81. 1
The leaves were in Rome ca. 1865, in Major Kühlen's possession. Given to the American banker Joseph W. Hambuechen, when he left Florence to return to America before World War II; in the possession of Karl Loevenich, New York, in 1972. Gift of Lawson Ridgeway to the Belt Library in 1975.

Scope and Content Note

1. We thank John Shearman for this reference; Professor Shearman will challenge the authenticity of a large group of such documents in a forthcoming study.
 

BELT LIBRARY 70. BARTOLOMEO AMMANNATI, LETTER TO FRANCESCO BUSINI. Italy (Florence), 10 February 1570.

Physical Description: Paper, 1 leaf; 290 × 205 mm. 14 lines and signature. Address: “Al molto Magnifico Messer Francesco Busini proveditore di loro altezze. In Pisa.”

Scope and Content Note

recto: Magnifico Messer Francesco honorando, Io ho ricevuto la letera di Vostra Signoria et ò scritto a messer Giovanni Cacini . . . senza fine mi racomando. Di Firenze, agli x di febraio 1570, di vostra Signoria amorevole Bartolomeo Amannati.
Holograph; dealing with timber and marbles needed for his work. Concerning Bartolomeo Ammannati see Dizionario biografico degli italiani vol.2 (1960) pp.798-801.
Gift of E. Maurice Bloch, professor in the Department of Art at UCLA, in 1974. Part of the same gift are Belt 69 (Francesco Albani, Letter to Girolamo Bonnini, Bologna, 20 July 1658) and Belt 71 (Giovanni Mannozzi, called Giovanni da S. Giovanni, Letter, dated Rome, May 1626).
 

BELT LIBRARY 73. BREVIARY. s. XVIII-XIX(?).

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 framed leaf (the verso is not accessible); 550 × 395 (365 × 260) mm., 11 long lines + 2 staves; 520 × 375 mm. including the illuminated border; ruled in plummet. Large and heavy rounded gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); black ink rather faded off. Full border with floral pattern and acanthus leaves, fruits, birds, vases on purple background; primary initial (4-line) in four colors on black and gold background; secondary initials in three colors (purple, blue, green) with floral pattern on gold background; tertiary initials in gold on purple and blue background, highlighted with white; initials in the text with elaborate black scrolls touched with green and yellow; rubrics in red minuscule; music in square notation on staves of four red lines.

Note

Fig. 36

Scope and Content Note

recto: // ardor proximos . . . Ant. . . . Deduc me domine . . . Psalmus. Legem pone mihi . . . in toto corde meo // [ Ant. in festis per annum ad tertiam in the Roman breviary; Ps. 118.33-34].
The framed leaf is described in typewritten catalog of the Norton Simon Foundation Gift (1966) as follows: “A page of an Antiphonal . . . by Fra Antonio da Monza . . . From the Rodolphe Kann collection, Paris 1907. From the collection of Archer Huntington who inherited it from his mother Mrs. Collis P. Huntington.” The piece probably dates from the eighteenth or nineteenth century, an attempt to imitate sixteenth -century Italian style. The size and style of script are unusual for the text of a breviary. The full border illumination seems out of place for a page containing no relevant incipit, but simply one of the many psalms for the ordinary office. The frame with glass prohibits a closer investigation of both sides of the leaf.
 

The Charles E. Young Research Library: Department of Special Collections.

Scope and Content Note

The library's collection of western European medieval and renaissance manuscripts, only a small portion of the manuscript materials housed in the Department of Special Collections, is steadily growing. The increase is obvious from a comparison of 1) the list of manuscripts possessed by the department in the 1950s, as recorded by Bond and Faye, Supplement, pp.538-539; 2) the number of manuscripts cataloged here; and 3) the list, below, of further acquisitions in the years since this catalog was made, 1978-1990. For the most part, the present catalog describes every manuscript written before 1600. Given their diplomatic nature, this was impossible to do for both the large Orsini Archive (Collection 902, Boxes 1-532) and the smaller Italian Diplomatic Collection (Collection 100, Boxes 113-114), which are reported summarily below; typewritten inventories are available in the Department of Special Collections. Among the literary (nondocumentary) materials, this catalog at times includes manuscripts written after 1600, when the texts present some peculiar interest (see 170/282, *170/380) or, in one case, when it seemed worthwhile rectifying data given in the De Ricci Census (see 170/87).
Three items described below came from the Isaac Foot collection, After Isaac Foot's death in 1960, the private library of his country house at Pencrebar, Callington, Cornwall, comprising ca. 70,000 volumes, was purchased by the University of California, primarily for the benefit of the university's smaller new campuses. Besides a number of printed books, UCLA received from the collection four manuscripts that antedate 1600: two letters of Philipp Melanchthon (Collection 100, Box 30), a Greek Bible (170/347, not cataloged below), and a Latin Bible (170/348). Concerning the collection see T.G. Griedler, The Isaac Foot Library: A Report to the University (Santa Barbara, California, 1964), where the Melanchthon letters are mentioned; and a shorter version of the same in The University Bulletin (28 October 1963) pp.80-84.
A number of the department's seventeenth to nineteenth-century manuscripts come from the collection of Sir Thomas Phillipps (1792-1872). Here is a concordance of the Phillipps numbers ( Catalogus librorum manuscriptorum in Bibliotheca D. Thomae Phillipps, Bart., A.D. 1837, and anon. [T. FitzRoy Fenwick], Bibliotheca Phillippica: A Catalogue of the Phillipps Manuscripts . . . [Cheltenham, 1886]) with the present call numbers in the Department of Special Collections: Phillipps 2445 (170/369); 2456 (170/370); 2499 (170/371); 2500 (170/372); 2978 (170/366); 8508 (Collection 100, Box 82); 8979 (*170/361); 9447 (*170/166); 9503 (170/245); 10610 (170/367); 12376 (*170/362); 13144(170/368); 13819 (*170/363); 16172 (*170/461, kept with Phillipps 17405); 16177 (170/364); 17405 (*170/461, kept with Phillipps 16172); 18545 (170/374); 20133 (*170/365); 21332 (170/513); 21547 (*170/393).
 

COLLECTION 100, BOX 30.

Scope and Content Note

(4 items before 1600).
 

EMPEROR CHARLES V, LETTER TO THE DUQUE DEL INFANTADO. Flanders (Mons, Hainaut), 11 October 1521.

Physical Description: Paper, 273 × 207 mm. 17 lines of text and signatures. Address: “Por el Rey. Al Duque del Ynfantadgo su primo.” Trace of a seal.

Scope and Content Note

Duque primo, vi vuestra letra de xxx de Jullio que me dio Francisco Davila . . . Mons d'Henao a xi dias del mes de otubre de quinientos y veynte y un anos. [Autograph signature] Yo el Rey. [In a different hand] Por mandado de su majestad [and the Chancellor's signature; acknowledges receipt of a letter from the duke; Don Martín (?) and Don Rodrigo de Mendoza, sons of the duke, are mentioned].
Source and date of acquisition by UCLA are unknown.
 

PHILIPP MELANCHTHON, TWO HOLOGRAPH LETTERS. Germany(?), s. XVI.

 

1) [To his servant John, dated 15 August, no year].

Physical Description: Paper, 260 × 195 mm. 13 lines of text and signature. Address “Iohanni ministro Philippi Melanthonis fidelissimo” on verso.

Scope and Content Note

S.D. Carissime Johannes, Nondum egi negocium cum senatu Torginesi . . . sola ire potest. Bene vale, die 15 Augusti, Philippus [mention of his work Loci communes theologici being printed].
Sold at Sotheby's (22 June 1955) to Isaac Foot. For the Foot Collection [see Introduction the Charles E. Young Research Library: Department of Special Collections] above.
 

2) [To Michael Diller, dated “die Triumphi Christi” (between 21 May and 24 June), no year].

Physical Description: Paper (Griffon, not found in Briquet), 310 × 213 mm. Written on both sides, 31 lines of text and signature. Address: “Reverendo viro eruditione et virtute prestanti Micaeli Dillero docenti Evangelium in ecclesia Dei in aula inclyti Electoris Palatini fratri suo carissimo.”

Scope and Content Note

S.D. Reverende vir et carissime frater, Etsi multa tristia spectacula in his confusionibus . . . Noribergensi. Bene vale et sepe ad nos scribito. Die Triumphi Christi, Philippus Melanthon [to recommend Paulinus Ursinus and to give information about various synods].
From the Isaac Foot Collection [see Introduction the Charles E. Young Research Library: Department of Special Collections] above.
 

MAXIMILIAN II VON HAPSBURG, LETTER OF INTRODUCTION FOR HIS ENVOY SEBALD VON PLATREN. Germany (Speyer), 18 November 1570.

Physical Description: Paper, 1 bifolium; 310 × 215 mm. 18 lines of text and signatures on f. 1r-v. Address: “Den Ersamen unnsern unnd des Reichs lieben getrewen. N. Burgermaister unnd Rath der Stadt Wümpfen” (f. 2v). Well-preserved embossed seal; remains of a wax seal. Chancery gothic script for the text, italic for the Latin subscription of the secretary.

Scope and Content Note

Maximilian der Annder von Gottes gnaden erwelter Römischer Kaiser zu allem Zeitten meerer des Reichs. Ersammen liebe getrewen, Wir haben gegenwärtigen . . . Geben in unser und des Reiches Stat Speijr den achtzehenden tag des Monats Novembris. Anno etc. in sibeinzigistens unserer Reichs des Römischen unnd hungarischen im achten unnd des Bohaimbishen im zwaii unnd zwainzigisten. [Autograph:] Maximilian. [In a different hand] Ad mandatum domini electi imperatoris secretarium [secretarial signatures].
Source and date of acquisition by UCLA unknown.
 

COLLECTION 100, BOX 102. FELICE DA SORA, AUTOGRAPH LETTER TO FRANCESCO MARIA DELLA ROVERE, duke of Urbino. Italy (Mantua), 22 December 1522.

Physical Description: Paper, 230 × 195 mm. 16 lines of text and signature, in humanistic cursive script. Address on verso: “Al Ill.mo et Ex.mo Signore lo signor Duca de Urbino, Prefetto de Roma, della excellentissima Republica etc. Capitano Generale, Benefactor mio precipuo”; Trace of a seal.

Scope and Content Note

Signor mio Illustrissimo, La sella e facta al modo che Baptista de Benafri . . . e tornato da Roma; e alla bona gratia di la Excellentia vostra humilmente mi ricomando. Mantue, xxii decembri MDXXII. De vostra Celsitudine perpetuo et humile servo Felice da Sora [mentions Baldassare Castiglioni, reports on the activities of the duke's son Guidobaldo, and describes progress on a saddle commissioned by the duke].
Source and date of acquisition by UCLA are unknown.
 

COLLECTION 100, BOXES 113/114. CHARTERS AND CARTULARY OF THE DELFINO FAMILY. Italy (Veneto), s. XIII-s. XVII.

Scope and Content Note

1. 185 numbered charters pertaining to many members of the Delfino family, Venetian patricians: no.1 is dated 1201 (N.S.); no.2 begins a series that extends from 1320 to 1651 with no more than a few years' interval between charters. Box 113 contains charters 1-91 (A.D. 1201-1530); Box 114 contains charters 92-185 (A.D. 1530-1651).

Scope and Content Note

2. A bound cartulary of Fantino Delfino recording 102 charters, from 8 June 1545 to 22 September 1558, that concern family estates at Zumello; kept in Box 114.
A typewritten inventory (in Italian) of the charters and the cartulary is kept with the collection.
Purchased by UCLA in 1963.
 

COLLECTION 100, BOX 178.

Scope and Content Note

(3 items before 1600).
 

GIOVANNI BOCCACCIO, ARGOMENTI ALLA COMEDIA; LIFE OF ST. JULIANA in Italian. Central Italy. s. XIV 2.

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 bifolium; 335 × 230 (222 × 165) mm. 2 columns of 38 lines. Written by 1 person in a rounded Italian gothic bookhand in olive-brown ink; rubrics in red minuscule. On f. 1ra, 9-line initial parted red and blue on blue and red penwork; the remainder of the quotation from Inferno in a display script; on f. 2v, 3-line initials alternately in red and blue, on penwork of the opposite color; initials in the text slashed with red. f. 1r badly worn.

Scope and Content Note

1) f. 1r-v: [Boccaccio, Argomenti] Brieve raccoglimento di cio che in se superficialmente contiene la lettera della cantica overo comedia di Dante degli Allighieri di Firenze facta per Jacopo suo figliuolo et d'essa cantica comincia il capitolo della prima parte chiamata inferno , Nel mezzo del carmin di nostra vita &c. Smarrito in una valle ... in male bolge viene ove i baratti// [G. Boccaccio, Comento alla Divina Commedia e gli altri scritti intorno a Dante, ed. D. Guerri (Bari, 1918) vol.3, pp.233-239; ed. Chiappelli pp.340-343].

Scope and Content Note

2) f. 2ra-va: [Life of St. Juliana] //facto. Ma vedendo che . . . con Cristo suo sposo in pace. Amen [ed. B. Sorio and A. Racheli, Vite de' Santi Padri di frate Domenico Cavalca colle vite di alcuni altri santi . . . (Trieste, 1861) 307-308 cap. 87; ed. Chiappelli pp.343-345].

Scope and Content Note

3) f. 2va-vb: Il principio del Vangelio secondo Giovanni. In principio era il figluolo . . . pieno di gratia et di verita. Deo gratias, Amen [Ioh. 1.1-14; ed. Chiappelli 345-346]. f. 2vb [Prayer from the Office of the Virgin, Lauds] Omnipotens sempiterne Deus qui gloriosissime Virginis Marie corpus et animam ut dignum filii habitaculum cooperante preparasti . . . per omnia secula Seculorum, Amen [ed. Chiappelli 346].
Written in central Italy. The good condition of f. 2v suggests that the biofolium may have been part of a codex until recently. From the Giuseppe Martini collection. H.P. Kraus, Catalogue vol.80 (1956), no.10. Bought by UCLA from H.P. Kraus, New York, in 1958; Kraus list p.189 (1958), no.51.

Bibliography:

G.E. Ferrari, “Codici della collezione Martini in vendita a New York,” Lettere italiane vol.10 (1958) p.473.
F. Chiappelli, “Un frammento sconosciuto di Jacopo Alighieri in California,” Giornale storico della letteratura italiana vol.149 (1972) pp.339-348 and plate of the opening initial.
F. Mazzoni, “Un frammento(sconosciuto) di Giovanni Boccaccio in California,” Studi danteschi vol.49 (1972) pp.215-223.
R.H. Rouse, “Exhibition of Medieval Manuscripts,” UCLA Librarian vol.25 (1972) 19, reproduction of f. 1.
F. Chiappelli, “An Unknown Fragment of Jacopo Alighieri in California,” UCLA Librarian vol.26 (1973) p.11.
 

PHILIP II, TWO LETTERS. Spain, s. XVI (1562, 1575).

 

1) [To the magistrates of Milan: Madrid, 14 June 1562].

Physical Description: Paper, 290 × 210 mm. 12 lines and signatures. Address on the verso: “Magnificis spectabilibus doctis devotis fidelibus dilectis Presidi et magistrates intratarum Status nostri Mediolani”; embossed seal.

Scope and Content Note

Philippus Dei gratia Hispaniarum utriusque Siciliae Hierusalem etc. Rex, Dux Mediolani. Magnifice spectabiles docti devoti fideles dilecti, Accepimus literas quas nuper ad nos . . . Data Madriti, die xiiii mensis Junii anno Domini MDLXII [followed by autograph signature and chancellor's signature; concerns taxes on the wine trade and the agreement reached between the king's lieutenant and a member of the Spinola family of Genoa.]
Source and date of acquisition by UCLA are unknown.
 

2) [To Don Antonio de Guzmán, marquis of Ayamonte: Escorial, 27 March 1575].

Physical Description: Paper, 425 × 310 mm. 19 lines and signatures. Registered on the verso upon arrival: “R[egistrato] in Regi[stro] Privilegiorum anni 1575 penes me Christoforum Capellum regiae Ducalis Camerae Rationarum existentem, fo. 195. Christoforus Capellus”; concerning Cristoforo Capelli see Storia di Milano vol.9 (Milan, 1961) p.499. Remains of a seal.

Scope and Content Note

Don Phelippe por la gracia de Dios Rey de Spana [etc.]. Al Illustrissimo don Antonio de Guzman Marques de Ayamonte nuestro governador y capitan general enel nuestro estado de Milan, salud y dilection. Por quanto teniendo . . . que en contrario aya. Datta en el Escorial a xxvii de Março de Mill y quinientos y setenta y cinco anos [followed by autograph signature and chancellor's signature; order to pay 2000 ducats to Giulio Claro in two installments, in addition to the 1000 already given him for travel from Spain to Genoa; concerning Giulio Claro or Clari see Storia di Milano vol.10 (Milan, 1957) p.207].
Source and date of acquisition by UCLA are unknown.
 

170/15. FRANCESCO BERNI (?), LIFE OF PIETRO ARETINO in Italian. Italy, s. XVI 2.

Physical Description: Paper, ff. vi (s. XIX) + i (s. XVI) + 45 + vi (s. XIX); 212 × 150 (155/160 × 90) mm. Gatherings of 8 leaves; catchwords at bottom verso of each leaf. 15 long lines; hardpoint bounding lines. Written by 1 Italian cursive hand.
Physical Description: Bound in dark green morocco over paste boards, gilt fore-edge, s. XIX.

Scope and Content Note

f. vii: [Title] Vita di Pietro Aretino del Berni. f. vii v blank, f. 1r-v [dedication letter] A Benedetto Lomellino Genovese il Berni salute. Eccoti la vita di Pietro Aretino, la quale ho raccolto . . . Ecco io la metto. Di Roma a di 20 settembre 1538. ff. 2-45 [text] Interlocutori. Berni et Mauro. Ber. Ah, ah, ah. Mau. Che diavolo hai tu . . . un'ignorante. Sta sano se puoi. Il fine [ Vita di Pietro Aretino del Berni (Perugia, 1807)]. f. 45v blank.
Written in Italy in the second half of the sixteenth century. On f. vi v an English hand, s. XIX, copied references to this work: “Mazzuchelli, Vita d'Aretino p.25; Tiraboschi, Storia della letteratura italiana, ed. 1792, VII, p.1206; Rolli, Raccolta di poesie burlesche, Londra 1721, T. I delle opere del Berni.” Paper slip pasted on f. i v with penned note (s. XIX) referring to S.W. Singer's sale catalog, London 1818, lot 759. Slip from unidentified sale catalog, lot 314. Belonged to Henry Thomas Buckle (1821-1862), armorial bookplate with the motto “Nil temere tenta, nil timide,” no. 4617. His sale, London 13 July 1863, lot 289 (?). On f. 1, vertically, “Chaucer Head.”
Bought by UCLA from Chaucer Head Bookshop, 3 February 1941.

Note

Secundo folio: Interlocutori Berni et

Bibliography:

Bond and Faye, Supplement p.539.
 

170/20. BREVIARY. Flanders, s. XVI in.

Note

Figs. 25, 26
Physical Description: Parchment, ff. i + 231 + i; 155 × 100 (110/115 × 70) mm. 1 6 2-29 8 30 3 (front and back pastedowns are part of the gatherings). Plain horizontal catchwords in the lower righthand corner, often cropped in the binding; each quire marked in the lower righthand recto corner of leaves 1-4 by a letter of the alphabet and roman numerals I-IIII. ff. 2v-125v in 31/32 long lines, ff. 126-231 in 26 long lines ruled in lead. Written by several hybrida hands; ink varying from chestnut brown to black. On ff. 18 and 95, 18-line initials in red and blue on red, green, yellow penwork; stylized, poorly water-colored floral borders in yellow, violet, and green. 6-line initials in red and blue; 2-line initials and initials in the text alternately red and blue; smaller initials in the text slashed with red; rubrics in red minuscule; line-fillers in red.
Physical Description: Bound in blind stamped dark brown leather over wooden boards, with two metal clasps, rebacked. On the front and back cover three panels, representing St. John the Baptist; St. Michael; a piper and four dancing figures (also on a Flemish book printed in 1529; of. Weale 419).

Scope and Content Note

1) ff. 2v-3: [Ordinary] A XL usque ad Pascha. Miserere mei Deus ... Sabbato. Ille nos benedicat qui in fine vivit et regnat. Amen.

Scope and Content Note

2) ff. 3v-4: [Tables for finding the Golden Number] Aureus numerus. Che est la manire pour troueir le pasque qui assaingne sur le nombre d'or. I. Prima dominica post nonas aprilis . . . XIX. Prima dominica post XV Kal. may fit pascha. f. 4 Aureus numerus et cursus lune . . . Indiction l'an M CCCC astoit l'indiction III et il est assavoir il monte jusques a XV . . . Pour scavoir troveir le bisext . Filius esto dei celum bonus accipe gratis.

Scope and Content Note

3) f. 4v: [Wheel for finding the indiction] Cest figure commenchat l'an M V c et I [= 1501]. Cest figure ensaingne pour troveir l'indiction . . . trovereis che est l'indiction pour l'annee.

Scope and Content Note

4) f. 5r-v: [Prayers in Latin, rubrics in Walloon French] Se alcunne personne per grant besoinge veult priier a notre dame, a sains loachim et a sainte Anne. O Ioachim exulta gaudio iam veteri carens . . . Sancta Anna mater matris et filie domini nostri Jesu Christi qui angelo nunciante ex tuo . . . Salve virgo pulcherrima mater plena gratia, salve tecum semper habens . . . Deus qui de beate Marie virginis . . . Dieu et Notre Dame le consolerat sans nulle doubt.

Scope and Content Note

5) ff. 6-11v: Calendar; among the saints mentioned: Geneviève (3 January); William of Donjeon (10 January, in red); Praejectus (25 January); Gertrude (17 March); Cuthbert of Lindisfarne (20 March); Robert (29 April, in red); Servatius (13 May); Ivo Helory (19 May); Commemoracio monachorum tocius ordinis (20 May); Desiderius (23 May); Medard (8 June); Martin of Tours, translation (4 July); Bernard of Clairvaux (20 August, in red); Louis IX (25 August, in red); Bernard of Clairvaux, octave (27 August); Aegydius (1 September, in red); Evurtius (7 September); Lambert (17 September, in red); Sequanus (19 September); Commemoratio pro defunctis (28 October); Hubert (3 November); Leonard (6 November); Edmund Rich (16 November); Commemoratio parentum nostrorum (20 November, in red); Eligius (1 December, in red).

Scope and Content Note

6) ff. 12-15v: [Antiphons and Collects for the common of the saints] De uno martyre ad vespera . . . f. 12v Incipiunt sanctorum proprias non habenti collecta . . . nos tribue meritis adiuvari. Per. ff. 16-17v lined but blank.

Scope and Content Note

7) ff. 18-84v: Psalter for the week. ff. 84v-92 Canticles from the Old and New Testaments, Athanasian Creed, Gloria, Versus, Collecta.

Scope and Content Note

8) ff. 92-93v: Litanies; the list of saints includes Omnes sancti beatorum spiritum ordinis, Lambert, Servatius, Hubert, Edmund Rich, William of Donjeon, Bernard of Clairvaux, Robert, Aegydius, Leonard, f. 94 blank.

Scope and Content Note

9) ff. 94v-142v: Breviary, temporale, Incipit diurnale per totum annum.

Scope and Content Note

10) ff. 142v-194v: Breviary, sanctorale.

Scope and Content Note

11) ff. 195-200: Canticles, ff. 200v-218v hymns.

Scope and Content Note

12) ff. 219-231 [rubric on f. 218v]: Incipiunt vigilie mortuorum. f. 231v blank.
Written in the Walloon-speaking Mosan region at the beginning of the sixteenth century for a Cistercian monastery, as the saints in the calendar and litanies and the mention “in solempnitate sancti Bernardi patris nostri” (f. 213) attest; also the commemorations for the dead of the order (20 May) and for their parents (20 November) are specific to Cistercian liturgy for these days. Inside the front cover a strip cut from Sotheby's auction catalog: “66. Breviary with Cistercian calendar . . . The panels are Weale R. 419 reproduced in the George Dunn Sale Catalogue lot 3378.” The number “27” in blue ink, circled, on rear pastedown. Final leaf (f. 231) has been removed, the lower half (with ex libris?) discarded, and the top half tipped in. Source and date of acquisition by UCLA unknown.

Note

Secundo folio: Deus misereatur nostri.

Bibliography:

Bond and Faye, Supplement, p.539.
 

170/21. NICHOLAUS CUSANUS, DE VISIONE DEI. Germany, s. XV 2.

Physical Description: Parchment, ff. 113; 135 × 95 (85 × 55) mm. 1 6(-1) 2-8 6 9-10 8 11-12 6 13 8 14 6 15 8 16 8(-1) 17 8 18 1. 17 long lines; frame ruled in lead. German hybrida script, influenced by humanistic; dark brown ink. 4-line chapter initials alternately blue on red penwork and red on brown; initials in the text slashed in red; titles and punctuation marks in red.
Physical Description: Bound in Germany (Buxheim) in contemporary blind-stamped white pigskin over wooden boards, with two metal clasps.

Scope and Content Note

ff. 1-113: [De visione dei] ff. 1-2v [chapter list] Capita 25 [title added in a later hand] Quod perfectio apparentie verificatur de deo perfectissime, ca. I ... Quomodo consumacio, c. 25. Finis capitulorum. ff. 2v-7 Incipit prologus. Pandam nunc que vobis . . . tria ad hec oportuna. ff. 7-113 Quod perfectio apparentie verificatur de deo perfectissime. C.I. Primo loco presupponendum . . . eternitate vite gloriose. Amen, [later hand adds:] Finit Theoria. f. 113v blank.
Printed in Nikolaus von Kues Werke, ed. P. Wilpert, vol.1 (Berlin, 1967) pp.292-338, which is essentially a reprint of the Strassburg 1488 edition, vol.2, pp.211-241.
Written in Germany in the second half of the fifteenth century. Belonged to the Carthusians of Buxheim; ex libris f. 1, “Carthusianorum in Buxheim” (s. XVII). On f. 1, “1456” (s. XIX-XX); The manuscript may be one of four volumes referred to as Mystica theologia in the mid-fifteenth-century catalog of Buxheim, ed. P. Ruf, Mittelalterliche Bibliothekskataloge Deutschlands und der Schweiz vol.3, no.1 (Munich, 1932) pp.96, 98. Regarding the Buxheim manuscripts see J. Hogg, “Buxheim Manuscripts in American Libraries,” Die Kartäuser und die Reformation, Analecta Cartusiana vol.108, no.1 (1984) pp.222-236, and idem, The Charterhouses of Buxheim, Ittingen, and La Valsainte, Analecta Cartusiana vol.38 (1977) pp.1-22. On the front pastedown, bookplate of Ernst Fischer, 1905, and a slip cut from a Sotheby's auction catalog. Source and date of acquisition by UCLA unknown.

Note

Secundo folio: (Chapter list, f. 2] alteritate capitulum 14; [Text, f. 4] benedictis si vos.

Bibliography:

Bond and Faye, Supplement, p.539.
 

170/22. PSEUDO AUGUSTINE, SERMONES AD FRATRES IN HEREMO. Italy, s. XV med/XV 2.

Physical Description: Parchment, ff. ii (modern) + 52 + ii (modern; i ant. and i post. are pastedowns); 220 × 150 (153 × 105) mm. 1-5 10 6 2(mutilated at the end). Horizontal catchwords in the center of the lower margin between flourishes, catchword on f. 10v in a frame with tiny rose, green, and blue floral decoration. 29 long lines; ruling in pale yellow ink, bounding lines in lead. Written in a rounded calligraphic gothic book hand in monastic style (littera textualis formata); black ink, flaked off particularly on flesh side. On f. 1, 7-line initial on violet background highlighted in white, with floral patterns and gold balls extending to the upper and inner margins; 3-line initials alternately red and blue with elaborated penwork in blue and red; initials in the text slashed with yellow; titl in red minuscule. Foliated in arabic numerals, s. XVIII.
Physical Description: Bound in half-leather over wooden boards by McKuen for UCLA, s. XX.

Scope and Content Note

ff. 1-52v: Incipiunt sermones sancti Augustini episcopi ad fratres heremitas, ff. 1-2 Sermo primus [no.1, PL vol.40.1235-37]; ff. 2-4 De pace sermo secundus [no.2, PL vol.40.1237-39]; ff. 4-5 De silentio tenendo sermo tercius [no.3, PL vol.40.1239-40]; ff. 5-7 De prudentia sermo IIII . . . adversarius vester regnat a quo nos liberare dignetur dominus. Amen [4, PL vol.40.1240-42, without the last paragraph]; ff. 7-9 De misericordia sermo V [6, PL vol.40.1246-48]; ff. 9-10 De obedientia sermo VI (7, PL vol.40.1248-9]; ff. 10-11 Deperseuerantia sermo VII [no.8, PL vol.40.1249-50]; ff. 11-12, De non irascendo sermo octavus [no.9, PL vol.40.1251-52]; ff. 12-13, Contra divitias et de bona consciencia sermo IX [no.10, PL vol.40.1252-53]; ff. 13-15 De luctu sermo decimus [no.11, PL vol.40.1253-55]; f. 15r-v De superbia sermo XI [no.12, PL vol.40.1255-56]; ff. 15v-16v De fortitudine sermo duodecimus [no.13, PL vol.40.1256-57]; ff. 16v-19 Qualiter debet queri Christus sermo tercius decimus [no.43, PL vol.40.1317-19]; ff. 19-22 De obediendo Deo et preceptis eius sermo quartus decimus [no.5, PL vol.40.1242-46]; ff. 22-25 De susurratoribus sermo quintus decimus [no.26, PL vol.40.1277-80]; ff. 25-28v De equitate vel pietate sermo sextus decimus [no.44, PL vol.40.1319-23]; ff. 28v-30v De iustitia et misericordia sermo septimus decimus [no.14, PL vol.40.1257-59]; ff. 30v-33 Sermo quod non debemus altum sapere sed in timore domini semper esse sermo octavus decimus [no.15, PL vol.40.1259-62]; f. 33r-v De inobedientia el impacientia et incontinentia sermo XIX [no.16, PL vol.40.1262]; ff. 33v-35v De vigilando et orando sermo XX [no.17, PL vol.40.1262-64]; ff. 35v-36v Contra invidum sermo XXI [no.18, PL vol.40.1264-66]; ff. 36v-38, De preparando monacho ad comunicandum sermo XXII [no.19, PL vol.40.1266-7); ff. 38-39 De sapientia sermo XXIII [no.20, PL vol.40.1267-68]; ff. 39-41v De generibus monachorum sermo XXIIII [no.21, PL vol.40.1268-71]; ff. 41v-43v De oratione sermo vigesimus quintus [no.22, PL vol.40.1271-73]; ff. 43v-44 De ieiunio sermo XXVI [no.23, PL vol.40.1273-74]; ff. 44-45 De ieiunio et abstinentia sermo XXVII [no.24, PL vol.40.1274-75]; ff. 45-46v De ieiunio et ad quid ieiunium fuit institutum sermo XXVIII [no.25, PL vol.40.1275-77]; ff. 46v-48v De prodigo filio vigesimus nonus [no.27, PL vol.40.1280-82]; ff. 48v-52v De cena domini sermo XXX [no.28, PL vol.40.1283-87]; f. 52v Expliciunt sermones beati Augustini episcopi et doctoris excellentissimi compilati ad heremitas. Deo gratias. Amen. [List of the sermons, ending imperfectly:] De vita et observantia fratrum I us . . . De vigilando et orando XX us //.
Written in Italy in the mid or later fifteenth century. On f. 52v, upper margin, erased possession note: “Iste liber fratris (?) . . .” (cursive humanistic script, s. XVI in). Lower part of ff. 18, 43 cut out. Source and date of acquisition by UCLA unknown.

Note

Secundo folio: horam nisi casus

Bibliography:

Bond and Faye, Supplement, p.539.
 

170/26. BOOK OF HOURS, use of Rome. France, s. XVI in.

Physical Description: Parchment, ff. iii (paper) + 116 (includes f. 38bis) + 24 (paper, printed, s. XVI/XVII) + iii (paper); 152 × 97 (110 × 70) mm. 1-4 8 5 8(-3 and 6, after ff. 34 and 36) 6 8 7 8 (-3, after f. 47) 8 8 9 8(-8, after f. 67, canceled by the scribe) 10-15 8. 18 long lines; double bounding lines; ruled in pale brown or pink ink. Written by 1 rounded sophisticated humanistic bookhand imitating roman type; grayish ink. 2-line gold initials on red/blue, green/blue, or red/green squarish backgrounds, 1-line gold initials on alternately red, blue, green squarish backgrounds, highlighted with gold, 14- or 15-line spaces for illustration were reserved at the beginning of each section; some were filled with engravings from various sources, while others remain empty: f. 7 (Gospel of John), 4 small engravings are glued in, depicting a sainted bishop exorcising a man, the same (?) bishop seeing a vision of the Virgin and Child, a man with a halo being strung up on a pole, 3 men in long tunics being crucified; f. 9v (Hours of the Virgin), Annunciation, possibly of Germanic origin; f. 25v (Lauds), left empty; opening leaf of prime is missing; f. 37v (Terce), left empty; f. 40v (Sext), the Virgin and Child, standing on a crescent, in glory, from a different source from the preceding engravings; f. 44v (None), Pietà, surrounded by a rosary with the large beads showing the Five Wounds of Christ, possibly from the same source as the engraving on f. 7; opening leaf of vespers is missing; f. 54 (Compline), Coronation of the Virgin by 2 angels as she sits on a crescent with the Child in her lap, from the same source as the engraving on f. 40v; f. 68v (Penitential psalms), left empty; f. 84v (Office of the Dead), left empty; f. 112 (at the end of the text), Francis of Assisi receiving the stigmata from a vision of the crucifix (full page). The manuscript is bound with a printed text, S'ENSVYVENT LES VESPRES DV DIMENCHE ET DV SAMEDI avec Compile & les hymnes communes de l'annee; French, s. XVI ex, 3 quires of 8, labeled Aa i-iiii, Bb . . . , Cc . . .; in roman types, with titles, headlines, initials printed in red. Water stains in the upper outer corners from f. 87 onward.
Physical Description: Bound in dark brown calf over paste boards. Gilt medallions (Crucifixion/ Annunciation) and the gilt inscriptions NICOLAS / NOVEL stamped on front/back covers respectively; gilt fore-edge; s. XVI/XVII.

Scope and Content Note

1) ff. 1-6v: Calendar with major entries in red; included are feasts of Rupert (27 March), Bernardinus, translation (17 May), Bernard[in]us (20 May), Medard (8 June), Amandus (25 June), Martialis (30 June), Our Lady of the Snow (5 August), Transfiguration (6 August), Louis of Toulouse (19 August), Vivianus (27 August), Nativity of the Virgin (8 September, in red), Maurilius (13 September), Lambert (17 September), Maurice (22 September), Francis of Assisi (4 October), Nicasius (11 October), Restitutus (3 November), Eligius (1 December); the following names were added later, apparently not intended as saints: Bernardus (10 March), Claudius (13 March), Petrus (14 March), Stephanus (23 March); also added in the lower margin of the same page, f. 2: Anna, Maria.

Scope and Content Note

2) ff. 7-9: Pericope of John [John 1:1-14] with versicle, response, and prayer, Protector deus in te sperantium. . . [P.F. Perdrizet, Le calendrier parisien . . . (Paris, 1933) p.25]; Oratio ad beatam mariam, O domina gloriae, O regina leticiae . . . .

Scope and Content Note

3) ff. 9v-68 [rubric on f. 9]: Hore beate mariae virginis secundum usum romanum incipiunt feliciter; at matins variations of psalms for the week are set into the text before the lessons; suffrages to All Saints at the end of each hour from lauds to compline; 3 leaves are missing with loss of text following f. 34 (end of lauds and beginning of prime), f. 36 (the third psalm of prime), and f. 47 (end of none and beginning of vespers).

Scope and Content Note

4) ff. 68v-84 [rubric on f. 68]: Penitential psalms and litany, including John and Paul, and Peter, Berard de Carbio, Accursius, Adjustus, and Otho (the last five as one entry, the Franciscan martyrs) among the martyrs; Francis, Antony, Berard, Bernardinus, and Dominic among the religious; Geneviève and Elisabeth among the virgins.

Scope and Content Note

5) ff. 84-111v: Office of the Dead, use of Rome; ff. 112-115v ruled but blank, except for an engraving glued to f. 112 (see below).
Written in France in the early sixteenth century. Belonged to the poet and friend of C.K. Ogden, Edward Harry William Meyerstein (1889-1952); his bookplate, dated 1911, on front pastedown. Acquired by UCLA soon after Meyerstein's death, source unknown.

Note

Secundo folio: [Calendar, f. 2] KL Martius habet; [Text, f. 8] sui eum non receperunt
 

170/43. MARTYROLOGY. Northern Italy, s. XV 1.

Physical Description: Parchment, ff. i (paper, modern) + ii (paper, s. XVI) + 95 (foliated iii-viii, 1-89) + i (paper, modern); 220 × 165 (152 × 115) mm. 1 6 2-9 10 10 12(-10, 11, 12). Plain horizontal catchwords in the middle of the lower margin. 26 long lines, ff. 87-89v in 2 columns of 26 lines; ruling in lead. Rounded Italian gothic bookhand in current liturgical style (littera textualis formata); almost black ink. 2-line initials alternately red on blue penwork and blue on red penwork; initials in the text slashed with yellow. A few additions (s. XV-XVI) to the calendar and to the text: f. i top “Littera [dat]aria martyrologi. 1539 currebat littera .A., 1552 .0.,” by the same hand as f. ii r-v, which also enters running titles on the recto top margin; f. i middle “MDXXXI” and (possibly the same hand) “Fratris Johannis Baptiste ... or. S. ob.”; f. i v “Questo martirologio serviva per la chiesa di Padova; si è incontrato con quello di Venezia del 1549 ad signum spei, quello Usuardo ed altri uniti da Giovanni Molano, Lovanii 1568, quello colle note del Baronio; e dove sono le linee di piombo indica non esservi nei sopradetti Martirologi cio che le linee notano. II tempo in cui è stato scritto pare dal 1400 al 143 < > e questo si cava da osservazione dei santi. Degno d'osservazione è il titolo che porta in fronte Incipit ordo datarii et come ancora, secondo I'uso anticho della Chiesa, principiando la vigilia di Natale” (s. XVII-XVIII; the codex shows throughout the marks of careful collation).
Physical Description: Bound in the original blind stamped leather (floral patterns, acorns and a typically Italian border with squarish rope motif) over wooden boards; traces of four clasps.

Scope and Content Note

1) f. ii r-v: [Table of paschal terms, written in a sixteenth-century cursive hand] Terminum paschalem [sic], Post nonas martis ubi sit luna . . . dominica prima post 15 kal. maii.

Scope and Content Note

2) ff. iii-viii v: [Calendar] Prima dies Iani timor est et septima vani . . . [Walther, Initia no.14561; other calendar verses at top and bottom of each month]; f. v IX Kal. Iun. Ver fugat Urbanus estatem Sinphorianus . . . [Walther, Initia no.20219].

Scope and Content Note

3) ff. 1-86v: In Christi nomine amen. Incipit ordo datarii sive martilogii secundum consuetudinem romane curie, IX Kal. Ianuarii, luna . . . Vigilia natalis domini. Apud Antiochiam Syrie ... [X Kal. Ian.] Sancti Servuli . . . miracula creberrimine [ sic] fiunt. Et alibi plurimorum sanctorum martirum confessorum atque sanctarum virginum. Dic lector nonas sic ydus atque kalendas . . . magnanimiter substinentes eterne vite delitiis cum eodem et gloria indicibili potiuntur, cuius nos ipse participes faciat. Qui cum Patre et Filio et Spiritu sancto vivit et regnat in secula seculorum. Amen. Numerus quidem sanctorum hiis exceptis suma [ sic] quorum / Solus sit rex angelorum . . . De quibus expertus solus Deus est sibi certus /[Q]ui sunt scribentis adiunctoresque legentis. Amen [Usuardi Martyrologium with additions; cf. PL vol.124.833-860, vol.123.601-992, vol.124.1-830].

Scope and Content Note

4) ff. 87-89v: [Temporal and sanctoral prayers, ending imperfectly] Dominica prima de adventu ad pretiosa. Lectio. Non in commessationibus et ebrietatibus ... In nativitate plurimorum martyrum. Fulgebunt iusti et tamquam scintile in arundineto discurent iu//.
Written in the first half of the fifteenth century, in northern Italy to judge from the spelling. Added names of saints provide little help in localizing: f. v “vi Id. Madii sancti Cataldi episcopi et confessoris” (Cataldus, bp. of Taranto); f. vii “viii Id. Septembris sancti Sperandei confessoris” (cf. Sperandeo and Sperandea of Gubbio); f. v “sancti Bernardini confessoris ordinis minorum” (s. XV ex; Bernardino da Siena was canonized in 1450). The manuscript presumably was in Padua in the seventeenth or eighteenth century (note on f. iv). Acquired by UCLA from an unknown source, before 1942 (accessioned in 1941).

Note

Secundo folio: [Calendar, f. iv] Martius apud hebreos; [Text, f. 2] Apud Ephesum natale

Bibliography:

Bond and Faye, Supplement, p.539.
 

170/49. BREVIARY, 4 volumes in 3. Paris, s. XV med.

Note

Fig. 19
 

Volume I.

Scope and Content Note

1) ff. 1-6v: [Calendar] Prima dies mensis et septima truncat ut ensis . . . [Walther, Initia 14563], including the feasts of Geneviève (3 January), William of Donjeon (10 January), Launomar (19 January), Bathildis and Radegundis (30 January), Vedast and Amandius (6 February); Honorina (27 February); Dionysius, invention (22 April); Eutropius (30 April); Medard and Gildard (8 June); Landericus, bishop (10 June); Leufred (21 June); Thuriaf (13 July); Philibert (20 August); Lupus and Chrodegang (3 September); Chlodoald and Evurtius (7 September); Audomar and Lambert (17 September); Dionysius, Rusticus, and Eleutherius (9 October); Gerald (13 October); Magloire (24 October); Edmund Rich (16 November); Susceptio reliquiarum of Dionysius (4 December).

Scope and Content Note

2) ff. 7-16v: [Ordinary] In anno quo nativitas . . . perducat nos regina angelorum amen.

Scope and Content Note

3) ff. 17-372va: Temporale, from I Dom. de adventu to Sabbato post Pentecosten; mutilated at the beginning, //princeps sodomorum percipite . . . , with a lacuna in Sabbato in vigilia Pasche; a leaf is missing between f. 293 . . . qui missa celebratur a// and f. 294, //gaudia nunciavit, candor . . .; f. 372vb blank.

Scope and Content Note

4) ff. 373ra-430v: Psalter, mutilated at beginning and end, with lacunae: //contrivisti. Domini est salus . . . [f. 394v:| . . . commoventur pedes mei super// [f. 400:] //et tabescere fecisti . . . [f. 398v:] . . . sed speravit in multitu// [f. 399:] //et dixi quis dabit . . . [f. 403v:] . . . inequitate et gentes// [f. 404:] //tuarum respice in me . . . illic mandavit dominus benedice// [1 folio is missing at the beginning; the sequence of folios between ff. 394 and 404 is to be reconstructed as follows: f. 394, 1 f. missing, ff. 400, 395-398, 1 f. missing, ff. 399, 401-403, 1 f. missing, f. 404; Ps. 3.8-25, 53, 117, 118 [divided in the liturgical portions, with Antiphon, Oratory, Hymnal inserted in between], 29-37.17; 38.12-51.9; 54.7-66.5; 68.17-79; Canticum Moysis I, Exodus 15.1-19; Psalms 80-96; Canticum Abacuc, Habakkuk 3.2-19; Psalms 97-108; Canticum Moysis II, Deut. 32.1-43; Ps. 109-132.3; with Antiphon and Hymnal].
 

Volume II.

Scope and Content Note

1) ff. 1-398v: Sanctorale, beginning (mutilated) with the feast of Medard and Gildard (8 June) //ferret divinitatis sue igitur . . . . and ending with Catharine (25 November), Geneviève, de miraculo ardentium (26 November), and Presentation of the Virgin (21 November) out of sequence; the Feast of the Presentation was added belatedly to the Western liturgy, first celebrated in France in 1374, which explains its displacement in the textual tradition of this breviary.

Scope and Content Note

2) ff. 399-431v: Commune sanctorum secundum usum parisiensem, mutilated at the end, from De evvangelistis to Commune unius virginis, . . . auribus meis inestimabiles margaritas//. f. 432r-v ruled but blank.
 

Volume III(1).

Scope and Content Note

1) ff. 1-6v: Calendar, identical with that in volume I.

Scope and Content Note

2) ff. 7-201v, Sanctorale; initial loss, probably including the Vigil and Feast of Andrew (29-30 November), now beginning with the Susceptio reliquiarum of Dionysius (4 December) //sanctorum martiris. Ut supra in vesperis. In primo nocturno . . . , to Tiburtius (14 April); f. 165vb Sequitur ordinatio de festis incidentibus tempore paschali. Notandum est quod si inventio corporum sanctorum Dyonisii sociorumque eius evenerit in die pasche festa sequencia sic celebrari debent . . .; f. 167rb Anno domini M CCC XXIX accidit pascha in festo sancti Georgii. Et fuit ordinatum in capitulo parisiensi de festis celebrandis modo qui sequitur....

Scope and Content Note

3) ff. 202-218rb: Commune sanctorum secundum usum parisiensem; f. 218rb-219va In conceptionis beate Marie [added in a contemporary hand], ff. 219vb-221 ruled- but blank.
 

Volume III(2).

Physical Description: Parchment, 3 vols.: I, ff. 430; II, ff. 432; III, ff. 400; 310/315 × 220/225 (195/200 × 140) mm. Gatherings of 8 leaves (calendars in gatherings of 6); gatherings mutilated corresponding with the lacunae described in the text; plain horizontal catchwords in the lower right-hand corner. 2 columns of 30 lines; ruled in purple ink. Calligraphic French gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); ink almost black. 6-line illuminated initials in I, ff. 411, 418, 426, to psalms 80, 97, 109, in blue on purple backgrounds enclosing stylized floral patterns, and with border in the inner margin which is now cut away; the folios with presumably similar major initials for psalms 1, 26, 38, 52, and 68 have been removed; 2-line initials, on blue and red penwork, alternately in gold and blue; initials in the text slashed with yellow; rubrics in red and blue; running titles in red minuscule. Generous use of gold leaf.
Physical Description: Bound in French gilt tooled white parchment over paste boards, s. XIX, with the two smaller volumes being bound together; remains of two ties on each volume.

Scope and Content Note

1) ff. 221v: Four hymns, “Beata nobis gaudia . . . ,” “Iam Christus astra ascenderat . . . ,” “Impleta gaudent viscera . . . ,” “Ihesu nostra redempcio . . . .”.

Scope and Content Note

2) ff. 222-366v: Temporale, 2 leaves missing at the beginning and with a lacuna, from In festo Trinitatis to Dom. XXV post pentecosten and the Vigil of St. Andrew // Resp. Benedictus dominus Deus Israel . . . [f. 223v:| quia Deus donator// [2 leaves missing In festo Sacramenti; f. 224:] //nam verum verbum carnem ....

Scope and Content Note

3) ff. 366v-368: [Benedictions and commemorations] Sequuntur benedictiones per totum annum; f. 367 Sequuntur memorie communes ab octava penthecostis usque adventum domini dominicis diebus, ad matutinum fit memoria de cruce. f. 368v blank.

Scope and Content Note

4) ff. 369-400v: Ordinary for the week from Diebus dominicis to Feria IIII, mutilated at beginning and end, //corde ut quid diligitis . . . misericordia quia tu reddes//.
Written in the mid-fifteenth century for a wealthy church or wealthy cleric in Paris (”secundum usum parisiensem” passim), perhaps a canon of Notre Dame (III, f. 167, “in capitulo parisiensi”). Belonged to Charles II, duc de Bourbon and constable of France, d. 1527; given by him to a (sieur de l'?) Espinette: II, f. 430, “Ces quatre volumes de breviere ma donnez monseigneur le conestable due de bourbonn' et dauvergne le xiii daoust, presens le sieur destansannes(?) et maitre Jehan de hospital. Espinette” and III, f. 220, “Ce livre ma donne monseigneur le connestable le xiii e jur daoust mil v c xxiii. Espinette,” both notes by the same French cursive hand. This gift (13 August 1523) occurred at the culmination of the rift between the constable and King Francis I; three weeks before, the constable had shifted his allegiance to Francis's enemy the emperor Charles V, and three days after (16 August 1523) Francis attacked the constable's city of Moulins. The gift of the breviary was part of the constable's process of rallying friends to his camp. One of the witnesses, Jean de Lhospital, was the constable's adviser and physician, and father of Michel de Lhospital (d. 1573), chancellor of France. Inside the front cover of vol.I is the description from a Sotheby's catalog which mentions “seven illuminated initials, four with partial borders of conventional flowers and foliage etc., the borders to the remaining three initials cut away”; the four with floral borders have been excised since this description was written. Bought by UCLA from Jacob Schwartz in England, ca. 1950.

Note

Secundo folio:
  • I [Calendar, f. 2] primus inadentem; [Text, f. 8] in breviario ultimum.
  • II festum sancti Landerici.
  • III [Calendar, f. 2] primus inadentem [Text, f. 8] omnium nostrum salvatoris.

Bibliography:

Bond and Faye, Supplement, p.539.
 

170/50. BOOK OF HOURS, use of Rouen. France, s. XV 2.

Note

Fig. 23
Physical Description: Parchment, ff. 122 (first and last are pastedowns, ruled but blank). 183 × 123 (100 × 65) mm. 1 3 2 12 (followed by a lacuna) 3-8 8 9 4 10-15 8 (followed by a lacuna) 16 7. Horizontal catchwords, often trimmed in binding. 16 long lines ruled in purple ink. Late, upright, calligraphic French gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); brown ink. Full-page illuminations on f. 19, Annunication; f. 28v, Visitation of St. Mary to St. Elizabeth; f. 42, Nativity; f. 47, Adoration of the shepherds; f. 50, Adoration of the Kings; f. 52v, Circumcision; f. 55v, Flight into Egypt; f. 61, Coronation of the Virgin Mary; f. 67, David and Nathan; f. 83, Crucifixion; f. 86, Pentecost; f. 89, Three Living and Three Dead; each panel measures 155 × 110 mm, and is surrounded by a border with fantastic and naturalistic animals, conventional flowers, and strawberries on gold background; in the inner and outer margins of the border are included two medallions with scenes related to the subject of the hour. Each page of the calendar has a similar border, with an illuminated panel in the lower margin; the panels on the rectos represent the occupations of the months, and those on the versos illustrate a variety of subjects, mostly biblical, including the baptism of Jesus, Jonah and the whale, Abraham's sacrifice, Noah's Ark, the creation of Eve, Job on his dung heap, Daniel in the lions' den, the Assumption of the Virgin, the drowning of Pharaoh's army. Throughout the book the outer margin of every page is decorated by a band 25-28 mm wide, with conventional flowers and strawberry motifs in green, red, blue, and gold; the decoration is repeated by tracing from the recto to the verso 4-line, 2-line, and 1-line initials in light blue with white highlighting, enclosing floral or strawberry motifs on gold background. Initials in the text slashed with yellow. Rubrics in red minuscule. Line-fillers in gold with ornamental patterns of logs and floral bands.
Physical Description: Bound with a velvet cover (s. XX) over the original bare wooden boards, sewn on 5 thongs.

Scope and Content Note

1) ff. 1-2v ruled but blank, ff. 3-14v: Full calendar in French with major feasts in gold, the others alternating red and blue; included are the feasts of Ansbert (9 February), Austreberta (10 February), Honorina (27 February), Ursinus, translation (12 June), Martialis (3 July, in gold), Our Lady of the Snow (5 August), Transfiguration (6 August, in gold), Mellonius (22 October), Romanus (23 October, in gold), Clarus (4 November), Edmund Rich (19 November), Ursinus (30 December).

Scope and Content

2) ff. 15-18v: //articulos fidei decem precepta legis firmiter tenere . . . et michi famulo tuo ostende michi . . . [end of the prayer Obsecro te, Leroquais vol.2, p.346]; Alia oratio, O Intemerata . . . orbis terrarum. De te enim . . . [A. Wilmart, Auteurs spirituels et textes dévots du moyen âge latin (Paris, 1932) pp.494-495].

Scope and Content Note

3) ff. 19-65: Hours of the Virgin, use of Rouen; following lauds are suffrages of the Holy Spirit, the Trinity, Michael, John the Baptist, the Apostles, Lawrence, Nicolas, Catharine of Alexandria, All Saints, and for peace, ff. 65v-66v ruled but blank.

Scope and Content Note

4) ff. 67-82v: Penitential psalms and litany, including Martialis among the apostles; Blasius, Eutropius, John and Paul, and Firminus among the martyrs; Mellonius, Romanus, Audoenus, Ansbert, Severus, Julianus, Taurinus, Maurus, and Julianus among the confessors; Austreberta and Geneviève among the virgins.

Scope and Content Note

5) ff. 83-85v: Short hours of the Cross.

Scope and Content Note

6) ff. 86-88v: Short hours of the Holy Spirit.

Scope and Content Note

7) ff. 89-115v: Office of the Dead, use of Rouen, ending defectively in the prayer for one's parents, . . . miserere clementer animabus//.

Scope and Content Note

8) ff. 116-118v: The first two lines have been erased and the words “parentum meorum” have been added to complete the prayer on f. 115v; the prayer Douce dame de misericorde ... is missing, as is the prologue to the 7 Requests, which now begin Beau sire dieu ie vous requier . , . [Leroquais vol.2, pp.309-310]; Saincte vraye crois aouree . . . [Sonet 1876]. ff. 119-120v ruled but blank.
Written in northern France in the second half of the fifteenth century; the saints in the calendar and litany point to Normandy. Washed out pen notes in French on front pastedown and f. 1, with the dates 1631, 1632, 1633, etc. Belonged to the Chicago mail-order merchant Louis E. Asher (1877-1948); printed ex libris inside the front cover. Given to UCLA by William A. Nitze (1876-1957), professor of French literature at UCLA.

Note

Secundo folio: [Calendar, f. 4] ffevrier

Bibliography

Bond and Faye, Supplement, p.539.
 

170/55. HANDBOOK OF CHRONOLOGY. Northern France, s. XVI 2.

Physical Description: Paper, ff. i + pp. 134 + f. i; 223 × 150 (150 × 100) mm. Gatherings of 4 leaves. 29/33 long lines; frame ruled in ink. Hasty cursive script with some chancery influence; black ink. Initials in red at times on brown penwork. Title in bold red minuscule. Contemporary pagination in arabic numerals.
Physical Description: Contemporary binding in limp parchment.

Scope and Content Note

pp. 1-134: Brevis Historiae chronologicae a conditu orbis descriptio. lsagoge ad Chronologiam, Vetus est laudare artem quam factitas . . . [ Christus nascitur] omnibus quaeso atque obtestor// (mutilated; notions of chronology and chronological summary from Genesis, through the Assyrians etc., to the Romans).
Written in the second half of the sixteenth century presumably in northern France. Belonged to the Celestines of Paris; p. 1 bottom, “Celestinorum parisiensium” (s. XVII-XVIII). Source and date of acquisition by UCLA unknown.

Note

Secundo folio: tempus est dimensum
 

*170/84. LIFE OF JESUS ACCORDING TO THE GOSPELS in French. Northern France, s. XV 2 or XV ex.

Physical Description: Parchment, ff. iii (i pastedown, ii-iii ruled but blank) + 240 + ii (ii is pastedown); 365 × 265 (255 × 162) mm. 1 4 (-4, 1 is pastedown) 2-31 8 Plain horizontal catchwords in the lower right-hand corner; the first four leaves of each fascicule are signed with a letter and roman numerals I to IIII in the lower right-hand corner of the recto. 2 columns of 43 lines; ruled in pale ink (ff. 1-184) and purple ink (ff. ii-iii, 185-240); pricking in the upper, lower and outer margin. Written by two copyists: (i) ff. 1-184, and (ii) ff. 185-240, in developed lettre bâtarde, with some chancery influence in the long flourished ascenders and descenders; ink grayish brown. On f. 3, 8-line initial parted in red and blue on red and blue penwork; similar 4-line initials on ff. 5, 193. 3-line initials of chapters in plain blue, at times on red penwork; 2-line initials in plain red; on ff. 1-2, initials to each entry alternately in red and blue. Titles in red minuscule or in the same ink as the text.
Physical Description: Bound in blind stamped leather (stamps: pelican, lion, flower) over wooden boards, s. XVI.

Scope and Content Note

1) ff. 1-2; [Chapter list] Ensuit la table et repertoire des chapitres des deux premieres parties de la vie notre, seigneur Jhesu Crist, Premierement. Le premier chapitre parle du prologue ou livre de la vie de Jhesucrist . . . Le IIII xx et XIII e, et XXXI e et derrenier de la segonde partie, du serment du quel on se doit garder et de laveugle en Bethsaide enlumine. f. 2v ruled but blank.

Scope and Content Note

2) ff. 3-5: [Prologue] Sensuit le prologue et premier chapistre du livre de la vie Jhesucrist selon les evangilles, Pour entierement et a son sauvement contempler la vie les eupvres et les parolles de Jhesucrist nostre doulx sauveur . . . vivre je puisse la jus par grace et la sups par gloire. Amen.

Scope and Content Note

3) ff. 5-193: [First book] Le premier chapistre de leupvre presente quant a la premiere partie contient la narracion evangelique de la vie Jhesucrist commancent a lincarnacion jusques a la XXXI e Premier de la generacion divine et eternele de Jhesucrist . Desirant pour nostre instruction puiser aucunes goutellettes de la fontaine du saint evvangille . . . cest assavoir de gloire vers toy pardurablement demourer. Amen. Explicit prima pars vite Christi etc. Quia hinc inde sequitur secunda pars.

Scope and Content Note

4) ff. 193-240v: [Second book] Ci commance la segonde partie du livre de la vie de Jhesucrist contenue en levangille et contient histoire evangelique des euvres nostre seigneur en l'an XXXII e. Et contient XXXI chapistre, dont le premier sensuit . Derechieff nostre seigneur ala en galilee dont venu estoit en Judee, mais avant , . . de verite, de justice et de pardurable sauvement. Amen. Explicit la II' partie de vita Christi Yd.
A translation and adaptation of the Vita Jesu Christi e quatuor evangeliis of Ludolf of Saxony (Paris, 1865). This is not mentioned by P. Meyer, “Légendes hagiographiques en français,” in Histoire littéraire de la France vol.33 (Paris 1906) pp.328-458.
Written in northern France in the second half of the fifteenth century. The number “2329” is written in ink on the front pastedown. Source and date of acquisition by UCLA unknown.

Note

Secundo folio: [Chapter list, f. 2] le lxviii e; [Text, f. 4] soit neantmoins prudentement.

Bibliography:

Bond and Faye, Supplement, p.539.

Note

A microfilm of this manuscript is no.2350 in the Negative Microfilm Collection.
 

170/87 (olim 85). MEDICAL NOTEBOOK, in Italian. Italy, s. XVII.

Physical Description: Paper, ff. 192; 187 × 130 mm.
Physical Description: Bound in contemporary parchment over cardboard.

Scope and Content Note

ff. 1-192: An early modern miscellany, beginning with Rimedi per il corpo humano da capo. ff. 190v-192v, alphabetical index to the volume.

Bibliography:

Bond and Faye, Supplement, p.539, listed under the superseded shelfmark 170/85 and mistakenly dated “late 15th c.”
 

170/199. Jacobus De Voragine, Legenda Aurea, with additions. Northern France, s. XV med.

Physical Description: Paper ( Tête de boeuf, similar to Briquet no.14181, Colmar 1442; qu. 21 Coeur, similar to Briquet no.4231-35, Paris 1443, etc.), ff. iv (parchment, i is pastedown) + ii (paper) + 268 (numbered a, 1-269; 266-269 parchment, 269 is pastedown); 220 × 150 (155/160 × 90) mm. i 4 ii 4(-2,-3) 1 14(-7,-8) 2-22 12 23 4. Plain horizontal catchwords in the lower righthand corner. 45/51 long lines; not ruled. Written by one hand, including text on f. iv, in a poorly formed lettre bâtarde; ink is grayish brown for text and titles both. On f. 253v (end of the quire), in the hand of the text, “Verte in ultimo folio + “; on f. 268r-v (the last written folio) the sign + is followed by the portion of text missing after f. 253v; f. iii, an erased note in fifteenth-century French lettre bâtarde; mildew damage on the initial and final parchment leaves.
Physical Description: Bound in parchment over wooden boards, s. XV.

Scope and Content Note

1) f. iv: Cy est l'opinion de six mestres qui parloient de tribulation, II estoient VI mestres assembles qui demandoient . . . et que par sa sainte misericorde il ait pitie de nos. Amen [47 lines], ff. v r-v and 1r-v blank.

Scope and Content Note

2) ff. 2-268v: Hic incipit legenda aurea: f. 2 De s. Andrea apostolo [ed. Th. Graesse, Jacobi a Voragine Legenda Aurea (Bratislava 1890) cap. II]; f. 4v De s. Nicolao [cap. III]; f. 7 De s. Lucia [cap. IV]; f. 7v De s. Thomaso [cap. V]; f. 9v De festivitatibus: de nativitate [cap. VI]; f. 12 De s. Anastasia [cap. VII]; f. 12v De s. Stephano [cap. VIII]; f. 14 De s. lohanne apostolo [cap. IX]; f. 16 De innocentibus [cap. X]; f. 17 De s. Thoma Cantuariensi [cap. XI]; f. 18 De s. Silvestro [cap. XII]; f. 21 De circumcisione [cap. XIII]; f, 23 De epiphania domini [cap. XIV]; f. 24v De s. Paulo heremita [cap. XV]; f. 25 De s. Remigio [cap. XVl]; f. 25v De s. Hylario [cap. XVII]; f. 26 De s. Machario [cap. XVIII]; f. 26 De s. Felice [cap. XIX]; f. 27 De s. Marcello [cap. XX]; f. 27 De s. Antonio [cap. XXI]; f. 28v De s. Fabiano [cap. XXII]; f. 28v De s. Sebastiano [cap. XXIII]; f. 29v De s. Agnete [cap. XXIV]; f. 31 De s. Vincencio [cap. XXV]; f. 32 De s. Basilio [cap, XXVI]; f. 33v De s. Iohanne elemosinario [cap. XXVII]; f. 35v De conversione s. Pauli [cap. XXVIII]; f. 36 De quadragesima [cap. XXXVI]; f. 36v De ieiunio quattuor temporum [cap. XXXV]; f. 37 De purificatione Marie virginis [cap. XXXVII]; f. 39v De s. Blasio [cap. XXXVI]; f. 40v De s. Agatha [cap. XXXIX]; f. 41v De s. Vedasto [cap. XL]; f. 41v De cathedra s. Petri [cap. XLIV]; f. 43 De s. Mathia apostolo [cap. XLV]; f. 44v De annunciatione dominica [cap. LI]; f. 46v De passione Domini [cap. LIII]; f. 50v De resurrectione Christi [cap. LIV]; f. 53v De s. Maria Egyptiaca [cap. LVI]; f. 54v De s. Ambrosio [cap. LVII]; f. 57 De s. Georgia [cap. LVIII]; f. 59 De s. Marco evvangelista [cap. LIX]; f. 60v De s. Philippo apostolo [cap. LXV]; f. 61 De s. Iacobo apostolo [cap. LXVI]; f. 64 De inventione s. Crucis [cap. LXVIII]; f. 66v De s. Iohanne apostolo ante portam latinam [cap. LXIX]; f. 67 [ De letaniis, cap. LXX]; f. 68v De ascensione Domini [cap. LXXII]; f. 71 De missione s. Spiritus [cap. LXXIII]; f. 74v De s. Barnaba [cap. LXXXI]; f, 75v De ss. Gervasio et Prothasio [cap. LXXXV]; f. 76v De s. Iohanne Baptista [cap. LXXXVI]; f. 79v De ss. Iohanne et Paulo [cap. LXXXVII]; f. 80v Des. Leone papa [cap. LXXXVIII]; f. 80v De s. Petro apostolo [cap. LXXXIX]; f. 85 De s. Paulo apostolo [cap. XC]; f. 90v De s. Margareta [cap. XCIII]; f. 91v De s. Alexio [cap. XCIV]; f. 93 De s. Praxede [cap. XCV]; f. 93 De s. Maria Magdalena [cap. XCVI]; f. 96v De s. Iacobo apostolo [cap. XCIX]; f. 99v De s. Christoforo [cap. C]; f. 101v De ss. Septem dormientibus [cap. CI]; f. 103 De s. Martha [cap. CV]; f. 104 De s. Petro apostolo ad vincula [cap. CX]; f. 106 De s. Stephano papa [cap. CXI]; f. 106v De inventione s. Stephani protomartiris [cap. CXII]; f. 108 De s. Laurentio [cap. CXVII]; f. 112 v Des. Ypolito [cap. CXVIII]; f. 113v De assumptione beate Marie [cap. CXIX]; f. 118 v Des. Bernardo [cap. CXX]; f. 122 v De s. Tymotheo [cap. CXXI]; f. 123 De s. Bartholomeo [cap. CXXIII]; f. 125v De s. Augustino [cap. CXXIV]; f. 132 De decollatione s. Iohannis Baptiste [cap. CXXV]; f. 135 De s. Egidio abbate [cap. CXXX]; f. 135v De nativitate beate Marie virginis [cap. CXXXI]; f. 139v De exaltatione s. Crucis, . . . mox de ea exivit [cap. CXXXVII, om. last paragraph]; f. 141v De s. Lamberto [cap. CXXXIII]; f. 142 De s. Matheo apostolo [cap. CXL]; f. 144 De s. Mauricio [cap. CXLI]; f. 145v De s. Michaele arcangelo [cap. CXLV]; f. 149v De s. Ieronimo [cap. CXLVI]; f. 151v De s. Francisco [cap. CXLIX]; f. 155v De s. Luca [cap. CLVI]; f. 157v De ss. Symone et Iuda [cap. CLIX]; f. 159v De omnibus sanctis [cap. CLXII]; f. 163 De commemoracione omnium fidelium defunctorum [cap. CLXIII]; f. 167 De s. Martino episcopo [cap. CLXVI]; f. 170v De s. Bricio [cap. CLXVII]; f. 171 De s. Cecilia [cap. CLXIX]; f. 173 De s. Clemente [cap. CLXX]; f. 177 De s. Katherina [cap. CLXXII]; f. 180 De ss. Felice et Audacto (sic) [cap. CXXVI]; f. 180 De s. Lupo [cap. CXXVIII]; f. 180v De s. Mamertino [cap. CXXIX]; f. 181 De s. Adriano martire [cap. CXXXIV]; f. 182v De s. Gorgonio et Dorotheo martiribus [cap. CXXXV]; f. 183 De ss. Protho et Iacinto [cap. CXXXVI]; f. 184 [ De ss. Cornelia et Cipriano, cap. CXXXII]; f. 184 De s. Eufemia [cap. CXXXIX]; f. 185 De s. lustina [cap. CXLII]; f. 186 De ss. Cosma et Damiano [cap. CXLIII]; f. 187v [ De s. Forseo episcopo, cap. CXLIV]; f. 188 De s. Remigio [cap. CXLVII]; f. 188v De s. Leodegario [cap. CXLVIII]; f. 189v De s. Pelagia [cap. CL]; f. 190 De s. Margarita [cap. CLI]; f. 190v De Thaisi meretrice [cap. CLII]; f. 191 De s. Dyonisio [cap. CLIII]; f. 193 De s. Kalisto papa [cap. CLIV]; f. 193v De s. Leonardo [cap. CLV]; f. 195 De ss. Grisanto et Daria [cap. CLVII]; f. 195 De undecim milium virginum passione [cap. CLVIII]; f. 196v [ De s. Quintino, cap. CLX]; f. 197 De s. Eustacio [cap. CLXI]; f. 199 [ De quattuor coronatis, cap. CLXIV]; f. 199 [ De s. Theodora, cap. CLXV]; f. 199v [ De s. Grisogono, ... vel tristibus desperacio vel letis dominetur elacio [cap. CLXXI, interr. p. 788]; f. 199v ( De s. Saturnino], . . . quorum passio alio tempore potissimum collitur [cap. CLXXIII, interr. p. 798] ubi recitatur rnemoria passionis istorum videlicet in festo Perpetue et Felicitatis quod habetur in fine libri; f. 200 [ De s. Iacobo rnartire cognomento interciso, cap. CLXXIV]; f. 201 [ De s. Pastore, cap. CLXXV]; f. 201v [ De s. Iohanne abbate, cap. CLXXVI]; f.202 De s. Moyse abbate [cap. CLXXVII]; f. 202v [ De s. Arsenio, cap. CLXXVIII]; f.203 [ De s. Agathone abbate, cap. CLXXIX]; f. 203v [ De s. Barlaam] in vitis patrum, . . . et contentio effrenata adversus caput meum insanire fecit [cap. CLXXX, interr. p. 819]; f. 207 [ De s. Pelagio papa], . . . de ipsa cruce potius ceciderunt. Addidit quoque quod impiis obscu// [cap. CLXXXI, interr. p. 825); f. 207v De dedicatione ecclesie [cap. CLXXXII]; f. 211v De s. Iohanne Crisostomo, . . . omnia quoque templa ydolorum destrui fecit [cap. CXXXVIII, interr. p.612]; f. 212 De s. Marciale, Sanctus Marcialis consanguineus sancti Stephani prothomartiris cum esset annorum XV cum parentibus suis venit . . . qui statim febre correptus adveniente domino et angelis in celum defertur; f. 212v De s. Victore, Maximianus cum venisset at urbem Massiliam peracta nuper sanctorum cede Thebeorum decrevit ... in lictoris oppositum transfetuntur [ sic]. In quibus a Christianis sepulta sunt anno domini CCC° x° et multa beneficia petentibus largiuntur; f. 213 De s. Albano, Anno domini LXXXVII sanctus Albanus de Britannia adhuc paganus Christianum quemdam persecucionem maximam imperatoris fugientem hospicio . . . perdidit quam cito sanctum Albanum cum predicto milite decollavit; f. 213v De s. Prisco, Anno domini cclxxvi Aurelianus imperator ad Gallias veniens contra Christianos persecutionem movit. Cum ergo tunc Senonis moraretur . . . caput autem sancti Prisci detulit ad locum qui differt IIII or ab urbe milibus vel ad castrum quod eiusdem Prisci nomine nuncupatur; f. 213v De s. Genevofa [sic] virgine, Beata Genevofa prope Parisius orta beato Germano Altisiodorensi episcopo per loca illa causa destruende heresis . . . spiritu prophecie plena omnes morbos ab humanis corporibus expellebat; f. 214 De s. Preiecto, Preiectus cum adhunc esset in utero matris vidit mater eius in sompnis quod eius filius . . . quod cum ceteri cognovissent similiter penitentes auri et argenti copiam obtulerunt; f. 214v De s. Gallicano, Gallicanus magister milicie Constantini ab eodem valde dilectus filiam eius Constanciam sibi poscebat in uxorem . . . secessit in heremum ubi dum sacrificare contempneret decollatus. Anno domini CCCLXVI; f. 215 De ss. Perpetua et Felicitate, Temporibus Valeriani et Galieni imperatorum apud Affricam comprehensi sunt Satyrus Saturninus Revocatus et Felicitas soror eius et Perpetua , . . Perpetua a leonibus devorati sunt, Saturninus decollatur, Revocatus et Felicitas a leopardis comesti martirio coronantur [cap. CLXXIII pp.798-799, with alterations]; f. 215v De s. Iusto, Cum Iustus novem esset annorum et avunculus eius Iustinianus in captivitate ductus esset ait ad patrem suum Iustinum . . . ipsa puella annorurn XVI ceca nata lumen oculorum recepit anno domini CCCC°XV; f. 215v [ De s. Secundo], Secundus philosophus hic philozophatus est omni tempore silencium conservans et pictagoricam deducens vitam . . . precepit libros eius sacre bibliotece inseri et intitulari Secundi philosophi digitis et bone reservari; f. 217v De adventu domini [cap. I]; f. 220v De s. Iuliano [cap. XXX]; f. 222 De septuagesima [cap. XXXI]; f. 223 De sexagesima [cap. XXXII]; f. 223v De quinquagesima [cap. XXXIII]; f. 223v De s. Amando [cap. XLI]; f. 224 De s. Valentino [cap. XLII]; f. 224v De s. Iuliana [cap. XLIII]; f. 225 De s. Gregorio, . . . et carnem illam in panem conversam vidit [cap. XLVI, interr. p. 198]; f. 228 De s. Longino [cap. XLVII]; f. 228 [ De s. Benedicto, cap. XLIX]; f. 231v De s. Patricio [cap. L]; f. 232v [ De s. Vitali, cap. LXI]; f. 233 [ De s. Petro novo martire de ordine predicatorum], . . . quern cum beatus Petrus signasset continuo sanatus surrexit [cap. LXIII, MS om. etimologia nominis, interr. p. 280]; f. 234 De ss. Gordiano et Epymaco [cap. LXXIV, MS om. etim. nom. ]; f. 234 [ De ss. Nereo et Achilleo, cap. LXXV, MS om. etim. nom.]; f, 234v De s. Pancracio [cap. LXXVI, MS om. etim. nom.]; f. 235 De s, Urbano [cap. LXXVII, MS om. etim. nom.]; f. 235 [ De s. Petronilla, cap. LXXVIII]; f. 235v De ss. Marcellino et Petro [cap. LXXIX]; f. 236 [ De ss. Primo et Feliciano, cap. LXXX, MS om. etim. nom.]; f. 236 De ss. Vito et Modesto [cap. LXXXII, MS om. etim. nom.]; f. 236v De s. Cirico [cap. LXXXIII, MS om. etim. nom.]; f. 237 De s. Marina [cap. LXXXIV]; f. 237 [ De septem fratribus qui fuerunt filii beate Felicitatis, cap. XCI]; f. 237v De s. Theodora [cap. XCII]; f. 239 De s. Apollinare [cap. XCVII, MS om. etim. nom.]; f. 239v De s. Christina [cap. XCVIII, MS om. sacre.]; f. 240v De ss. Nazario et Celso, ... in eadem ecclesia collocavit. Passi sunt autem sub Nerone anno domini LVII [cap. CII, MS om. etim. nom. and last paragraph]; f. 241v De ss. Simplicio et Faustino [cap. CIV]; f. 241v De s. Germano [cap. CVII]; f. 243 De ss. Abdon et Sennen [cap. CVI, MS om. last sentence]; f. 243 De s. Eusebio, . . . Constantius autem Constantini filius ipsa heresi corruptus fuit [cap. CVIII, MS om. etim. nom., interr. p. 452]; f. 243 De s. Dominico [cap. CXIII, MS om. etim, nom.]; f. 247v De s. Sixto [cap. CXIV, MS om. etim. nom.]; f. 248 De s. Donato [cap. CXV, MS om. etim. nom.]; f 248v De s. Ciriaco [cap. CXVI]; f. 249 De s. Simphoriano [cap. CXXII]; f. 249v In die cene, Scitis quid fecerim (Ioh. 13.12). Felix discipulus qui ad hanc questionem valet respondere. Et II aquestio illius summi doctoris . . . et bibit eius sanguinem habet vitam eternam ad quam nos perducat; f. 250 [ Sermo], Probet autem se ipsum homo et sic de pane primo edat et de calice bibat. I Cor. iii [=11.28]. Si animus debet aliquod cibum recipere oportet quod videat et probet si cibum . . . deduxit eos in portum voluntatis eorum. Rogemus etc.; ff. 251v-253v and 268r-v De sancto Sacramento, Circa istud sacramentum totum evvangelium in quo fit mencio de magnitudine veritate huius sacramenti . . filia principis hanc autem sancti-// (follows on f. 268:) tatem mentio debet quibus . . Hebr. 4 [. 11 ] festinemus ingredi in illam requiem id est glorie paradisi ad quam vos perducat; f. 254 De s. Ludovico rege Francie [BHL no.5047]; f. 257v De s. Barbara [BHL no.927]; f. 259 De s. Eligio confessore, . . capilli tempore obitus sui rasi mirum in modum crevisse videbantur [Graesse cap. CCXXXIX, interr. p. 952]; f. 259v De s. Iudoco, Circa annos domini circiter sexcentos XLVIII temporibus beati Martini pape primi Constancii imperatoris tercii et regis Francorum Dagoberti beatus Iudocus filius Michaelis regis Britannie maioris . . ad presens suificiat que dominus per sui Iudoci beati merita operare dignatus est, cui est honor et gloria in secula; f. 262 De s. Clara, Venerabilis Christi sponse Deoque dicate virginis Clare natalicium diem, fratres karissimi, honorificentia dedita celebrantes . . paulo post iusto Dei faciente iudicio gladio interemptus occubuit; f. 263v De sancto Sacramento, Caro mea vere est cibum etc. Io.6[.56]. Videmus per experientiam quod quanto res in se est nobilior et preciosior . . nam prima erunt figure hic autem veritas ipsa disgressio. f. 269 (pastedown) blank. [Kaeppeli, SOPMA 2154; this manuscript is not cited.].
Written in northern France in the middle of the fifteenth century. f. 2 lower margin, “Celestinorum Sancte Crucis. G.40,” probably to be identified with the Celestin monastery of Ste-Croix-sous-Offémont (Île de France). Purchased by UCLA in 1959 from the London book dealer Stanley Smith.

Note

Secundo folio: Andreas in Achaia consistens
 

*170/281. ANONYMOUS, LIFE OF COSIMO I DE' MEDICI, in Italian. Tuscany, 1574/1587.

Physical Description: Paper, ff. 193; 295 × 210 (265 xca. 155) mm. 1-3 20 4 22 5 166-8 22 9 24 10 6(-1). Catchwords at the bottom of each page; gatherings signed by a capital letter in the lower right-hand corner of the first recto. 18/21 long lines, not ruled. Written in a late humanistic cursive script, in various brown inks. Extensive marginal annotation in the hand of the text, on every page; ff. 1r-v and 193r-v badly worn, but little text is lost.
Physical Description: Bound in a detached limp parchment cover, s. XVI, with modern ties.

Scope and Content Note

ff. 1-193v: Al Serenissimo Gran Duca di Toscana Francesco Medici unico mio signore. Hanno scritto, et s'io non m'inganno, sono ancora per scrivere molti della vita del Serenissimo Signor Padre di Vostra Altezza Serenissima per fare in gratia di lei et in testimonianza del vero . . sbandito quando pensava d'esserne pagato ne fu //.
The author says, in the opening chapter, that he comes from Volterra and that, before this present Life in the vernacular, he wrote a Latin Life in six books (”mi ci metto oltre a quello che latinamente ho già scritto in sei libri del Principato suo”). The extensive corrections, additions, and stylistic alterations written at different times and in different inks indicate that this is the author's working copy.
Written in Tuscany in the reign of Francesco I (1574-1587) in the hand of the author. The front cover bears a title, and the remains of a shelf-mark, from an Italian archive, written in purple ink by a nineteenth-century Italian hand: “[2-line erasure]. Sezione C. Miscellanea. Filza A. Storia-[erasure]. Vita di Cosimo de' Medici prime Granduca dedicata a Francesco I suo figlio. Autografo di Anonimo Volterrano stato segretario di Cosimo presso I'Imperatore Carlo V, il Re Francesco I, la Repubblica di Venezia e finalmente presso lo stesso Granduca, ed autore di sei libri scritti in latino sul Principato di Cosimo. L'autore é probabilmente Monsignore Jacopo di Giovanni De' Conti Guidi Vescovo di Penna e di Atri nell'Abruzzo, che scrisse gli Atti del Concilio di Trento.” There is no evidence for this attribution to Jacopo Guidi, bishop of Penna and Atri (d. 1587). Acquired by UCLA ca. 1962 from an unknown source.

Note

Secundo folio: sue più secrete

Bibliography:

UCLA Librarian, vol.16 (1963) p.93.
 

*170/282. ACCOUNT BOOK OF CARLO DE' MEDICI. Tuscany, 1535-1536.

Physical Description: Paper, ff. i (parchment) + 240 + i (parchment); 338 × 230 mm. 1-15 16 Bounding lines and vertical columns for figures ruled in leadpoint. Contemporary parallel foliation in arabic numbers on the upper left-hand corner of the verso, in roman numerals on the upper right-hand corner of the recto. Written in late Italian lettera mercantesca by one hand; dark brown ink.
Physical Description: Contemporary envelope-shaped binding in limp parchment, reinforced with four leather straps on the back and a fifth surrounding the volume, fastened by means of a metal buckle; on the front cover, by three different sixteenth-century Italian hands: “Q(uaderno) di Chassa Quarto”; “1535 del ... di Carlo Medici”; “n° 292.”

Scope and Content Note

ff. 1-108v: Account book of bank business, on the verso of each leaf “dare,” on the recto “avere,” covering the years 1535-1536; among the persons and institutions that appear are the Università dell' arte della lana, and members of the noble Florentine families of Corbinelli, Della Fonte, Rucellai, Valori. ff. 109-240 (unnumbered) bounding lines and columns ruled but blank.
Written in Tuscany (Florence?) in 1535-1536. Carlo de' Medici may be the Carlo who was born probably before 1501, “senatore” in 1573, and died probably in the same year, son of Bernardo de' Medici, captain of Volterra in 1508; see P. Litta, Famiglie celebri italiane, 11 vols. (Milan, 1856-1885), vol. 2 fasc. 24: “Medici di Firenze, parte III,” tav. 6. Source and date of acquisition by UCLA are unknown.
 

*170/292. TRISTANO CARACCIOLO, WORKS. Italy (southern?), s. XVII.

Physical Description: Paper, ff. 204; 305 × 205 (245 × 145) mm. Quires of 12s; catchword at bottom of each page. 25 long lines, not ruled. Sophisticated cursive script by a professional hand; blackish ink. On f. 1, “Tristani Caraccioli Opera omnia” in square capitals.
Physical Description: Bound in parchment over cardboards, s. XVII.

Scope and Content Note

1) f. 2: Index operum Tristani Caraccioli, 1. Vita Ioannae Primae Neapolis Reginae . . . 21. De Ferdinando, qui postea Aragonum Rex fuit, 22. De Ioanne Baptista Spinello Cariati Comite, ad Ferdinandum filium, 23. De concordia, et de ineundo Coniugio, 24. Genealogia Caroli primi Siciliae Regis, 23. Ordo servandus a Militibus Hierosolimitanis in electione Magni Militiae Magistri [the last four works are now missing from the manuscript], f. 2v blank.

Scope and Content Note

2) ff. 3-17: Vita Iohannae Primae Neapolis Reginae per Tristanum Caracciolum.
Printed: L.A. Muratori, ed., Rerum italicarum scriptores (RIS) 22 part 1, revised ed. G. Paladino (Bologna 1934) 5-18.

Scope and Content Note

3) ff. 17v-40: Vita Serzanis Caraccioli Magni Senescalci [RIS 22.1.21-40].

Scope and Content Note

4) ff. 40v-52: Disceptatio quaedam priscorum cum Iunioribus de moribus suorum temporum, Quam nimium sui saeculi homines sint amatores . . . et veneramur alteris vero aeternam optamus pacem.
Other manuscripts of this work are reported by Kristeller, Iter italicum vol.1.428 and vol.2.116.

Scope and Content Note

5) f. 52v: Petrus Gravina Tristano Caracciolo. S.D., Non salutasti modo more majorum . . .diuturniora imperia petirentur. Vale et me ama [Kristeller, Iter italicum vol.1.428].

Scope and Content Note

6) ff. 53-58: Oratio ad Alfonsum Iuniorem [RIS 22.1.173-176].

Scope and Content Note

7) ff. 58v-98: De Varietate fortunae [ibid. 73-105].

Scope and Content Note

8) ff. 98v-109: Epistola de Inquisitione [ibid. 109-117].

Scope and Content Note

9) ff. 109v-111 De Inconstantia, Quid maxime vitam non modo videri sed etiam brevem . . . et levitatis merito damnatos [Kristeller, Iter italicum vol.1, pp.5, 428 and vol.2, pp.25, 116].

Scope and Content Note

10) ff. 111v-116: De cuiusque vanitate in loquendo, Mirabar profecto aliquando cur docti illi receptissimique . . . laborantibus virorum bonorum opinio est atque fuerit [ibid. vol.1, pp.5, 428 and vol.2, pp.25].

Scope and Content Note

11) ff. 116v-120: Epistola de Statu Civitatis [RIS 22.1.153-155].

Scope and Content Note

12) ff. 120v-134v: Plura bene vivendi praecepta ad filium, Quoniam quos plurimum diligi natura voluit hoc . . . non in suum lucrum incutere solent. Finis [Kristeller, Iter italicum vol.1, pp.5, 428, vol.2, p.116].

Scope and Content Note

13) ff. 135-138v: De funere Ferdinandi primi epistola [RIS 22.1.159-163].

Scope and Content Note

14) ff. 139-147v: Defensio civitatis Neapolitanae, Petri Gravine canonici Neapolitani carmen quo Parthenopen alloquitur, Tu licet antiqua proavorum laude superbum/ . . . /Haec tibi defensae gloria maior erit [12-line dedicatory verse; Kristeller, Iter italicum vol.1, p.428, vol.2, pp.25, 116], Defensio civitatis Neapolitanae ad Legatum Reipublicae Venetae [RIS 22.1.141-148, without the verse].

Scope and Content Note

15) ff. 148-160v: De vitae Auctoris actae notitia, Quid potissimum utile mihi scriberem, Quid potissimum utile mihi scriberem cum accuratius meditarer . . . doluisse tamen animo non parum iuvat. Finis [Kristeller, Iter italicum vol.1, pp.5, 428, vol.2, p.116].

Scope and Content Note

16) ff.161-163, Ioviani Pontani vitae brevis pars [RIS 22.1.181-183].

Scope and Content Note

17) ff. 163v-170v: Didonis Reginae Vita, Finxisse Virgilium Didonem Eneae Amore deperditam . . . Carthaginenses cumulatis quotidie persolverunt. Finis [Kristeller, Iter italicum vol.1, pp.5, 428, vol.2, pp.25, 116].

Scope and Content Note

18) ff. 171-173: Penelopes Castitas et perseverantia, Saepe plurimas egregiasque virtutes quibus aliquis ornatus est. . . ne fraudemus ergo sua Castitatis gloria. Finis [ibid. 1.5, 428, 2.25, 116].

Scope and Content Note

19) ff. 173v-182: Quid sit in tot variis artibus Iunioribus amplectendum Consultatio ad quendam expertum Monachum, Non tibi satis visum fuerat pro redimendis peccatis vitaque perpetua . . . magnopere oramus quam rectissimam fore non dubitamus. Finis [ibid. 1.5, 428, 2.25].

Scope and Content Note

20) ff. 182v-190: Opusculum ad Marchionem Atelle, Magnum profecto fortitudinis argumentum esse remur . . . materiam grandi contribuisse iuvat [ibid. 1.5, 428, 2.25, 116].

Scope and Content Note

21) ff. 190v-200v: De Sororis obitu, Cum semper, et si non omnium, plurimorum tamen paternorum . . . compar gloriae futurum iterum perventuram. Finis [ibid. 1.5, 428, 2.25, 116].

Scope and Content Note

22) ff. 201-204v: De Ferdinando qui postea Aragonum Rex fuit, Ferdinandus Alfonsi illius . . . hic finis coronariae pompae qua et funere quo patrem// [RIS 22.1.13 131-134, line 23].
A manuscript with the same contents, before the mutilation, and in the same order, is Naples, IX C 25, noted by Kristeller, Iter italicum1.428. We have described the present manuscript here, even though it belongs to the seventeenth century, because of the rarity of earlier manuscripts containing works of Tristano Caracciolo (ca. 1437-1528).
Written in Italy, probably in the south, in the seventeenth century. Two armorial bookplates inside the front cover: one with the motto “Comme je fus,” the second “Ex libris Marchionis Salsae.” For further books and papers from the Salsa library see below, MS 953. Acquired by UCLA in 1966 from an unknown source.
 

170/307. ORDINANCES OF THE CONFRATERNITY OF ST. JULIAN IN TERUEL, in Spanish. Spain (Teruel), 1440-1574.

Note

Fig. 16
Physical Description: Parchment, ff. 57; 193 × 130 (120 × 85) mm. 1-5 8 6 10(-1) 7 10(-l, -2). Catchwords only in the first section, horizontally in the middle of the lower margin. 13 long lines; the first section ruled in lead, then in ink. Written by seven fifteenth-century hands (1440 and after) in a rather square late Spanish gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata), (i) ff. 3-6, i-xxiv v, (ii) ff. xxiv v-xxvi v, (iii) ff. xxvi v-xxvii v, xxviiii-xxxi, (iv) ff. xxvii v-xxviii v, (v) f. xxxii, (vi) ff. xxxiii-xxxxi v, (vii) ff. xxxxii-xxxxvii, and several sixteenth-century cursive hands, ff. 6-7v and xxxxvii v-xxxxviiii v; black ink for the main text, brown for the additions. On f. 1, 5-line initial parted in red and blue on red and violet flourishes, with marginal extensions to form a light border; 4-line initial in red, f. xxxxii; ff. i-xxiv, 2-line initials alternately in red and blue and initials in the text slashed with yellow; rubrics in red; ff. xxxxii-xxxxvii, red paragraph marks; ff. i-xxiv foliated by the scribe in red roman numerals, continued in brown ink on ff. xxv-xxxxviiii. Fifteenth- and sixteenth-century notes inside the back cover. On f. 2, a seventeenth- or eighteenth-century coat of arms in pen and ink, with the names and symbols of St. Bartholomew, St. Julianus, St. Quiteria.
Physical Description: Only the spine of a contemporary binding in limp parchment survives.

Scope and Content Note

1) ff. 3-7v: [List of chapters with folio references] Capitulo primo de mantener la lampara a ii . . . Capitulo quel demandador sea tovido dar conto por cada domingo e cada paschua a xxiiii [followed by several additions:] Capitulo del conto . . . Capitulo como se deve meter en seguro lo de la companya, xxxxvi. f. 8r-v blank.

Scope and Content Note

2) ff. i-xxiv v: Esta es la ordenacion de la confradria de senyor sant Julian de la ciudat de Teruel, En el nonbre del nuestro senyor Ihesu Christo et de la virgen sancta Maria su madre et ha honor de todos los sanctos de Dios. En la era de mil et CCCC et XL aquesta hermandat et aquesta companya establecems los cofradres [over erasure: de senyor sant Bartholome] et de sant Julian de Teruel. En nombre et en advocacio de [over erasure: sant Bartholome; added between the lines: et de sant] Julian ffazemos et ordenamos nuestras posturas segunt que daqui adelant es scripto et ordenado a fieldat del senor Rey de Aragon et ha hondra de la ciudat de Teruel . . . por cada un dia que nolo fara.

Scope and Content Note

3) ff. xxiv v -xxxii; [8 added chapters] Capitulo del confradre qui se salliere de la companya. Item como a toda persona . . . y esto sin nenguna remission, ff. xxxi v and xxxii v blank.

Scope and Content Note

4) ff. xxxiii-xxxxi v : Capitulos de la ordenacion de la cambra que se faze en et spital de senyor sant Iulian et de senyor sant Bartholomme, Item primerament hordenamos . . . para necessidades del spital.

Scope and Content Note

5) ff. xxxxii-xxxxvii: [Additional ordinances, including the mention f. xxxxiii v of an annual procession to honor St. Quiteria] De esleyr officiales et del qui no querra acceptar, Item stablescemos ... la pena sobre dicha.

Scope and Content Note

6) ff. xxxxvii v-xxxxix: A series of ordinances with the dates 1524, 1529, 1551, 1557, 1574.
Written at Teruel in 1440, with additions to 1574, for the confraternity of St. Julian. A stamp in ink on f. 1, “Angel San Gros N° 12—Zaragoza,” s. XVIII/XIX; a Spanish hand has written in ink on f. 1 “Codice original,” s. XIX. Purchased by UCLA in Spain in 1963.

Note

Secundo folio: [Chapter list, f. 4] fijo dexare; [Text, f. ii] primerament prometemos.
 

*170/322. PAULUS NICOLETTI VENETUS, SUMMA NATURALIUM. Italy (Rimini), 1421.

Note

Fig. 15
Physical Description: Paper ( Monts, similar to Briquet no.11685, 11687, 11699, all northeast Italy, s. XV 1/3; ff. 76-88, 97-98, Etoile, similar to Briquet no.6024, Augsburg 1423), ff. 145; 290 × 215 (200/205 × 140/145) mm. 1 12 2 14 3-6 12 7 12 (-1,+1) 8-11 1212 12(-12). Framed catchwords in the lower right-hand corner; leaves signed 1-6 lower right, usually cropped. 2 columns of 55/56 lines; frame ruled in pale ink. Written in a small semicursive gothic hand (littera notularis); ink varies from dark brown to greenish, 24-line initial in red on brown penwork, f. 1; 4- and 5-line initials in red usually on brown penwork; red paragraph marks; initials in the text slashed with red; running titles, on the recto only, in small brown minuscule. Notabilia in the margins and a few marginal corrections to the text by the copyist; sporadic marginalia by contemporary hands.
Physical Description: Bound in parchment on paper boards, s. XVI-XVII; on the spine in bold gothic, “F. Franciscus de Bolca:.”

Scope and Content Note

ff. 1-140v: [ Summa naturalium] Plurimorum astrictus precibus . . . [f. 25va] in 3° de anima igitur etc, Igitur sic est finis prime partis summule naturalium et sequitur 2 a scilicet de celo et mundo etc.; f. 26rb Finita prima parte in quo de motu . . . [f. 39vb] et leviora super graviora quare etc. Explicit 2 a pars summule naturalium scilicet de celo et mundo et sequitur 3 a que de generacione et corrupcione; f. 40 Tractaturus de generacione et corrupcione . . . [f. 55] correspondere una potentia etc. et sic est finis huius 3 e partis summule. Incipit 4 ia pars scilicet Methaurorum, Necesse est mundum hunc . . . [f. 74va] superflue continue habundantis supervenientis [canceled: quare etc. . . . ]. Explicit quarta pars summe naturalium acta per reverendum sacre theologie doctorem magistrum Paulum de Veneciis ordinis fratrum heremitarum sancti Augustini; f. 75 [Quinta pars] Quoniam scientia de anima . . . [f. 107] sint materiales sive immateriales etc. Sic est finis istius tractatus qui est quintus in summa naturalium acta per reverendum magistrum Paulum de Veneciis ordinis fratrum heremitarum sancti Augustini completum 1421 in die sancti Antonini [2 Sept.] Iohanne de Beylario etc. Yhesus Christus nostra salus quod reclamat omnis malus nobis sui memoriam dedit in panis hostiam. Mentem sanctam spontaneam honorare deo et prius etc. Ave maris Stella dei mater alma atque semper; f. 107rb [Sexta pars] Naturalium pars ultima difficultates methaphisicas . . . donare dignetur per infinita secula seculorum. Amen. Scriptum Arimini per me fratrem Iohannem de Beylario Colonie provincie in studio Ariminensi. Sub anno domini M° CCCC° XXI° ultima die decembris completum. Finito libra sit laus et gloria Christo. ff. 141-145v ruled but blank.
Paulus de Venetiis, Summa naturalium (Venice: Ioh. de Colonia, 1476); Hain 12515. For lists of surviving manuscripts see Zumkeller 739; C. H. Lohr, “Medieval Latin Aristotle Commentaries, Authors: Narcissus-Richardus,” Traditio 28 (1972) 314-320; and A. R. Perreiah, Paul of Venice: A Bibliographical Guide (Bowling Green, Ohio 1986) 45, 53.
Written in 1421 by Johannes de Beylario at Rimini in a studium, presumably Augustinian; he belonged to the Cologne Province, a designation appropriate to an Augustinian but not a Dominican or Franciscan; concerning the studia at Rimini sec C. Piana, Ricerche su le Università di Bologna e di Parma nel secolo XV (Florence 1963) 548. Johannes's German background is evident in the opening lines of each part, written in a larger book gothic (see esp. f. 1) and in the decoration of the initials. Belonged to Master Franciscus de Bolzano; f. 1 bottom, his name in late fifteenth-century blue capitals, and his coat of arms in a floral frame with gold balls: parted per fess or and vert, in chief an eagle's wing erased sable; Franciscus de Bolzano, a Franciscan, was professor of theology at Cremona in 1489; the facsimile of a colophon with this information, from a gradual that he commissioned for the Franciscans of Belluno, appears in Sotheby's catalog of 10 June 1963, p. 40, lot 151, T. De Marinis & Co. sale catalog (1911) p. 23, lot 71; to Federico Patetta (1867-1945), professor of law at Turin etc. and collector of manuscripts; f. 1 top, his signature and ex libris, “Federico Patetta, MS n° 130”; concerning Patetta see Enciclopedia italiana 26 (1935) 505, and App. 2.2 (1949) 509. Purchased by UCLA from John Howell Books, San Francisco, in 1963/64.

Note

Secundo folio: 2 a conclusio corpus naturale
 

170/323. INVENTORY OF A BISHOP'S LIBRARY in French. France (Cahors), 1589.

Physical Description: Paper ( Main, similar to Briquet no.10864), ff. 14; 250 × 180 (ca. 210 × various widths) mm. One gathering. 19/22 long lines. Written in a chancery hand. On f. 14v written vertically by a contemporary hand, “Inventaire des livres.” Manuscript is recently restored; edges of the leaves are torn and there are water stains, both damaging the text slightly.
Physical Description: Bound in marbled paper over cardboard, s. XX.

Scope and Content Note

ff. 1-13v: Et advenu le sixiesme [. . .] ensuyvant procedant par lesdits sieurs de Raymond et [. . .] chanoine a l'inventere des libres dudit seigneur evesque [selon] l'iniongtion faicte par ledit sieur Lecomte. A este treuve dan le cabinet dudit seigneur evesque, scavoir au premier rang du palpitre au second aix: Repetitiones Benedicti couvert de vert . . .; f. 13v Extrait a son original [signed] Caissac notaire. f. 14-r-v blank.
Notary's copy of the inventory of 483 books belonging to Antoine IV Ebrard de Saint-Sulpice, bishop of Cahors (1576-1600), impounded by troops of the Ligue in April 1589 while they occupied his palace. Edited from this manuscript by Nicole Marzac, The Library of a French Bishop in the Late XVIth Century (Paris 1974); see her introduction regarding the date and the identification of the bishop.
Written at Cahors in 1589. Purchased by UCLA from William Salloch, Ossining, New York, in 1963/64.

Note

A copy of this inventory is UCLA Negative Microfilm no.04255.
 

170/331. STEPHEN LANGTON, INTERPRETATIONES HEBRAICORUM NOMINUM. England or France, s. XIII med.

Physical Description: Parchment, ff. iii (modern; i is pastedown) + 70 + iii (modern; iii is pastedown); 160 × 110 (130 × 80) mm. 1-5 12 6 12(-11, -12). Plain horizontal catchwords. 2 columns of 38 lines; ruled in leadpoint, single bounding lines and double frame ruling in the upper and lower margins; pricking in the upper and lower margins, seldom visible in the outer margin which has been cropped by binding. Small current gothic bookhand (littera textualis); olive brown ink. 2-line initials in red and green, with tendrils in red or green penwork, at times ending in a human face; 1-line initials to each entry alternately red and green (ff. 1-34v) or pink and green (ff. 34v-70); on f. 12v alternately red and pink. On f. 26 the initial D in red or green has been mistakenly applied to the first 20 words that should begin with E, following mistaken marginal instructions; usually the erroneous colored D is written over the correct E in brown ink.
Physical Description: Bound in dark leather over wooden boards rebacked, with remains of two metal fore-edge clasps, probably s. XV; title: “Interpretationes bibliothecae” in gilt capitals.

Scope and Content Note

1) ff. 1-70: Aaz apprehendens vel apprehencio. Aaz testificans vel testimonium . . . Zusitidis consilium vel consiliatrix. Zusim consiliantes eos vel consiliatores eorum. Expliciunt interpretationes bibliotece [Stegmüller 7709].

Scope and Content Note

2) f. 70ra-rb: [ Prologus in Matthew] Matheus cum primo predicasset euuangelium in Iudea volens transire ad gentes primus euuangelium scripsit ebraice ... in leone regnum, in aquila exprimitur divinitatis sacramentum [Stegmüller 589]. Remainder of column and f. 70v blank.
Written in England or France in the mid-thirteenth century. Erased inscription on f. 70. Belonged to Thomas Tylston Greg, whose bookplate ca. 1880 appears on the front pastedown with the motto “Ein doe and spair not,” see W. Hamilton, Dated Book-Plates (Ex-libris), with a Treatise on Their Origin and Development (London 1895) 168. Belonged to the English bibliographer W. W. Greg (1875-1959) whose signature appears on f. 11, “W.W. Greg, Park Lodge, 1920,” and who left pencil notes on f. iii. For other manuscripts from his collection see Bond and Faye, Supplement, p.78, 100, 390; British Museum Catalogue of Additions to the Manuscripts, 1936-1945 part 1 (London 1970) 25 (Add. 44882-44884), 205-207 (Add. 45567-45573); and de la Mare, Lyell Cat., 287. Slips from two unidentified sale catalogs are pasted on f. 70v; one bears an annotation in W. W. Greg's hand, “G.H. Last. Jan. 1920.” Purchased by UCLA from Bernard Rosenthal in 1964.

Note

Secundo folio: Abinaam patris mei

Bibliography:

R.H. Rouse, “A Twelfth-Century Glossary,” UCLA Librarian vol.18 (1965) pp.63-64.
 

170/348. BIBLE, with prologues and additions. Spain, s. XIII med.

Note

Fig. 13
Physical Description: Parchment, ff. i + 387 + i; 175 × 120 (122 × 77) mm. i 2(pastedown + flyleaf, numbered f. 1) 1-21 16 22 18(-18b) 23 16 24 16(+1) ii 2 (back flyleaf, numbered f. 387 + pastedown; foliation includes f. 113bis and the halfsheet f. 354bis). No catchwords; quires 23 and 24 signed xxiii, xxiiii in leadpoint. 2 columns (ff. 355-383v 3 columns) of 52 lines; ruled in leadpoint, with double lines in the upper margin for running titles. Written in a small skilled calligraphic gothic bookhand (littera textualis); ink varies from dark brown to olive brown. The additions are principally in a smaller and more current littera textualis, in 3 columns: ff. 1r-v/387r-v, of 67/77 lines, probably an English hand; ff. 383v-386v, 71 lines, ruled in leadpoint; and f. 386vb-vc, in a littera textualis formata, ca. 60 lines. On f. 4 (Genesis), a 28-line historiated initial, with Christ in majesty, and with floral and zoomorphic patterns on pink and blue backgrounds, extending to the upper and lower margins; on f. 161v (Psalms), a 10-line initial in blue highlighted in white on an ocher background, inhabited by seated David playing the harp; on f. 260v (Amos), a 9-line initial in blue highlighted in white on an ocher background, inhabited by a fantastic bird on floral patterns; initials of books, ranging from 7-line to 20-line, in red and blue, or blue only, on red and blue penwork with marginal extensions, at times with white zoomorphic motifs, at times on an ocher background; 2-line chapter initials alternately red and blue on blue and red penwork; titles in red minuscule; marginal chapter numbers in red and blue (in the chapter division attributed to Stephen Langton); running titles in gothic majuscule alternately red and blue. Many marginal cross-references by the hand of ff. 1r-v, 387r-v, which always indicates biblical texts by book, chapter, and a-g subdivision; the same hand wrote Dominicale, Dominicalis in the margins of the New Testament to mark the beginning of the readings for Sunday masses; sporadic marginalia by other readers; on the front pastedown, a list of Old Testament canticles in a thirteenth- or fourteenth-century English semi-cursive gothic hand, a list of the books of the Bible in a thirteenth-century English chancery hand. Many of the leaves are water-stained.
Physical Description: Rebound; remains of fifteenth-century blind stamped leather laid down over wooden boards; traces of chain- or clasp-marks, front top and bottom center.

Scope and Content Note

1) f. 1r-v: List of epistle and gospel lections of the temporale, use of Rome, In quattuor temporibus (?) dicitur feria IIII. Ysa. ii.a. Erit in novissimis fi. dei nostri . . . [ Sabbato post Dom. XIX post Pentec.: Luc.] xiii.b. Arborem fisci fi. ab eo. [Added by a small contemporary semi-cursive gothic hand; the text is continued on f. 387r-v.].

Scope and Content Note

2) ff. 2-286: Old Testament, ff. 2-3v Epistola s. Ieronimi presbiteri ad Paulinum presbiterum de omnibus divine historic libris [Stegmüller 284]; ff. 3v-4 Prologus s. Ieronimi in libro Genesis [Stegmüller 285]; ff. 4-17v Liber Genesis qui dicitur hebrayce Bresith [Stegmüller 1 ]; ff. 17v-29v Liber Exodi [Stegmüller 2]; ff. 29v-37v Liber Uaietra quod nos Leviticum dicimus [Stegmüller 3]; ff. 37v-49v Liber Numeri [Stegmüller 4]; ff. 49v-60 Liber Deuteronomii [Stegmüller 5]; f. 60 Prefatio Ihesu Nave [Stegmüller 311]; ff. 60-67 Liber Iosue [Stegmüller 6]; ff. 67-74v Liber Iudicum [Stegmüller 7]; ff. 74v-75v Liber Ruth [Stegmüller 8]; ff. 75v-76 Prefatio in libro Regum [Stegmüller 323]; ff. 76-85 Liber Regum primus [Stegmüller 9]; ff. 85-93v Liber Regum secundus [Stegmüller 10]; ff. 93v-103v Malachim I, Regum liber tercius [Stegmüller 11]; ff. 103v-112 Liber Regum quartus [Stegmüller 12]; f. 112r-v Heli sacerdos iudicavit Israel annis XL, Samuel propheta iudicavit Israel annis XL, Saul rex regnavit super Israel annis XL . . . Heliachim qui et Ioachim annis XI, Ioachim filius eius regnavit in Iherusalem tribus mensibus et decem diebus, Sedecias frater eius regnavit in Iherusalem annis XI [cf. Stegmüller 317]; f. 112v Prologus Iheronimi in Paralipomenon, Paralipomenon liber instrumenti veteris . . . innumerabilies explicantur evangelii questiones. Paralipomenon ergo dicitur quod nos pretermissorum vel reliquorum dicere possumus . . . summatim ac breviter explicantur [Stegmüller 326 + ?]; f. 112v Prologus in libro Paralipomenon secundo [Stegmüller 327]; ff. 112v-113 Prologus in libro Paralipomenon [Stegmüller 328]; ff. 113-120v Liber Paralipomenon [primus] [Stegmüller 13]; ff. 120v-130v Liber Paralipomenon secundus, with Oratio Manasse [Stegmüller 14 + 93.2]; f. 130v Prologus in libro Hesdre. [Stegmüller 330]; ff. 130v-133v Liber Hesdre primus [Stegmüller 15]; ff. 133v-137v Liber Neemie prophete [Stegmüller 16]; ff. 137v-142 Liber Hesdre secundus [III Esdr., apocr.: Stegmüller 94.1]; f. 142r-v [ IV Esdr. 1-2] Liber Esdre prophete secundus filii Sarei . . .mirabilia domini Dei vidisti [Stegmüuller 96]; f. 142v Prologus in libro Thobie [Stegmüller 332]; ff. 142v-145v Liber Thobie [Stegmüller 17]; f. 145v Prologus in libro Iudith [Stegmüller 335]; ff. 145v-149 Liber Iudith [Stegmüller 18]; f. 149 Prologus in librum Hester [Stegmüller 341 + 343]; f. 149 Item alivs prologus [Stegmüller 337]; ff. 149-152v Liber Hester [Stegmüller 19]; ff. 152v-153 Prologus in libro Iob Ieronimi presbiteri [Stegmüller 344]; f. 153 Item alius prologus [Stegmüller 357]; ff. 153-160 Liber Iab [Stegmüller 20]; ff. 160-161v Prologus super Psalterium [Peter Lombard, PL 191.55-62); ff. 161v-178 Liber Ymnorum vel soliloquiorum prophete David [Stegmüller 21]; f. 178r-v Prologus in Parabolis Salomonis [Stegmüller 457]; ff. 178v-184 Liber Proverbiorum [Stegmüller 22]; f. 184r-v Prologus in libro Ecclesiastes [Stegmüller 462]; ff. 184v-186v Liber Ecclesiastes [Stegmüller 23]; ff. 186v-187v Cantica canticorum, quod hebrayce dicitur Sirasirim, que sunt meliora meliorum. Vox iudaice multitudinis ante dispersionem converse ab apostolos ad ipsos apostolos loquentis [Stegmüller 24]; f. 187v Prologus in librum Sapientie [Stegmüller 468]; ff. 187v-192 Liber Sapientie [Stegmüller 25]; ff. 192-203 Prologus libri Ihesu filii Sirach and Liber Ecclesiasticus [Stegmüller 26]; f. 203r-v Prologus s. Iheronimi in Ysaiam prophetam [Stegmüller 482]; f. 203v [ Prologus in Is] Isayas filius Amos . . . mole ostructa terre exposue[rat] [Isidore De ortu et obitu patrum 37.69-72, PL 83.141-142]; ff. 203v-217 Liber Ysaye prophete [Stegmüller 27]; f. 217 Prologus in librum Iheremie prophete [Stegmüller 487]; f. 217 [ Prologus in Ier], Iheremias propheta excelsus simplex in loquendo et ad intelligendum . . . postquam eversam Iherusalem in Egipto cum populo fuit; f. 217 [ Prologus in ler.], Iheremias ex tribu sacerdotali ortus . . . insigni cuhu hactenus venerantur [Isidore De ortu 38.73-74, PL 83.142-143]; ff. 217-232v Liber Iheremie prophete [Stegmüller 28]; ff. 232v-234 Lamentatio Iheremie prophete quod est in titulo Timoth cum absolutione literarum ebrearum and Oratio Iheremie prophete [Stegmüller 29]; f. 234 Prologus in libra Baruch [Stegmüller 491]; ff. 234-236 Liber Baruch [Stegmüller 30]; f. 236 Prologus in librum Ezechiel prophete [Stegmüller 492]; f. 236r-v [ Prologus in Ezech.], Ezechiel qui in latinum vertitur fortitudo Dei . . . prophetavit ibique vaticinium conservavit; f. 236v Prologus in librum Ezechiel prophete [Isidore De ortu 39.75, PL 83.143]; ff. 236v-250v Liber Ezechielis prophete [Stegmüller 31]; ff. 250v-251 Prologus in librum Danielis prophete [Stegmüller 494]; f. 251 Item alius prologus, Daniel qui interpretatur iudicium Dei qui etiam de Christo . . . Daniel in Babilonem quando et Ezechiel; f. 251 Item alius prologus [Isidore De ortu 40.76-78, PL 83.143-144]; ff. 251-257 Liber Daniel prophete, . . et devorati sunt in momento coram eo [Dan, 14.41; Stegmüller 32]; ff. 257 Prologus Osee prophete [Stegmüller 500]; f. 257r-v Item alius prologus [Stegmüller 507]; ff. 257v-259v Liber Osee prophete [Stegmüller 33]; f. 259v Prologus in libra Iohel prophete [Stegmüller 511];f. 259v Item alius prologus, Ioel propheta qui interpretatur incipiens iste ad Iudam tantum . . . Ioathan rege Iudae quando et Micheas; f. 259v Item alius prologus, Iohel filius Phatuel de tribu Ruben natus in agro Betheron describit terram . . . scienciam Dei habuerit apertam recte incipit prophetare [Stegmüller 509 + 510]; ff. 259v-260v Liber Ioel prophete [Stegmüller 34] f. 260v Prologus Amos prophete [Stegmüller 515]; f. 260v Item alius prologus, Amos qui interpretatur honus vaticinavit in Samaria . . . sub rege Ozia eo tempore quo Osee vel Ysaias; f. 260v Item alius prologus [Stegmüller 512 + Isidore De ortu 43.81-82, PL 83.144]; ff. 260v-252 Liber Amos prophete [Stegmüller 35]; f. 262 Prologus Abdie prophete [Stegmüller 519 + 517]; f. 262 [ Prologus in Abd.], Abdias idem servus domini inter omnes prophetas brevior . . . regem Iude quando et Micheas; f. 262r-v [ Prologus in Abd.; Stegmüller 518]; f. 262v Abdias propheta [Stegmüller 36]; f. 262v Prologus Ione prophete [Stegmüller 524]; f. 262v Item alius prologus, Ionas qui interpretatur columba tam sermone quam naufragio . . . et Osee et Amos et Ysaias prophetaverunt; ff. 262v-263 Item alius prologus [Stegmüller 522]; f. 263 Item alius prologus [Stegmüller 521]; f. 263r-v Ionas propheta [Stegmüller 37]; f. 263v Prologus Michee [Stegmüller 526 + 525]; 263v [ Prologus in Mich.], Micheas propheta contaminatur Samarie terram domini . . . et sub Ioathan quando et Ezechias; ff. 263v-264v Micheas propheta [Stegmüller 38]; ff. 264v-265 Prologus in librum Naum prophete [Stegmüller 528]; f. 265 [ Prologus in Naum], Naum qui est consolator simulacra gentium . . . idest salvatoris adventum proclamat; f. 265r-v Liber Naum prophete [Stegmüller 39]; f. 265v Prologus in libro Abachuc prophete [Stegmüller 531]; f. 265v Item alius prologus, Abachuc amplexans sive luctator . . . adventum et passionum salvatoris; ff. 265v-266v Abachuc propheta [Stegmüller 40]; f, 266v Prologus Sophonie prophete [Stegmüller 534]; f. 266v Item alius prologus, Sophonias speculator misteriorum domini . . . prophetavit sub Iosiam quando et Iheremias; f. 266v Item alius prologus [Stegmüller 532 + Isidore De ortu 49.89, PL 83.145]; ff. 266v-267 Sophonias propheta [Stegmüller 41]; f. 267r-v Prologus Aggei prophete [Stegmüller 538]; f. 267v Item alius prologus, Aegeus [ sic] qui interpretatur sollepnis hic in vaticinii sui textu . . . Zachariam suo vaticinio precedens. Natus est ipse Aggeus in Babilonia . . . gloriose sepultus quiescit [? + Stegmüller 537]; ff. 267v-268 Liber Aggeu prophete [Stegmüller 42]; f. 268 Prologus Zacharie prophete [Stegmüller 539]; f. 268 Item alius prologus, Zacharias qui nominatur memoria domini postquam . . . desolationis templi et captivitatis populi; ff. 268-270v Zacharias propheta [Stegmüller 43]; f. 270v Prologus in librum Malachie prophete [Stegmüller 543]; f. 270v Item alius prologus, Malachias propheta qui interpretatur angelus domini in principio vaticinii ... in Babilone quando Aggeus et Zacharias; f. 270v Item alius prologus [Stegmüller 544 + 546, with variations]; ff. 270v-271v Liber Malachie prophete [Stegmüller 44]; f. 271v [ Prologus in Machab] [Stegmüller 552]; ff. 271v-280 Liber Machabeorum primus [Stegmüller 45]; ff. 280-286 Liber Machabeorum secundus [Stegmüller 46].

Scope and Content Note

3) ff. 286-354 bis: New Testament, f. 286 Prologus primus super Matheum [Stegmüller 589]; f. 286r-v Secundus prologus super Matheum [Stegmüller 590]; ff. 286v-295 Matheus evangelista [Stegmüller 47]; f. 295 Prologus Marchi evangeliste [Stegmüller 607]; ff. 295-300v Liber Marchi evangeliste [Stegmüller 48]; f. 300v Prologus in libro Luce evangeliste [Stegmüller 620]; ff. 300v-309v [ Luc.], Quoniam quidem multi . . . eruditus es veritate. Incipit liber Luce evangeliste Fuit in diebus Herodis . . , [Stegmüller 49]; f. 310 Prologus Iohannis evangeliste [Stegmüller 624]; ff. 310-317 Liber Iohannis evangeliste [Stegmüller 50]; f. 317 [ Prologus in Pauli ep. ad Rom.; Stegmüller 670]; f. 317r-v Prefatio s. Iheronimi, Primum quidem intelligere nos oportet quibus aut qualibet . . . scripsisse, maxime cum nobis in his precepta et exempla videndi plenissime sint digesta. Sed initio nascentis ecclesie novis causis existentibus etiam post Romanis qui ex Iudeis et gentibus ... ad pacem et concordiam cohortatur [? + Stegmüller 674]; f. 317v Argumentum [Stegmüller 677 + 664]; ff. 317v-321 Epistola Pauli apostoli ad Romanos [Stegmüller 52]; f. 32] Argumentum Ieronimi [ in I Cor.; Stegmüller 685]; ff. 321-324 Epistola prima ad Corinthios [Stegmüller 53]; f. 324 Argumentum [ in II Cor.; Stegmüller 699]; ff. 324-326v Epistola secunda ad Chorintios [Stegmüller 54]; f. 326v Argumentum [ in Gal.; Stegmüller 707]; ff. 326v-327v Epistola ad Galathas [Stegmüller 55]; f. 327v Argumentum [in Ephes; Stegmüller 715]; if. 327v-329 Epistola ad Ephesios [Stegmüller 56]; f. 329 Argumentum [in Philipp.; Stegmüller 728]; f. 329r-v Epistola ad Philippenses [Stegmüller 57]; ff. 329v-330 Argumentum [in Col.; Stegmüller 736]; f. 330r-v Epistola ad Colossenses [Stegmüller 58]; f. 330v Argumentum [in I Thess.; Stegmüller 747]; ff. 330v-331v Epistola prima ad Thessalonicenses [Stegmüller 59]; f. 331v Argumentum [in II Thess.; Stegmüller 752]; ff. 331v-332 Epistola secunda ad Thessalonicenses [Stegmüller 60]; f. 332 Argumentum [in I Tim.; Stegmüller 765]; ff. 332-333 Epistola I a ad Timotheum [Stegmüller 61]; f. 333 Item prologus [in II Tim., Stegmüller 772]; f. 333r-v Epistola II ad Timotheum [Stegmüller 62]; f. 333v Argumentum [in Tit.; Stegmüller 780]; ff. 333v-334 Epistola ad Titum [Stegmüller 63]; f. 334 Argumentum [in Philem., Stegmüller 783]; f. 334 Epistola ad Philo [sic, for Philemonem , Stegmüller 64]; f. 334 Prologus in epistola ad Hebreos [Stegmüller 793]; ff. 334-337 Epistola ad Hebreos [Stegmüller 65]; f. 337 Prologus in Actibus apostolorum [Stegmüller 640]; f. 337 Item alius prologus [Stegmüller 639]; ff. 337-346 Liber Actuum apostolorum [Stegmüller 51]; f. 346 [ Prologus in VII epist. canon.; Stegmüller 807, with variants]; f. 346 Prologus in Epistola Iacobi [Stegmüller 809 + 806]; ff. 346-347 Epistola Iacobi apostoli [Stegmüller 66]; f. 347 Prologus [in I Petr; Stegmüller 815]; ff. 347-348 Epistola prima Petri [Stegmüller 67]; f. 348 Prologus [in II Petr; Stegmüller 818]; f. 348r-v Epistola II Petri [Stegmüller 68]; f. 348v Prologus [in I Ioh.; Stegmüller 822]; ff. 348v-349v Epistola prima Iohannis [Stegmüller 69]; f. 349v Prologus [in II Ioh.; Stegmüller 823]; ff. 349v-350 Epistola secunda Iohannis [Stegmüller 70]; f. 350 Prologus [in III Ioh.; Stegmüller 824]; f. 350 Epistola III Iohannis [Stegmüller 71]; f. 350 Prologus [in Iudae; Stegmüller 825]; f. 350 Epistola Iude [Stegmüller 72]; f. 350r-v Prologus in libro Apocalipsis [Stegmüller 839]; ff. 350v-354bis Liber Apocalipsis [Stegmüller 73]; f. 354bis v blank; the outer column, excised, was probably blank.

Scope and Content Note

4) ff. 355-383v: [Stephen Langton, Interpretationes hebraicorum nominum] Aaz apprehendens vel apprehensio. Aad testificans vel testimonium . . . Zusithidis consilium vel consiliatrix. Zuzym consiliantes eos vel consiliatores eorum. Expliciunt interpretationes [Stegmüller 7709].

Scope and Content Note

5) ff. 383v-386v: [ Summa contra hereticos et manicheos de articulis et sacramentis ecclesie, pts. 1 and 2, added by a thirteenth-century gothic bookhand] I° quod pater et filius et spiritus sanctus una substancia et unus Deus . . . f. 385 Incipit campilatio auctoritatum de sacramentis ecclesie contra hereticos manicheos . . . Explicit summa breviata contra manicheos paterinos et contra passaginos et circumcisos et contra multos alios hereticos qui nituntur subvertere veritatem quorum dampnatio iam olim non cessat et eorum perditio non dormitat de qua dampnatione ille custodiat suos qui ad dexteram maiestatis residet in excelsis super novem ordines angelorum [concluding with 19 additional topics ff. 385v-386v:] Probatio quod unus est Deus ... sic nos existimet homo ut ministros Christi.
Concerning this work see Laura Light, “The New Thirteenth-Century Bible and the Challenge of Heresy,” Viator 18 (1987) 275-288; excerpts and a list of manuscripts, 287.

Scope and Content Note

6) f. 386v: [List of epistle and gospel lections of the temporale for feasts only] Dominica I a in adventu. Ro. xii [= xiii]. Scientes quia. Matthew xxi. Cum appropinquasset Ihesus . . . Dominica XXIIII [post oct. Pentec.] Colo. i. Non cessamus pro vobis. Matthew ix. Loquente Ihesus ad turbas. Dominica XXV, Ier. xxiii [.b. , added]. Ecce dies ve(nit). Ioh. vi [.b., added]. Cum sublevasset oculos [added by a graceful thirteenth-century gothic bookhand].
The readings agree with the Roman use, except the first reading for the last Sunday of the year; on the back pastedown a nineteenth- or twentieth-century hand notes: “The lectionary on the last leaf but one does not agree with Rome or Paris, but was common elsewhere both in France and England.”

Scope and Content Note

7) f. 387r-v: [Following from f. 1v, a list of epistle and gospel lections for the sanctorale] In vigilia sancti Andree apostoli. Eccli. xliiii.g. Benediccio Dei . . . [In natale unius virginis] Matthew xxv.a. Simili est regnum celorum fi. neque horam [added by the hand of f. 1r-v].
Written in Spain in the middle of the thirteenth century. In the possession of a Dominican convent or friar before the end of the century; front pastedown top, half cropped, “. . . -ia ordinis predicatorum.” In England before the fourteenth century; English hands on ff. 1r-v, 387r-v, front pastedown. On f. 386 lower margin, erased note of accounts in fourteenth-century anglicana, “... sol[idos] . . . sol[idos] . . . Ego frater . . . sororem . . . sorores. ...” On f. 1v top, an erased note. Paper label “11” on the spine. Belonged to Isaac Foot; his bookplate, f. 1v. Came to UCLA with the Foot Collection (see above, p.39) in 1960.

Note

Secundo folio: plagis est decalogo
 

170/358. MARCO BONINO, SKETCHBOOK OF ENGINES; MISCELLANY. North Italy; France, s. XVI 2, s. XVII 2.

Note

Fig. 32
 

Part I.

Scope and Content Note

1) ff. 1-57: An engineer's sketchbook signed by Marco Bonino (”di Marco Bonino,” f.1) in the hand that writes the captions in Italian. ff. 1-2v, machines related to water—water-powered machines, boats and boat gear, water-lifting machines, canal blockades, floating bridges, machines for dredging canals; ff. 3-7v, weight-moving machines and construction equipment, bellows, perpetual motion machines; ff. 7v-8v, military devices; ff. 9-12v, architectural studies; f. 13 blank; ff. 13v-19v, cars, pulverizers, bell-ringing device, column-lifters and weight-moving machines; f. 20r-v, bellows; ff. 21-26v, construction equipment, clay scoops, anchor for the base of a crane, pile-drivers; ff. 26v-27, climbing devices; ff. 27v-29, flotation devices, bailers, water wheels; ff. 29v-30v, windmills, clockwork, grappling hooks; ff. 31-32, fasteners for binding ropes together, ladder erectors, a rotisserie turned by heat rising from its fire; ff. 32v-51, water- and man-powered mills, pumps, pistons, gears; ff. 51-57, machines relating to water and military devices: floating canal blockades, retrieval baskets, devices for sinking enemy ships, boats with covers to protect rowers, ff. 57v-58 blank.
About 400 engineering drawings, adapted or copied from various sources, particularly from the fifteenth-century Italian engineers Francesco di Giorgio Martini (1439-1501) and Mariano Taccola (1381-1458?). Some drawings, or elements of drawings, have no known source and may originate with Bonino; these include the water-pump details on ff. 42v-43v, and the clockwork on f. 29v which incorporates a loosely coiled spring. An extensive typewritten report on the manuscript, written by Silvio A. Bedini, is available in the Department of Special Collections.

Scope and Content Note

2) f. 58v: Archimedean screw water-lift, and hasp with padlock, signed by a French hand and dated 1612; this has been added on the blank verso of the last folio in Bonino's manuscript.
 

Part II.

Scope and Content Note

f. 59 blank.

Scope and Content Note

3) ff. 59v-60: Sketches of plumbing, valves, and geared wheels, watercolored in blue, with captions in French, f. 60v blank.

Scope and Content Note

4) f. 60 bis r-v, a loose leaf of only half width: Sketch of a cannon, with description and explanation in French, in the hand of F. de Vegnauld (cf. f. 62); this is a formal rendering of the rough sketch on f. 61.

Scope and Content Note

5) f. 61: Hasty sketch, with brief notes in rapid cursive, for the formal drawing on f. 60 bis f. 61v blank.

Scope and Content Note

6) f. 62: Trompette pour se parler de 1/2 ligue[?] inventée par Mr. Morland Anglois, [signed] F. de Vegnauld fecit. 30 a Ianuarii anni MDCLXXIII [same hand as f. 60 bis, etc.], f. 62v blank.
A detailed drawing of the speaking trumpet invented in 1670 by Samuel Morland, Master Mechanic to King Charles II. F. de Vegnauld's notes record that he himself had experimented with a similar device in 1672.

Scope and Content Note

7) f. 63: A mechanized chariot or cart sketched in crayon; f. 63v blank; an inserted foldout.

Scope and Content Note

8) ff. 64-66: Machinery sketched in ink. f. 66v blank, ff. 65-66 are inserted foldouts.

Scope and Content Note

9) f. 67: An inserted engraving of a bell-ringing mechanism; f. 67v, dedication to Fr. Pierre Rossilhe, rector of the Jesuit College at Tournon 1591-1596 and 1600-1605.

Scope and Content Note

10) ff. 69 and 70: Late sixteenth-century Italian engineering drawings, in black ink on brownish paper, captions (in the same hand) in Latin and Italian respectively, pasted on the folios, ff. 69v and 70v blank.

Scope and Content Note

11) ff. 70v-71: Sketch in ink of a pump, accompanied by an extensive French text in the hand of F. de Vegnauld, “Aoust 1680. Pompe nouvelle. . . .” ff. 71v-83v blank.
Pt. 1 was written in the late sixteenth century in northern Italy, as the language suggests, by Marco Bonino. In France by 1612; note on f. 58v. Pt. 2 was compiled in the late seventeenth century by F. de Vegnauld, who combined the two parts and had them bound; the front flyleaves belong to the same batch of paper on which de Vegnauld wrote. Purchased by UCLA from H.P. Kraus, New York, in 1964.

Bibliography:

L. Reti, “The Double-Acting Principle in East and West,” Technology and Culture vol.11 (1970) pp.193-194, with pictures off. 20r-v.
UCLA Librarian vol.26 (1973) pp.7-8, with pictures.

Note

A copy of this book is UCLA Negative Microfilm no.02342.
 

*170/380. REPORTS OF VENETIAN AMBASSADORS 1558-1570, CONCLAVES 1590 AND 1623. Italy, s. XVI/XVII and XVII 1.

 

Part 1.

Scope and Content Note

1) ff. 1-33: Relatione del clarissimo messer Michel Soriano ritornato ambasciatore da Filippo Re di Spagna l'anno 1560, Serenissimo Principe, Padri e Signori eccelentissimi, l'opinione universale et provato con esperienza . . . , con altro che con la gratia della Serenità vostra e delle Signorie vostre eccellentissime. II fine. f. 33v blank.
E. Alberi, ed., Le relazioni degli ambasciatori veneti al Senato duranle il secolo decimosesto ser.1, vol.3 (Florence, 1853) pp.333-90.

Scope and Content Note

2) ff. 34-62v: Relatione del clarissimo messer Bernardo Navagero che fu poi cardinale alla Republica sua di Venetia tornando di Roma ambasciatore a Papa Paolo IIII l'anno 1558 , Ho imparato, Serenissimo Principe, nelle legationi . . . che io non accetti allegramente. II fine.
Alberi, Le relazioni . . . ser.2, vol.3 (Florence, 1856) pp.369-416.

Scope and Content Note

3) ff. 63v-96: Relatione del clarissimo messer Giovan Cornero tornato ambasciatore dal Re di Francia l'anno MDLXX, Ho veduto il regno di Francia . . . ma affettuosa et sincera servitù mia. II fine.
Cf. N. Tommaseo. Relations des ambassadeurs vénitiens sur les affaires de France au XVIe siècle 2 (Paris, 1838).

Scope and Content Note

4) ff. 97-138: Conclave di Papa Gregorio XIIII nel quale si racconta destintamente tutte l'attioni che sono in esso occorse nell'anno 1590, Giusto desiderio veramente et laudabil' curiosità èquella che V. S. mostra d'haver particolar' ragguaglio . . . il discorso e la prudenza civile. II fine. ff. 138v-140v blank.
 

Part 2.

Scope and Content Note

5) ff. 141-146v: [Faculties and duties of the nuncio in Naples] II Nuntio di Napoli ha titolo di Nuntio . . . all'arcivescovo che obedisca.
 

Part 3.

Physical Description: 3 parts together by the seventeenth century: Paper, ff. i + 199; 270 × 195 mm. Gatherings of mostly 10 leaves in part 1; catchwords at the bottom verso of each folio in pts. 1-3. ca.25 long lines; unruled. Written by several professional Italian cursive hands.
Physical Description: Bound in limp cardboard backed in parchment, s. XVII.

Scope and Content Note

6) ff. 147-189: [Conclave for the election of Urban VIII] Fatte secondo l'antica consuetudine l'essequie al morto pontefice Gregorio XV li cardinali la mattina 19 luglio 1623 . . . de privati interessi e dissentioni. ff. 189v-199v blank.
Written in Italy, part 1 after 1590 possibly in Venice, pts. 2 and 3 (after 1623) early in the seventeenth century. Purchased by UCLA from B. Rosenthal in New York in 1964.
 

170/382. JACOBUS DE VORAGINE, SERMONES DE TEMPORE, with additions. Italy, s. XIV 2.

Physical Description: Parchment, ff. i (modern) + 391 (foliated 1-388, with 45 bis, 213 bis, 301 bis, ) + i (modern); 148 × 105 (93 × 68; fols. 381-387, 100 × 68) mm. 1-3 12 4 12+1 5-9 1210 8 11-18 12 19 4 20-31 12 32 10 34 8. Plain horizontal catchwords in the center of the lower margin. 2 columns of 31 lines (fols. 381-387, 26/34 lines); ruled in lead, double bounding lines. Written in a small round Italian gothic bookhand (littera textualis); ink varies from grayish brown to greenish. On f. 1, a 2-line illuminated pink and blue initial with a border of pink and blue stylized floral patterns in the inner and part of the upper and lower margins; 2-line initials alternately red on blue penwork and blue on red; initials sometimes slashed with red; paragraph marks alternately red and blue; titles in red minuscule, inconsistent in numbering the Sundays of the liturgical year. The sermons on the Transfiguration that fill the last 2½ columns of quire 33 and the added quire 34 (ff. 380rb-387v) are a slightly later addition in a rounded script that expands letters more in width than in height; minims show a tendency to be broken; the a is flat-topped and squarish; the tironian 7 appears both crossed and uncrossed; top and bottom lines show long ascenders and descenders with chancery flourishes slashed with red; strong French influence is seen in the red and blue penwork extending from top to bottom margin, esp. ff. 383v, 386v, 387v. Many marginal notes throughout the codex by three or more contemporary or slightly later cursive gothic hands, one of which has carefully corrected the text.
Physical Description: Bound in wooden boards backed in leather with diagonal rules and traces of two clasps, s. XIX.

Scope and Content Note

1) ff. 1-116v: Incipiunt sermones dominicales de evangelio per totum annum editi a fratre Iacoba de Veragine [sic] ordinis fratrum predicatorum archiepiscopo Ianuensi ; ff. 1 -3v Dominica prima de adventu [Schneyer no.2]; ff. 3v-6 De eadem [= dom. 2; Schneyer no.5]; ff. 6-8 Dominica secunda [= tertia] de adventu [Schneyer no.8]; ff. 8-10 Dominica 3 [= 4] de adventu [Schneyer no.11]; ff. 10-11 Dominica 4 de adventu, Anno quinto decimo etc. Luc. 3. [1]. Volens ostendere qui recipiant verbum allocutionis interne describit hic tres differentias hominum . . Ps. ecce elongavi fugiens etc.; ff. 11-13 De eadem, Factum est verbum domini super loannem Zacharie filium in deserto [Luc. 3.2], Describens evangelista initia nascentis ecclesie ponit quattuor scilicet: causam principaliter operantem, personam, locum et actum . . . Baruch 4. Delicati mei ambulaverunt vias asperas; ff. 13-15 De eadem, Videbit omnis caro salutare Dei. Luc. 3. [6]. Verbum istud est evangelicum quia in evangelio scriptum est et propheticum quia de propheta Ys. 40 sumptum. In quo pronuntiatur salvatoris adventus . . . vel triumphus, vel regnum, vel iudicium, vel reversio. Rogamus Deum etc.; ff. 15-17 Dominica infra octavam natalis Domini [Schneyer no.14]; ff. 17-19 Dominica infra octavam epyphanie [Schneyer no.17]; ff. 19-21 Dominica 2 4 post epyphaniam [Schneyer no.20]; ff. 21-23v Dominica 3 post epyphaniam [Schneyer no.23]; ff. 23v-24 Dominica 4 post epyphaniam, Ascendente Ihesu in naviculam secuti sunt eum discipuli eius. Matthew 8. [23]. Sepe contingit quod [ interlin, quando] quis penitentiam inchoat temptatio eum pulsat . . . voce corvina quia noluerunt [ signe de renvoi, contemporary marginal note: “hunc sermonem completum require in fine libri istius scilicet 379” (= f. 378v); Schneyer no.26]; ff. 24-26 Sermo secundus [title and first lines added in the lower margin, continues in the body; Schneyer no.27]; ff. 26-28v Dominica V a post epyphaniam [Schneyer no.29]; ff. 28v-31 Dominica in septuagesima, . . . quod sic murmurent taliter respondetur eis [beginning like Schneyer no.32]; ff. 31-33v Dominica in sexagesima [Schneyer no.35]; ff. 33v-36v Dominica in quinquagesima [Schneyer no.38]; ff. 36vb-39 Dominica in octava pasche [Schneyer no.62]; ff. 39-42 Dominica 2 a post resurrectionem [Schneyer no.65]; ff. 42-44v Dominica 3 a post pentecosten [= resurrectionem], ... a societate fastidium quia sicientes saciabuntur et satiati sitiemus [beginning like Schneyer 68]; ff. 44v-45 bisv Dominica 4 a post resurrectionem [Schneyer no.71; the text on the added f. 45r-v is marked for insertion at f. 45 bis rb]; ff. 45 bis v-48v Dominica V a post resurrectionem [Schneyer no.74]; ff. 48v-51 Dominica infra octavam ascensionis [Schneyer no.77]; ff. 51-53v In pentecosten [Schneyer no.80]; ff. 53v-56 Dominica in trinitate [Schneyer no.83]; ff. 56-59 Dominica prima post pentecosten [Schneyer no.86]; ff. 59-62 Dominica 2 a post pentecosten [Schneyer no.89]; ff. 62-64v Dominica 3 a post pentecosten [Schneyer no.92]; ff. 64v-67v Dominica prima [= quarta] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.95]; ff. 67v-69v Dominica 4 [= 5] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.98], ff. 69v-71v Dominica V[= VI] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.101 ]; ff. 71v-74 Dominica 6 [= 7] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.104]; ff. 74-76v Dominica 7 [= 8] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.107]; ff. 76v-78 Dominica 8 [= 9] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.110]; ff. 78-80v Dominica 9 [= 10] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.113]; ff. 80v-82v Dominica X [= XI ] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.116]; ff. 82v-85 Dominica 11 [= 12] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.119]; ff. 85-87 Dominica 12 [= 13] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.122]; ff. 87-89v Dominica 13 [= 14] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.125]; ff. 89v-92 Dominica 14 [= 15] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.128]; ff. 92-95 Dominica 15 [= 16] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.131]; ff. 95-97v Dominica 16 [= 17] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.134]; ff. 97v-99v Dominica 17 [= 18] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.137]; ff. 99v-102 Dominica 18 [= 19] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.140]; ff. 102-104v Dominica 19 [= 20] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.143]; ff. 104v-107 Dominica 20 [= 21] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.146]; ff. 107-109v Dominica XXI [= XXII] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.149]; ff. 109v-112 Dominica 22 [= 23] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.152]; ff. 112-114v Dominica 23 [= 24] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.155]; ff. 114v-116v Dominica 5 in quadragesima [= 25 post pentecosten, Schneyer no.158].

Scope and Content Note

2) ff. 117-215v [A second annual cycle]; ff. 117-118v Dominica prima de adventu [Schneyer no.3]; ff. 118v-120v Dominica prima [= secunda] de adventu [Schneyer no.6]; ff. 120v-122v Dominica 2 [= 3] de adventu [Schneyer no.9]; ff. 122-124 [guide letters i.m., Dominica 3 a ( = 4 a) de adventu ; Schneyer no.12]; ff. 124-125v Dominica infra octavam nativitatis [Schneyer no.15]; ff. 125v-127v Dominica infra octavam epyphanie [Schneyer no.18]; ff. 127v-129 Dominica prima octava epyphanie [= secunda post epiphaniam; Schneyer no.21]; ff. 129-131 Dominica 2 a [= 3 a] post epyfaniam [Schneyer no.24]; ff. 131-133 Dominica 3 [= 4] post epyphaniam [Schneyer no.28]; ff. 133-135v Dominica 4 [= 5] post octavam epyphanie. [Schneyer no.30]; ff. 135v-138 Dominica in septuagesima sermo [Schneyer no.33]; ff. 138-140v Dominica in sexagesima [Schneyer no.36]; ff. 140v-142v Dominica in quinquagesima sermo [Schneyer no.39]; ff. 142v-145 Dominica prima post pasca [Schneyer no.63]; ff. 145-147v Dominica 2 a post pasca [Schneyer no.66]; ff. 147v-150v Dominica 3 a post pascha [Schneyer no.69]; ff. 150v-152v Dominica 4 post pascha [Schneyer no.72]; ff. 152v-154v Dominica 5 post pentecosten [= pascha; Schneyer no.76]; ff. 154v-156v Dominica in octava ascensionis [Schneyer no.78]; ff. 156v-159 Dominica pentecostis [Schneyer no.81]; ff. 159-161v Dominica de trinitate [Schneyer no.84]; ff. 161v-164 Dominica prima post pentecosten [Schneyer no.87]; ff. 164-166v Dominica 2 post pentecosten [Schneyer no.90]; ff. 166v-168v Dominica 3 post pentecosten [Schneyer no.93]; ff. 168v-171 Dominica prima [= quarta] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.96]; ff. 171-172v Dominica 4 [= 5] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.99]; ff. 172v-174v Dominica 5 a [= 6 a] post pentecosten, . . . sibi subiciat tamquam domina ancillam suam [beginning like Schneyer 102]; ff. 174v-176v Dominica 6 [= 7] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.105]; ff. 176v-178v Dominica 7 [= 8] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.108]; ff. 178v-180v Dominica 8 [= 9] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.111]; ff. 180v-182v Dominica 9 [= 10] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.114]; ff. 182v-184v [guide letters, Dominica X( = XI) post pentecosten; Schneyer no.117]; ff. 184v-186v Dominica 11 [= 12] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.120]; ff. 186v-188v Dominica 12 [= 13] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.123]; ff. 188v-191 [ Dominica 14 post pentecosten; Schneyer no.126]; ff. 191-193v Dominica 14 [= 15] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.129]; ff. 193v-195v Dominica 15 [= 16] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.132]; ff. 195v-198 Dominica 16 [= 17] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.135]; ff. 198-200v Dominica 17 [= 18] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.138]; ff. 200v-202 Dominica 18 [= 19] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.141]; ff. 202-204v Dominica 19 [= 20] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.144]; ff. 204v-207 Dominica [20, add. = 21 ] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.147]; ff. 207-209v Dominica 21 [= 22] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.150]; ff. 209v-211v Dominica 22 [= 23] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.153]; ff. 211v-213 bis Dominica 23 [= 24] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.156]; ff. 213 bis-215v Dominica 4 in quadragesima [= 25 post pentecosten; Schneyer no.159].

Scope and Content Note

3) ff. 216-376v [A third annual cycle]; ff. 216-217v Dominica prima de adventu [Schneyer no.4]; ff. 217v-219v De eadem dominica [= Dom. 2 de adventu; Schneyer no.7]; ff. 219v-221 Dominica 2 a [= 3 a] de adventu [Schneyer no.10]; ff. 221v-223 Dominica 3 [= 4] de adventu [Schneyer no.13]; ff. 223-224v Dominica infra octavam natalis domini [Schneyer no.16]; ff. 224v-226v Dominica infra octavam epyphanie [Schneyer no.19]; ff. 226v-228v Dominica infra primam octave epyphanie [Schneyer no.22]; ff. 228v-230 [guide letters i.m., Dominica 3 post epyphaniam; Schneyer no.25]; ff. 230-232 Dominica 5 post epyphaniam [Schneyer no.31]; ff. 232-234v Dominica in septuagesima [Schneyer no.34]; ff. 234v-237 Dominica in sexagesima [Schneyer no.37]; ff. 237-239v Dominica in quinquagesima [Schneyer no.40]; ff. 239v-242 Dominica prima in quadragesima, Ductus est Ihesus in desertum Matthew [4.1]. Sciebat dyabolus per scripturas et prophetias dei filium in mundum esse venturum . . . [Bible verse and ending = Schneyer no.41]; ff. 242-245 De eadem dominica [Schneyer no.42]; ff. 245-247v De eadem sermo tercius [Schneyer no.43]; ff. 247v-250 Dominica 2 in quadragesima [Schneyer no.44]; ff. 250-252 De eadem sermo secundus [Schneyer no.45]; ff. 252-254v De eadem sermo tertius [Schneyer no.46]; ff. 254v-257 Dominica 3 a in quadragesima [Schneyer no.47]; ff. 257-259v De eadem [Schneyer no.48]; ff. 259v-262v De eadem sermo tertius [Schneyer no.49]; ff. 262v-264v Dominica 4 in quadragesima [Schneyer no.50]; ff. 264v-267 De eadem [Schneyer no.51]; ff. 267-269v De eadem [Schneyer no.52]; ff. 269v-272v Dominica de passione [Schneyer no.53]; ff. 272v-275 De eadem [Schneyer no.54]; ff. 275-277v De eadem [Schneyer no.55]; ff. 277v-280v Dominica in palmis [Schneyer no.56]; ff. 280v-283 De eadem [Schneyer no.57]; ff. 283-285v De eadem [Schneyer no.58]; ff. 285v-288 De resurrectione domini [Schneyer no.59]; ff. 288-290v De eadem [Schneyer no.60]; ff. 290v-292v De eadem [Schneyer no.61]; ff. 292v-295 Dominica prima post resurrectionem [Schneyer no.64]; ff. 295-297 Dominica 2 post resurrectionem [Schneyer no.67]; ff. 297-300 Dominica 3 a post resurrectionem [Schneyer no.70]; ff. 300-302 Dominica 4 post resurrectionem [Schneyer no.73]; ff. 302-304v Dominica 5 post resurrectionem [Schneyer no.75]; ff. 304v-307v Dominica infra octavam ascensionis [Schneyer no.79]; ff. 307v-310 Dominica in pentecosten [Schneyer no.82]; ff. 310-313 De trinitate [Schneyer no.85]; ff. 313-315v Post 2 am dominicam quadragesime [= Dom. 1 post pentecosten; Schneyer no.88]; ff. 315v-318 Dominica 2 post pentecosten [Schneyer no.91]; ff. 318-320v Dominica 3 post pentecosten [Schneyer no.94]; ff. 320v-323 Dominica 7 [corr. in prima = 4] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.97]; ff. 323-325 Dominica 4 [= 5] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.100]; ff. 325-327v Dominica 5 [= 6] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.103]; ff. 327v-329v Dominica 6 [= 7] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.106]; ff. 329v-332 Dominica 7 [= 8] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.109]; ff. 332-334v Dominica 8 [= 9] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.112]; ff. 334v-336v Dominica 9 [= 10] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.115]; ff. 336v-339 Dominica X [= XI] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.118]; ff. 339-341v Dominica XI [= XII] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.121]; ff. 341v-344 Dominica 12 [= 13] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.124]; ff. 344-347 Dominica 13 [= 14] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.127]; ff. 347-349v Dominica 14 [= 15] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.130]; ff. 349v-352 Dominica 15 [= 16] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.133]; ff. 352-354 Dominica 16 [= 17] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.136]; ff. 354-357 Dominica 17 [= 18] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.139]; ff. 357-359v Dominica 18 [= 19] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.142]; ff. 359v-362 Dominica 19 [= 20] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.145]; ff. 362-365 Dominica 20 [= 21] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.148]; ff. 365-368 Dominica 21 [= 22] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.151]; ff. 368-370v Dominica 22 [= 23] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.154]; ff. 370v-373v Dominica 23 [= 24] post pentecosten [Schneyer no.157]; ff. 373v-375v Dominica 4 in quadragesima [= 25 post pentecosten; Schneyer no.160]; ff. 375v-376v Dominica 24 post pentecosten, Cum vidieritis [ sic] abhominationem desolationis etc. Matthhew 24.[15.] In hoc evangelio ostenditur adventus antichristi et Christi in quibus ostenditur timor retrahens . . . mandatum quod precipiet ibi et mittet angelos suos [Matthew 24.31]. ff. 376v-378 blank.

Scope and Content Note

4) ff. 378v-380rb: [guide letters i.m., Dominica 4 a post epyphaniam , a complete text written to replace the miscopied text on ff. 23v-24 above; Schneyer no.26].

Scope and Content Note

5) ff. 380rb-387v: Sermons on the Transfiguration, in a slightly later hand; ff. 380rb-383v Sermo de transfiguratione, Levantes autem oculos neminem viderunt nisi solum Ihesum. Matthew [17.8]. In verbis istis spiritualiter intellectis proponuntur nobis beati apostoli Simon Petrus Iacobus et Iohannes in exemplum contemplacionis . . . conversacionem ad te dirigo qui es futurus vestrum premium, etc.; ff. 383v-386 Sermo de eodem, Hic est filius meus dilectus in quo mihi bene complacuit ipsum audite. Matthew xvii.[5]. In presenti verborum serie continetur testificacio paterna de filio in transfiguratione coram quinque testibus . . . quecumque pater facit hec et filius facit etc. Rogemus etc.; ff. 386v-387v Sermo de eodem, Resplenduit facies eius sicut sol. Vestimenta eius facta sunt alba sicut nix. Matthew xvii.[2]. Presens protector noster aspice Deus et respice in faciem Christi tui . . . servi eius serviunt ei et videbunt faciem eius semper. Amen. Amen. Amen. f. 388r-v blank.
This manuscript is not listed by Schneyer vol.3, p.235, nor by Kaeppeli, SOPMA no.2156.
Written in Italy in the second half of the fourteenth century, ff. 380-387v probably in Naples or in the Kingdom of Naples. Belonged to Giuseppe Martini (1870-1944), Italian bookseller and collector; H.P. Kraus, list no.189 (1958), “Text Manuscripts from the Middle Ages to the XVIII Century for the most part from the Giuseppe Martini Collection,” no.92. For other manuscripts from the collection of Giuseppe Martini in California, see Bond and Faye, Supplement vol.3-4, no.45-50, 52, 53, 55 (University of California, Berkeley), and Manuscripts Collection 100, Box 178 and 170/442 in the present catalog. Bought by UCLA from Kraus, New York, in 1966.

Note

Secundo folio: [sordida-] rum scilicet vestem nigram
 

170/442. DOMENICO CAVALCA, DIALOGUES OF GREGORY THE GREAT, in Italian. Italy (Veneto), s. XV ex.

Physical Description: Paper ( Croix grecque, Briquet no.5549, Vicenza, 1453), ff. ii (modern) + 120 + iii (modern); 205 × 150 (145 × 100) mm. 1 10(-9, 10)// 2 10 3 10(-10) // 4-12 10 13 3. Horizontal catchwords between flourishes in the center of the lower margin. 27 long lines, ruled in lead. Written in a humanistic semi-cursive script showing gothic influences, in monastic style; ink varies from dark brown to pale chestnut brown. On f. 1, an elaborate 5-line initial in red on bluish-green penwork extending to the inner and upper margins; “YHS” in red on the top margin off. 1; 2-line initials in red on bluish-green penwork; rubrics in red minuscule and initials in the text slashed with red. Outer edges of the first folios have been repaired for water damage.
Physical Description: Bound in green paper over cardboard, s. XIX.

Scope and Content Note

1) ff. 1-116v: Dialogues of Gregory the Great translated into Italian by Domenico Cavalca. ff. 1-2 [Cavalca's prologue] Questo si e el prolego de lo libero el quale se chiama dialogo de sancto Gregorio papa el quale e translatato de latino in volgare , Perzo che como dixe sancto Paulo . . . conzeda abondevolmente de la soa spiritual gratia; ff. 2-3v Comenza el dialogo de sancto Gregorio papa in volgare e in prima comenza el suo prologo, Uno zorno siando tropo afatigato et opreso . . . non sse potrebono cossi ordinatamente scrivere. Fenisse lo prologo del dialogo de sancto Gregorio; ff. 3v-8v E comenza el primo libro. [chapter list:] Capitoli XII: Capitolo I, De uno abate Honorato . . . Capitoli XII, De Severo prete de la chiesa de sancta Maria ne la dita provencia. Capitolo primo. De lo abate Honorato del monestiero de Fundi, Nelle parte de Samo nella villa . . . [cap. III] che l'ortolano fo venuto. E vedendo l'ortola// ff. 9-29 [Book II, lacking the beginning and with a lacuna in the middle; list of chapters] //de uno monaco che li tegnia la lume inanzi e comandoli che de presente se partisse. Capitolli XXIIII . . . [f. 9v] cap. XLII. Como una femena paza entrando nel suo sepulcro de Benedecto fo guarita; f. 9v Comenza el segondo libero del predicto dialogo de sancto Gregorio papa. Capitollo I. Como Benedecto lasò lo studio e fuzi el mondo e como sanò el cadinello , Fu adunqua uno zovene de vita venerabille . . . [f. 27v, cap. XXXIIII] vedendosse piazer quella// f. 28 [cap. XLI] //neta e coverta de belissimi palii . . . poi più forti a parlar per questo tacer. Fenite lo segondo libro de lo dialogo de sancto Gregorio; ff. 29-30 [list of chapters] Comenza li capitolli del terzo libro dello predicto diallogo che sonno capitolli XXXVIII: Capitollo I, De sancto Paullino . . . Capitolli XXXVIII, De Redento vescovo di Ferenti; ff. 30-73 Comenza lo terzo libero de lo predicto dialogo de sancto Gregorio. Capitollo I de Paullo vescovo, Parla san Gregorio. Intendiamo o Pietro molto a parllare di sancti padri . . . da po' la carne in questo quarto volume che seguiterà. Finisse lo terzo libro; ff. 73-74v [list of chapters] Comenza la rubrica de li capitolli del quarto libero dello dialogo de de [sic] sancto Gregorio papa: Capitollo I, Como sancto Zermano [Bernardo, add. interl.] vete portare . . . Capitolli LIIII, Como e la exzellenzia del sancto Sacramento de lo alttare; ff. 74v-116v, Comenza el quarto libero de lo diallogo de santo Gregorio papa, Dixe san Gregorio. Poi che'l primo padre de la umana generacione . . . seremo ostia viva de Dio. El qualle vive e regna in secula seculorum. Amen. Deo grazias. Amen.
Volgarizzamento del Dialogo di san Gregorio e dell' Epistola di s. Girolamo ad Eustochio opera di fra Domenico Cavalca con alcune poesie dello stesso (Milan, 1840); the language of the manuscript is colored with Venetianisms, and the chapter division is different from the printed edition.

Scope and Content Note

2) ff. 117-118v: Verses. f. 117 Sepe recorderis, homo, quod morieris . . . omnia que dixi laus et gloria sit crucifixy [24 vv.; cf. Walther, Initia no.17041]; f. 117v Salve regina, ergeminato ramo . . . fame semper veder clemente pia. Amen [12 vv.]; f. 118r-v [acrostic, each line beginning with a successive word of the Pater noster] Pater, qui es unigenitus Yhesu filii beate / Noster director . . . Amen. Ut semper caelitus possimus te laudare. Amen.
Written in the Veneto in the late fifteenth century. In the possession of a Veronese family in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries; f. 119, “A di 11 otubrio 1533. Nota come ali 11 de otubrio 1533 sono nasu uno fiolo masculo a mi Antonio di Tiberi in la contra di Caliari in casa de mio cuigno Antonio quondam magistro Marco Pelacan; per nome se chiama Bonzuano a batezemo, et li compari sono el nobel omo misser Girardo Pelegrin et l'altro misser Ieronimo Pantin e le comare sono madona Maria Mandela et l'altra madona Tarsia di Basi, et fu batezato in Santa Elena in domo”; “Nota come ali 29 de avosto 1536 sono nasu uno fiolo masculo a mi Antonio di Tiberi in la contra di Caliari in casa di mio cuigno Antonio quondam magistro Marco Caliaro; per nome se chiama Jozepo a batezemo, et li conpari sono misser Jeronimo Pantin e le comare sono madona Maria di Mandegi et funo bateza in Santa Elena in domo de Verona”; f. 11 9v, “A di 12 dezembrio 1545. Nota come a di suprascripto me sono nasu uno fiolo mascolo a mi Antonio di Tiberi per nome se domanda a batezemo Bonzuane; et el nobel omo misser Girardo Pelegrin et misser Jacopo di Sangane sono li compari et madona Anzola da Vigo per comare, bateza in Santo Apostolo in Verona”; “Nota come a di 25 zugno 1549 me sono nasu uno fiola per nome se domanda a batezemo Felipa, el compare sono misser Lucha Tentoro (?) et la comare madona Maria di Mandeli, bateza in Santo Apostolo in Verona,” all in Antonio Tiberi's hand; f. 119v, “Anno domini 1579 nascitur C. FAB in Verona,” s. XVI; f. 120v, “Laus dei. Liber meus Antoni Caliarius. Liber de oracione meus etc. Ave sanctissima Maria . . . ,” prayers in Italian and Latin in the seventeenth-century hand of Antonio Caliari, and his pen-drawing of a cross and instruments of the Passion, 112 × 37 mm.; f. 81 lower margin, “Memoria come il di 30 zugno 1614 andai a Fiorenza et li arrivai il di 5 luio 1614 in casa del magnifico s(igno)r Nicholla Spinetaie alla piazza del grano”; f. 82 lower margin, “Io Bonzuane Tiberii alle case de Sallizolle die 25 ottobris 1592 . . .” (same hand as f. 81). On the front pastedown a slip from an unidentified sale catalog, lot 444. From the collection of Giuseppe Martini (1870-1944); no.78 in H.P. Kraus's list of Martini books (see the description of Manuscript 170/382 above). Bought by UCLA from Kraus, New York, in 1969.

Note

Secundo folio: che io per la poverta
 

170/521. ANTIPHONAL. Italy, s. XV 1.

Physical Description: Parchment, ff. i (paper, modern) + 70 + i (paper, modern); 170 × 120 (120 × 80) mm. 1-5 12, 6 12(-9, 10). Horizontal catchwords in the center of the lower margin, framed by flourishes or by sketches of fantastic animals. 15 long lines or 5 lines of text and 5 of music, ruled in lead. Written in a bold rounded Italian gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); dark brown ink; rubrics in black, in gothic verging on notula. 2-line initials alternately red on blue penwork and blue on red; 1-line initials alternately red and blue; initials in the text slashed with red. Music in square notation on staves of 4 red lines. Contemporary corrections to the text.
Physical Description: Bound in dark brown calf over paste boards, green fore-edge, s. XVIII/XIX.

Scope and Content Note

1) ff. 1-51v: Antiphonal. ff. 1-34v from Dominica in ramis palmarum to Pascha; ff. 34v-38v In die ascensionis; ff. 38v-47v In purificationis beate Marie Virginis; ff. 48-49 In solempni receptione coniunctus; ff. 49-50v In receptione legatorum et prelatorum, ff. 50v-51v In receptione secularium et principum f. 52r-v blank.

Scope and Content Note

2) ff. 53-69: [Office of the dead] Non intres in iudicium cum servo tuo domine . . .; f. 56v [office for a member of a religious community] Deus qui inter apostolicos sacerdotes famulum tuum pontificali fecisti dignitate vigere presta quesumus . . .; f. 68v Que circa sepulturam fratris supra notata sunt ubi commode non possunt servari plenarie propter paucitatem fratrum minuatur de solempnitate notata et fiat ut prelato videbitur faciendum. Hoc idem fiat circha sepulturam extraneorum sive sint pauci sive sint multi fratres, excepto quod ad eorum corpora deferenda non ponantur fratres . . . oratio satisfaciat ut supra notatum est, ff. 69v-70v blank.
Written in Italy in the first half of the fifteenth century for a regular religious community; cf. ff. 56v, 68v. Belonged to D'Alté A. Welch (1907-1970), friend of Wilbur J. Smith (curator of UCLA's Special Collections 1951-1971) and author of the Bibliography of American Children's Books Printed Prior to 1821 (Worcester, Massachusetts, 1972). Given to UCLA with his collection of children's books by his widow in 1971.

Note

Secundo folio: ex discipulis suis
 

*170/524. RASIS, LIBER ALMANSORIS, 2 leaves. Italy, s. XIII 2.

Physical Description: Parchment, 2 leaves: f. 1, 330 × 203 (232 × 140) mm., in 2 columns of 59 lines; f. 2, 325 × 190 (235 × 132) mm., in 2 columns of 60 lines; ruled in lead; triple lines between the columns. Written in a round Italian gothic bookhand of university type (littera textualis); olive brown ink. Opening word of f. 1 in red and blue majuscule letters, 11-line, on red and blue penwork; f. 1 rb, 8-line initial in blue on red penwork; 1-line initials alternately red and blue, slashed with the opposite color, placed outside the written space; initials in the text touched with red; titles in red minuscule; a running title “L(iber)” in red, f. 2.

Scope and Content Note

1) f. 1: [Prologue] Verba Abbubecri Rasis fili Izacane liber incipit translatus a magistro G(erardo) Cremonensi in Toleto de arabico in latinum qui ab eo Almansorius vocatur eo quod Regis Mansorii Ysaac filii precepto editus sit . In hoc meo libro regis cuius vitam Deus prolonget . . . regis placeam eique incessanter adherere possim; [list of chapters] Tractatus primus de figura et forma membrorum . . . Tractatus decimus de febribus . . . De aggregationibus et summis iuvamenti membrorum quas nos premittere oportet in principio huius tractatus. De forma ossium . . . De forma matricis; [book 1] De aggregationibus et summis iuvamenti membrorum quas nos premittere oportet in principio huius tractatus , Creator omnium Deus ossa condidit ut per ea corpus . . . membro continuantur sensum et dantes et// f. 1v washed clean.
Abubetri Rhazae Maomethi . . . Opera exquisitiora . . . per Gerardum Toletanum medicum Cremonensem . . . latinitate donata (Basel, 1544) 5-8 line 8, with variations.

Scope and Content Note

2) f. 2: [Book 2 chapters 27-45] //color vero inter rubeum et album medius equalem significat complexionem . . . De significatione pedum, Pedes in quibus carnis est multitudo atque ipsius duricies// f. 2v washed clean.
Ibid. pp. 48-51.
Written in Italy in the second half of the thirteenth century. Used for binding; ff. 1v and 2v have been completely washed. The leaves bound in paper over cardboard, s. XIX/XX. Belonged to Dr. Alfred Jerome Brown (1878-1960), professor of surgery at the University of Nebraska and author of Old Masterpieces in Surgery . . . (Omaha, 1926) and More Old Masterpieces in Surgery (Chicago, 1931); his bookplate, inside the front cover. His sale, Swann Auction Galleries, 31 March 1949 (catalog no. 228), lot 229. Bought by UCLA from Zeitlin and Ver Brugge, Los Angeles, in 1974 or 1975.
 

170/525. DIEGO HURTADO DE MENDOZA, DE LA GUERRA DE GRANADA, in Spanish. Spain, s. XVI-XVII.

Physical Description: Paper ( Croix latine, not found in Briquet), ff. 130 (contemporary foliation 1-129 with 67 bis); 225 × 160 (ca. 170 × 105) mm. 1-14 8) 15 12) 16 6). Catchwords at the bottom of each page. 19/27 long lines, unruled. Written in cursive script by three hands: (i) ff. 1-111v, (ii) ff. 112-122, (iii) ff. 122-128v; grayish brown ink.
Physical Description: Unbound.

Scope and Content Note

ff. 1-128: Capitulo I° De los primeros fundadores de Granada y de primer Rey y nombre, La ciudad de Granada segun entiendo fue poblacion . . . y Baça remitiendo la conclusion de las cortes para Madrid donde llego. Aqui acaban muchos originales; f. 128r-v No era negocio de menos importancia que peligro el de la sierra . . . de gente haciendo y matando sin difereneia. Fin d'este libro. f. 129r-v blank.
Lacks the prologue. Edited by M. Gomez-Moreno (Madrid 1948) who lists 25 manuscripts, this one not among them.
Written in Spain in the late sixteenth or early seventeenth century. Purchased from Joseph Rubinstein, Tucson, Arizona, in 1967.
 

*170/527. MISSAL AND LIBER CENSUUM of Uckerath. Germany (Uckerath), s. XII-XVI.

Note

Fig. 6
Physical Description: Parchment, 17 loose folios of varying dates with an incorrect eighteenth-century foliation; original size ca. 380 × 265 mm., more or less deeply torn with damage to the text. 1 (frontispiece), s. XVI/XVII. 2-3, s. XV, in 2 columns of varying numbers of lines, unruled; written in gothic cursive scripts in grayish brown inks. 4, s. XII, written space 285 × ca. 240 mm., 2 columns of 33 lines ruled in hardpoint; written in a spiky twelfth-century ordinary minuscule in brown ink; 3-line yellow and green initials; dominical letters alternating in brown, red, green, and pale blue. 5, s. XIII-XV, in many hands. 6-7, s. XV, written space 285 × 195 mm., 2 columns of 50/51 lines; bounding lines only, ruled in ink; written in a running gothic bookhand in grayish brown ink; rubrics in red minuscule. 8, s. XV, written space 265 × 195 mm., 2 columns of 19 lines; frame ruled in ink; written in a spiky stately German gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); 2-line initials alternately red and blue; initials and crosses in the text in red; rubrics in red minuscule. 9, s. XV ex. 10-11, s. XVI, severely damaged and reduced in size because of mildew and rodents; a varying number of lines, written in cursive gothic script. Notes of payments going back to the early sixteenth century (1512, 1517) are entered in the margins of ff. 10v-12v; on f. 9v a long note, dated 1609 and mentioning “Bavariae dux,” by the same hand as notes on f. 12v (undated) and f. 17v (1605); on f. 10, notes dated 1681, 1725. The name of the parish is spelled in different ways through the centuries: Ocherode, Ockenroit, Ockeroit, Oeckenroit, Oickerroide, Okeroide, Okerode, Okirrode, Okorode, Oykerode, Uckenrad, Uckenrade, Uckenraide, Uuckerode, etc.

Scope and Content Note

1) f. 1: Full-page watercolor (sixteenth or seventeenth century). Crucifixion with St. Mary and St. John, framed by a border of pale green acanthus leaves.

Scope and Content Note

2) ff. 1v-2: Records of offerings to the church, in German mixed with Latin, from the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries and later, some dated: 1489, 1509 (written by “pastor Henrichus de Querenbach”), 1736.

Scope and Content Note

3) ff. 2v-4v [ Liber censuum of the church for the year 1453] Anno domini MCCCCLIII renovati sant census ecclesie in Okeroid presentibus iuratis et pastoribus, text in German; f. 4v additions up to the year 1487.

Scope and Content Note

4) ff. 5-6v: [Calendar, mutilated at the end, containing January to August] Prima dies et VII a fine timetur . . .; among the saints are Adelgundis (30 January); Polychronius (17 February), Pinnosa, translation (28 February), Suitbert (1 March), Heribert (16 March, stroked with red), Ludger (26 March), Evergisil, translation (28 March), Balbina (31 March), Bede (26 May), Augustine, Apostle of the English (27 May), Boniface (5 June), Medard (8 June), Maurinus (10 June), Ulric (4 July), Goar (6 July), Kilian (8 July), Agilulf (9 July), Pantaleon (28 July), Oswald (5 August), Privatus (21 August). The calendar contains numerous obituary notes, ranging from the early thirteenth century, to judge from the script, to the sixteenth; a dated one on f. 6v [12 July], Obiit Elizabet de Brylon mater domini Conradi pastoris anno 1442.

Scope and Content Note

5) f. 7r-v: Records of gifts to the church and obituary notes, from the thirteenth to the fifteenth century, including (f. 7) Obiit Aleidis de Bughusin begina que concidit ecclesie in Okirrode . . . , and records of two deeds of the year 1252, in one of which the witness is “Henricus plebanus de Okerode qui presentem conscripsit cedulam,” and (f. 7v) the record of an obligation written “per Iohannem pastorem anno domini M CCC [XX, expunged] nonodecimo.”.

Scope and Content Note

6) f. 8: Sequitur missa de beata Virgine, Salve sancta parens . . . [RH no.18197].

Scope and Content Note

7) f. 8r-v: Sequitur officium de sancta Cruce, including the sequence “Laudes crucis attollamus . . .”[RH no.103606; f. 8vb, note in German written in fifteenth- or sixteenth-century gothic cursive script, signed “Ego Stephanus pastor in Oeckenroit.”.

Scope and Content Note

8) ff. 9-11v: [Ordinary of the mass, mutilated]//ac sereno vultu respicere . . . propiciabile in vitam eternam. Amen.

Scope and Content Note

9) f. 11v: [List of mementos to be said during the mass, 1498] In nomine domini. Amen. etc. Anno MCCCCXCVIII. Item sal eyn pastor von Ockenroit . . .; [in the outer margin] Anno 1639 die 18 Junii renovatum ac reinceptum per me Henricum Georgii pro tempore pastorem.

Scope and Content Note

10) ff. 11v-15, 17: Liber censuum of the church for the year 1503, with additions (f. 12, A.D.1516); insertions not concerning the Liber censuum on f. 12v (seventeenth century), 13v (A.D.1552).

Scope and Content Note

11) ff. 15v-16v: Records of offerings to the church, six of them dated 1512; (f. 17, end of the Liber censuum for 1503) f. 17v notes dated 1539, 1556, 1605.
Written in Germany by or for the parish church of Uckerath, Siegkreis, in the archdiocese of Cologne, where it remained and continued in use from the twelfth through the seventeenth century or later; 1 concerning Uckerath see F.W. Oediger, ed., Die Erzdiözese Köln um 1300 1: Der Liber valoris, Publications of the Gesellsch. für Rhein. Geschichtskunde vol.12 (1967) p.101. Given to UCLA ca. 1936 by Edmund M. Riese. A palimpsest and a bifolium from Uckerath cataloged below among the loose leaves, 1/XII/Ger/4 and 2/XII/Ger/5, which were given to UCLA by Mr. Riese at the same time, probably once belonged to the missal; but the identification is not positive.
1. We are grateful to V. Honemann and the Institut für historische Landesforschung der Universität Güttingen for the identification of Uckerath.
 

170/529. COMMONPLACE BOOK OF LAURENCE NOWELL. England, ca. 1560-ca. 1571.

Note

Figs. 28-30
Physical Description: Paper ( Chapeau and Lettre B, not found in Briquet), ff. 276 (includes unnumbered leaf after f. 59, and f. 242bis); 155 × 105 mm. Varying numbers of lines; unruled, except for occasional bounding lines in lead point. Written in several tiny Elizabethan scripts mainly by Laurence Nowell, 1 except for items in the hand of William Lambarde: ff. 135v, 199v, 187v-192v, 205v-207, 210.
Physical Description: Bound in contemporary limp parchment, title along the spine erased; parchment strips from a twelfth-century manuscript used as reinforcement for the spine.

Scope and Content Note

1) ff. 1-8, 9-10 blank, save for possession notes and added miscellaneous notes, ff. 8v, 10v-16v: Notes on philosophy in Greek and Latin in quasi-dictionary form.

Scope and Content Note

2) ff. 17-41: Philosophical florilegium in Greek and Latin organized by Latin headings in intermittently alphabetical order from Aberra to Veritas; f. 41v, the Greek equivalents of 3 Latin words.

Scope and Content Note

3) ff. 42-47v: Sentences and notes on geographical names in Latin, Greek, and Italian, ff. 48-52 blank.

Scope and Content Note

4) ff. 52v-53v: Geographical names with explanations in Greek, ff. 54-55v blank.

Scope and Content Note

5) ff. 56-58: Excerpts from Pausanias, in Greek.

Scope and Content Note

6) ff. 58v-59: Notes in Latin and English with dates 1553, 1554, 1560 (but written at one time), ff. 59v-59 bis blank.

Scope and Content Note

7) ff. 60-72: Notes in Latin, Greek, and English on chronology, astrology, history, etc., with dates 1560 (f. 160v) and 1518 (f. 62); includes on f. 63v Bibliothecae celebres: Romae Vaticana seu pontificia, Florentiae Medicum, Bononiae S. Salvatoris, Venetiis Bessarionis, S. Ioannis et Pauli et aliae, Diegi Hurtadi. ff. 72v-79v blank.

Scope and Content Note

8) ff. 80-116: Latin-Greek dictionary from A to Ingratus, f. 116v blank.

Scope and Content Note

9) ff. 117-120: Notes on geometry in Italian (f. 119r-v blank), ff. 120v-122v blank.

Scope and Content Note

10) ff. 123r-v: List of kings of England to Henry III. ff. 124-135 blank.

Scope and Content Note

11) f. 135v: Index to ff. 136-212, which bear separate foliation 1-6 and 1-72 (the number 59 omitted).

Scope and Content Note

12) ff. 136-184v: A transcription of the Quadripartitus from Holkham Hall MS 228 (ff.141v-142, 146v-147, 179v-180 blank), ff. 185-187 blank.

Scope and Content Note

13) ff. 187v-192v: [Laws of William the Conqueror in Anglo-Norman copied from the Croyland Chronicle of “Ingulph”] Inveni in quodam Croilandiae chronico Ingulphum abbatem eiusdem detulisse secum a Londino domum usque has leges sequentes . . . quae ut ipse testatur hoc ipso idiomate scriptae fuerunt. (f. 188) Ces sunt les leis e les custumes . . . les vilains en ferme plege. [Added:] Sequuntur vide infra fol. 65 [= f. 205v].
This part of the chronicle has not been edited in the original. Cf. Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland, translated by Henry T. Riley (London, 1854) pp.175-184, sections 1-29, followed by a misplaced section 22.

Scope and Content Note

14) ff. 193-199: [Laws of William the Conqueror in Latin] Haec quae sequuntur in Gulielmi legibus ascribuntur quae in maiori libro omittuntur . . . ferrum triplicis Deiiudicii ponderet 3 libras. [Added:] Interponenda sunt fol. precedens: Quod sinecessitas . . . nisi rex ei patriam indulserit.

Scope and Content Note

15) f. 199v: Charta H. 3 . . . toforenseid; and pet [with catchword] aelc. ff. 200-205 blank.
The first half of Henry III's proclamation of 1258 in Middle English issued for Oxfordshire; ed. W.W. Skeat, “The Oxford Manuscript of the Only English Proclamation of Henry III,” Transactions of the Philological Society 1880-1881 app. 6pp. 169*-177*, to the middle of line 6 (Skeat p.173*).

Scope and Content Note

16) ff. 205v-207: Addenda legibus Gulihelmi gallice conscriptis post capitulum de streward. Si il que custinent la terr ne deit lome ... sil ne poit envers le voy lamende e il soil utlage. ff. 207v-209v blank.
The completion of the laws extracted from the Croyland chronicle (cf. item 13 above); cf. Riley, sections 30-53, pp.184-188.

Scope and Content Note

17) f. 210: Ex legibus [Alfredi, corr. to:] Edgari regis quibus titulus est Her gebirađ nu to Eadgares gerædnesse be gehadodra liffadunge. We lærađ pæt godes peowas beon heora woruld lafordurn eac hold 7 getrywe. And we lærađ pæt preost ne beo hunta ne hafecere ne tæflere ac plegge on his bocum swa his hade gebryađ. Liber est Matthaei Cantuar. Archiep. 1571. W[illelmus] L[ambardus].
Two excerpts from the so-called Canons of Edgar: Roger Fowler, ed., Wulfstan's Canons of Edgar, EETS no.266 (London, 1972) pp.2 and 14. Copied from Cambridge, Corpus Christi College Manuscript 201 which belonged to Matthew Parker, archbishop of Canterbury.

Scope and Content Note

18) f. 211: Ex libro 3° Willelmi Malmesbyrie de regibus, ubi has quae sequuntur legibus Willelmi regis magni ascribit. Regem Angliae singulari maiestate . . . molimine semper infrendit. ff. 211v-274v blank.
William of Malmesbury, Gesta regum anglorum book 3; ed. Thomas D. Hardy, vol.2 (London 1840, reproduced 1964) 473n-474n.

Note

1. We are grateful to Carl T. Berkout for identifying a number of the contents of this manuscript and especially for distinguishing the hands of Nowell and Lambarde
Written in England between ca. 1560 and ca. 1567 by Laurence Nowell (d. ca. 1570); his signature, f. 2; concerning Nowell's dates and identity see now Carl T. Berkout, “The Pedigree of Laurence Nowell the Antiquary,” English Language Notes vol.23, no.2 (1985) pp.15-26. Belonged to Nowell's friend William Lambarde (1536-1601) who wrote additional material between ca. 1567 and ca. 1571; his signature also on f. 2. On ff. 2, 118, 210, 274, forgeries of various Shakespeare signatures: f.2, “William Shakspere 1590” (almost obliterated with pen strokes); f. 118, “William Shaksp(e)r(e), Oxforde” (copy of the second signature in Shakespeare's will of 1616); f. 210, “William Shaksp(ere) 1590” (copy of the third signature in the will of 1616); f. 274, initials “W.S.”; for facsimiles of forged autographs of Shakespeare see S.A. Tannenbaum, Problems in Shakespeare's Penmanship, Including a Study of the Poet's Will (New York, 1927) plates 39-42; the present forgeries possibly date from the twentieth century. Sold by Hodgson (19 June 1924, lot 512) to Myers & Company, London. Belonged to C.K. Ogden (1889-1957); his bookplate, inside the front cover. Acquired by UCLA with the Ogden library in 1958.

Note

A copy of this book is UCLA Negative Microfilm no.05428.
 

COLLECTION 902. ORSINI COLLECTION. Italy, s. XIV-s. XX.

Scope and Content Note

The archive of the Orsini family, in 532 boxes, includes roughly 1000 items that date before the year 1600. A one-volume typescript inventory of the collection was compiled by Evert Volkersz in 1967.
Acquired by UCLA in 1967.

Bibliography:

G. Billanovich, Tra don Teofilo Folengo e Merlin Cocaio (Naples, 1948) p.174.

Note

A copy of the inventory is UCLA Negative Microfilm no.06423.
 

COLLECTION 952, BOX 1. GIUGNI FAMILY ACCOUNT BOOK. Italy (Tuscany, Garbo?), 1580-1586.

Physical Description: Paper, ff. 192 (contemporary foliation 1 to 8 and 41 to 68 in a double series, in roman numerals on the upper right of the recto and in arabic numerals on the upper left of the verso); 330 × 230 mm. 1-12 16. Written by Raffaello Giugni in an Italian cursive.
Physical Description: Contemporary envelope binding in parchment over limp cardboard reinforced with three leather straps, one of which encircles and fastens the volume with a flap; on the front cover in a contemporary hand, “Entrata e uscita”; under the flap, a large (45 mm. × 45 mm.) “A”; on the spine, “1581-1586.”

Scope and Content Note

ff. 1-68: [Accounts of the Giugni family, from 22 December 1580 to 16 September 1586] Yhesus Maria. Al nome sia dello onnipotente et immortale Idio padre figliuolo et spirito sancto e della gloriosissima madre Maria sempre vergine dello unigienito figliuolo di Dio vocato Jesu creatore di questo secolo e redentore della humana generatione e delli altri santi e sante desso Idio equali tutti suplichiamo che si degnino interciedere per noi che insuquesto libro si scriva cose utile per lanima e per il corpo a laude e gloria de Dio e de sua santi. Ammen. Questo libro e di Raffaello, Antonio, Niccolo fratelli e figli di Andrea di Raffaello di Rinieri Giugni heredi di detto Andrea per la heredita di Andrea detto e altre loro facciende principiato dappoi la morte di detto Andrea, intitolato Entrata e uscita, signato A. Da carte l sino a carte quaranta sara entrata, da carte quaranta sino fine sara uscita . ff. 1v-8 [credit accounts] Yhesus, MDLXXXI. Entrata di danari contanti che si risquoteranno per Raffaello, Antonio, Niccolo Gtugni fratelli e figli di Andrea Giugni tenuta per mano di me Raffaello Giugni, cominciata addi 22 dicembre 1581 [1580 N.S.] . . .; ff. 8v-40v blank; ff. 41-68 [debit accounts] Yhesus. MDLXXXI. Uscita di danari contanti che si pagheranno per Raffaello, Antonio, Niccolo Giugni fratelli e figli di Andrea di Raffaello Giugni tenuta per mano di me Raffaello Giugni cominciata addi 22 dicembre, e prima . . . . ff. 68v-192v blank.
Written in Tuscany, presumably in Garbo, by Raffaello Giugni. There are two later account books in this box: Raffaello Giugni's accounts for his business in Garbo, 1613-1626; and the credits and debits of Lucretia, widow of Cosimo Gorini, in Tuscany, 1642-1657. A part of the Corsini Collection, which came to UCLA after World War II; the source and date of acquisition are unknown.
 

COLLECTION 952, BOX 2.

Physical Description: (2 items)
 

CONVENT OF S. MARIA DEGLI ANGELI, ACCOUNT BOOK. Italy (Tuscany, Lucca?), 1540-1546.

Physical Description: Paper, ff. i (parchment) + 192 (numbered 1-191 with first leaf unnumbered) + i; 280 × 202 mm. 1-12 16. Written by several Italian cursive hands, including Sr. Caterina, ff. 78-98v and entries on 99-103v, I04-108v, 139-140v.
Physical Description: Contemporary envelope binding in limp parchment reinforced by three leather straps, one fastening the volume with a buckle; on the front cover: “G” and “Giornale.”
Physical Description: Flyleaves: Fragments of Gregory I, Moralia, written in central Italy, s. XI 2 Text begins on back flyleaf verso “//suam appetit quia . . . ,” ends on front flyleaf recto ” . . . et remissionem peccatorum per omnes gentes//”; Moralia 28.7-29.14, PL 76.485D-491B. Two parchment leaves originally conjugate, 4 and 5 of a quire of 8; cropped top and bottom, original written space ca. 290 × 185 mm.; in 2 cols., originally of 40 lines; ruled in drypoint, double bounding lines. Written in brown ink in a late developed Caroline minuscule script, showing the peculiar ri-ligature; et appears as both ampersand and tironian 7; both uncial and upright d; small s-shape abbreviation marks for b(us) and q(ue). Brown majuscule initials, touched with yellow. Marginalia by the hand of the text; carefully revised by a contemporary corrector. Written in central Italy, and used for binding in a region not far from its place of origin some five centuries later.

Scope and Content Note

ff. i v-140v: Accounts of the Dominican nuns of S. Maria degli Angeli from 1540 to 1546. ff. i v-98v Debit accounts from December 1540 (N.S.) to February 1544; ff. 99-103v Miscellaneous records in several hands, including occasional accounts from February 1544 to November 1545 (N.S.); ff. 104-108v: [credit accounts, 1545-1546] A entrata del nostro monasterio di Sancta Maria degli Angeli la quale entrata scrivera Suora Caterina al presente priora del capitolo e convento di Santa Maria degli Angdi del terzo ordine di San Domenico delta Penitentia. Al nome di Dio. Sabato adi 13 di novembre 1546 ( = 1545 N.S.); ff. 109-138v blank; ff. 139-140v Debit accounts, December 1545 (N.S.)-Jan. 1546. ff. 141-191v blank.
A part of the Corsini collection; See COLLECTION 952, BOX 1. Source and date of acquisition by UCLA are unknown.
 

CAMBINI FAMILY ACCOUNT BOOK. Italy (Florence), 1531-1647.

Physical Description: Paper, ff. i + 158; 290 × 220 mm. 1 16 (2-3 16missing; ff. 16-47v) 4-12 16. Written in Italian cursive script by different hands including that of Lorenzo Cambini (ff. 87-183).
Physical Description: Contemporary envelope binding in limp parchment with three leather straps, one fastening the volume with a buckle; on the front cover: “Entrata e uscita,” “A”;on the spine: “1531-1540.”

Scope and Content Note

1) ff. i-86: Cambini family accounts, ff. i v -8 Credit accounts, from December 1531 (N.S.) to June 1540 (N.S.); f. 8v blank; f. 9 Addition with the date 1569; f. 9v blank; f. 10r-v Notes of harvests for 1635-1644; ff. 11-15v blank; ff. 16-47v missing; f. 48 Notes for the years 1639-1644; ff. 48v-55v blank; ff. 56-84v Debit accounts, from December 1531 (N.S.) to June 1540 (N.S.); ff. 8-86 Additions for the years 1543-1547; f. 86v Addition for 1544 crossed out.
On the Cambini family of Florence see Dizionario biografico degli italiani 17 (1974) 132-136; and R. de Roover, The Rise and Decline of the Medici Bank (1397-1494) (Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1963) pp.91, 255.

Scope and Content Note

2) ff. 87-150v: [Accounts of the Cambini estate of La Sassaia, 1638-1645] Da qui in avanti servirà per diverse rnemorie tenute da Lorenzo Cambini per interesse del podere della Sassata come appresso(ff. 87v, 89-103v, 106-129v, 133v-139v, 141v-144v, 145v-150, 151-179v blank); ff. 180-183 Notes recording the harvesting of trees on the estate, 1610-1656. ff. 183v-190v blank.
A part of the Corsini collection; See COLLECTION 952, BOX 1. Source and date of acquisition by UCLA are unknown.
 

COLLECTION 952, BOX 3. CARLO DI ANDREA CAMBINI, ACCOUNT BOOK. Italy (Florence), 1556-1616.

Physical Description: Paper, ff. 192 (contemporary foliation I-CLXXXXVIII with gaps); 280 × 215 mm. 1-8 24. Written in Italian cursive script by one main hand (ff. 1-99v), with later additions.
Physical Description: Contemporary envelope binding with three leather straps, one fastening the volume with a buckle; on the front cover: “Debitori e creditori,” “Cambini,” “A”; on the spine: “1556-1605.”

Scope and Content Note

ff. 1-198v [Accounts from 1556 to 1594, with additions] Yhesus. In nome di Dio et della madre Maria. Amen. Questo libro e di Carlo d'Andrea di Bartolomeo Chambini citadino fiorentino, chiamasi Debitori e creditori . Carta 1 a di 198 servira per tenere gli chonti di dare ed avere. If. 1v-99v Credits and debits from 1556 to 1594; ff. 99v-102 Occasional accounts from 1600 to 1616; ff. 102v-198 blank; f. 198v Notes of payment with dates 1566-1567.
Written in Italy, presumably Florence. In this same box are two later account books of Lorenzo di Andrea di Carlo Cambini of Florence, dated 1623-1655 and 1653-1660. A part of the Corsini collection; See Collection 952, Box 1. Source and date of acquisition by UCLA are unknown.
 

COLLECTION 952, BOX 4. BIAGIO CASTELLANI, NOTARIAL REGISTER. Italy (Pistoia), 1382-1391.

Physical Description: Paper, ff. 100; 290 × 220 (215/240 × 120/145) mm. 1-2 18 3-6 16 31-34 long lines, unruled. Written by Biagio Castellani in Italian littera cancelleresca. ff. 1-24 damaged by a large hole in the lower half of the page, with loss of text; ff. 1-5 also lack upper right corner with further loss of text.
Physical Description: Loose gatherings wrapped in a limp cover; title, s. XVIII: “Documenti di Casa Salvagnoli.”

Scope and Content Note

ff. 1-100: [Register of the deeds drawn up by Biagio Castellani of Larciano, resident of Montevettolino in Val di Nievole, Pistoia, 4 December 1382 (N.S.)-31 May 1391 (N.S.)] In nomine domini. Amen. Hie est <...> continens in se omnia instrumenta <...> scripta et edita et rogata per <...> Castellani notarium de Larciano <...> -li in districtu Florentino et scripta <...> notarium antedictum partim sub anno <...> trecentesimo octogesimo tertio indictione <...> infrascriptis nec non partim sub anno M<...> quarto indictione partim septima et partim indictione oc<tava . . .> mensibus(?) infrascriptis. Signum mey [his sign] Blaxii notarii antedicti . . . Et ego Blaxius filius quondam Castellani comitatus Pistorii nec non terrigena Castri Montivectulini provincie Vallis Nebule destrictus Florentini, imperiali auctoritate Iudex ordinarius atque notarius publicus, predictis omnibus et singulis suprascriptis in presenti libro dum agerentur interfui et ea rogatus scribere scripsi et fideliter publicavi ideoque me subscripsi et signum meum apposui consuetum.
Written by Biagio Castellani presumably in Pistoia. In this same box are four medical manuscripts from later centuries: (i) De febribus, s. XVII ex , ff. 71; (ii) Seminario medico prattico s. XVIII, pp. 300; (iii) Libro di secreti medicinali pratticati dal dottor Joachim Lampranti filosofo e medico ebreo raccolti da varii libri d'eruditissimi signori e prencipi grandi et esperimentati più volte nel corso di tanti anni di sua prattica esercitata in Padova ed in attri luoghi e specialmente in Ferrara , s, XVIII, 4 fascicles + ff. 220 + 4 fascicles; (iv) Farmacopea di Torino tradotta dal latino in italiano idioma da me Giovanni Beriollo, s. XVIII ex, pp. 234. A part of the Corsini collection; See COLLECTION 952, BOX 1. Source and date of acquisition by UCLA are unknown.
 

COLLECTION 952, BOX 5. SIENESE FISCAL RECORDS. Italy (Siena), 1601-1615.

Physical Description: Parchment, ff. xviii (paper) + 240; 213 × 145 mm.
Physical Description: Bound in contemporary blind-stamped half leather over wooden boards. Two medieval pastedowns:
Physical Description: (i) [Justinian, Codex; Italy, s. XIII] //Imp. Negotiandi causa edificia . . . future non timeat detrimentum// [ C., 8, 10, 2-9]. Upper portion of 1 leaf, 150 × 213 mm. 2 cols., of which 22 lines survive; gloss surrounding the text, of which 37 incomplete lines survive; ruling not discernible. Written in Italian gothic bookhand in university style (littera bononiensis); initials alternately red and blue. Another strip from this same manuscript, 65 × 210 mm., is pasted in the spine.
Physical Description: (ii) [Office of the dead; Italy, s. XV) //tue de corpore . . . Libera domine animam servi// 1 leaf, 220 × 160 (155 × 105) mm. 2 cols., of 31 lines; ruling not discernible. Written in an Italian gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); initials and rubrics in red.

Scope and Content Note

Libro autentico di compere, di effetti e censi di Piano e Potentino nello Stato Senese dal 1601 al 1615.
Another late manuscript is kept in this same box: Bartolomeo Dotti, Poesie e satire, s. XVIII, pp. 1170. A part of the Corsini collection; See COLLECTION 952, BOX 1. Source and date of acquisition by UCLA are unknown.
 

COLLECTION 953, BOX 1 NO.3. NEAPOLITAN MISCELLANY. Italy (Naples?), s. XVI.

Physical Description: Paper, ff, i + 55; 271 × 205 mm. Written by several late humanistic hands.
Physical Description: Bound in limp vellum, s. XVIII, with a large miscellany of later printed and manuscript items.

Scope and Content Note

[ff. 49-55 are bound before ff. 1-48].

Scope and Content Note

1) ff. 1-16v: Sanfelice della Campagna felice a Elio Marches di famiglie [Antonio Sanfelice, Campania (Naples, 1562 etc.)]; the heading is on f. i v. f. 17r-v blank.

Scope and Content Note

2) ff. 18-49v: [Francesco Elto Marchesi] IX novembris MDLIX. Francisci Aelii Marchesii Neapolitani De nobilium familiarum origine libellus ad Hieronymum Carbonem Neapolitanum . . . VIII Dec. describere explevi horis succisivis ob negociorum molem, sed desiderium atque aviditas mira hęc audiendi et memorię mandandi omnia superavit. Antonius Feltrius bona fide ex codice qui LX propemodum annis latuerat.
Other manuscript copies of this work are recorded in Kristeller, Iter italicum, vol.1, no.127, 353, 397; vol.2, no.96, 332, 341, 450, 451, 470.

Scope and Content Note

3) ff. 53-52: [38 couplets] Augustino Nipho medici philosopho Hieronymus Carbo. Liber ago in terris vitam sine turbine rerum . . . O decus et verę nobilitatis Amor: Finis.
Concerning Girolamo Carbone see Dizionario biografico degli italiani vol.19 (1976) pp.695-698.

Scope and Content Note

4) f. 52v: <. . . tear . . . >-ns Alexandrinus In oratione adhortatoria ad Gręcos sive ad Gentes , f.23. Solent enim nescio quomodo . . . etiam haberi in admiratione.

Scope and Content Note

5) f. 53r-v: Ioannis Casae ad Galeatium Florimontis Ut Capta reditus Helena cum coniugio Troia . . . Nixa diu tandem plagis perterrita currit.
60 verses, not included in Opere di Monsignor Giovanni della Casa, ed. A. Pasinelli, 5 vols. (Venice, 1728-1729).

Scope and Content Note

6) f. 54r-v: Prestantissimo iuveni Colae Antonio Caracciolo Marchioni Vici Paulus Manutius S.P.D. [E. Pastorello, L 'epistolario manuziano: Inventario cronologico-analitico 1483-1597 (Venice, 1957) no. 1052: Rome, 28 February 1562]. f. 55 Notes in various hands, including the name “Hannibal Caraciolo” and the date 1561.

Scope and Content Note

7) f. 55v: [Antonio Sanfelice, three Latin couplets] F. Antonii Santofelicin. Moribus antiques senioque . . . est inimica probis.
Two other volumes are kept in this box: (i) a miscellany of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century manuscript copies of earlier documents (A.D. 1182 to s. XVI) relevant to the Kingdom of Naples, bound with miscellaneous printed items, and (ii) Gaspare Deodato Zamponi, Del Regno di Napoli, Memorie, indrizzate agli eccellentissimi Signori della Reggenza, s. XVIII; and there are three other boxes of late miscellaneous materials, printed and manuscript, concerning the history of Naples (Collection 953, Boxes 2-4). Each volume, including the present, bears two armorial bookplates with mottoes “Ex libris Marchionis Salsae” and “Comme je fus,” found also in Manuscript 170/292. Among the materials bound in the present volume are verses in several hands, with dates in the 1770s, dedicated to the “Eccellentissima Signora Donna Gioseffa Malaspina, Marchesa di Salsa.” Acquired by UCLA in 1966 from an unknown source.
 

COLLECTION 968, BOX 1, NO.71. PIERRE GAUTIER, MISCELLANEA. France (Paris and Orleéans), 1572-1575.

Note

Fig. 33
Physical Description: Paper, ff. iii + 188; 210 × 160 (170/190 × 110/125) mm. Quires of 8 leaves. Long lines and (ff. 177-187) 2 cols., 32/41 lines per page. Written by one hand, the legal and literary matter in italic script (ff. 1-94v, 109v-112v, 142-187), the scientific matter in chancery script (ff. 101-109, 113-141v).
Physical Description: Contemporary binding in limp parchment; remains of a paper label on the spine.

Scope and Content Note

1) ff. 1-75v: Miscellanea id est variae de variis rebus sententiae a me collectae . . . Hic substiti 4 Idus lulii 1574, cum de discessu cogitare inciperem et quatuor pauloplus annis Lutetiae mora facta, patrios lares repetere proponerem. Laus Deo.

Scope and Content Note

2) ff. 76-81: Poemata latina P. Galteri [with the date 1574 on f. 81].

Scope and Content Note

3) ff. 81v-82v: Legal notes.

Scope and Content Note

4) ff. 93-98: Poesie francoise [with the dates 1573 (f. 84), 1574 (f. 87), and, bottom of f.87:] 1575 Aureliae, mense Iulio.

Scope and Content Note

5) ff. 87v-94v: Aureliae haec conscripsi [in margin], Continuantur miscellanea que superius ad fol. 76 usque perducta sunt [legal notes].

Scope and Content Note

6) ff. 95-100 [printed fascicle:] Institutio physica perbrevis et dilucida (Paris: Officina Thomae Brumennii, 1572) [with extensive manuscript glosses], f. 100v blank.

Scope and Content Note

7) ff. 101-109: In institutionem physicam annotationes domini Riolani . . . Finis eorum quae dictata atgue annotata sunt a domino Riolano in institutionem physicam 1572, Laus Deo .

Scope and Content Note

8) ff. 109v-112v: Paraphrasis [of portions of the Corpus Iuris Civilis].

Scope and Content Note

9) ff. 113-141v: Praefala in physicam Aristotelis a Petro Maiorio Claromontano doctore, a Calendis Octobris 1572 . . . Finis eorum quae ante dictata sunt quam ad contextum librorum physicorum Aristotelis ventum sit. 1572.

Scope and Content Note

10) ff. 142-144v: Notes on the Corpus luris Civilis.

Scope and Content Note

11) ff. 145-163v: Annotata in Georgica Virgilii . . . Finis eorum quae in 4. Georgicon. 1572.

Scope and Content Note

12) ff. 164-168v: In primum librum Aeneidos annolata . . . Finis eorum quae in primum Aeneidos..

Scope and Content Note

13) ff. 169-171v: In 2. Aeneidos librum annotata . . . Finis eorum quae in secundum librum sunt notata. 1572.

Scope and Content Note

14) ff. 171v-175v: In 5. librum Annotationes . . . Finis eorum quae in 5. librum sunt notata Deo Gratias, f. 176 blank. 1572.

Scope and Content Note

15) f. 176v: [8-line verse in French:] Huictain responsif a un aultre. Sur I'enclume d'Andreé, gaillard, forge les vers/ . . . [and a Latin epigram].

Scope and Content Note

16) ff. 177-187: Omnium quae in Miscellaneis superioribus continentur Index Alphabeticus . . . Finis 1575 mense Maio, P.G. ff. 187v-188 blank; 188v is pastedown.
See Nicole Marzac, “The Notebooks of Pierre Gautier: The Academic and Social Life of a Sixteenth-Century Student in Paris and Burgundy,” Bibliothèque d'humanisme el renaissance 36 (1974) 621-632.
Written in Paris and Orléans between 1572 and 1575 (ff. 75v, 109, 141v, 175v, 187) by Pierre Gautier; f. 187v, “Sum Petri Galteri advocati Cabilonensis [Chalon-sur-Saône]. 25 Iunii 1578,” “Sum Petri Gautier Cabilonensis,” “Petrus Gautier,” and (twice) “Gautier”; f. iii v, “P. Gautier.” Bought by UCLA from Librairie Paul Jammes, Paris, in 1966.

Bibliography:

Charles B. Schmitt, “Acquisition of Early French Books and Manuscripts,” UCLA Librarian vol.19, no.3 (1966) p.11.

Note

A copy of this manuscript is UCLA Negative Microfilm no.03849.
 

COLLECTION 1033. ANTIPHONALS (2 leaves). Italy or Spain, s. XVI/XVI ex.

Note

Note: This shelf number refers to a packet of oversize parchment leaves from liturgical manuscripts, 2 of which date before 1600.
 

Item no: 1)

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 580 × 415 (400 × 280) mm. 6 lines of text with music; ruled in lead. Written in a late gothic liturgical bookhand (littera textualis formata), in blackish ink; square notation on staves of 4 red lines. Initials alternately in blue and red on red and mauve penwork; initials in the text in brown with flourishes slashed with yellow.

Scope and Content Note

[Antiphonal, Italy or Spain, s. XVI:] //cerunt et ideo Gloria . . . Resp. In circuitu tuo domi// [a fragment from the Commune plur. mart.; use of Rome?].
 

Item no: 2)

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 490 × 320 (430 × 245) mm. 8 lines of text with music; ruled in lead. Written in a late gothic liturgical bookhand (littera textualis formata), in brown ink; square notation on staves of 4 red lines. Initials alternately plain red and elaborate brown pen-and-ink interlaces. In the upper right-hand corner of the recto, “XXXIIII,” in red, belonging to the original foliation.

Scope and Content Note

[Antiphonal, Spain (?), s. XVI ex:] //et nox in suo cursu . . . Quando natus es ineffabiliter ex virgine// [fragment from the Oct. Nativ. Domini; use of Rome?].
Source and date of acquisition of both leaves by UCLA unknown.
 

COLLECTION 2070. COLLECTION OF DATED DOCUMENTS, 1198-1585.

A boxed collection of original documents from several countries, most of them written in Latin or French. 16 that date from before 1600 (1198 to 1585) are listed listed here. Unless otherwise noted, these were purchased by UCLA from B. Rosenthal, New York, in 1962.
 

Item no: 1)
Spain (Salamanca), 14 April 1198 (Era 1236); in Latin.

Physical Description: Parchment, 255 × 235 mm. 16 lines including signatures. Written in a chancery hand; remains of a large pendent seal.

Scope and Content Note

Alphonso IX, king of León and Galicia, and his queen Berenguela grant privileges to the monastery of Peleias. Scribe: Froila, for the chancellor P. Vele.
 

Item no: 2)
Italy (Pisa), 6 February 1313; in Latin.

Physical Description: Parchment (torn at the left with damage to the text), 230 × 450 mm. 51 lines including the notarial subscription. Written in a notarial cursive hand.

Scope and Content Note

Bertus and Parus the goldsmiths, sons of the late Bensus, sell a plot of land at Pisa to Master Cioni Frizico, son of Master Bianchus, and to Johannes called Vanni, son of the late Paganellus Penticosus. Notary: “Henricus Francisci Pacterii notarius civis Pisanus,” who copied the deed from the register of his father Franciscus and drew it up in public form.
 

Item no: 3)
Italy (Pisa), 15 December 1350; in Latin.

Physical Description: Parchment, 305 × 570 mm. 72 lines including the notary's subscription. Written in notarial cursive hand.

Scope and Content Note

Brother Jacobus de Penitentia, son of the late Ser Tuldus notary of Calcinara, bequeaths to Brother Jacobus son of the late Orlandus and Brother Donatus son of the late Landus Caltho, ministers and procurators of the convent of the Third Order of St. Francis at Pisa, eight pieces of ground in the region of Calcinara. The convent undertakes to pay in return an annual rent. Notary: “Pierius Pictii de villa Senignuele, iudex ordinarius atque notarius,” who extracted the deed from the register of the notary Alifonsus son of the late Ugolinus de Camugliano and drew it up in public form.
 

Item no: 4)
Italy (Florence), 11 May 1358; in Latin.

Physical Description: Parchment (torn in the middle, and left and lower portion torn away, with damage to the text), 223 × ca. 410 mm. 54 lines including the notary's subscription, defective. Written in notarial cursive hand. Used for binding.

Scope and Content Note

Domina Pera, daughter of the late Bencius Bruni of Florence and of the late Margherita, wife of the late Bencius and of Ser Minus Giomi, notary, accepts and confirms her mother's dotal deed and related obligations, in the presence of “Mattheus iudex ordinarius.” The notarial subscription is almost completely missing.
 

Item no: 5)
Italy (Padua), 15 September 1378; in Latin.

Physical Description: Parchment (torn, with damage to the text), 350 × 550 mm. 42 lines including the subscription. Written in chancery hand. Trace of a pendent seal.

Scope and Content Note

Francesco I da Carrara, lord of Padua (abd. 1388; d. 1393), grants permission for his wife Domina Fina, daughter of the late Patharius de Buzacharinis, to give a house to the chapter and canons of the Ecclesia Maior of Padua in exchange for three plots of land and for release from the legacy of her uncle, Salio de Buzacharinis, which obliged her to pay an annual rent to the canons. Witnesses: Bonifacius son of the late Ugolotus de Lupis of Parma, marquis of Soragna; Antonius de Cechis son of the late Manoel of Piemonte, doctor in law; Manfredinus son of the late Albertus de Comitibus. Notary and scribe of Francesco da Carrara: Johannes son of the late Bartholomeus de Campolongo.
 

Item no: 6)
Italy (Poggibonsi), 18 September 1411; in Latin.

Physical Description: Parchment, 205 × 500 mm. 70 lines including notarial subscription. Written in notarial cursive hand.

Scope and Content Note

Antonia, daughter of the late Feduccius Guido de Falconibus de Petraficta of Florence, widow of Fruosinus Jacobus Bartholus de Sommavilla of San Salvatore della Castellina and at present wife of Franciscus son of the late Laurentius de Podiobonizi, acknowledges receipt of her dowry paid by her brother Nicholaus. Notary: Michael, son of the late Jacobus de Podiobonizi.
 

Item no: 7)
Italy (Piacenza), 13 March 1481-10 January 1491; in Latin.

Physical Description: Parchment, 4 leaves (2 bifolia); 230 × 185 (183 × 137) mm. 31 lines per page. Written by 2 notarial cursive hands: Octavianus Rustichus (ff. 1-3) and Bernardinus de Cupalatis (f. 3r-v). Has been folded vertically, with f. 4v serving as a cover.

Scope and Content Note

ff. 1-2 (13 March 1481): Bartolinus de Vicecomitibus de Vigolano, priest, rector of the church of S. Michael de Corneliano in the diocese of Piacenza, gives a plot of land, a mill, and water rights in perpetuity to Florentinus de Valaria, son and procurator of Marchus.
ff. 2-3 (14 March 1481): Aurelius de Antociis, dean, and the canons of S. Maria de Travazano, to whom the church of S. Michael de Corneliano is subject, sanction and ratify the previous deed of Bartolinus de Vicecomitibus. Notary for both deeds: Octavianus Rustichus de Caxaliremisso, notary of Piacenza, who extracted them from the register of Johannes Petrus de Caxaliremisso, notary of Piacenza, and drafted them in public form.
f. 3r-v (10 January 1491): Petrus Francischus de Guerris, vicar of Hylarius de Gentilibus of Tortona. “podestà” of Piacenza, grants Octavianus Rustichus permission to draft in public form the previous deeds extracted from the register of Johannes Petrus de Caxaliremisso, notary of Piacenza, who has become a doctor and left the city. Notary: Bernardinus de Cupalatis, notary of Piacenza. f. 4 blank; f. 4vb, title.
 

Item no: 8)
France, 16 July 1346; in French.

Physical Description: Parchment, 257 × 60 mm. 4 lines. Written in secretary hand. Remains of a seal. Used for binding; scraps of paper are pasted on the verso.

Scope and Content Note

Guillaume Godiay acknowledges receipt from the countess of Blois of 11 pounds 6 deniers, paid to him via Yves Landin.
 

Item no: 9)
France (Paris), 13 June 1405; in French.

Physical Description: Parchment, 460 × 365 mm. 40 lines and the chancellor's signature. Written in lettre bâtarde. Used for binding.

Scope and Content Note

Agreement between Jean Jamet, procurator of Robert d'Annoys called Galore, seigneur d'Orville and de Grant Moulin, and Raoulet de Bailleul, made before Guillaume seigneur de Tignonville, king's counselor and chamberlain, at the Châtelet in Paris.
 

Item no: 10)
France (Paris), 28 June 1478; in French.

Physical Description: Parchment, 485 × 500 mm. 52 lines and chancellor's signature. Written in lettre bâtarde. Trace of a pendent seal. Used for binding

Scope and Content Note

Agreement between Jehanne Rathault, widow of Charles de Montmorancy, seigneur de Boucqueval, and Marie de Quoquerel, widow of Anthoine d'Esterlan, seigneur de Bourneville in Valois, made in the presence of Robert de Stouteville, seigneur de Beme(?), king's baron of Saint Andry en la Marche, king's counselor and chamberlain, guard of the Prévôté of Paris, at the Châtelet in Paris.
 

Item no: 11)
England, 23 April 1521; in Latin.

Physical Description: Parchment, 280 × 180 mm. 13 lines with autograph signature. Written in secretary hand. Remains of a pendent seal.

Scope and Content Note

John More of Rothurwyke declares that he resigns his estate called Bockwyfoldys, located in Rothurwike and Wildmore (Hampshire), in favor of Thomas Haydok.
 

Item no: 12)
England, 6 November 1550; in Latin.

Physical Description: Parchment, 320 × 195 mm. 19 lines. Written in secretary hand. Traces of a pendent seal.

Scope and Content Note

Thomas Cowper of Packwood (Warwickshire) declares that he resigns his estates, called the Myddelfyld and the Homefyld, in favor of William lchenor(?) and Christopher Shakespere, both of Packwood.
Source and date of acquisition by UCLA are unknown.
 

Item no: 13)
England, 4 October 1585; in Latin.

Physical Description: Parchment, 360 × 350 mm. 30 lines and signatures. Written in secretary hand. Wax pendent seal, and remains of a second.

Scope and Content Note

Robert Browne and Sibille Browne sell an estate to Henry Thayer.
Source and date of acquisition by UCLA are unknown.
 

Item no: 14)
France (Paris), 12 May 1558; in French.

Physical Description: Parchment, 385 × 245 mm. 23 lines and signatures. Written in lettre bâtarde. Trace of a pendent seal.

Scope and Content Note

Agreement between Phelippes de Boullaumi, cleric, and <...?>, made in the presence of Anthoins du Prat, baron du Thicot, king's counselor, guard of the Prévôté of Paris, at the Châtelet in Paris.
Source and date of acquisition by UCLA are unknown.
 

Item no: 15)
Italy (Rome, St. Peter), 22 February 1550; in Latin.

Physical Description: Parchment, 600 × 455 mm. 44 lines, with chancellors' signatures. Written in bullatica pontifica. Pendent bull in lead.

Scope and Content Note

Bull of Pope Julius III addressed to Dominicus de Servinis, cleric of the diocese of Cortona, concerning a benefice in the monastery of St. Peter at Lodi (Milan).
 

Item no: 16)
Austria (Neuenstadt), 12 May 1368; in German.

Physical Description: Parchment, 350 × 205 mm. 15 lines and chancellor's signature. Remains of two pendent seals.

Scope and Content Note

Albert III and Leopold III, brothers, dukes of Austria, issue a patent letter in favor of Herman von Landenberg.
Former shelf number at UCLA, 170/526. Source and date of acquisition by UCLA are unknown.
 

Charles E. Young Research Library: Department of Special Collections, Collection of Loose Leaves: ***170/403 (10 oversized ringed binders).

Scope and Content Note

The department's collection of medieval manuscript leaves comprises 134 items, including bifolia, leaves, and fragments of leaves. One item is in Arabic script, 2 in Greek script, 2 in Hebrew script, and 129 in Latin script. This catalog describes only those items in Latin script. Unless otherwise noted, the leaves described here belong to a collection that was assembled by Bernard M. Rosenthal, New York, from whom it was purchased by UCLA in 1962. Concerning the collection see P. Levine, “Palaeographic History Illustrated in Manuscript Collection,” UCLA Librarian vol.16, no.6, supplement (1963) pp.49-51.
The leaves are cataloged here in shelf-number order, save that the initial number 1 or 2 (a designation of size) is ignored. Thus, e.g., after the leaf numbered 2/XIII/Ita/7 is described the leaf numbered 1/XIII/Ita/8.
 

2/IX/ITA/1. PAUL THE DEACON, HOMILIARY. Northwestern Italy, s. IX exIX in.

Note

Fig. 1
Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 290 × 230 (232 × 191) mm. 2 columns of 29 lines; double bounding lines; ruled with drypoint; prickings on top and bottom margins. Written in Caroline minuscule similar to Monza, Biblioteca capitolare c-5/65; brown ink. Contemporary corrections in black ink.

Scope and Content Note

r-v: //Quis est homo qui vivit et non videbit . , . que activa non solis in coenobio//.
Bede, serm. 1.9 (CC vol.122.60-67) = hom. 1.33 in Paul the Deacon's collection; R. Grégoire, Les homéliaires du moyen âge (Rome, 1966) 81.
Written in northwestern Italy. The leaf formerly belonged to Manuscript 15 of the Biblioteca del Seminario metropolitano of Turin. When seen by J. Leclercq at Turin, “Manuscrits cisterciens dans des bibliothèques d'Italie,” Analecta sacri ordinis Cisterciensis 7 (1951) 76, the manuscript was already mutilated, consisting of 72 folios that contained Paul the Deacon's Homiliary part 1 ( pars hiemalis) homilies 11-41. It disappeared from Turin ca. 1954. 70 ff., including the present one, have been identified in 4 American libraries: New Haven, Yale University Library T. E. Marston Manuscript 2(151), 61 ff. (J. Leclercq, “Textes et manuscrits cisterciens dans des bibliothéques des Etats unis,” Traditio vol.17 (1961) p.217; Bond and Faye, Supplement, p.81); Bloomington, Lilly Library Manuscript Poole 136 (259), 2 ff. (J.W. Halporn, “Two Manuscripts in the Lilly Library, Bloomington, Indiana,” Transactions and Proceedings of the American Philological Association vol.92 [1961] pp.224-227); and Detroit Public Library Manuscript 1, 6 ff. (Halporn, p.225; Bond and Faye, p.297); Jean Leclercq confirmed the provenance of these fragments, “Textes et manuscrits cisterciens dans diverses bibliothèques,” Analecta ... vol.20 (1964) p.217; and see also Grégoire, Homéliaires, p.72. Bernhard Bischoff confirmed the provenance of the UCLA leaf.

Bibliography:

Levine, 49 fig. 1.
 

2/X/GER/1. MARTYROLOGY. Switzerland(?), s. X in.

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 365 × 240 (265 × 182) mm. 2 columns of 28 lines; double bounding lines, triple between the columns; ruled with hard point; slits top and bottom to guide the ruling. Written in a somewhat square Caroline minuscule; abbreviations marked by a horizontal flourish, tending toward a dumbbell shape; chestnut brown ink.

Scope and Content Note

r-v: //Sanctus Andreas respondit: ipsum supplicium misterii . . . Nam humanus timor stimilis est fumo//.
Passio sancti Andreae: B. Mombritius, Sanctuarium 1 (Milan: Printer for Mombritius, ca. 1477) f. 55r-v; BHL no.428.
Written in Alemannic Switzerland or in eastern France. Probably f. 2 of a codex until recently: “2” in pencil in a twentieth-century hand, upper right corner of the recto; and the feast of St. Andrew often begins the liturgical year.
 

2/X/GER/2. MARTYROLOGY. Switzerland(?), s. X 1.

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 365 × 250(251 × 183) mm. 2 columns of 27 lines; double bounding lines, triple between the columns; ruled with drypoint; slits in the top, bottom, and outer margins to guide the ruling. Written in a heavy, rather uneven Caroline minuscule script; abbreviation for q(ue) is a medial dot, for b(us) a colon; omitted m is marked by a horizontal flourish or by a plain rounded stroke; chestnut brown ink.

Scope and Content Note

r-v: //ficata consurges. Populi autem multitudo . . . Tu autem domine miserere nobis//.
Passio s. Syri: Mombritius, Sanctuarium 2 ff. 299v-300; BHL no.797b.
Written probably in Alemannic Switzerland, but northern Italy is not to be excluded. An “8” in pencil, by a twentieth-century hand on the top right of the recto, and the fact that the verso is badly stained, suggest that this leaf was for a time the last folio of an isolated quire of 8.
 

1/X/GER/3. MISSAL. Switzerland or Germany, s. XII ex/XIII in.

Physical Description: Parchment, fragment of 1 leaf; 155 × 135 (155 cropped × 85 cropped) mm. 16 mutilated long lines survive; ruled with drypoint. Written in a developed Caroline minuscule script, with characteristic German tironian notes and abbreviation marks; dark brown ink. The Communio of Dom. in Albis (recto) and the gradual of Dom. II post Pasc. (verso) are written in a smaller script, with neumes of the St. Gall type.

Scope and Content Note

r-v: // secreta . . . [exulta]ntis ecclesie ut cui causam . . . meas et cognoscunt me// [temporale, fragment from Dom. in Albis, Fer. IIII post act. Pasc., Dom. II post Pasc.].
Written in Switzerland or south Germany. Quite damaged and torn, used for binding.
 

1/X/ITA/1. AUGUSTINE, TRACTATUS IN EVANGELIUM IOANNIS. Italy (Central?), s. X 1.

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 320 × 230 mm., cropped at the top (est. 310 × 200/205 mm.). 2 columns of 33 (of an est. 35) lines survive; double bounding lines; ruled in drypoint. Written in a Caroline minuscule showing ligatures ( ri, re); rr run together; the loop of the e rises well above the other letters, frequently in ligature with the next one; the shafts of b, d, and l are club-shaped; I-longa is at times used initially; r(unt) abbreviation is sickle-shaped; text in brown ink with contemporary corrections in grayish ink. Rubrics in mixed uncial and minuscule in pink ink; 10-line initials of sermons, drawn in brown ink, show the hollow interlace pattern filled with pink and yellow.

Scope and Content Note

r-v: //more seculi caritas nostra separetur . . . vitam quam modo non habemus sed resurrectionem spe [ Feria II in V ebd. Quadr., Hom, in Ioh. 7.37-39, lacking the beginning; Augustine, Tract. 30.9.4-40; ed. R. Willems, CC vol.36.305-306]; Incipit tractatus Aureli [Au]gustini [in] ebdomada V in quadragesima, Feria III. Lectio sancti evangelii secundum Iohannem. In illo tempore. Ambulabat Iesus in Galilea ... in manus impii caro data est// [lacking the end; Augustine, Tract. 28.1.2-2.22; ed. Willems, 277-278].
Written in Italy, probably in the central region. Severely rubbed on the recto and damaged by insects; used for binding.

Bibliography:

Levine, 50 fig. 2.
 

1/XI/FRA/1, Palimpsest.

 

MARTYROLOGY, primary script. France, s. X.

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf, cropped at the inner side; 325 × 215 (275 × 200 cropped, est. 275 × 205) mm. 2 columns of 36 lines; single bounding lines; drypoint ruling. Written in a Caroline minuscule script, reduced to palimpsest in the eleventh century; chestnut brown ink.

Scope and Content Note

Unidentified and almost illegible fragment of a martyrology.
 

LEGENDARY, secondary script. Northern France, s. XI 2.

Physical Description: Written space of the secondary script, 270 × 195 (cropped; est. 270 × 205) mm. 2 columns of 35 lines (recto) and 46 long lines (verso); no fresh ruling is visible for the secondary script. Written between the lines of the primary script in a spiky and uneven ordinary minuscule script, with extensive use of insular abbreviations; opening words of the text in mixed majuscule; brown ink. A single fourteenth-century hand has entered the foliation, “XLVIIII,” on the top center recto, and the title on the top verso.

Scope and Content Note

ra-rb: //vetus et novum testamentum instructa et repleta . . . quicumque vero memoriam f[aciunt] sancte crucis accipient partem cum D[ei] genitrice Maria. Amen.
Inventio sanctae Crucis; BHL no.4169.

Scope and Content Note

v: Vita sancti Allexii confessoris [title added, s. XIV]: Fuit vir Rome magnus et nobilis Eufemianus . . . quia liberum eum faciam et de domo mea//.
Vita s. Alexii; AS July 4.251-252; BHL no.286.
Written in northern France. Rubbed on the verso. On the recto, offset of a leaf written in 2 columns in ninth- or tenth-century Caroline minuscule. Used for binding; perforated in the middle.
 

2/XI/FRA/2. BRUNO THE CARTHUSIAN, EXPLANATIO IN PAULI EPISTOLAS. France, s. XII ex.

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 bifolium slightly cropped at the bottom (second and seventh folios of a quire); 242 × 190 (233 × 157) mm. 2 columns of 48 lines (the last line half cropped); single-bounding line, drypoint ruling. Small, current, somewhat slanting, developed Caroline minuscule script, showing extensive use of abbreviations; d appears in two forms ascenders are often fork-shaped; et appears only as the tironian note 7; brown ink. Title and colophon in brown mixed majuscules; f. 2, the initial is left blank; upper margin, the heading “Ad Philippenses” added by a semi-cursive gothic hand (s. XIII-XIV).

Scope and Content Note

f. 1r-v: //[Pathm]os insu[lam scrips]it Apocalipsim. Hi Ephesii . . . qui licet inferiores non tamen sunt subiecti//; f 2 //excipiens. Non ideo dicit veritatem cingulum lumborum . . . servat vel ita: Gratia sit illis in corruptione id est in spe corrupcionis, id est vite eterne. Amen [ In Ephes.: PL vol.153, columns 317A-323C, 349C-350; Stegmüller 1821]; f. 2r-v Incipit epistola ad Philippenses. Philipenses [Philipis, corr. by a second hand] est civitas in Macedonia in Philippenses. Hi autem de numero eorum fuerunt . . . quid enim nocet dum id est solum modo// [In Philipp.: PL vol.153, columns 349-356C; Stegmüller 1822].
Written in France, possibly in the north. Rubbed on the flesh-side (ff. 1, 2v). Remains of strips of leather and parchment sewn on the inner portion and the outer margin of f. 2, Used for binding, probably a sixteenth- or seventeenth-century account book or notarial register: note (s. XVII) on f. 1, apparently Italian, “M. 1521.1621.” Other numbers are scribbled on f. 2v.
 

1/XI/GER/1. SACRAMENTARY. Germany, s. XII med.

Physical Description: Parchment (coarse), 1 leaf; 280 × 220 (232 × 164) mm. 2 columns of 30 lines; drypoint ruling. Bold, heavy, fully developed Caroline minuscule script: s appears in the majuscule or minuscule form at the end of words; both the ampersand and the tironian note 7 are seen; the abbreviation mark for ( us) is a curled flourish, for q(ue) is a colon; dark brown ink. 2-line initials in red capitals; rubrics in stately red minuscule. “LXI” on the upper left-hand corner of the verso seems to be a contemporary foliation. Instructions to the rubricator are visible on the inner margin. On the verso offset traces of a leaf written in a hasty German littera textualis, (s. XIII-XIV) on 2 columns: the text is a theological treatise on angels. Notes in pencil on the recto, s. XIX-XX.

Scope and Content Note

r-v: //Omnipotens sempiterne deus parce metuentibus . . . quadragesimalis initii sollempniter immolamus te domine deprecantes// [temporale, from Oratio ante missam ad benedicendas cineres (cf. Missale Romanum) in the Fer. III post cap. Quadrag. to Secreta of Dam. I Quadrag.: Deshusses 1, 153-155, 1546, 156-165, Sabbato “Adesto domine supplicationibus nostris et hoc sollempne ieiunium . . . ,” no. 90*, Com. “Caelestis vile munere vegetati . . . ,” Super populum “Adesto domine supplicationibus nostris et in tua misericordia . . . ,” nos. 166-167].
Written in Germany. Stained by water. Used for binding as a pastedown.
 

1/XI/GER/2. GRADUAL. Switzerland (?), s. XI 1.

Physical Description: Parchment, a strip cut vertically from a leaf; 280 × 90 (225 complete × 70 cropped) mm. 27 long lines; drypoint ruling on the hair-side, double bounding lines; drypoint ruling. Rather square Caroline minuscule script; brown ink. Rubrics in mixed red minuscule and majuscule. Neumes of St. Gall type.

Scope and Content Note

r-v: // Vig(ilia) [assumptionis] . . , Communio. Beatus servus . . . Exaltatio sancte Crucis . . . [cru]ce domini nostri Iesu// [sanctorale, fragment of feasts from 14 August to 14 October; use of Rome?].
Written in Switzerland or southern Germany. Used for binding.
 

1/XI/ITA/1. PAUL THE DEACON, HISTORIA ROMANA. Central Italy, s. XI-XII or XII in.

Physical Description: Parchment, 2 fragmentary bifolia (bottom of i [ff. 1, 4], top of ii [ff. 2-3]); 70 × 140 (70 cropped × 103) mm.; original size, ca. 185 × 140 (ca. 140 × 103) mm. i was the third, ii the fourth/inner bifolium of a quire of eight leaves. i, 6-7 long lines; ii, 10 long lines; originally, ca. 23-24 long lines; single bounding lines; drypoint ruling. Written in a fully developed Caroline minuscule showing considerable use of abbreviations; brown ink.

Scope and Content Note

ff. 1-4v: [ Historia Romana lib. 7] f. 1://obsequerent[ur] et habitu romano . . . precipitare neque imperatori bono// ff. 1v-2://gratus civilis animi et lepidi . . . qui ulciscendis vitiis quibus// f. 2v://pene aequaret fastigio suo . . . sub Augusto fuit// f. 3://resolutis militie artibus . . . bellum contra Germanos susce// f. 3v://pellantur orcades, filio . . . unguentis retibus aureis// f. 4://occisus est imperii mense . . . non potuit ostendere// f. 4v://Neronis que humiliter . . . stercore involutus et pectus//.
Historia Romana 7.10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18; ed. A. Crivellucci (Rome 1914) pp. 102 lines 9-16, 103 line 14-104 line 6, 104 line 21-105 line 8, 105 line 21-106 line 9, 107 lines 3-13, 109 lines 1-7, 109 line 25-110 line 6.
Written in central Italy (Tuscany?); used for binding, probably in the fourteenth century, as suggested by notes in Italian cursive gothic on the margins and on a scrap of paper pasted on ff. 2v-3.
 

2/XI/ITA/2. HAIMO OF HALBERSTADT, EXPOSITIO IN PAULI EPISTOLAS. Central Italy, s. XI 2.

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 510 × 350 (379 × 227) mm. 2 columns of 53 lines; double bounding lines enclose each column; drypoint ruling; pricking in the outer margin. Developed rounded Caroline minuscule script; ink almost black. Running title in uncial, in the same ink as the text. Biblical quotations are marked by a double s-shaped flourish in the left margin.

Scope and Content Note

r-v: //carnaliter sed spiritualiter [observas al]ioquin non prodest esse . . . ipse solus verus esse predicatur quare me damp// [ Expos, in Rom. 2.25-3.7; PL vol.117, columns 383.A-386.C].
Written in central Italy. Parchment wrinkled; the edges have been cut. Scraps of paper pasted on the margins. Used for binding a seventeenth-century account book: title by an Italian hand (s. XVII) on the recto, “Sabbatino Sabbatini, A, carte 100, 1623. Con rubricella car(ta) 110.”
 

1/XI/ITA/3. BIBLE. Central Italy, s. XI 2.

Physical Description: Parchment, top portion of 1 leaf; 205 cropped × 295 (180 cropped, about one-half the original height, × 234) mm. 2 columns, of which 28 lines survive; double bounding lines enclose each column; drypoint ruling. Developed rounded Caroline minuscule script: r and s go below the line; q(ue) and b(us) abbreviation marks are in the small 7-shape; script similar to 1/XI/Ita/4 and 1/XI/Ita/12; brown ink.

Scope and Content Note

r-v: //dicit dominus vobis, nolite . . . templum interficiatur. Sintque cum rege// [2 Par. 20.15-23, 20.31-21.4, 21.14-22.3, 22.11-23.7].
Written in a scriptorium maintaining high standards, in Italy, in the Umbro-Roman region, to judge from script, abbreviations, and size. The fragment belonged to an Atlantic Bible (on Atlantic Bibles see E. B. Garrison, Studies in the History of Mediaeval Italian Painting, 4 vols. [Florence 1953-1962]): other fragments belonging to Atlantic Bibles are 1/XI/Ita/5, 1/XI/Ita/12, 2/XII/Ita/13. The fragment is damaged by water and rats. Used for binding in the sixteenth century: scraps of a sixteenth-century label pasted on the recto. Pen trials (s. XVI-XVII) by Italian hands on the verso.
 

1/XI/ITA/4. HOMILIARY. Central Italy, s. XI 2 or XI ex.

Physical Description: Parchment, top portion of 1 leaf; 125 cropped × 290 (100 cropped × 206) mm. 2 columns, of which 14 lines survive; single bounding lines; drypoint ruling. Developed Caroline minuscule script, similar to 1/XI/Ita/3 and 1/XI/Ita/12; brown ink. 2-line red capital initial; rubrics in small red capitals.

Scope and Content Note

r-v: //preceptis credulis in promissionibus . . . his de quibus loquimur sine fine enim constat honesta. Lectio V. Nunc ergo revertamur ad eos quos unda baptismatis ... in paucis vexati in multis bene disponentur, quern Deus// [unidentified sermon, probably dating from the ninth century].
Written in central Italy. Severely damaged by mildew. Used for binding.
 

1/XI/ITA/5. BIBLE. Central Italy, s. XI ex.

Physical Description: Parchment, top half of 1 leaf; 250 cropped × 360 (200 cropped × 238) mm. 2 columns of which 27 lines survive; double bounding lines enclose each column; drypoint ruling. Fully developed Caroline minuscule script, often showing descenders ending in a serif; dark brown ink. Running title on verso, “Liber” in small red capitals; red capital at the beginning of the chapter. 16-line illuminated E opens the book of Joshua: yellow letter paneled with stylized acanthus leaves and geometrical patterns in red and green.

Scope and Content Note

ra: //non in reprehensione veterum nova . . . et invidendi Christianos sint abl[ata]// [Jerome, Praef. in Iosue; ed. Biblia sacra iuxta latinam uulgatam versionem 4 (Rome 1939) 4 line 5-6 line 4; Stegmüller 311]; rb //Promittit Deus Iosue dicens . . . tribui Manasse terram sibi dari pos// [ Iosue Capitulatio; series A forma a, ed. cit. 18-23, cap. 1-19]; va //Et factum est ut post mortem . . . ad mare magnum contr[a solis o]ccasum //[Ios. 1.1-4]; vb //sicut et vos dedit . . . et illi pariter exie//[Ios. 1.15-2.5].
Written in Italy, in a scriptorium of high standards in the Umbro-Roman region. The leaf belonged to an Atlantic Bible (see 1/XI/Ita/3). Used for binding, probably early in the seventeenth century, as is suggested by “1615” in a seventeenth-century Italian hand on the recto; other scribbles (s. XVII) on the recto and verso.
 

2/XI/ITA/6. MARTYROLOGY. Central Italy, s. XI ex.

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 450 × 310 (329 × 205) mm. 2 columns of 45 lines; double bounding lines enclose each column; drypoint ruling; pricking on the outer margin. Careful, developed calligraphic Caroline minuscule script, similar to 1/XI/Ita/14; brown ink. Corrections by a slightly later hand; marginalia by an Italian reader (s. XV). On the top recto, “80” (s. XV) may refer to an old foliation.

Scope and Content Note

r-v: //Egredientes autem bestiarum comprehensores . . . aut si volueritis sacrificare morientur in tormentis//[ Passio s. Blasii; AS Febr. 1.337-338; BHL no.1370].
Written in central Italy. Damaged by mildew and torn. Used for binding (s. XVI). Notes and sums by sixteenth-century Italian hands are seen on the verso, including ” 155[. ]. E”; “Die ultimo iulii . . . fratribus Baptiste Luce de Barni et Francisco Thome de Monte Gridolfa habitatoribus . . . .”
 

2/XI/ITA/7. GREGORY THE GREAT, MORALIA IN IOB. Northern Italy, s. XI-XII.

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; ca. 520 × 350 (ca. 375 × 211) mm. 2 columns of 38 lines; double bounding lines enclose each column; drypoint ruling; pricking slits in outer margin. Fully developed Caroline minuscule script; ascenders are seldom wedge-shaped; d appears in uncial and upright forms; brown ink.

Scope and Content Note

r-v: //conspicit ubi non est malorum suorum . . . initium omnis peccati superbia. Bene// [Gregory, Moralia in lob vol.23, no.21.41-22.44: PL vol.76, columns 276A-278A].
Written in northern Italy. Rubbed on the verso (flesh-side). Severely torn and worn in the middle portion. Used for binding.
 

2/XI/ITA/8A, B. HAIMO OF AUXERRE, HOMILIARY. Italy, s. XI 2 or XI ex.

Note

Fig. 3
Physical Description: Parchment, 1 bifolium (ff. 1-2) + 1 leaf (f. 3); 365 × 230 (284 × 185) mm. ff. 1-2 were originally the third and sixth folios of a quire of 8, and f. 3 the first of the next quire. 2 columns of 41 lines; double bounding lines, triple between columns; uneven dry point ruling; pricking in the outer margin. Upright, uneven, fairly compressed Caroline minuscule script; r and s often go below the line. Initials red or slashed with reddish orange; headings in red mixed majuscule; 18/20-line watercolor initials of the sermons in vinestem pattern outlined in red on vertical bands of yellow, red, blue, and violet.

Scope and Content Note

ff. 1-3v: [Haimo of Auxerre, Homiliary] //pru[. . .] tres [. . .] inte[. . .] mag[. . .]nium autem ecclesia sig[. . .] ordines habet, coniugatorum, continentium . . . Deum verum hominem esse crediderunt Hiesum Christum dominum// [ Hom, in Dom. II post The-ophaniam, lacking the beginning; PL vol.118, columns 136-137; H. Barré, Les homéliaires carolingiens de l'école d'Auxerre (Vatican City 1962) p.149, homily H I, 15]; ff. 1rb-2vb Dominica III post epiphaniam. Lectio evangelii secundum Lucam. In illo. Cum descendisset Iesus de monte secute sunt eum turbe multe. Et reliqua [Mt. 8.1-13]. Superior textus evangelii narrat quod dominus in montem sedens octo beatitudines discipulos docuit . . . et quia verus est medicus qui non venit vocare iustos sed// f. 2: //tentem, unde et per divinitatis eius potentiam eum ubique presentem . . . et in carne mea videbo Deum salvatorem meum. Quem visurus sum ipse ego et non alius et oculi mei// [lacking a portion in the middle and the end; PL vol.118, columns 137-138, 144-146; Barré, 149, hom. H I, 160]; f. 3 //sicut naturaliter per bonam consuetudinem custodire incipit. Dicens . . . inter populum habitantes eorum malignantibus non adherent. [ Hom, in Dom IV post Theophaniam, lacking the beginning; PL vol.118, columns 154; Barré, 150, hom. H I, 17bis]; f. 3ra-vb Dominica in septuagesima. Lectio sancti evangelii secundum Mattheum. In illo. Dixit Iesus discipulis suis parabolam hanc; Simile est regnum celorum [Mt. 20.1-16]. Regnum celorum rebus terrenis per similitudinem comparatur, ut per ea quae novimus ad ea quae non novimus cognoscenda surgamus et per visibilia ad invisibilia . . . quia nemo nos conduxit quod est dicere: Nemo nos ad culturam vinee vocavit. Dicit // [Barré, 199, hom. L 21bis].
Written in Italy, in Emilia or in central Italy. Damaged by mildew; top lines of f. 1 cropped. Used for binding, probably a fifteenth-century account book: f. 2v bottom, “C. 1470-1475,” “C[arte] 244 scritte e molte lasciate”; f. 3 top, “146.”

Bibliography:

Levine, 50 fig. 3.
 

1/XI/ITA/9. COMMENTARY ON THE PSALMS. Central Italy, s. XI-XII.

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 310 × 235 (258 × 154) mm. 2 columns of 33 lines; double bounding lines, dry point ruling. Fully developed Caroline minuscule script. Main initials in red or slashed with red; rubrics in brown and red ink, in mixed majuscule.

Scope and Content Note

r-v: //quia non creatura sed vitium oderam. Diligebam quod Dei erat, tabescebam super iniquitates . . . sit tibi sicut sacrificium vespertinum. Mos enim erat aput// [anonymous commentary on Psalms 138.21-140.2].
Written in central Italy. Damaged by damp and insects; scraps of paper pasted on the recto; used for binding.
 

2/XI/ITA/10. MARTYROLOGY. Central Italy, s. XI ex.

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 450 × 295 (332 × 203) mm. 2 columns of 42 lines; double bounding lines, triple between the columns; drypoint ruling; pricking in the outer margin. Late rounded Caroline minuscule script; ascenders are often wedge-shaped; abbreviation marks for q(ue) and b(us) in the small 7 shape; e with very long cedilla is frequent; dark brown ink. Small capital initials and heading line of the text are slashed with red; on verso, an 18-line initial outlined in red, paneled with geometrical patterns in red, green, and blue on yellow grounds.

Scope and Content Note

r-v: //[non]dum retentura suspensum si voluisset . . . quattuor lampadarios quattuor esse episcopos// [ Passio s. Severini: AS Jan. 1.501 cols. 1-2; BHL no.7660].
Written in central Italy. Torn in the middle portion. Ink has flaked off the flesh-side. Used for binding a notarial register (s. XVI?): title on the verso, “Liber instrumentorum domini Georgii,” entered among other notes by a sixteenth-century Italian hand.
 

2/XI/ITA/11. HOMILIARY. Central Italy, s. XI 2.

Note

Fig. 2
Physical Description: Parchment, 1 incomplete bifolium; f. 1, 470 × 235 (cropped) mm., f. 2 (complete) 470 × 340 (353 × 227) mm. Originally the inner bifolium of a quire. 2 columns of 55 lines; single bounding lines; drypoint ruling. Fully developed Caroline minuscule script, often showing descenders ending in a serif; r and s go below the line; d appears in two forms; g is flat-topped; the ampersand ends in a long upright stroke; the diphthong ae is mostly written in full; 7-shaped abbreviation marks for q(ue) and b(us); brown ink. 9/14-line vinestem initials in yellow, red, and green; rubrics in mixed majuscule, in red; first line of text in brown capitals touched with red.

Scope and Content Note

ff. 1-2v: [Homiliary]//cetus et candidatorum grex. Quam si diligentius . . . apparuerit in fine seculi cum ipso et vos appareatis in gloria. Amen [Jerome, Ep. supp. IX de assumptione B.M.V..: PL vol.30, columns 138B-142; BHL no.5355d; Clavis 633; B. Lambert, Bibliotheca hieronymiana manuscripta 3 A (Steenbrugge-'s-Gravenhage 1970) no.309]; f. 2rb Incipit prologus. Defloratio Iohannis humilis Aretini episcopi in venerabilem dormitionem sanc-tissime et gloriosissime dominae nostre Dei genitricis semperque virginis intemerate Marie ex dictis reverentissimorum sanctissimorum patrum . . . digna veneratione concelebrant. Incipit sermo de asumptione sancte Marie. Hodierna die festivitatis Dei genitricis virginis Marie dormitionem . . . cum nulla mulier absque ea . . . //.
On Iohannes, bishop of Arezzo 872-898, see P.B. Gams, Series episcoporum ecclesiae catholicae (Regensburg 1873-1886) p.741; C. Vogel, Introduction aux sources de l'histoire du culte chrétien au moyen âge (Spoleto, 1966) pp.75, 78; Deshusses 40; G. Ropa, in Contribute e studi di liturgia e musica nella regione padana (Bologna 1972) 100. Concerning the sermon on the Assumption see G. Philippart, “Jean évêque d'Arezzo (IXe s.) auteur du De assumptione de Reichenau,” Analecta Bollandiana vol.92 (1974) pp.345-346.
Written in central Italy, most probably Tuscany. Severely stained and rubbed on ff. 1r, 2v (flesh-side). Used for binding an account book (s. XVI): f. 1, “A. 1529 usque ad 35.”
 

1/XI/ITA/12. BIBLE. Central Italy, s. XI 2.

Physical Description: Parchment, upper inside quarter of a leaf; 190/255 × 250 (140/210 cropped × 200 cropped; originally × 255) mm. 2 columns, the inner cropped, of which 20/29 incomplete lines survive; double bounding lines to each column; drypoint ruling. Developed Caroline minuscule script, similar to 1/XI/Ita/3 and 2/XI/Ita/4: r and s go below the line; ascenders and descenders often end in a serif; small 7-shaped b(us) and q(ue) abbreviations; brown ink. 2-line red capital initials; running title “Liber” in red capitals.

Scope and Content Note

r: completely rubbed.

Scope and Content Note

va-vb: //dixitque Ioas ad sacerdotes ... scriba Regis et pontifex// vb: [column incomplete] //in manu Azahclis Regis . . .[de]clinavit ab omnibus . . . Maria// [ 4 Reg. 12.3-10, 13.3-13].
Written in Italy, in the Umbro-Roman region, to judge by script, abbreviations and size. The fragment belonged to an Atlantic Bible (see 1/XI/Ita/3). Completely rubbed on the recto. Used for binding, probably a fifteenth-century account book, as is suggested by “P.Q.1485,” entered by an Italian hand (s. XVI) on the recto.
 

1/XI/ITA/13. AMBROSIAN MANUAL (?). Northern Italy (diocese of Milan?), s. XII.

Physical Description: Parchment, lower outside quarter of one leaf; 145 × 110(115 cropped × 72 cropped; originally ca. 180/190 × 160) mm. I (of original 2) column with 15 incomplete lines; double bounding lines; drypoint ruling. Written in Caroline minuscule of low quality, in liturgical style; dark brown ink. l-line red uncial initial; neumes of St. Gall type. A marginal note (a recipe) entered on the recto in gothic cursive script, s. XIV.

Scope and Content Note

r: //es illas. In illo die . . . et Ger[geseos et Jebu]seos. [Genesis 15.17-21]; [rubric, illeg.) Unus est enim magister . . . Christus dominus [Matthew 23.8, with neumes]; Oratio. [P]erfice in nobis domine . . . facienda cognovimus te//.
Oratio in feria III ebd. II Quadrag. Cf. Corpus ambrosianum liturgicum 2: Das ambrosianiche Sakramentar von Biasca, part 1, ed. O. Helming (Münster 1969) vol.43, no.300; Deshusses 209. A quinquag. usque quadrag.: cf. Liber sacramentorum romanae aeclesiae ordinis anni circuli. , . , ed. L.C. Mohlberg (Rome, 1960) vol.18, no.85.

Scope and Content Note

v: //filium susci[piam]. Cumque ille adquievisse . . . cui respondens Abram// [Genesis 16.2-6].
Written in northern Italy, in the diocese of Milan if the identification of the rite as Ambrosian is correct. Much rubbed on the recto. Used for binding.
 

1/XI/ITA/14. MARTYROLOGY. Central Italy, s. XI ex.

Physical Description: Parchment, fragment of 1 leaf; 230 × 150 (230 cropped × 95 cropped; originally ca. 320/340 × 210) mm. 30 lines of the outer column survive, of the original 2 columns of 44/45 lines; double bounding lines enclose each side of the column; drypoint ruling. Developed Caroline minuscule script, similar to 2/XI/Ita/6. Damaged by mildew. Scraps of paper pasted on the recto. Used for binding.

Scope and Content Note

r-v: [Martyrology] //necavit gla[dio fur]ore arreptus talem auctoritatem per totum orbem . . . vidit iuvenem transeuntem spe[ciosum]// v: //et civ[ium salubritate et ut nomen] habeat glorie ipse . . . post sacrificium ascendit iuvenis aeq[uum]// [ Passio s. Caesarii; AS Nov. 1. 106.1-107.3, 107.5-108.9; BHL no.1511].
Written in central Italy.
 

1/XI/ITA/15. BURCHARD OF WORMS, DECRETUM. Italy, s. XI med.

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 400 × 280 (284 × 180) mm. 2 columns of 40 lines; double bounding lines, triple between the columns; drypoint ruling. Developed rounded Caroline minuscule script of high standards: ascenders are often wedge-shaped; abbreviation marks for r(um) and m(us) appear as a stroke crossing the horizontal elongated tail of the letter; brown ink. 2-line initials in red rustic capitals, slashed with yellow or yellow and green; initials in the text slashed with yellow; rubries in smaller minuscule, in red; running title on the verso, “Lib.” in red rustic capitals, on the recto, “XV. De imperatoribus et principibus” in red minuscule. In the margins a nota-monogram by the copyist and other almost contemporary nota marks in the shape of a deformed s; corrections of the text by an Italian cursive hand, s. XIV-XV. Lower portion torn, and recto so faded and stained as to be hardly readable. Used for binding a “Formolario”: title on the recto, by an Italian hand, s. XVII. Scribbles by an Italian hand on the recto top s. XVI.

Scope and Content Note

r-v: //multiplica, ydolorum cultum insequens fanorum edificia everte . . . de vestris citius finibus amputatis. Data die// [Burchard, Decretum, book 15 De laicis, chaps. 16-19: PL vol.140, columns 898A-900A).
Written in Italy, possibly in the north. Early Italian example of this text.
 

1/XII/ANG/1. SENTENTIAE OR SUMMA. England, s. XII ex.

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 250 × 180 (210 × 142) mm. 2 columns of 33 lines; double bounding lines, triple between the columns; ruled in lead; pricking in the inner margin, in the insular manner. Spiky English twelfth-century minuscule: ascenders often end in a fork; crossed tironian note 7 for et; dark brown ink. 2-line initials alternately in red and green; initials in the text touched with red. Pointing hands in the margins.

Scope and Content Note

r-v: //igitur compendiosam uniuscuiusque descriptionem. Cogitatio est subito animo rei presentis vel rei absentis imaginaria representatio . . . cupiditas est de adipiscendis. Leticia de adeptis, timor de amittendis, tristicia de amissis. Cave igitur ne rerum//.
Written in England. On the upper right-hand recto, the foliation “3” in pencil, s. XX. This foliation and the condition of preservation suggest that the leaf was part of a codex until recently.
 

1/XII/FRA/1. EZECHIEL, with gloss. Northern France, s. XII-XIII.

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf, lower margin cropped; 300 × 200 (ca. 205 × 127) mm. Text on the inner column in 25 lines, gloss on the outer in 50 lines; text and gloss are at times in alternate blocks; double bounding lines enclose text and gloss; ruling in lead; pricking in the outer margin. French gothic bookhand of early type (littera textualis). Initials in the text alternately red and blue; running title on the verso “Eze,” on the recto “chiel,” in red minuscule. Marginalia in contemporary French semi-cursive gothic script.

Scope and Content Note

r-v: //altitudinem per circuitum fundata . . . oblique [et simi]litudo palmarum . . . // [Ezech. 41.8-26, with the ordinary marginal and interlinear gloss].
Written in northern France, possibly in a university (Paris?). Parchment is wrinkled stained, and severely rubbed on the verso. Used for binding: “L.G.” on the verso (s. XVI-XVII) may refer to the contents of the book bound with this leaf.
 

1/XII/FRA/2. MACROBIUS, SATURNALIA. Northern France, s. XII in.

Physical Description: Parchment, bottom of 1 incomplete bifolium; f. 1, 76 cropped × 120 (65 cropped × 94) mm., 11 long lines survive; f. 2, 76 cropped × 45 cropped (65 cropped × 35 cropped) mm., 11 mutilated long lines survive; estimated original number of lines 25-27. It is difficult to envision the position of the bifolium in a quire: correctly folded it shows flesh-side outside, and the lacuna between f. 1v and f. 2r probably corresponds to at least 10 written folios. This suggests either that the original gathering was of 12 folios (with fleshside outside) or more, an unusual practice in that century; or that the text of Macrobius in this codex was incomplete (excerpts?). Single bounding lines; drypoint ruling. Small current Caroline script, showing many abbreviations, often of insular type; the curled shape of the abbreviation mark for omitted m and contractions is noticeable; g has a long open tail; Greek words in small mixed majuscule; brown ink. On f. 1v contemporary marginalia.

Scope and Content Note

ff. 1-2v: //consistes egre nee cicius quam . . . usque ad aequalitatis contentionem// f. 1v: //et excitata leticia cum in Avieno . . . tunc Eustachius: quid agis// [ Sat. 2.7.9-12, 2.8.1-5: ed. J. Willis (Leipzig 1963) 154.12-155.17, 156.20-157.19]; f. 2: //enim de nihilo est. Quod cum Delon . . . Velius Longus, immutatio est epit[heti]// f. 2v://[Roma]no sacro causam dedit . . . iubet et sublata reponi// [ Sat. 3.6.1-6, 3.6.11-16: ed. Willis, 176.14-177.9, 178.13-179.12].
Written in northern France. Damaged by water. Apparently used for binding.
 

2/XII/GER/1. MISSAL. Germany, s. XII ¾.

Note

Fig. 10
Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 347 × 240 (243 × 170) mm. 24 long lines; ruling in lead; pricking in the inner, upper, and lower margins. Spiky, upright, rather compressed gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis format a), in two sizes. 2-line and 3/4-line initials in red capitals; initials in the text slashed with red; rubrics in red in the same script as the text; instructions to the rubricator in the inner margin. Almost contemporary marginalia by a German current gothic bookhand, on the recto “Thomae episcopi et martiris . . .”, on the verso “Genofeve virginis . . . Wilhelmi episcopi . . .”.

Scope and Content Note

r-v: // Secundum Matheum. In illo tempore. Angelus domini apparuit in somnis . . . supra serpentes et scorpiones et supra om// [sanctorale. from the Feast of the Innocents, 28 December, to the Feast of Felix, 14 January].
Written in northern Germany, to judge from the parchment, script, and spelling. A fairly reliable terminus ante quern, 1170, is the added reference to St. Thomas of Canterbury. The conditions of preservation and “96” in pencil (s. XIX-XX) on the upper right-hand corner of the recto suggest that the leaf was part of a codex until the present century. Purchased from Dawson's Book Shop, Los Angeles; book-dealer's note in pencil: “1170. Spain. Missal. Revived Carolingian script.”
 

2/XII/GER/2. CANONICAL EPISTLES, with gloss. Switzerland or Germany, s. XII 2.

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 220 × 145 (142 × 51, text; 155 × 140 with gloss) mm. Text on 1 column of 15 lines, gloss on 2 side columns; double bounding lines to the text, frame ruling to the gloss; drypoint ruling; slits in the outer margin and pricking at the top to guide the ruling. Spiky upright compressed twelfth-century ordinary minuscule script; dark brown ink for the text, brown for the gloss.

Scope and Content Note

r-v: //conspectu ecclesie quos benefaciens . . . scribere tibi spero autem protinus// [3 Ioh. 6-14, with marginal and interlinear gloss, apparently the standard glossatura parva].
Written probably in Switzerland or southern Germany. The state of preservation, and “101” in ink (s. XIX) on the upper right-hand corner of the recto, suggest that the leaf was part of a codex until at least the nineteenth century. From the collection of Otto F. Ege; purchased by UCLA from Dawson's Book Shop, Los Angeles.
 

1/XII/GER/3. PSALTER. Germany, s. XII 2.

Physical Description: Parchment (coarse), 1 leaf; 210 × 153 (155 × 105) mm. 20 long lines; ruling not discernible. Spiky late Caroline minuscule script: shafts, both ascenders and minims, are wedge-shaped; brown ink. 4-line majuscule I in blue, surrounded by red, on the recto; initials of verses in red.

Scope and Content Note

r-v: //[salu]taris noster et averte iram . . . nomen tuum in eternum// [Ps. 84.5-85.12].
Written in Germany. Parchment wrinkled and stained. Used for binding. Notes by a German cursive gothic hand on the verso, dated 1558. Notes in pencil in German (s. XX) on both recto and verso.
 

1/XII/GER/4, Palimpsest.

 

Unidentified illegible text, primary script Germany (Uckerath?), s. XII.

Physical Description: Parchment, 3 fragments that were formerly 2 leaves; 360 × 250 (ca. 310 × ca. 180) mm. 2 columns of ca. 36 lines. Late spiky ordinary minuscule verging to gothic; brown ink. Red initials and rubrics in red minuscule. Reduced to palimpsest in the late sixteenth century.
 

JOHANNES CRUPAEUS, REPORT ON THE TITHES OF UCKERATH, in German, secondary script. Germany (Uckerath), 1598.

Physical Description: Parchment, 2 bifolia, the outer torn into 2 separate leaves; 250 × 180 mm. 27/29 long lines, perpendicular to the primary script, on ff. 2v-4; not ruled. Written in late German cursive gothic; grayish brown ink. Each folio is numbered in the lower right-hand recto, N. 1 to N. 4.

Scope and Content Note

ff. 1-4: f. 1 blank, except a note vertically written with the date 1565, corrected to 1665; f. 1v blank, remains of a seal. f. 2 [title, repeated below by a seventeenth-century hand] Nachricht über die Zehnden der pastoray Uckerath per Rev. dominum Johannem Crupaeum pastorem der selbs; ff. 2v-4 Des si auch wissen allen nimen nachkommen . . . daruff gedan [mentions the date 25 July 1598]; f. 4v [archival register, s. XVII-XVIII] N. 4 blattern von Pastoren Johan Crupaeus de 1598 betrifft den Zehenden besonderes der Bellenbergt und . . . [mentions place-names, among them Ravenstein].
Both the primary and secondary scripts are German; the leaves were in the parish of Uckerath, where the secondary script was written, by 1598. This quire was kept in a parchment folder, which is now 2/XII/Ger/5 described below. The primary script may once have formed part of the twelfth-century portion (ff. 5-6v) of the Uckerath missal and Liber censuum described above, MS *170/527; in the little that one can decipher here, the hand and the layout are similar. The measurements, however, not only of the page but of the written space and the individual columns, do not match those of the missal, nor does the number of lines per page (36) correspond with that of the missal (33). Whatever their origin, the leaves have certainly had a separate existence for 400 years. Gift of Edmund M. Riese, ca. 1936, along with the missal (*170/527) and with 2/XII/Ger/5.
 

2/XII/GER/5. Missal. Germany (Uckerath). s. XII 1

 

1) f. 1ra: [ Dom. VIII(?) post Pentec.] //[ig]nem mittetur. Igitur . . . [Matthew 7.20-21 = Roman missal, Dom. VII post Pentec.]; Off. Populum humilem s[alvum] f[acies] [Roman missal, Dom. VIII post, Pentec.]; Secre. Deus qui legalium differentias . . . [Roman missal, Dom. VII post Pentec.]; Comm. Gustate et videte . . . [Roman missal, Dom. VIII post Pentec.]; Post comm. Tua nos domine medicinalia . . . [Deshusses 1152].

 

2) f. 1ra-rb: Feria IIII, Ad Romanos [Rom. 5.8-11]; f. 1rb-va Secundum Marcum [Marc. 9.37-47].

 

3) f. 1va: Feria VI, Matheum [Matthew 23.13-23).

 

4) f. 1vb: Dominica IX. Ecce Deus adiuvat . . . mala inimicis meis et in// [Roman missal, Introitus Dom. IX post Pentec. ].

 

5) f. 2ra: [ Dom. X post Pentec. ]//se exaltat humiliabitur . . . [Luc. 18.14: Roman missal, Evang. Dom. X post Pentec. ]; Off. Exaltabo te . . .; Secr. Tibi dornine sacrificia . . .[Deshusses 1160); Comm. Honora dominum de tua subslancia . . .; Post comm. Quesumus domine Deus noster ut quos divinis reparare . . . [Deshusses 1161).

 

6) f. 2ra-rb: Feria IIII, Ad Corinthios [1 Cor. 6.15-20]; Evang. Qui non est mecum. Require in ... feria.

 

7) f. 2rb: Feria VI, Lucam [actually, Marc. 2.13-17].

 

8) f. 2v: Dominica XII. Deus in adiutorium . . . [Roman missal, Introitus Dom. XII post Pentec.]; Coll. Omnipotens sempiterne Deus qui abundantia pietatis tue . . . [Deshusses 1162]; Ad Corinthios [2 Cor. 3.4-9; Roman missal, Epist. Dom. XII post Pentec.]; Off. Benedicam dominum . . . [Roman missal, Grad. Dom. XII post Pentec. ]; Secundum Marcum . . . lingue eius et loquer// [Marc. 7.31-35].

Note

The text seems to be a transitional stage between the separate sacramentary and lectionary and the new plenary missal.
Physical Description: Parchment, 2 leaves; f. 1, cropped: 360 × 210 (280 × 180 cropped) mm. 2 columns of 28 lines (outer column cropped); f. 2: 360 × 270 (280 × 200) mm. 2 columns of 28 lines, with a surviving vertical strip of the conjugate (215 × 70 mm., 17 incomplete lines of the inner column). Drypoint ruling barely discernible. Spiky ordinary minuscule in brown ink. Primary initials placed outside the written space, alternately red and blue, at times with flourishes of the alternate color; secondary 1-line initials in red; initials in the text alternately red, green, and blue; rubrics in red minuscule. Neumes of St. Gall type.
Written at Uckerath by the same hand that wrote folios 5-6v of the Uckerath missal, *170/527 above. These leaves may formerly have belonged to that missal, but the evidence is inconclusive; f. 2, which is uncropped, is smaller than the missal's leaves, the measure of the written space is smaller, and the lines per page are fewer. Whatever their origin, the leaves have certainly had a separate existence since the seventeenth century, when they were made into a folder to enclose the quire that is now 1/XII/Ger/4 above; traces of sewing across both leaves; on f. 1v in gothic cursive, s. XVII, “Diese fier uns beschlossen(?) . . . blatter der Kirchen Uckerath zustand// (tear) //Zubeobachten.” Gift of Edmund M. Riese, ca. 1936, along with the missal (*170/527) and with 1/XII/Ger/4.
 

1/XII/IBE/1. Gregorian Sacramentary. Spain. s. XII med or XII 2

 

r-v: //poscentibus ut his qui te auctore . . . sacris domine misteriis expiati et veniam consequamur// [temporale, from the post com. of the Fer. V post II Dom. Quadrag. to post com. of Fer. III post III Dom. Quadrag.: Deshusses 220-227 “Implorantes domine misericordiam tuam . . . ,” 229-238].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 337 × 225 (251 × 138) mm. 26 long lines; double bounding lines; ruling hardly discernible, apparently hardpoint. Rounded ordinary minuscule script written in liturgical style; sporadic use of v and bow of d resembling an 8; only one instance (on the verso) of an open-loop e recalling Visigothic script; frequent use of a reverse c-shaped abbreviation mark for b(us) and q(ue). 2-line initials in red capital or uncial; rubrics in red mixed majuscule.
Written in Spain. Stained by damp. “4” and “6” in modern pencil on the upper recto. The state of preservation suggests that the leaf was part of a codex until recent times.
 

1/XII/ITA/1. Augustine, Tractatus In Evangelium Ioannis. Central Italy. s. XII 1

 

r-v: //[ido]nei erant ubi erat Christus . . . sed quos et redemit fraters //rb://[evan]gelii et bono eius odore excitati . . . et clamabat dicens: Si quis sitit ve[niat]// va://fluent aquae vivae. Quid est . . . voluptate et capit de corpo[re]// vb://et forma membrorum accenduntur . . . vivescit purgata conscientia et hauriens// [Augustine, Tractatus 31.10.15-11.9, 31.11.27-32 heading, 32.2.4-21, 32.3.4-5; ed. Willems, CC 36.299, 300, 300-301, 301-302].

Physical Description: Parchment, top portion of 1 leaf; 240 × 350 (215 cropped × 246) mm. 2 columns, of which 24 lines survive; originally ca. 48-50 lines; single bounding lines; drypoint ruling. Late rounded stately Caroline minuscule, showing the peculiar ri ligature; ascenders often wedge-shaped; d appears in two forms, uncial and upright; b(us) and q(ue) abbreviation marks are in the small 7 shape; dark brown ink.
Written in central Italy. Rubbed and stained on the recto. Used for binding.
 

2/XII/ITA/2. Homiliary. Central Italy. s. XII 1

 

r-v: //[carn]es sacrificiorum porcinas. Hic vero . . . Et post filios occisa est et mater. Hecergo de impietatibus . . . ipsi gloria in secula seculorum. Amen [ Passio ss. Machabeorum: BHL no.5108]; Item sermo beati Maximi nempe in nativate eorum. Unum esse spiritum novi ac veteris testamenti etiam Machabeorum [fratrum?] magnanimitas pro[ . .] declarat qui (de etermtatis, catchword)//[Ps. Maximus of Turin; PL 57.693].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 520 × 330 (394 × 258) mm. Horizontal catchword in the bottom margin, below the second column of text. 2 columns of 42 lines; double bounding lines, triple between the columns; drypoint ruling. Firm ordinary minuscule script, showing the peculiar ri ligature and verging to gothic; both a form of ampersand and the tironian note 7 for et are used. Title in red minuscule; 4-line initial outlined in red filled with yellow. Folio number 120 on the top recto (s. XV).
Written in central Italy. Quite damaged and nearly illegible on the verso. Used for binding a sixteenth-century account book: title by an Italian hand (s. XVI) entered among other notes on the verso, “Quattro protocolli, difficile legendi. Per Innocentio de Bernardini da Campo fattore . . . car(te) 234 dal 1534 al 1551.” A scrap of a label (s. XVI) is pasted on the verso.
 

1/XII/ITA/3. Gregory the Great, Dialogues. Italy. s. XII med

 

r-v: //eas colligi precepit et [in praelo] mitti. Et quamlibet . . . alii quoque septem fratres ex nomine// v: //Ceteri autem in eo ordine [ex ca]rne educti sunt . . . sunt ut precibus optineantur// [Gregory, Dial. 1.7-8, 1.8: ed. U. Moricca, Gregorii Magni Dialogi libri IV (Rome 1924)46.15-47.23, 48.5-26].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf cropped at the top; 275 × 230 (220 cropped × 140) mm. 23 long lines, originally probably 27 long lines; double bounding lines; drypoint ruling. Calligraphic ordinary minuscule, showing an archaizing flat-topped g and slanting a of early type; brown ink. 2-line initials in red; rubrics in bold red minuscule; instructions to the rubricator quite visible, vertically written in the outer margin.
Written in Italy, most probably in the north. Used for binding. A note by an Italian hand (s. XVII) on the recto may refer to the contents of the book bound with this leaf: “Clavenna 1608,” Clavenna possibly being the name of a village, now Chiavenna, in upper Lombardy.
 

2/XII/ITA/4. Martyrology. Central Italy. s. XII 1

 

r-v: //emendi causa pergerent Egiptum. Qui sepius . . . de eo etiam quod cum omnia possit Deus susci// [ Vita Hieronymi: PL 22.221-213; BHL no.3871 and 3872].

Physical Description: Parchment, top portion of 1 leaf; 260 × 350 (230 cropped × 245) mm. 2 columns, of which 28 lines survive from an original ca. 50 lines, with a surviving vertical strip of the conjugate (260 × 57 mm., an unidentified Passio); double bounding lines to each column; drypoint ruling. Written in a late rounded Caroline minuscule; dark brown ink. 5-line initial, uncolored pen and ink with stylized leaf motif. Foliation “CLXXV” on top recto (s. XIV).
Written in central Italy (Tuscany?). Used for binding a notarial register; title in an Italian hand, s. XVII, “Instrumentorum liber, 1619 . . . 1625, A.8 . . . signor Pietro Mario Cianeschi, not(aio).”
 

1/XII/ITA/5. Gospel Lectionary. Northern Italy. s. XII-XIII

 

r: completely rubbed.

 

v: //gelizare pauperibus misit me . . . que procedebant de ore ipsius [ Lectio evang. secundum Luc. 4.18-22]; Feria VI secundum Marcum. In illo tempore. Egressus dominus lesus venit in patriam . . . paucos infirmos impositis mani// [ Lectio evang. secundum Marc. 4.1-5; the readings do not agree with either the Roman or the Ambrosian Capitulare evangeliorum].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 260 × 170 (217 × 140) mm. 24 long lines; single bounding lines; ruled in lead. Written in a bold, somewhat crude, ordinary minuscule in liturgical style, verging toward gothic; dark brown ink. 4-line initial in red with simple blue penwork; Initials in the text slashed with red; rubrics in red minuscule.
Written probably in northern Italy, or possibly in southern Germany. Parchment wrinkled, stained on the verso; completely rubbed on the recto, save traces of rubric. Used for binding, probably as a pastedown.
 

1/XII/ITA/6. Missal. Northern Italy. s. XII-XIII

 

r-v: //dete iusti in domino rectos . . . va In nativitate sancti Georgii martyris . . . et omnem qui fert// [end of Missa in Dom. II post Pasc.; beginning of Missa s. Georgii; 23 April].

Physical Description: Parchment, top portion of 1 leaf; 155 × 205 (143 cropped × 160) mm. 2 columns, of which 17 lines survive; double bounding lines; ruling in lead. Rounded early gothic book-hand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); brown ink. 3-line and 7/8-line initials with heavy vine stem motif outlined in red or brown and filled here and there with yellow and red; 2-line initials in yellow outlined in red; initials in the text slashed with yellow; rubrics in red minuscule.
Written in northern Italy. Badly rubbed on the verso. Used for binding. Scribbles by sixteenth-century hands.
 

1/XII/ITA/7. Homiliary. Central Italy. s. XII med

 

r-v: //eam filii non vide[ant] matrem . . . rerum imagine Adam// rb: //quia et de latere . . . usque ad Noe secunda// va://unde dicitur in psalmo . . . ageret . . . et novem . . . [ Hom, in Fer. VI post III Dom. Quadrag.: Augustine, Tract. in Ioh. 15.7.13-8.1, 8.6-9.3, 9.10-10.13, Willems, CC 36.153-154]; vb: Presenti . . . lectio . . . tanto incrementus (?) . . . relaturus . . . // [almost illegible; opening portion of unidentified sermon].

Physical Description: Parchment, incomplete top portion of 1 leaf; 270 × 245 (257 cropped × 205 cropped; original width ca. 235) mm. 2 columns (the inner cropped) of which 23 lines survive; single bounding lines; drypoint ruling. Written in a bold ordinary minuscule in liturgical style, verging on gothic; brown ink. On vb, 10-line initial in yellow outlined in red with ornamental patterns.
Written in central Italy. Parchment torn, stained and rubbed on the verso. Used for binding; title by an Italian hand (s. XVI) on the verso, “Berardino . . . dal 1550 al 1562.”
 

1/XII/ITA/8. Psalter, with gloss. Italy. ca. 1160-1190

 

ff. 1-2v: //olive et arva non afferent ... in psalmis canentem [Hab. 3.17-19: Canticum Hahacuc, Stegmüller 21g, with marginal and interlinear gloss, apparently the standard glossatura parva]; Canticum Moysi. Audite caeli que loquor . . . et dicent tibi: quando di// abbreviation marks for b(us) and q(ue) in the shape of a colon with long tail; r and s often go below the line; the peculiar rounded ri ligature occurs; brown ink. On the verso 2 line initial in red majuscules, followed by the opening words of the text in brown small-majuscules; chapter number in red.

Written in central Italy, probably in the area of Rome. Stained and rubbed on the verso. Used for binding an account book or notarial register: note by an Italian hand (s, XVII) on the verso, “5”. 1608 sino a 63.”
 

2/XII/ITA/11. Homiliary. Central Italy. s. XII med

 

r-v: //vivi. Id est, tu domine de carne virginis factus es . . , perrexit Petrus ad crucem, qui repulso timore mortis moriendi ordinem tam acerba passione quaesivit [unidentified sermon on Matthew 16.13-19]; va Sermo sancti Augustini. Beatus Petrus apostolorurn primus domini nostri Iesu Christi tam amator quam negator sicut indicat euuangelium . . . nec aliud respondenti: amo, quam: pasce oves meas. Commendatis Petro ovibus// [unidentified sermon, Ps. Augustine].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf, cropped at the bottom; 445 × 310 (413 cropped × 248) mm. 2 columns of which 51 lines survive; single bounding lines (?); drypoint ruling. Late rounded Caroline minuscule script: r and s go below the line; r is also found in the 2-shape; s in majuscule form at the end of words rises above the other letters: d appears in two forms; abbreviation mark for q(ue) in small 7-shape, for b(us) in 7-shape or colon; brown ink. On va, 8-line initial with vine stems and yellow interlaces on red, blue, green, and purple backgrounds; rubrics in mixed uncial, in red; first lines of text in brown mixed uncial.
Written in central Italy, in a scriptorium maintaining high standards, perhaps in the Umbro-Roman region. Damaged and covered with a strip of paper pasted on the middle of the recto. Used for binding a notarial register: title by an Italian hand (s. XVI) on the recto, “Instrumenta extensa, 3°, Protocollo dalli 20 luglio 1514 sino li 26 maggio 1570, di ca(rte) 81. Con un quinternetto in quarto foglio de c(arte) 8 con poca tavola, mancante di molte carte che principia li 2 settembre 1570 sino li 21 settembre 1570. Sig. Elisio Giovanni Elisii Not(ai)o.”

Bibliography

Levine, 50 fig. 4.
 

2/XII/ITA/12. Homiliary. Italy. s. XII 2

 

r-v: //demos [. . .] operatur [. . .] prophete . . . resurrectio presignat. Hic Iona . . . Nam qui se a celesti pretio vident redemptos ad celestia non dubitent preparatos [unidentified sermon]; vb Sermo sancti Augustini (in) Die(m) sanctum pasce. Passionem vel resurrectionem domini et salvatoris . . . quid egerit. Libere enim egit// [Ps. Augustine, serm. 160: PL vol.40.2059].

Physical Description: Parchment, bottom portion of 1 leaf; 290/340 × 310 (190/240 cropped × 223) mm. 2 columns, of which 22/26 lines survive; single bounding lines; drypoint ruling. Written in ordinary minuscule script in liturgical style, verging on gothic; brown ink. On vb, 13-line initial with zoomorphic and floral patterns, painted in yellow, rose, blue; title in red minuscule.
Written in Italy (central?). Rubbed on the recto. Used for binding, probably an account book or notarial register: partial title by an Italian hand (s. XVI) on the recto, “1570 usque ad . ...” Other sixteenth-century scribbles on the margins.
 

2/XII/ITA/13. Bible. Central Italy. s. XII in

 

r-v: Et factum est verbum domini . . . et dixit ad eos// rb://immolaverunt hostias domino . . . dies et Ninive [. . .] viri Ninivite// va://ut faceret eis et non fecit . . . et iumenta multa. Explicit Ionas propheta [Ion. 1.1-9, 1.16-3.5, 3.10-4.11]; va Incipit prophatio in Micheas prophetam. Temporib// [cf. Stegmüller 526]; vb Incipit argumentum. Micheas de Mosrachim . . . percusserit iudicis Israel. Explicit argumentum [Stegmüller 525]; vb Incipit Micheas propheta. Verburn domini quod factum est ad Micheam . . . quasi acervum lapidum// [Mich. 1.1-6].

Physical Description: Parchment, top portion of 1 leaf; 320 × 300 (270 cropped × 245) mm. 2 columns, of which 37 lines survive; originally ca. 55 lines; single bounding lines; drypoint ruling. Developed rounded Caroline minuscule script; olive brown ink. First line of text and colophons in brown small mixed uncial and capital; 12-line initials in yellow with interlaces, paneled with red and blue geometrical patterns; 2-line initials in red uncial; rubrics in large uneven mixed capitals in red; running title in red minuscule, on the recto only.
Written in central Italy, in the Umbro-Roman region. The fragment belonged to an Atlantic Bible (see 1/XI/ITA/3). Ink faded and stained by water. Used for binding.
 

2/XII/ITA/14. Martyrology. Central Italy. s. XII med

 

ff. 1-2v: //velante sibi Spiritu Sancto tamen secuturam prenoscens providentia . . . celebremus diem sollempnitate. Auxiliante domino qui vivit et regnat in trinitate per immortalia secula seculorum. Amen [end of an unidentified legend]; f. 1rb-vb Incipit passio sancte Reparatę virginis, Beatorum Christi martyrum gloriosa certamina . . . et cum mori in crucis patibulo dignatus sit tertia// [ Passio s. Reparatae, BHL no.7184b]; f. 2r-v //post Iesu Christi domini nostri gloriosam ascensionem cum beatus Paulus . . . eos qui unum et verum Deum sancti baptismatis// [ Passio s. Dionysi Areopagitae: AS Oct. 4.792 par. 2-793 par. 10, BHL no.2178].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 bifolium, margins slightly cropped; 410 × 277 (356 × 214) mm. 2 columns of 45 lines; double bounding lines in the inner and outer margins; drypoint ruling. Crude, rather compressed ordinary minuscule script in liturgical style; brown ink. 7-line initial in yellow outlined in red, enclosing white floral patterns on blue background; rubrics in mixed majuscule in red.
Written in central Italy, possibly in Florence, given the presence of St. Reparata. “1544” (a date?) is noted twice in the lower margin of f. 1.
 

2/XII/ITA/15. Martyrology. Central Italy. s. XII 2/4

 

r-v: //dicunt de oriente venisse presbiterum. Dicit ei Alexander . . . sanctus Alexander clamavit eum dicens . . . // [ Passio ss. Alexandri, Eventii et Theoduli: BHL no.266].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf, damaged at the bottom; ca. 415 × 305 (ca. 320 × 195) mm. 2 columns of 35 (?) lines; single bounding lines; drypoint ruling; pricking in the outer margin. Late rounded calligraphic Caroline minuscule script: d appears in two forms; abbreviations for b(us) and q(ue) marked by a colon; olive brown ink. Initials in the text slashed with red.
Written in central Italy. Severely damaged by mildew. Scraps of paper, covered by a late sixteenth-century cursive Italian script, are pasted on the recto. Used for binding a notarial register: title by an Italian hand (s. XVI), “Ser Pietro Pegli (?) 1574” (1574 is repeated three times).
 

1/XII/ITA/16. Gospel Lectionary. Italy. s. XII 2

 

r-v: //die vos cognoscetis . . . manifestabo ei me ipsum [ Lectio in vig. Pentec., Ioh. 14.20-21]; Dominica in Pentecosten sequentia evangelii secundum Iohannem. In illo tempore . . . michi Pater sic facio [ Lectio in Pentec., Ioh. 14.23-31]; Feria. II. In illo tempore ... in mundum et dilexerunt// [ Lectio Fer. II post Pentec., Ioh. 3.16-19; use of Rome].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf, 333 × 225 (229 × 138) mm. 21 long lines; ruling now invisible. Rounded stately ordinary minuscule in liturgical style; chestnut brown ink. On the verso a 17 line initial paneled with geometrical red, blue, and yellow patterns on blue background, and ending in a heavy tail with conventional foliage; rubrics in red minuscule mixed with majuscule letters. On the top right-hand corner of the recto, the folio number “LXXXXVII” (s. XIV?).
Written in Italy, possibly in the north. Ink faded on the recto and rubbed on the verso. Used as a pastedown in binding.
 

2/XII/ITA/17. Bible. Northern Italy (?). s. XII-XIII

 

r-v: //sed et ligna cedrina mitte michi . . . super duodecim boves impositum erat// [2 Paralip. 2.8-4.4].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf, cropped at the margins; 470 × 335 (345 × 221) mm. 2 columns of 36 lines; double bounding lines, triple between the columns; ruling in lead; pricking in the inner margin. Rather spiky gothic bookhand of early type: d and r appear in two forms; abbreviation for q(ue) and b(us) marked by a colon; brown ink. Running title “Lib.” on the verso, “Paralipomena II us” on the recto, in stately minuscule; corrections by a contemporary reader; red paragraph-marks and chapter numbers (according to the chapter division attributed to Stephen Langton), s, XIII.
Written probably in northern Italy, but southern Germany is not to be excluded. Rubbed in the middle portion; the edges have been cut. Used for binding: title by an Italian hand (s. XV1-XVII) on the recto, “Parte IIII delle Indie Orientali). 4.”
 

1/XIII/ANG/1. Homiliary. England. s. XIII 1

 

ff. 1-2v: //requirat et sicut totum corpus levat ad celum . . . vitam eternam prestante domino nostro Ihesu Christo. etc. [unidentified homily]; f. 1r-v Cum sero esset die illa [Ioh. 20.19]. Scilicet die resurrectionis, una sabbatorum, id est prima sabbatorum idest prima die septimane. Nam omnes . . . inquiri debuerit in lectione et disputatione [ Hom. in octavo Paschae]; f. 1v Cum esset sero die illa una sabbatorum . . . pax vobis [Ioh. 20.19]. Dominus ac redemptor noster veritatem sue resurrectionis et gloriam multis indicavit argumentis . . . eis resistere. Voluptas omnium sensuum delici// [ Hom. in octava Paschae]; f. 2r-v //pastor et facte sunt in devoratione omnium bestiarum . . . iudicii opera sanctitatis; hoc autem nobis prestare dignetur Ihesus Christus qui vivit et regnat etc. [unidentified homily]; f. 2v Dominica 3 a super epistola sermo [title added by a later hand] Obsecro vos tamquam advenas et peregrinos . . . adversus animam [ 1 Petr. 2.11]. In hac dominica tercia pro gaudio resurrectionis in introitu misse premittitur iubilatio . . . hoc enim si quis fecerit gratus efficitur Deo [ Hom, in Dom. III post Paschem]; f. 2v Obsecro vos tamquam advenas et peregrinos . . . adversus animam [1 Petr. 2.11]. Petrus non solum arguit et increpat sed sicut docet nos Paulus obsecrat . . . Ier. xii. Si cum peditibus currens laborasti quomodo contendere// [ Hom. in Dom. III post Pascham].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 bifolium, 320 × 215 mm.; f. 1 (240 × 130 mm.), 52 long lines; f. 2 (235 × 135 mm.), 51 long lines; ruled in lead, f. 1r-v written above the top ruled line, f. 2r-v written below the top ruled line; ruled space is the same for both, 238 mm.; pricking in inner, outer, and lower margins. Uneven English gothic bookhand (littera textualis): the tironian note 7 is seldom crossed; insular abbreviation for est; flat-topped suprascript a in abbreviations; curled three-stroke suprascript sign for abbreviation; dark brown ink. 2-line plain initials in red; instructions to the rubricator visible on the outer margin of f. 1; titles left blank, except the one added by a later hand on f. 2v.
Written in England, probably toward the middle of the thirteenth century.
 

1/XIII/ANG/2. Aristotle, Metaphysics. England. s. XIII ex

Scope and Content Note

In Latin.
 

f. 1r-v://et partes eorum, forma vero non est . . . tocius forme. Que igitur est materia partium que// f. 2r-v://et quidem sunt quorum essentia est mixto . . . diffinire aliquid quale sit et quale scitur per qua// [Aristotle, Metaphysica bks. 6, 7; translation from the Greek book Z 1035a-1036a, H 1043a-b, with glosses).

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 bifolium; 295 × 220 (148 × 87 text, 190 × 196 gloss) mm. Probably originally the conjugate first and tenth leaves of a gathering of 10 leaves. Text on 27 long lines, gloss bordering the text; double column frame ruling for the gloss; ruled in lead. Text written in a calligraphic English gothic bookhand (littera textualis formata) in black ink; marginal and interlinear glosses written in anglicana, in brown ink. Paragraph marks alternately red and blue; running title, “Metha[physi]ce” (verso), “Liber VII us, Liber VIII ua ” (recto), written in anglicana in brown ink. Faces and pointing hands in the margins.
Written in England (Oxford?). Stained and worn. Used for binding an Italian notarial register: title (s. XVI) on f. 1, “Instrumenta D. Cintii Sofanii incipientia die 24 Aprilis 1592 usque ad 13 Settembris 1593”; on f. 2v, “1592/1594” and “B. 1592, 1593.”
 

1/XIII/ANG/3. Treatise on the Trinity. Unidentified England. s. XIII 2

 

r-v: //otum bonum eius sed ad fruendum eo quo fruendum . . . intellectum ad cognitionem Dei et sui ipsius. Quod in trinitate personarum unitas essencie est. In unitate nature divine tres persone sunt quarum prima a nulla est ... pluralitatem personarum in unitate essencie aut ipsam unitatem essencie//.

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf, cropped on the inner side; 205 × 115 (176 × 110 cropped) mm. 2 columns of 54 lines; ruled in lead. Semi-cursive English gothic hand (littera hybrida); brown ink. 4-line red initial on verso; initials in the text touched with red; paragraph marks in red; title in red minuscule. On the upper recto, “3” (s. XIV?) may be a running title.
Written in England. Stained on the recto; scraps of paper pasted on the verso. Used for binding.
 

2/XIII/ANG/4A, B. Bible. England. s. XIII 1

 

ff. 1-2v: // [testamen]tum enim huius mundi mortem comparatur ... sapiens in verbis producit se// ff. 3-4v: //[distrib]ue hereditatem tuam, cibaria . . . rose plantate super//[Eccli. 14.12-20.29, 33.24-39.17].

Physical Description: Parchment (coarse), 2 bifolia, slightly cropped at the top; 210 × 155 (160 cropped × 103) mm. Originally the first and eighth leaves (ff. 1, 4) of a gathering of 8, and the second and seventh leaves (ff. 2, 3) of the same gathering. 2 columns of 46 (originally 47) lines; leadpoint frame ruling barely discernible. Uneven English gothic bookhand (littera textualis): insular abbreviations, tironian note 7 both crossed and uncrossed; ink almost black. Red paragraph marks underscore the opening words of the chapters and extend to the margin to include the chapter number. The original chapter numbers have been replaced with a new series of roman numerals in the margin, according to the chapter division attributed to Langton. Contemporary marginal corrections of the text and cross references to other books of the Bible in littera textualis; on f. 1, a marginal note in anglicana.
Written in England. Rubbed and partially illegible on ff. 1r, 4v (hair side), and 2r, 3v (flesh side). Used for binding.
 

1/XIII/ANG/5. Clementine Constitutions. England. s. XIII-XIV

 

r-v: //noscuntur eligere sepulturam. Nos autem pii patris amore laudabili . . . aut in eos taliter data vel donata procedant// [from the “De sepulturis” section, 3.7 chap. 2, of the “Liber septimus” of the decretal collections, better known as the Clementine Constitutions; ed. E. Friedberg, Corpus iuris canonici 2: Decretalium collectiones (1881; repr. Graz 1959) 1162-1164].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 200 × 150 (168 × 116) mm. 38/39 long lines; ruled in lead. Written in a rounded English cursive gothic (anglicana); brown ink. Initials in the text slashed with red; paragraph marks alternately red and blue; running title, “[De sepul]turis Liber” (verso), “VII” (recto), written in textualis.
Written in England. Insect damage. Used as a pastedown in binding. “44” on the top verso seems to be a bookdealer's note.
 

2/XIII/FRA/1A, B. Johannes Mesue, Grabadin. Northern France. s. XIII ex

 

ff. 1-2v: //et tussi et confortat pulmonem et laxat(?) et stomachum(?) et eius modum est sicut sirupus de agresta. Sirupus de kesmes . . . aliqui aromatizant illam cum speciebus alefanguine sicut est zinziber(?) crocus cinamo// [f. 2, much rubbed and half covered by pasted cardboard]; f. 2v . . . et sunt qui vocant utrumque utroque nomine et in omni eorum sunt diversi et sunt ad iuvamenta// [Ioannis Mesue Grabadin quod est aggregatio et antidotarium electuariorum et confectionum et aliarum medicinarum compositarum (Venice: Pelegrinus de Pasqualibus Bononiensis, 1490) ff. 17va-21va, “Distinctio vi, De syrupis”; a few lines are missing from the bottom of each manuscript column]; ff. 3-4v://[te]rantur contritione bona et iterum confice cum glutino eorum et fiant inde trocisi . . . donec coaguletur et prohice super illud reliquas medicinas et administretur. Unguentum ceraseos parvum faciens nasci// [op. cit. ff. 26ra-31ra, from “Distinctio viii, De trocisis” to “Distinctio xi, De unguentis”; a few lines are missing from the bottom of each manuscript column].

Physical Description: Parchment, 2 fragmentary bifolia: A (ff. 1, 4), cropped at the bottom and at the outside of each leaf; f. 1, 250 × 165 (235 cropped × 140 cropped) mm.; f. 4, 230 × 155 (230 cropped × 130 cropped) mm. Originally the second and seventh leaves of a quire. 2 columns, the outer mutilated, of which 50 (f. 1) or 60 (f. 4) lines survive. B (ff. 2, 3), cropped at the bottom and at the outside of each leaf; f. 2, 235 × 180 (235 cropped × 155 cropped) mm.; f. 3, 235 × 150 (235 cropped × 120 cropped) mm. Originally the third and sixth leaves of the same quire as bifolium A. 2 columns, the outer mutilated, of which 54 lines survive. Original written space ca. 250 × ca. 160 mm., in 2 columns of 52/62 lines. No ruling discernible. Written in a current, rather compressed and hurried, heavily abbreviated French gothic bookhand of the university type (littera textualis): though the tironian note 7 is uncrossed, a rare feature in northern French manuscripts of this time, the ductus of the script points to that region; brown ink. Blank space is left at the beginning of each paragraph for 2-line initials, never executed; instructions to the rubricator are clearly visible.
Written in northern France, possibly Paris. Damaged by insects; remains of a piece of cardboard pasted on ff, 2r, 3v. Used as pastedowns for binding: title, vertically on ff. 1r 4v, in a French hand (s. XVI), “Diascorides, quem Petrus Paduanensis legendo correxit et exponendo quae utiliora sunt in luce reduxit. Impressum Collae, per magjstrum lohannem Alemannum de Modemblich, Anno Christi millesimo cccc lxxviii mense iulii” (GW *8436). Bequeathed to UCLA by Kenneth C. Kingsley and William J. Kingsley.
 

1/XIII/FRA/2. Commentary on Aristotle's De Sompno. France (northern?). s. XIII 2

 

r-v: // scientia ad significatum cum dicitur de illo quod non est non potest scientia . . . Adhuc autem quid sit sompnium etc. Postquam Aristoteles in precedenti parte . . . unius partis alterius nec esse circa ...//.

Physical Description: Parchment, middle portion of 1 leaf cut horizontally, 113 × 210 (113 cropped × 164) mm. 2 columns, of which 29-32 lines survive; ruling in lead; pricking on the outer margin. Spiky, extremely abbreviated, semi-cursive gothic script (littera hybrida) by a scribe with training in philosophical texts; brown ink. Blank space left for 3-line initials (never executed) at the beginning of each paragraph.
Written in France, probably in the north (Paris?). Lower portion torn. On the recto, offset of a fragmentary leaf (s. X?) written in Caroline minuscule. Used for binding.
 

1/XIII/FRA/3. Treatise on Physics. Northern France. s. XIII 2

 

r-v: //divisionis illi autem iterum non confitentur quod omne corpus sensibile cadens sit sub divisione . . . angulos qui sunt (?) in eo omnia elementa adurancia (?) calefatiencia ...// [from the third book of the treatise, cf. running head line; probably a commentary on Aristotle's Physics 3.1-3, De motu; with extensive glosses].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 300 × 210 (text 157 × 84) mm. Text in 30 long lines; gloss in three vertical columns (one in the inner margin, two about 30 mm. wide in the outer margin) and in the lower margin; double frame ruling for the gloss; ruled in lead. Calligraphic upright French gothic bookhand (littera textualis); brown ink; gloss in small cursive gothic, in the same ink as the text. Running head line in the upper margin of the recto in brown ink, “3 us.”
Written in France, probably in the north. Used as a pastedown in binding. Ink flaked off and large stains on both sides.
 

1/XIII/FRA/4. Aristotle, De Anima. Northern France. s. XIII med or XII 2

Scope and Content Note

In Latin.
 

r-v: //[for]mice aut api aut vermi. Preterea sensus hii quoniam vim semper fantasie . . . De fantasia quidem igitur quid est et propter quid est dictum sit in tantum; va-vb [ Liber tertius] De parte autern anime qua cognoscit anima et sapit sive separabilis sive non separabilis . . . intellectus cum intelligat ad valde intelligibile non// [Artistotle, De anima, end of book 2-beginning of book 3].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 310 × 190 (155 × 99) mm. 2 columns of 30 lines; ruled in lead, with double lines for running title and double frame ruling on the outer and lower margin. French gothic bookhand: the use of abbreviation, comparatively little for a philosophical text, is in keeping with the calligraphic appearance of the book. On va, 6-line pink initial with blue, red, green, gold interlaces on a square blue and gold background; paragraph-marks alternately red and blue; running title, on the verso “L(iber),” on the recto “II,” in red and blue. A marginal note (s. XIV) in cursive gothic on the verso; a few notes in a hurried cursive script (s. XV) on the recto.
Written in northern France. Remains of paper are pasted on the recto. Used for binding, possibly in Italy: see on the verso an Italian note (s. XVI ex), “AI molto illustre signore mio . . . (?).”

Bibliography

Levine, 50 fig. 6.
 

2/XIII/FRA/5. Peter Riga, Aurora. France (central?). s. XIII 1

 

r-v: //Erigit insignes dux illic arte columpnas . . . Causa fit hircani suscipit ille preces// [ Aurora, Liber Machabeorum, vv. 253-350; ed. P. E. Beichner, Aurora: Petri Rigae Biblia versificata 1, Notre Dame Publications in Mediaeval Studies 19 (Notre Dame 1965) 409-412].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 238 × 117 (194 × 72) mm. 49 lines; triple bounding lines; ruled in lead. Gothic bookhand with some chancery influences in the flourished ascenders of the first line (litlera textualis); brown ink. Initials in brown majuscule, standing apart from the text, colored by a vertical continuous yellow stroke from the top to the bottom line.
Written probably in central France. Traces of modern foliation (”87” in the upper right-hand corner of the recto in pencil, s. XX) and the well-preserved condition suggest that the leaf was part of a codex up to the present century. Purchased from Dawson's Book Shop, Los Angeles.
 

2/XIII/FRA/6. Biblical Concordance. France. s. XIII 2

 

r-v: //II. Mac. x.g. [reple]ti perturbatione cadebant . . . Replicare . . . Requies. . . ibi. [Ps. 131] et requiem temporibus meis// [third form of the verbal concordance: cf. R.H. and M. A. Rouse, “The Verbal Concordance to the Scriptures,” Archivum fratrum praedicatorum 44 (1974) 5-30].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 380 × 255 (302 × 199) mm. 3 columns of 66 lines; frame vertical ruling in margin; double line for running titles; ruled in lead. Current, somewhat messy French gothic bookhand (littera textualis): the tail of g is open, tironian note 7 is Z-shaped and crossed; brown ink. The lemmata are underscored in red; initials of biblical books are slashed with red; alternately red and blue paragraph marks; running titles (first syllable of the lemma) in elaborated red and blue majuscule over the central column, in smaller red mixed majuscule over the side columns. In the lemma “Reputans” there is a blank instead of the biblical quotation II Cor. vii.d (vb), and the copyist notes in margin “deficit in exemplari.”
Written presumably in northern France (Paris?). Much rubbed on the recto. Used as a pastedown in binding, in Italy: three of the six strips of parchment (ca. 50 × 50 mm.) once pasted to the leaf to reinforce the binding are now kept separately; one comes from a twelfth-century central Italian codex (a few letters of text survive). By an Italian hand (s. XX) in pencil on the recto, “Davanti.”
 

1/XIII/FRA/7. Treatise on the Generation of Christ. Northern France. s. XIII-XIV

 

r-v: //assumptio attribuitur soli Verbo ergo . . . Secundo queritur utrum Christus possit dici filius specialiter et quod . . . Tertio queritur utrum Christus possit dici filius . . . De conceptione Christi in comparatione ad gratiam . . . sicut pro eo quod gratis datur// [from book 3 of the treatise, according to the running title; Hugh of St. Victor is cited].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 290 × 235 (213 × 157) mm. 2 columns of 61 lines; ruled in lead. Written in a hasty and heavily abbreviated French gothic bookhand in university style (littera textualis). 2-line initials, alternately red on blue penwork and blue on red; paragraph marks alternately red and blue; running title “L.” on the verso, “III” on the recto, in red and blue. Few contemporary marginalia in cursive script.
Written in northern France (Paris?). Stained and worn; rubbed on the verso; used for binding.
 

1/XIII/FRA/8A, B. Gradual. Northern France(?). s. XIII-XIV

 

r-v: //tus eorum. Versus. Denumerabo eos . . . et fructum afferatis et fructus// [sanctorale, from the mass of St. James the Greater, 25 July; use of Rome?].

Physical Description: Parchment, 2 fragments that combine to form the upper outer portion of a leaf; total figures: 187 × 145 (150 × 85 cropped) mm. 2 columns, the outer 58 mm. wide, the inner almost completely cropped, of which 10 incomplete lines with music survive; 11 mm. between columns; ruling in lead; pricking in the outer margin. Written in a calligraphic gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); brown ink. Initials, 1 line of text and music, alternately in red on pink penwork and blue on red; square notation on staves of 4 red lines.
Written presumably in northern France. Stained and rubbed. Used for binding. Source and date of acquisition by UCLA are unknown.
 

1/XIII/FRA/9. Missal. Northern France or Low Countries. s. XIII 1

 

r-v: //diligentibus usque se pro vobis . . . ex utero matris sue// [sanctorale, from Sts. Gervasius and Protasius, 19 June, and the Eve of St. John the Baptist, 23 June].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf, inner margin cropped; 310 × 220 (216 × 14-9) mm. 2 columns of 23 lines; ruled in lead. Written in a bold calligraphic French gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); brown ink. Plain capital initials alternately red and blue; instructions to the rubricator visible in the outer margin.
Written in northern France or the Low Countries. The top margin is torn. On the verso, offset of gothic script. Used as a pastedown in binding.
 

1/XIII/FRA/10. Repertorium of Decretals of Gregory IX. Southern France or Italy. s. XIII-XIV

 

r-v: //de procuratore quia in causis in glosa de . . . ex parte tua in glosa. Qualiter coniugati possunt ambo// [repertorium of Decretals of Gregory IX 1].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 278 × 228 (220 × 162) mm. 2 columns of 57 lines; ruled in lead. Hastily written gothic bookhand (littera textualis); olive brown ink. Main heading underscored in red; paragraph marks alternately red and blue. A few marginalia, s. XIV.
Written in southern France or Italy. Slightly stained on the recto.

Note

1. We thank Stephanie Tibbetts and A. B. Palacios for this identification.
 

2/XIII/FRA/11. Canon Law Treatise. Northern France (Paris?). s. XIII-XIV

 

f. 1r-v:// . . . ematur ab ignorante agitur extra contractum . . . facienda precaria vacante ecclesia. XII.q. 11// f. 2r-v: //pastoralem sandalia et . . . De legatis. 40. Postea considerandum de dignitate secundum officio legationis et circa hoc primo ... a sua provincia . . . //[unidentified].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 mutilated bifolium; f. 1 cropped at top, 270 × 250 (255 cropped × 171) mm.; f. 2 cropped at top and outer margin, 270 × 180 (255 cropped × 155 cropped) mm. 2 columns, of which 51 lines survive; double vertical frame ruling; ruled in lead. Upright, heavily abbreviated French gothic bookhand in university style (littera textuali brown ink. 2/3-line initials in red on blue penwork and blue on red; rubric in reminuscule; paragraph marks alternately red and blue; notabilia by the copyist under scored with red paragraph marks.
Written in northern France, at a university (Paris?). Torn and stained; almost illegible the flesh-side (ff. 1r, 2v). Used for binding.
 

1/XIII/FRA/12. Pauline Epistles. Southern France (?). s. XIII 1

 

f. 1r-v://qui fecit utraque unum . . . pater omnium qui est super// [Ephes. 2.14-4.6]; f.2r-v //affectione pro vobis sollicitus . . . ipsorum qui terrena sapiunt// [Philipp. 2.20-3.19].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 bifolium, margins slightly cropped; 180 × 125 (152 × 85) mm. The conjugate third and sixth leaves of a quire; 2 columns of 29 lines; ruling in lead, hardly discernible. Written in a regular gothic bookhand (littera textualis): the tironian note for et a is uncrossed; brown ink. 2-line initials alternately red and blue with very simple alternating blue and red penwork; original chapter numbers in red in the inner and outer margins; a new series of chapter numbers, according to the division attributed to Stephen Langton, is added in margin by a later thirteenth-century hand, in olive-gray ink; running titles in red almost completely cropped. A few marginal cross-references (s. XIV).
Written probably in southern France but northern Italy is not to be excluded. Stained and damaged by insects. Used for binding.
 

1/XIII/GER/1. Antiphonal. Germany (southern?). s. XIII in

 

r-v: //ierit evovae. Invit. Regem regum dominum . . . patiuntur propter iustitiam quoniam// [sanctorale, from Omnium sanctorum, 1 Nov.; use of Rome?].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 313 × 210 (222 × 162) mm. 20 long lines of text with music; ruling in ink. Upright German gothic bookhand: d appears in two forms; uncrossed tironian note 7; brown ink. 2-line bulbous initials in red; red rubrics; staves of 4 lines, in brown ink, with German notation.
Written in Germany, probably in the south, early in the thirteenth century. Damaged by insects, stained and rubbed on the verso. Used as a pastedown in a binding.
 

1/XIII/GER/2. Treatise on the Eucharist. Germany. s. XIII 2

 

f. 1r-v: //dium esse et manducabis me; non tu me mutabis in te . . . Memoriam fecit etc. . . . intelligens ad contemplationem veritatis// f. 2r-v: // . . et calicem bibetis mortem domini annuntiabitis donec veniat . . . Memoriam fecit . , . Memonam fecit mirabilium suorum . . . fallebantur preter solum auditum. Ibi enim de// [allegorical commentary on Ps. 110.4-5, concerning the Eucharist].

Physical Description: Parchment (coarse), 1 mutilated bifolium; f. 1, 158 cropped × 115 (135 cropped × 93) mm., in 2 columns of which 31 lines survive; f. 2, 158 cropped × 93 cropped (135 cropped × 82 cropped) mm., in 2 columns, the outer mutilated, of which 31 incomplete lines survive. Ruling not discernible. Written in a spiky and conservative gothic bookhand (littera textualis); ascenders often ending in a fork; the tironian note 7 appears both crossed and uncrossed; brown ink. Biblical references underscored in red; initials in the text slashed with red.
Written in Germany, presumably in the south or in Austria. Barely discernible offset traces of a bold and heavy German gothic bookhand. Used for binding.
 

1/XIII/GER/3A, B. Breviary. Germany. s. XIII 2

 

f. 1r-v: //et victurum in eter[num] sanguinem fusurum . . . Ut supra In II a Vesperarum // f. 2r-v: //sus persecutionem profanam vociferatio . . . Clamaverunt iusti. Alleluja. Te martyrum. Se// [proper of the saints, from the Exaltation of the Cross, 14 Sept., and St. Maurice and his companions, 22 Sept.].

Physical Description: Parchment, 2 fragments from the same manuscript; f. 1, lower inner corner of 1 leaf, 255 × 130 mm., 19 incomplete lines of one column survive; f. 2, lower portion of 1 leaf, 255 × 280 (173 cropped × 191) mm., in 2 columns of which 19-20 lines survive. Double bounding lines; ruling in ink. Bold German gothic bookhand in liturgical style; Anliph. and Ymn. are in smaller script, verging to notula, with neumes; brown ink. Rubrics in red mixed majuscule and minuscule; 3-line bulbous initials in red; initials in the text slashed with red.
Written in Germany, possibly in the south. Stained, rubbed and torn. Used for binding.

Bibliography

Levine, 50 fig. 5.
 

2/XIII/ITA/1. Justinian, Digest, with gloss. Northern Italy. s. XIII 2

 

r-v: //meum quoque transibit. Idem. Naturaliter etiam servus . . . solvit competere repetitionem. Marcell. lib. XX// [Dig. XII.6.12-XII.6.26.4, with glossa ordinaria].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf, 372 × 255 (240 × 137, text; 335 × 235 including gloss) mm. Text, 2 columns of 48 lines; gloss bordering the text, 2 columns of 107 lines; ruling in lead; pricking on the outer margin. Rounded professional Italian gothic bookhand (littera bononiensis); script in the gloss is smaller, rather compressed, with long ascenders often ending in a fork; olive brown ink for the text, rust brown for the gloss. Alternately red and blue 1-line and 3-fine initials and paragraph marks; initials in the text slashed with yellow. Several marginalia by Italian cursive gothic hands (littera notularis) s. XIV; running title “XII” in grayish ink added by a later hand on the top rector
Written in northern Italy, apparently in a university (Bologna?). Stained and torn. Use as fly-leaves in a binding.
 

1/XIII/ITA/2. Justinian, Institutes, with gloss. Northern Italy. s. XIII-XIV

 

f. 1r-v: //parentis neque alio ullo iure per legem duodecim tabularum . . . ex masc quam// f. 2r-v: // [pa]riter cum matre admittebatur . . . de edicto quo pretor legitit heredibus daturum// [ Inst. III. 1.9-III.1.15, 11, III.3.3-III.4.5 (4), with glossa ordinance .

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 bifolium, cropped at the bottom; 280 × 230 (225 × 114, text) mm. Original the fourth and seventh leaves of a gathering of 10; text, 2 columns of 38 lines; glo encloses the text; ruling in lead. Rounded professional Italian gothic bookhand (litte bononiensis); brown ink. 2-line initials with simple tendrils alternately red and blue alternately red and blue paragraph marks; title in red minuscule; running title, on the verso, “III” on the recto, in red and blue. Marginalia in Italian cursive script s. XV.
Written in northern Italy, in a university (Bologna?). Used for binding and still folded and pasted over cardboard.
 

1/XIII/ITA/3. Horace, Epistolae. Italy. s. XIII-XIV

 

r-v: //Ludus enim genuit trepidum certamen et iram ... Si quia Grecorum sunt anti quissima queque// [Horace, Epistolae 1.19.48-2.1.28].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf, cropped at the margins; 195 × 140 (ca. 180 × 90) mm. 29 long line ruling not discernible. Upright Italian gothic bookhand (littera textualis); olive brown ink. 3-line initials in red; majuscule initials of each line in brown ink stroked with red. A few contemporary notes, mostly interlinear glosses.
Written in Italy. Damaged by insects; ink flaked off on the verso. Used for binding.
 

1/XIII/ITA/4. Bible. Northern Italy. s. XIII 2

 

r: covered.

 

v: //[phi]losophyae verbosa eloquentia a[lii sec]tam . . . ab Epheso per Timothe [di]scipulum suum. Explicit argumentum [Prol. in 1 Cor.: Stegmüller 685]; Incipit beati Pauli ad Corinthios prima. Paulus vocatus apostolus Christi Iesu per vo[lun]ta Dei . . . ceterum nescio si quem alium vestrum b// [1 Cor. 1.1-16].

Physical Description: Parchment, lower outer corner of 1 leaf; 295 × 115 mm. 44 mutilated lines of the column survive, of the original 2 columns; ruling hardly discernible. Rounded professional Italian gothic bookhand (littera bononiensis); almost black ink. 28-line initial P in grey, green, and red conventional foliage on blue background, inhabited by St. Paul and the Corinthians: school of northeast Italy; initials in the text slashed with red; titles in red minuscule. Marginal corrections by the copyist.
Written in northeastern Italy. The recto is covered by a pasted strip of paper that contains 6 blank 5-line staves for music. Used for binding; note on the verso, s. XVII, “Ill.mo Die . . . mei ann . . . Not(arii),” may indicate a notarial register.
 

1/XIII/ITA/5. Medical Treatise. Northern Italy. s. XIII 2

 

r-v: //sanetur. De cura rupture inguinalis cum modis medicinarum. [C]um accidit ruptura inguinibus inde descendit eminentia . . . sua ad interiora ventris et si non obediunt// [unidentified medical treatise].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf, cropped at the lower and outer side; 245 × 175 (220 cropped × 157 cropped) mm. 2 columns, the outer incomplete, of which 45 lines survive; ruling in lead. Written in a rather running Italian gothic bookhand in university style (littera textualis); greenish-brown ink, typically Italian. 2-line red initials (one left blank on the recto); red paragraph marks; titles in red minuscule; initials in the text slashed with red. In the middle of the upper recto, “2” (s. XIV-XV) may be an added running title; “95,” reversed, on the left-hand corner of the upper margin (s. XIX-XX).
Written in northern Italy. Badly stained on the recto and rubbed on the verso, partially covered with pasted strips of paper. Used for binding.
 

1/XIII/ITA/6. Bible. Italy. s. XIII in

 

r-v: //[na]talis pharaonis erat qui . . . tenues et percusse ure[dine] // rb://Egypti viderim que devoratis . . . terra Egypti. Quos se[quentur] // va: //[vesti]vitque eum stola . . . sunt autem Ioseph// vb: //[quid]quid patiatur mali . . . exploratores estis; iam nunc ex[perimentum]// [Genesis 40.20-41.6, 41.19-30, 41.42-50, 42.4-15].

Physical Description: Parchment, lower half of 1 leaf; 270 × 350 (160 cropped × 232) mm. 2 columns, of which 21 lines survive; originally, ca. 45 lines; ruling in lead; pricking in the outer margin. Regular Italian gothic bookhand of early type; brown ink. Chapter number in red roman numerals; 2-line initial in plain red.
Written in Italy. Stained and worn, almost illegible on the verso, where many Italian notes (s. XVI-XVII) are seen; remains of paper pasted on the middle portion. Used for binding, possibly an account book, as is suggested by “B. 1590” in an Italian hand (s. XVI) on the verso.
 

1/XIII/ITA/7. Justinian, Digest, with gloss. Northern Italy (Bologna?). s. XIII-XIV

 

r-v: //mule perissent furti teneri veteres . . . manifestus fur extimandus est// [ Dig XLVII.2.67.2-81.4, with glossa ordinaria].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf cropped at the bottom; 295 × 255 (221 × 123, text; 272 cropped × 200 including gloss) mm. Text, 2 columns of 46 lines; gloss, 2 columns surrounding the text, with 83 lines surviving; ruled in lead. Written in a rounded, rather compressed Italian gothic bookhand in university style (littera bononiensis); brown ink. Blue 2-line initials placed outside the written space; red 1-line initials in the text; 2-line initials in the gloss, alternately red and blue; paragraph marks alternately red and blue; running title, “L[iber]” on the verso, “XLVII” on the recto, in red and blue majuscules. “De furtis,” in contemporary semi-cursive script on the upper right corner of the recto; contemporary and later marginalia by Italian hands.
Written in northern Italy (Bologna?). Presumably used for binding.
 

1/XIII/ITA/8. Isaac Israeli, Liber Urinarum; Medical Treatise. Italy. s. XIII 2 or XIII ex

 

1) f. 1r-v: //[a]speritate eorum vel quia humores . . . lapidem in renibus concreatum significat et fit// [ed. E. Fontana, Il libro delle urine di Isacco l'Ebreo tradotto dall'arabo in latino da Costantino Africano: Testo latino e traduzione italiana, Scientia veterum 67 (Pisa 1966) 217.7-222.27].

 

2) f. 2r-v: //si . . . sint amitantur res in amaritudines . . . cuius humores crossi in subtilitatem et ex multitudine in parvam siccitatem sunt mutati, unde// [unidentified medical treatise].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 bifolium; 300 × 230 (216 × 153) mm. 2 columns of 49 lines; ruled in lead. Written in an upright and rather compressed Italian gothic bookhand in university style (littera textualis); greenish-brown ink. Initials outside the written space are alternately red and blue with simple alternating blue and red penwork; initials in the text slashed with red; titles in red minuscule.
Written in Italy. Badly stained and worn. Ink flaked off the flesh side (ff. 1v, 2r). Edges cropped. Used for binding a register of documents concerning a parish church: title in Italian cursive (s. XVI), f. 1, “Multa instrumenta renovationis Plebis P. ... 4 / 1552 ad 1568”; on f. 2v, “Liber instrumentorum emph[itheoticorum] del anno 1552, 1553, 1554, 1555, 1565, 1566, 1567, 1568.” On f. 1, by an Italian hand in pencil (s. XX), “Albini Matteo.”
 

2/XIII/ITA/9. Paul the Deacon, Historia Romana. Italy. s. XIII med

 

r-v: // Affricanus secundo consul factus est et ad Numantiam . . . peremptus iacuit dissolutis. Explicit liber quartus. Incipit liber quintus. Dum bellum in Numidia . . . traiectis per colla eorum laqueos ad// [Paul the Deacon, Hist. Rom. 4.17-5.2; ed. A. Crivellucci (Rome 1916) 64.6-72.17].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf, 330 × 230 (284 × 193) mm. 37 (recto) and 41 (verso) long lines; ruling in lead, verso only. Uneven, rounded Italian gothic bookhand (littera textualis); greenish-brown ink. Plain red initial placed outside the written space (verso); initials in the text touched with red. Marginal note by Italian hand (s. XVI ex) on the recto, “Nota et vide Tacit[um] ann. 156.”
Written in Italy; the spelling points to central Italy. Apparently used for binding. “59” in ink on the upper left-hand corner of the recto (s. XIX) seems to be a bookdealer's mark. Purchased by UCLA from Zeitlin & Ver Brugge, Los Angeles.
 

1/XIII/ITA/10. Legendary. Italy. s. XIII med

 

r-v: //virginitatem predicans modo matrimonia casta defendens . . . numquam suscepisset mortalis hominis sponsionem. Nunc vero quia Deus vobis aperuit// [ Vita Hieronymi: PL 22.207-208; BHL no.3871].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 332 × 225 (297 × 166) mm. 2 columns of 34 lines; ruled in lead. Stately rounded Italian gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); dark brown ink. Initials in the text stroked with red.
Italian, possibly written in central Italy. Stained; ink flaked off the recto. “50” in ink on the upper right-hand corner of the recto (s. XIX-XX) seems to be a bookdealer's note.
 

2/XIV/FRA/1. Psalter(?). Flanders (?). s. XIV 1

 

r-v: //quoniam ad te domine animam meam levavi. . . et principum horum qui fuerunt in ea// [Ps. 85.4-86.6].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 200 × 140 (138 × 84) mm. 20 lines; ruling in lead; the minims of the script are between 2 ruled lines, as in deluxe manuscripts; pricking here and there visible on the outer and lower margins. Written in an upright highly calligraphic gothic bookhand (littera textualis formata): d and r appear in two forms; et appears both as ampersand and as crossed tironian note; a is double-looped; brown ink. 2-line initial in gold on pink and blue background on the verso; verse initials, 1-line, alternately blue on red penwork and gold on blue; line-fillers alternately red and blue; blue paragraph marks.
Written probably in Flanders. “9” on the upper right-hand corner and “8” on the lower right-hand corner of the recto, in pencil by two different twentieth-century hands, suggest that the leaf was part of a quire extant until the present century. Purchased by UCLA from Dawson's Book Shop, Los Angeles.
 

1/XIV/FRA/2A, B. Sermons(?). France. s. XIV-XV

 

ff. 1-2v://destinatus. Hec autem vicia que tenent . . . //f. 2: //va sed sicut populo similis eorum ... //.

Physical Description: Parchment, 2 fragments, each one 250 × 170 (245 × 138, originally ca. 200) mm. 2 columns, the second mutilated, of which 43 incomplete lines survive. Written in French hybrida; ink flaked off both sides. Initials in the text slashed with red.
Written in France. Ink completely washed on both sides, text illegible. Used for binding.
 

1/XIV/FRA/3. Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologiae. France (northern?). s. XIV 1

 

r-v: //omnis enim effectus dependet a sua causa . . . habitualis gratia sed sufficit aliquis motus gratie// [Thomas Aquinas, Summa theologiae 3.86.6-3.87.2].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 268 × 195 (220 × 150) mm, 2 columns of 46 lines; double bounding lines and vertical frame ruling in the margins; ruled in lead. Written in a rather messy French gothic bookhand of a university type (littera textualis): double-looped a, g with a horizontal open tail, crossed tironian note 7 could point to northern France; chestnut brown ink. Initials alternately red and blue, 2-line on 1-color penwork, 3-line on 2-color (red and blue) penwork; initials in the text slashed with red; paragraph marks alternately red and blue. Contemporary corrections of the text in black ink.
Written in France (Paris?). Probably used as a flyleaf in binding. “116” in ink on the upper margin of the recto (s. XIX-XX) seems to be a bookdealer's note.
 

2/XIV/FRA/4. Civil Law Treatise. France. s. XIV 1

 

r-v: //possit ut no. s. c. V liberi. Item nec removet quin . . . va-b: De sepulturis. Supra tractavimus de successione mortuorum testatorum . . . sepeliri in sepulcro . . . suorum idest e.c.i. rui// [unidentified civil law treatise, book 3, section on succession and burial].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 457 × 295 (331 × 208) mm. 2 columns of 70 lines; ruled in lead, double line for running titles. Rounded French gothic bookhand (littera textualis); chestnut brown ink. 2-line initials in red with blue penwork; rubrics in red minuscule; instructions to the rubricator visible in the lower margin; paragraph marks alternately red and blue; running title “Li[ber]” on the verso, “III” on the recto, in red and blue majuscule. In the upper right-hand corner of the recto “De successoribus ab intestato” in contemporary cursive script; corrections of the text in margin by the copyist.
Written in France. Mildew damage. Stained and barely legible on the verso. Used for binding: note by an Italian hand (s. XVI-XVII) on the verso “G. C[arte] 444 sine indice [. . .] 72 “
 

1/XIV/FRA/5. Breviary. Southern France or Italy. s. XIV t

 

ff. 1-2v:// . . . misericordia tua. Ad Matutinum antiphona . . . deinde lector dicit. lube . . . // [temporale; fragment, with lacuna between f. 1v and f. 2; use of Rome].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 bifolium cropped at the top; 160 × 160 (150 cropped × 112) mm. 2 columns of 31 lines; ruled in pale ink. Rather compressed gothic bookhand; olive brown ink. 2-line initials placed outside the written space, alternately red on blue penwork and blue on red; blue paragraph marks.
Written in southern France or in Italy. Ink flaked off on ff. 1v, 2r (flesh side). Stained. Used for binding. “63” (f. 1v) and “64” (f. 2) entered in ink(s. XIX-XX) seem to be book-dealer's marks.
 

1/XIV/GER/1. Diurnal. Germany (Marbach). s. XIV 1

 

ff. 1-2v: Incipit matutinale nec non diurnale de tempore et de sanctis per circulum anni secundum morem breviarii ecclesie Marbacensis qui est optimus ordo secularium sacerdotum. In adventu domini ad vesperas . Deus pacis sanctificet . . . homo de domo Davit sedere in throno alleluia. Ant. Ex egypto ...// [beginning of the temporale, first week of Advent; lacuna between f. 1v and f. 2r].

Physical Description: Parchment, portion of 1 bifolium, probably the outer of a quire; f. 1, cropped at bottom and outer side, 188 × 102 (182 cropped × 80 cropped) mm., 37 lines of 1 column and a few letters of the other column survive; f. 2, cropped at bottom and outer side, 190 × 165 (185 cropped × 143, originally × 150) mm., 38 lines in 2 columns survive. Ruled in pale brown ink. Written in an uneven and somewhat current German gothic bookhand in poor liturgical style (littera textualis); brown ink. 12-line initial on f. 1, in red and blue filled with greenish-blue and red penwork; 2-line initials in red; 1-line initials alternately red and blue; rubrics in red minuscule.
Written in Marbach (Baden-Württemberg). Stained on the hair side, ff. 1r, 2v. Used for binding.
 

1/XIV/GER/2. Ordinal. Germany. s. XIV-XV

 

r-v: //Biduo vivens. Ewangelium. Ambulans Iesus . . . Explicit de sanctis. Dominica prima post octavam penthecoslis . . . Ant. Dives ille. Hec Antiphone // [end of the sanctorale, pars hiemalis; beginning of the temporale, pars aestiva].

Physical Description: Parchment (coarse), 1 leaf; 200 × 135 (172 × 100) mm. 30 long lines; ruled in pale ink. Written in an upright and rather compressed and conservative gothic bookhand in liturgical current style (littera textualis); grayish ink. Rubrics in red. Pointing hands and nota-marks in red in margin.
Written possibly in the Rhineland. Severely stained and rubbed on the verso (flesh-side] Used for binding. “Nro. [? = Numero] 81” in the top recto margin seems to be bookdealer's note.
 

2/XIV/IBE/1. Civil Law Treatise, with gloss. Spain. s. XIV

 

r-v: //que servi corrupti actionem . . . movit adversus eum qu// [unidentified civil treatise, the section De furtis].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf cropped at top and inner side; 320 × 223 (text, 185 × 143 cropped; with gloss, 245 cropped × 190 cropped) mm. Text, 2 columns of 34 lines; the gloss is split into blocks, with sentences running from one block to another; ruled in lead. Written in rounded Spanish gothic bookhand (littera textualis), showing the peculiar 8-shaped s and the a with two open loops; greenish brown ink. Paragraph marks alternately red and blue. Extensive marginalia in gothic cursive script, s. XV.
Written in Spain. Water damage on the upper part. Used for binding, probably a notarial register; title (?) by a Spanish hand on the recto, s. XVI, “Prothocollum mei Francisci de la Tovenya.” Other sixteenth-century Spanish notes on the verso, “Francisco| de la Tovenya not[arius] proc[urator],” “lohannes de ta . . . y Bernar . . . lohannes Bernues(?) notarius publicus de la Ciudad . . . .” Source and date of acquisition by UCLA unknown.
 

2/XIV/ITA/1. Biblical Concordance. Italy (southern?). s. XIV 1

 

r-v: // xxx.f. lux lune sicut lux solis . . . Lunula . . . Magis. Gen. xix.c te magis quam hos affligemus// [third form of the verbal concordance; see R.H. and M. A. Rouse, “The Verbal Concordance to the Scriptures,” Archivum fratrum praedicatorum 44 (1974) 5-30].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 465 × 310 (321 × 225) mm. 3 columns of 55 lines; ruled in lead, double line for running titles. Written in an upright Italian gothic bookhand (littera textualis). On va, 9-line initial in red and blue on squarish red penwork, inhabited by a nimbed figure (Judas Macchabeus?), with gold staff on blue background: the style of the illumination points to southern Italy (Naples?); 1-line initials and paragraph marks alternately red and blue; running titles (the first syllable of a lemma) in red and blue majuscule over each column. Instruction to the rubricator visible in margin on the verso.
Written in Italy, probably in the South. The well-preserved condition of the leaf suggests that it was part of a codex until recent times. Another leaf from the same manuscript (lemmata: Revertendi to Ritus] is currently in the possession of R.H. and M. A. Rouse, Los Angeles, who acquired it in Rome early in 1959.
 

2/XIV/ITA/2. Antiphonal. Italy. s. XIV med

 

r-v: //mag[na]. evovae. Omnipotens domine Deus noster . . . Ant. Sancti Dei omnes . . . flamini qui totum sub// [sanctorale, All Saints, 1 Nov.; use of Rome?].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 445 × 310 (279 × 179) mm. 11 long lines of text with music; ruled in lead; 2 ruled lines enclose the minims of the script. Written in a rounded Italian gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); Cap., Respons , and Vers. on the recto are in a smaller script, verging to notula. On the verso, 5-line initial floral patterned, in bright orange, blue, and ocher, on blue background enclosed in ocher border; initials alternately in red with blue ornamental strokes and blue with red; square notation on staves of 4 red lines.
Written in Italy. Stained on the margins by use. A long tear in the lower portion, affecting the initial. The state of preservation suggests that it was part of a codex until recent times.
 

1/XIV/ITA/3. Missal. Italy. s. XIV 2

 

r-v: //[ec]clesie sue. Vers. Oratio. Deus omnium fidelium. Et servat usque ad purificationern, sancte Marie . , . infra octava resurrectionist / [orationes for the temporale].

Physical Description: Parchment, outer portion of 1 leaf; 312 × 107 (228 × 71 cropped) mm. 18 lines on 1 column, originally the outer of 2 columns; ruled in lead. Written in a rounded stately Italian gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); rubrics in red, prayers in olive brown ink. Initials slashed with yellow; blue paragraph marks.
Written in Italy. Used for binding; stained.
 

1/XIV/ITA/4. Astronomical Treatise. Italy. s. XIII-XIV

 

r-v: //utilitas plebi. Et cum fuerit Iupiter in loco sibi convenienti . . . sed hunc modum in futuro. Et quia auxiliante Deo explicavimus quod exponere voluimus differentiam itaque quartam complevimus. Differentia 5 Tractatus secundi in qualitate scientie more eorum. Scito quod scientie qualitas extrahatur eorum mora; consideratio dividitur in duas divisiones . . . quod est ut des singulis inter eos gradibus// [unidentified astronomical treatise].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf cropped at the top; 307 × 240 (223 cropped × 156) mm. 2 columns of which 46 lines survive; double bounding lines, triple between the columns; ruled in lead. Italian gothic bookhand (littera textualis), with some chancery influences: long ascenders and descenders, sporadically large serifs; olive brown ink. 6-line plain red initial on the verso; a few initials in the text are stroked with red; red paragraph marks and title. Marginalia, mostly glosses on individual words, written with tie marks by the copyist himself.
Written in Italy, Used for binding the report of a lawsuit: title on the recto, s.XVI, an Italian hand, “MAZZO SESTO/n° 7/B/ Processus Magnifici Domini loannis Leone cum heredibus quondam sp. domini Luce de Salvis circa exequutionem tentie late ad ... dicti Magnifici Domini Ioannis occasione assumptionis . . . pare torum per dictos heredes.”

Bibliography

Levine, 51 fig. 7.
 

2/XIV/ITA/5. Antiphonal. Italy. s. XIV 1

 

f. 1r-v:// Deinde dicitur antiphona de cruce. Crucem sanctam subiit . . . Versus. Exurge Christe adiuva. Alleluia// f. 2r-v: //eam scripta Et super muros . . . Ant. Sicut novit me pater et ego agnosco patrem// [antiphonal, the first and second weeks after Easter; use of Rome?].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 bifolium; 405 × 310 (300 × 215) mm. Originally the third and eighth leaves of a quire of 10. 11 lines of text with music; ruling in lead. Rounded Italian gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); olive brown ink. Rubrics in notula script, in red; square notation on staves of 4 red lines; initials alternately red and blue with an elaborate cross-stroke alternately blue and red. Contemporary foliation in red roman numerals in the center of the upper margin.
Written in Italy. A few lines on f. 1r are half-erased. Source and date of acquisition by UCLA unknown.
 

1/XIV/ITA/6. Missal. Italy. s. XIV 2

 

r-v: //et clementa munera que [ut tu]o sunt digna . . . ma[ter] eius et fratres sta[bant foris que]rentes loqui e// [sanctorale, Sts. Processus and Martinianus, 2 July; Octave of Sts. Peter and Paul, 6 July; the Seven Brothers, and Rufina and Secunda 10 July].

Physical Description: Upper portion of 1 leaf, parchment, 228 × 175 (200 cropped × 122 cropped) mm. 2 columns, the outer 65 mm. wide, the inner cropped, of which 28 incomplete lines survive; 17 mm. between columns; ruled in lead. Rounded Italian gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); black ink. 2-line initials alternately red on violet penwork and blue on red; 1-line initials in blue; rubrics in red minuscule.
Written in Italy. Ink partially flaked off the recto. Used for binding.
 

1/XIV/ITA/7. Logical Treatise. Italy. s. XIII-XIV

 

ff. 1-2v: //aditus quando vero difinitum est inferius cum locus . . . sed in hac omnis homo est alias est recta predicatio et subicitur homo// [unidentified; Porphyry and Aristotle in primo topicorum are quoted].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 bifolium cropped at the top; 200 × 150 (150 × 103) mm. 2 columns of 39 lines; single bounding lines, triple between the columns; ruled in lead. Rounded, highly abbreviated Italian gothic bookhand (littera textualis); brown ink. Initials in the text slashed with red; red paragraph marks. A contemporary marginal note on f. 2.
Written in Italy. Badly stained and almost illegible, particularly on ff. 1v, 2 (hair-side). Used for binding.
 

1/XIV/ITA/8. Antiphonal. Italy. s. XIV 2

 

r-v: //Secus decursus aquarum plantavit . . . et ideo coronas triumphales// [antiphonal, the common plurimorum martyrum; use of Rome?].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf, 330 × 235 (280 × 193) mm. 9 lines of text with music; ruling in lead. Rounded bold Italian gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); brown ink. Square notation on staves of 4 red lines; 2-line initial in 7 colors, water-colored; initials in the text alternately red on blue penwork and blue on red.
Written in Italy. Worn on both sides.
 

1/XIV/ITA/9. Breviary. Italy (northern?). s. XIV 2 or XIV ex

 

r-v: //quibus spiritus ante faciem Christus est . . . Dominica III in quinquagesima [for quadragesima]. Invitatorium . . , apparebit quid illi prosint// [temporale, Sabb. post Dom. II Quadrag. and Dom. III Quadrag.; use of Rome?].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf, 280 × 195 (191 × 130) mm. 2 columns of 34 lines; ruling in lead. Italian gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); brown ink. 3-line and 2-line initials alternately red and blue on penwork of the opposite color, or parted red and blue on red and blue penwork, indented or placed outside the written space; initials in the text alternately red or blue stroked with the other color.
Written in Italy, possibly in the north. Stained on the top. Used for binding: an illegible note on the lower margin of the verso (s. XVI-XVII) by an Italian hand could be a title. “75” on the upper recto margin in ink seems to be a bookdealer's note.
 

1/XIV/ITA/10. Treatise on the Liberal Arts. Italy. s. XIV 1 or XIV med

 

r-v: //scribit dicens: Rethorica est bene dicendi scientia . . . quod centones sunt qui de multis aliorum carminibus ad propria more centenario ex multis hinc inde// [unidentified treatise, including a paragraph on Homer independently inserted by the copyist on the verso].

Physical Description: Parchment, upper half of 1 leaf; 155 × 210 (140 cropped × 166) mm. 2 columns (3 columns, for much of the verso), of which 30/31 lines survive; ruled in lead. Written in a hurried Italian gothic bookhand (littera textualis); greenish brown ink, typically Italian Paragraph marks alternately red and blue.
Written in Italy. “209” and “210” are entered on the upper right-hand corner of verso and recto, respectively. Apparently used for binding.
 

1/XIV/ITA/11. Legendary. Italy. s. XIV-XV

 

r-v: //erat omnino neque fabrica aliqua. Et ecce subito apparuit civitas . . . pervenerunt simul in unum et nunc quieverunt in pace. IIII. In diebus sanctissimi Archadii archiepiscopi fuit quidam Filentulus in Constantia que dicebatur de Olympia// [an unidentified miracle of St. Patrick].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf cropped at the top margin; 290 × 220 (207 × 160) mm. 2 columns of 34 lines; ruling not discernible. Upright Italian gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); blackish ink. 3-line plain majuscule initial in blue on vb; initials in the text slashed with red; chapter number in red. Contemporary marginal corrections of the text.
Written in Italy. Ink flaked off the recto. Used for binding: on the verso, scribbled numbers (s. XVII) and the name “Domenico di Guido (?).”
 

2/XIV/ITA/12. Justinian, Digest, with gloss. Italy (Bologna?). s. XIV 1

 

ff. 1-2v: //Marcianus. Legis Flavie crimine suppressi . . . vel similem penam sive// [ Dig. XLVIII.15.3-17.1.1., with glossa ordinaria].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 bifolium cropped at top margin; 415 × 280 (text 256 × 143; with gloss, 370 cropped × 245) mm. The central bifolium of a gathering of 10 leaves. 2 columns of 47 lines; gloss surrounding the text, 88 lines survive; ruled in lead. Written in a rounded professional Italian gothic bookhand in university style (littera bononiensis). 4-line and 3-line illuminated initials, pink on gold, blue, and red backgrounds with floral patterns. Bolognese style; 2-line initials placed outside the written space, blue on red penwork; 1-line initials in the text stroked with blue; 2-line initials in the gloss alternately red stroked with blue and blue stroked with red; paragraph marks alternately red and blue. Extensive marginalia by several contemporary Italian hands in gothic cursive script.
Written in Italy (Bologna?). Badly torn and stained. Used for binding. Given to UCLA in 1977 by Fredi Chiappelli, professor of Italian at this university.
 

1/XIV/ITA/13A, B. Stephen Langton, Interpretations of Hebrew Names. Italy (northern?). s. XIV 1 or XIV med

 

f. 1r-v [A]: //Achobor turbatio vel tumultum . . . Aheberim hebreorum vel transeuntium seu transitus aut transitores eorum// f. 2r-v [D-E]: //mentee fugiens. Dioschore pulcra . . . Elym aves// f. 3r-v [F-G]: //Falech dividens vel divisiis . . . Gail exultans vel exultatio// f. 4r-v [S]: //unde ad simulacra . . . Semelyas . . . Sephonias abscondens dominum vel // [Stephen Langton, Interpretationes hebraicorum nominum, Stegmüller 7709; probably from a Bible].

Physical Description: Parchment, 2 bifolia slightly cropped at the top; 305 × 225 (216 × 155) mm. Bifolia from two successive gatherings. 3 columns of 54 lines; ruled in lead. Written in a rounded Italian gothic bookhand (littera bononiensis); dark brown ink. 2-line initials in red with blue ornamental pen nourishes; 1-line initials for each entry alternately red and blue. The second bifolium is damaged and stained by mildew.
Written in Italy, probably in the north. The outer bifolium of the quire to which XIV/Ita/13A belongs was acquired from B. Rosenthal by the Department of Special Collections of the University Library of the University of California, Davis.
 

1/XIV/ITA/14. John of Freiburg, Summa Confessorum. Northern Italy. s. XIV 1 or s. XIV med

 

r-v: //tribus causis. Nubant si in fidem . . . contraxerint in gradibus divina lege prohibitis// [John of Freiburg, Summa confessorum lib. 4, Tit. 9, qu. 2 fin.-Tit. 10, qu. 4 fin. 1].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 320 × 230 (283 × 184) mm. 2 columns of 53 lines; ruled in lead. Rounded Italian gothic bookhand of good quality (littera bononiensis); olive brown ink. 2-line initials alternately red on blue penwork and blue on red; title in red minuscule; quaestio numbers in red roman numerals, corrected in brown ink on the recto; paragraph marks alternately red and blue.
Written in Italy. Small stains on the verso.

Note

Levine, 51 fig. 7.
1. We thank Stephen Horowitz and Stephanie Tibbetts for this identification.
 

2/XIV/ITA/15. Missal. Italy (Perugia). s. XIV 2 or XIV-XV

 

r-v: //nexibus deprimi potuit . . . Agapiti martiris tui confisa suffragi// [temporale: Assumption, 15 Aug.; Octave of St. Lawrence, 17 Aug.; St. Agapitus, 18 Aug.].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 325 × 230 (212 × 147) mm. 2 columns of 26 lines; ruled in lead. Upright Italian gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); olive brown ink. 7-line illuminated initial on the verso, ocher highlighted in white on blue back- ground with gold balls and floral pattern; 2-line initials alternately red on blue penwork and blue on red penwork; initials in the text slashed with yellow; rubrics in red minuscule.
Written in Perugia, to judge from the decoration. Its well-preserved condition suggests that the leaf was part of a codex until recent times. Bookdealer's note: “1353 A.D. Italy, Perugian Dominican Missal. Round Gothic Hand.” Purchased by UCLA from Dawson's Book Shop, Los Angeles.
 

1/XIV/ITA/16. Common Law Treatise. Italy. s. XIV ( med?)

 

r-v: //et solvit de sua pecunia . . . quod fatere tenetur vellit nollit coactus// [unidentified common law treatise, the section on procurators in deeds of sale].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf, cropped at top, bottom, and outer margins; 285 × 220 (285 cropped × 195 cropped) mm. 2 columns of which 57 incomplete lines survive. The ruling (s. XI-XII) does not belong to the actual writing; it was done with a hard point for a 2-column text, double bounding lines enclosing each column; the leaf, however, is not a palimpsest. Trained Italian cursive gothic hand of notarial type (littera notularis); olive brown ink. A contemporary marginal note in cursive script on the recto.
Written in Italy. Rubbed on the verso, and stained on both sides. Used for binding.
 

1/XIV/ITA/17. Psalter, with responsories. Italy. s. XIV 2

 

r-v: //... precamur idem supplices . . . Ant. Dominus defensor . . . Ps. Dominus illuminatio mea . . . mihi concidisti saccum meum// [ Resp., Ant., Ps. 26.1-29.12].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 305 × 210 (217 × 134) mm. 2 columns of 38 lines; ruled in lead. Rounded Italian gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); greenish brown ink. On the recto, 6-line historiated initial to Ps. 26, pink on squarish blue background, depicting a male saint, half-length in profile; 2-line initials placed outside the written space, alternately red on mauve penwork and blue on red; 1-line initials in red; responsories with music, square notation on staves of 4 red lines.
Written in Italy. Parchment wrinkled and badly rubbed. Scraps of paper pasted on the verso. Used for binding; remains of a title on the right margin of the verso.
 

1/XIV/ITA/18. Commentary on Paul's Epistle to the Romans. Italy (southern?). s. XIV 1

 

r: nearly illegible; commentary on Romans 7.9ff.

 

v: //appareat esse peccatum [. . .] . . . partc . . . mortalis vel appareat . . . pugnavit me ita peccatum sed non debent(?)// [commentary on Romans 7.13-15].

Physical Description: Parchment, strip of the outer column of 1 leaf; 275 × 60/115 (238 cropped × 60 cropped) mm. 41 incomplete lines; ruling in lead. Rounded, highly abbreviated Italian gothic bookhand (littera textualis); brown ink. Notabilia by the copyist in the margin.
Written in Italy, possibly in the south. Worn and almost completely rubbed on the recto, Used for binding.
 

2/XV/FRA/1. Le Mort Le Roi Artu. France. s. XV 2

 

r-v: //que ie ressusse honte en lieu ou il soient ... a heure de vespres. Et ce dedans celluy terme ne vient chevalier qui// [ed. Jean Frappier (Geneva 1954) 98-103, sections 76.81-103.21 1].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 450 × 350 (347 × 250) mm. 2 columns of 50 lines; ruled in violet ink; prickings in the outer margin. Developed, slanting French lettre bâtarde exhibiting chancery influence; brown ink. 2-line gold or red initials on purple and blue backgrounds, highlighted with yellow; red paragraph marks; line-fillers in red.
Written in France. Middle portion badly stained and torn. Used for binding public records (s. XVIII 1): title on the recto, “La Voulte. Registre des audiences commencé le 23 mars 1696 et finissant le 12 november 1700,” and “Premier livre des audiences de la court ord[inaire] du Comté de la Voulte[-sur-Rhône].”

Bibliography

Levine, 51 fig. 8.

Note

1. We thank Joseph J. Duggan for this identification.
 

1/XV/FRA/2A, B. Book of Hours. Northern France. s. XV 2

 

f. 1r-v: //la michi quando morietur . . . in seculum. Fiat. Fiat [Ps. 40.6e-14]. Requiem. Ant. . . . Ps. Quemamodum desiderat cervus . . . transibo in locum tabernaculi// [Ps. 41.2-5]; f. 2r-v //dixi non videbo... in domo domini [Isa. 38.11-20). Requiem. Ant. . . . Ps. Laudate dominum de celis etc. [Ps. 148.1]. Ant. Omnis [catchword]: spiritus // [Office of the Dead].

Physical Description: Parchment, 2 leaves; 182 × 123 (text 104 × 61; 104 × 90, including the illuminated vertical band) mm. 22 long lines; ruled in purple ink. Sophisticated, regular, French gothic cursive hand (lettre bâtarde); brown ink. 2-line and 1-line gold initials on background alternately purple and blue, highlighted in gold; line-fillers alternately red and blue, highlighted in gold; rubrics in purple minuscule; the illuminated band on the outer border is drawn by tracing from the recto to the verso: paneled white, ocher, silver backgrounds with floral motifs.
Written in northern France. The condition of preservation suggests that the leaves were part of a codex until recent times. Purchased by UCLA from Dawson's Book Shop, Los Angeles.
 

1/XV/FRA/3. Book of Hours. France (Burgundy?). s. XV med or XV 2

 

r-v: //pecora domino benedicite . . . superexaltate eum in secula. Amen. Psalmus David. Laudate dominum de celis . . . laudent nomen domini// [Dan. 3.81-88, 56; Ps. 148.1-4: from Hours of the Virgin, Lauds].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf, 180 × 125 (93 × 64) mm. 15 long lines; ruled in pink ink. Upright French gothic bookhand in liturgical style of high standards (littera textualis formata); olive ink. 2-line and 1-line gold initials on purple and blue backgrounds highlighted in white; paneled line-fillers in purple and blue, highlighted in white with gold decorations; rubrics in red minuscule; illuminated border on the outer margin of the verso, 23 mm, wide, composed of pen-and-ink stem decoration with gold balls and floral patterns in ocher, red, blue, green.
Written in France. The style of decoration points to Burgundy. On the upper right-hand corner of the recto appears the foliation “54” in pencil (s. XX). Both this foliation and the condition of the leaf suggest that it was part of a codex until recently. Purchased by UCLA from Dawson's Book Shop, Los Angeles.
 

1/XV/FRA/4. Book of Hours. Northern France. s. XV 1 or XV med

 

ff. 1-2v: //tota die contristatus . . . salutis mee. Gloria. Ps. Miserere mei Deus . . sapiencie tue magnifestasti michi// [Ps. 37.7-23, 50.1-8: third and fourth Penitential psalms].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 bifolium; 160 × 113 (78 × 57) mm. The central bifolium of a quire. 15 long lines; ruled in purple ink. Upright calligraphic French gothic bookhand (littera textualis formata); brown ink. 2-line and 1-line gold initials on purple and blue backgrounds, highlighted in white; rubrics in red minuscule.
Written in northern France. The condition of the bifolium suggests that it was part of a codex until recently. Purchased from Dawson's Book Shop, Los Angeles, by Hugh Dick (d. 1971), professor of English at this university, who bequeathed it to UCLA.
 

1/XV/FRA/5. Book of Hours(?). Northern France. s. XV 1 or XV med

 

r-v: //Laudate dominum de celis . . , populo appropinquanti sibi. Psalmus David. Cantate domino canticum no// [Ps. 148, Ps. 149.1; perhaps from a psalter but more likely from a book of hours, Hours of the Virgin, Lauds].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 170 × 127 (85 × 58) mm. 14 long lines; ruled in pale yellow ink. Written in an upright compressed spiky French gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); olive brown ink. 2-line and 1-line gold initials on purple and blue backgrounds, highlighted in white; rubrics in red minuscule.
Written in northern France. Trace of foliation (?) on the upper right-hand corner of the recto. The state of preservation suggests that the leaf was part of a codex until recently. Purchased by UCLA from Dawson's Book Shop, Los Angeles.
 

1/XV/FRA/6. Book of Hours. Northern France. s. XV 1 or XV med

 

r-v: //cem meam. Fiant aures . . . iniquitatibus eius. Domine exaudi orationem meam . . . anxiatus est super me spiritus meus in me// [Ps. 129.2-8, 142.1-4: sixth and seventh Penitential psalms].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 170 × 122 (85 × 58) mm. 14 long lines; ruled in pink ink. Upright spiky calligraphic French gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); grayish brown ink. 2-line and 1-line gold initials on pink and blue backgrounds, highlighted in white.
Written in northern France. The condition of the leaf suggests that it was part of a codex until recently. Purchased by UCLA from Dawson's Book Shop, Los Angeles.
 

1/XV/FRA/7A, B. Antiphonal. France. s. XV 2

 

f. 1r-v: //dos respondit: quis es domine . . . accepit angelus thuribu-// f. 2r-v: //lum et implevit illum . . . beata es virgo et gloriosa// [sanctorale, excerpts, from Transfiguration, 6 August, to St. Caecilia, 22 November; use of Rome?].

Physical Description: Paper (watermark not visible), 8 fragments, to be combined to reconstruct 2 leaves: total size of each leaf ca. 195 × 145 (165 × 125) mm. 6 lines of text and six staves of music; no ruling. Current French gothic script (lettre bâtarde); brown ink. Music in square notation on staves of 4 brown lines drawn freehand.
Written in France. Removed from the binding of an unidentified printed book at the Research Library.
 

2/XV/FRA/8. Homiliary. France. s. XV med

 

r-v: //ducat per seipsum ad seipsum . . . ut eadem ipsa caritas fructum in vobis inveniat operis non folia laudis. Amen [end of an unidentified sermon]; Admoneo fratres in conspectu Dei timori vestro timorem meum . . . confundaris sed in regnum celestem inducaris. Amen [Ps. Caesarius, Ps. Augustine, Sermo de penilentia; PL 67.1082-1083]; Adversus demonum nequiciam que nobis dominus arma ostendit . . . plene sitiant anime humane substantie nec fastidio// [Ps. Augustine, Ps. Petrus Chrysologus, Sermo VI; PL 52.678].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 305 × 228 (200 × 142) mm. 2 columns of 40 lines; ruled in lead. Written in a French cursive gothic script of high standards (lettre bâtarde), with opening word of each sermon in bold littera textualis formata; grayish brown ink. 3-line initials alternately red on blue penwork and blue on red; initials in the text slashed with yellow; rubrics left blank.
Written in France. The condition of the leaf suggests that it was part of a codex until recently. Given to UCLA by Willard Hougland in 1958.
[1/XV/Ger/1: This number is assigned to a printed leaf.]
 

1/XV/GER/2. Pontifical. Northern Germany or Low Countries. s. XV

 

r-v: //[ pro]phetia et continuatur proul . . . presbyteros post quorum ordina[tionem]// [Pontifical, from the section In ordinatione presbyterorum].

Physical Description: Parchment, upper portion of 1 leaf; 250 × 230 (210 cropped × 133) mm. 13 long lines survive; ruled in red ink. Angular heavy gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); rubric in black ink, text in red, with initials slashed in yellow; illuminated 1-line initials in gold over purple and blue square shield backgrounds, highlighted with white.
Written in northern Germany or the Low Countries. Purchased by UCLA from Zeitlin & Ver Brugge, Los Angeles, in 1962.
 

1/XV/GER/3. Breviary. Southern Germany or Austria. s. XV 2

 

ff. 1-2v: //fratres karissimi sollicita intentione oportet . nunc facti estis [prope] in sanguine// [temporale, from Quadragesima].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 bifolium cropped at the bottom; 250 × 190 (220 cropped × 146) mm. 2 columns of 37 lines; bounding lines in ink; ruling in lead, barely discernible. Rounded humanistic book script, with traces of gothic; pale greenish brown ink. 1-line initials in red; rubrics in red minuscule. “LXXIIII” and “LXXX” in red on the top recto of ff. 1 and 2, respectively, belonged to the contemporary foliation.
Written in a German language area to judge from the spelling; and in an area heavily influenced by humanism, such as Austria or Bavaria to judge from the script. Used for binding a mathematical text: title (s. XVI ex) in the gutter between f. 2v and f. 1r, “Proportional. Circul. . .”
 

2/XV/ITA/1. Humanistic Treatise. Central Italy. s. XV med or XV 2

 

f. 1r-v://Nam . . . sublimitates et regna terrena existimarent posse . . . amicicias mundi huius volunt vana . . . // f. 2r-v: //agere liberam . . . etiam venerem putant . . . non ad ipsum hominem, sed ad ea que sunt hominis, sicut est victus atque vestitus et quecunque alia huic vite// [unidentified humanistic treatise, on pagan religion].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 bifolium, cropped at top; 317 × 270 (225 cropped × 150) mm. 36 long lines survive; double bounding lines; drypoint ruling. Written in a rounded Italian humanistic book script; brown ink. 4-line gold initials on blue, green, and pink square back- grounds, highlighted with white and yellow.
 

1/XV/ITA/4. Gradual. Italy. s. XV

 

r-v: //fidelis. In natali unius virginis Off. Gaudeamus omnes . . . Ps. Eructavit cor meum verbum// [sanctorale, the common of one virgin and martyr; use of Rome?].

Physical Description: Parchment, top portion of 1 leaf; 253 × 340 (210 cropped × 230) mm. 3 lines of text with music survive; ruled in lead; the minims of the script are enclosed between two lines. Large, stately, upright Italian gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); dark brown ink. 2-line initial on the recto, watercolored, in 8 colors, with floral patterns on square blue background highlighted in white; rubrics in red minuscule; music in square notation on staves of 4 red lines. In the outer margin of the verso, “CLXXII” (?) half-cropped, in red and blue, is a remnant of a contemporary foliation.
Written in Italy. Scrap of a paper label pasted on the recto. Used for binding a notarial register: title (s. XVI) on the recto, “Liber testamentorum. 1574. T.”
 

1/XV/ITA/5. Philosophical Treatise, in Italian. Italy (Tuscany?). s. XV 1

 

r-v: //alquanti savi ch'essi studiano a richiedere et a cercare di queste tre cose che sono dette di filosofia . . . de' fare et che no. Et alla verità dire elli puo// [unidentified philosophical treatise].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 mutilated leaf; 250 × 175 (186 × 107) mm. 34 incomplete long lines; ruled in lead. Rounded Italian gothic verging on humanistic book script; greenish brown ink. 2 illuminated initials of chapters were excised; remains of purple and red pen-and-ink marginal extensions; paragraph marks alternately red and blue; rubrics in red minuscule.
Written in Italy; the language points to Tuscany. Scraps of paper are pasted on the recto. Parchment wrinkled and stained. Ink flaked off the verso. Apparently used for binding.
 

2/XV/ITA/6. Philosophical Treatise. Italy. s. XV med or XV 2

 

r-v: //quod non debet poni in diffinitione etermtatis ad minus . . . de interminabilitate eternitatis, aliquo modo dicuntur eterna participative quod vero// [unidentified philosophical treatise; Augustine, Boethius, Aristotle, and the Bible are cited].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 288 × 215 (174 × 134) mm. 2 columns of 37 lines; double bounding lines; drypoint ruling. Italian humanistic book script with extensive use of technical abbreviations; olive brown ink. 3-line plain blue initial on verso; first words of the chapter in small brown capitals; paragraph marks alternately red and blue.
Written in Italy. On the upper right-hand corner of the recto “55” (s. XX) in pencil seems to be modern foliation. This and the state of the leaf suggest that it was part of a codex until recently, Bookdealer's note, “St. Thomas Aquinas, Italy, July, 1470.” Purchased by UCLA from Dawson's Book Shop, Los Angeles.
 

[1/XV/Ita/7]. This number is assigned to a leaf in Hebrew.

 

1/XV/ITA/8. Aristotle, Metaphysics. Italy (northern?), sXV 1 .

 

r-v: //compositi, quoniam immo et separabilia aut . . . propter quid quia hec existunt quod erat domui esse et// [ Aristotle, Metaphysica bk. 7; translation from the Greek book Z 1040a-1041b].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 277 × 200 (160 × 100) mm. 30 long lines; ruled in lead. Written in a current Italian gothic bookhand showing humanistic influences, in monastic school style; dark brown ink. 2-line initial in blue stroked with red on the verso; instructions to the rubricator visible in the margin; initials in the text touched with red; alternating red and blue paragraph marks. Contemporary and later fifteenth-century marginalia; “7” on the upper recto (s. XV) and again (s. XVI?) on the upper verso are running titles ( = lib. 7).

Scope and Content Note

In Latin.
Written in Italy, possibly in the north. Ink flaked off the recto. Stained and torn. Used for binding; notes by Italian hands (s. XVII) on the recto.
 

 1/XV/ITA/9 . Missal. Italy. s. XV med or s. XV 2

 

r-v: //spiritus Philippo: Accede et adiunge . . . depositio sordium sed conscientie bo[ne]// [temporale, Feria V, VI post Pascham].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 330 × 230 (240 × 140) mm. 2 columns of 27 lines; ruling in lead. Upright Italian gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); greenish brown ink. 2-line plain initials and 1-line initials in the text, paragraph marks, and rubrics in red.
Written in Italy. Damaged by mildew; middle portion torn. Ink partially flaked off the recto. Used for binding.
 

1/XV/ITA/10. Breviary. Italy. s. XV 1

 

r-v. //aspectus et totum corpus plenus oculis . . . abdenago proposuit autem Daniel// [temporale, fragment from November; use of Rome?].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 340 × 250 (211 × 163) mm. 2 columns of 33 lines; ruled in lead. Upright developed Italian gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); black ink. 2-line initials alternately blue on red penwork and red on violet penwork rubrics in red minuscule.
Written in Italy. Rubbed and stained on the verso, where numbers are jotted (s. XVI XVII). Used for binding.
 

1/XV/ITA/11A, B. Missal. Italy. s. XV med XV 2

 

f. 1: //et dare animam suam . . . Grad. Propitius// [temporale, Fer. IV, V post II Dom. Quadrag.]; ff. 1v and 2, illegible; f. 2v: //argenti et sex milia ... In veritate vobis// [temporale, Fer. II post III Dom. Quadrag.].

Physical Description: Parchment, 2 leaves from a single manuscript; 328 × 230 (223 × 161) mm. 2 columns of 32 lines; ruled in lead. Written in a developed upright Italian gothic bookhand in liturgical style (littera textualis formata); brown ink. 2-line plain red initials; rubrics in red minuscule.
Written in Italy. ff. 1v, 2 completely rubbed. Water damage to f. 2. Used for binding; illegible traces of a title (s. XVI ex ) on f. 2.
 

1/XV/ITA/12. Mystical Treatise. Italy. s. XV 1

 

r-v: //vocatione et repulsione iudeorum differentibus ita de subito in medium prosiliret . . . sed gloriam intentione captantes commissa sua non diluunt sed seipsos illudunt// [unidentified mystical treatise].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf; 285 × 215 (203 × 138) mm. 2 columns of 43 lines; ruled in lead; pricking in the outer margin. Rather compressed Italian gothic bookhand showing humanistic influences; brown ink. A few contemporary nota marks and marginalia.
Written in Italy Stained; ink flaked off the verso. Apparently used for binding.
 

2/XV/ITA/13. Canon Law Treatise. Italy or Southern France. s. XV 1

 

r-v: //rite repellitur verbi gratia religiosus allegat . . . et quod ibi dicitur qui iurat suumnon esse debet adicere// [unidentified canon law treatise, the section on the judicial oath of clergy].

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 leaf cropped at the margins; 380 × 220 (345 × 175) mm. 2 columns of 80 lines; ruled in lead. Heavily abbreviated, semi-cursive gothic; grayish ink. 2-line initials, blue on red penwork and red on violet; red paragraph marks.
Written in Italy or southern France. Completely rubbed on the verso. Used for binding.
 

Appendix: Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts Identified or Acquired 1978-1990.

Scope and Content Note

Since Dr. Ferrari completed the preliminary version of this catalog in 1978 approximately fifty-two manuscripts have been added to the university collections, and a few additional manuscripts have turned up in the collections themselves. Illuminated incunabula at UCLA are described by M.A. Rouse and R.H. Rouse, Cartolai, Illuminators, and Printers in Fifteenth-Century Italy, UCLA Charles E. Young Research Library Department of Special Collections Occasional Papers 1 (Los Angeles 1988) 95-120 and plates 1-24. The added manuscripts will form the subject of a future volume in the present series. A provisional list follows.
 

The Elmer Belt Library of Vinciana.

 

Belt MS 37. Hours of the Virgin, use of Rouen. Rouen. s. XV 2

Physical Description: Parchment, 146 ff.
Physical Description: Bound by N. Spierinck, Cambridge 1520.

Scope and Content Note

Eleven large miniatures, including donor portrait on f. 53v.
Belonged to Arthur H. Lee, first viscount of Fareham (1868-1947). From the library of Dr. Elmer Belt.

Note

See Bond and Faye, Supplement 16.
 

Belt D 1. Gerolamo Figino (fl. s. XVI 2).

Physical Description: Drawing in crayon and chalk of the Last Supper, after Leonardo da Vinci. Italy, ca. 1562. Paper. 130 × 195 mm.
Belonged to the von Feder Collection (stamp: “v. Feder“ and note ”Nov. 04-la-”).
Source and date of acquisition unknown.
 

Belt D 2. Francesco Melzi (1493-1570). Drawing in red chalk of the head of a horse, after the antique. Italy. ca. 1510

Physical Description: Paper. 128 × 128 mm.

Scope and Content Note

Possibly a drawing of the Roman horse in Naples.
Acquired at Hauswedell, Hamburg, in 1956.
 

Belt D 3. Francesco Mazzuoli, called Parmigianino (1504-1541). Drawing of a female figure. Italy, s.XVI 1.

Physical Description: In pen and brown ink on brown paper heightened in white. Paper. 280 × 150 mm.
Source and date of acquisition unknown.
 

Belt D 19. Francesco Melzi (1493-1570). 2 pen drawings.

Physical Description: Paper. 46 × 104 mm. (a), 56 × 105 mm. (b).

Scope and Content Note

Attributed by Carlo Pedretti to Francesco Melzi, a pupil of Leonardo da Vinci, they are Copies of Leonardo sketches, some of which are in the collections of the duke of Devonshire at Chatsworth. Formerly attributed to Leonardo himself.
a. two grotesques, man with pointed chin and old woman, in profile facing each other.
b. two grotesques, old woman and smiling old man, in profile facing each other.
Given to the Elmer Belt Library by Mr. and Mrs. Edward Fowles in honor of Dr. Franklin D. Murphy in 1968.

Note

From a set of twelve drawings of similar size in the collection of the earls of Pembroke at Wilton House, one of which is now at the Detroit Institute of Art (gift of E. Fowles).
 

The Charles E. Young Research Library: Department of Special Collections.

 

100/178. Register of the Châtelet (day-book of the Paris prison). Paris. April-May 1412

Physical Description: Paper, 6 ff.

Scope and Content Note

Removed from a book binding, these are the only surviving portions of the medieval registers of the Paris jail, the bulk of which were discarded in the seventeenth century.

Note

See article by †J. Benton and R. Rouse forthcoming.
Given by J.R. McClurkin in 1981.
 

100/178. Breviary, fragment. Netherlands. s. XIV 1

Physical Description: Parchment, 4 parts of 3 leaves.

Scope and Content Note

Removed from the binding of *A1 M72: Werner von Schussenried, Modus legendi abbreviaturas (Netherlands: Printer of the Alexander Magnus, ca. 1475), and Johannes Gritsch, Quadragesimale (Strasbourg: Printer of the Vilas patrum, 1486).
Belonged to William Jacob (ex libris), priest in the village of Pufflick near Utrecht, s. XV; and to the St. Bride Foundation Typographical Library, London (stamp).
Source and date of acquisition unknown.
 

***100/179. Record of 22 bequests of property to the church of St. John the Baptist of Caaveiro in Galicia between 1093 and 1133(?). Spain. before 1133(?)

Physical Description: Parchment, 1 large leaf. 590 × 422 mm. Written by several hands in Visigothic script. Church and village no longer extant.
Acquired from H.P. Kraus in 1984.
 

170/14. Antiphonal. Belgium (Mechelen). 1633

Physical Description: Paper, 155 ff. A small (portable) antiphonal written in 1633 at the Convent of Bethanie in Mechelen (Malines) by Sister Maria van den Hove, choir directress of the convent. Written and decorated in imitation of a medieval manuscript with letter unions and parted initials, with added texts at the end.
Physical Description: Bound in contemporary stamped calf over wooden boards, rebacked, two fore-edge clasps, back to front, colored leather fore-edge knots as place-markers.

Scope and Content Note

In Latin.
Source and date of acquisition unknown.
 

***170/72. Hymnal. Spain. 1762

Physical Description: Parchment, 37 ff. Very large lectern hymnal written for a Franciscan convent in Spain by Johannes Romeros of Ballisteros in 1762, f. 37, “Fuit exaratus calamo, ac elargo. D.F. Joannis Romero, Ballesteros, Predicatoris & Chori Vicarii Jubilati, anno ab incarnata Sapientia, 1762.” Ballisteros is in south central Spain. Approved by Fr. Emmanuel de la Fuentes, synodal examiner for the archbishop of Seville. Notation rewritten and accented in 1771.
Physical Description: Bound in contemporary full leather with cut brass bosses and corners, remains of two fore-edge clasps front to back.

Scope and Content Note

In Latin.
Source and date of acquisition unknown.
 

*170/351. Schoenbartbuch (Nârnberg carnival book). Nârnberg. 1600

Physical Description: Paper, 132 ff. Compiled (with nos. 352-355 below) for the third centennial of the city council of Nârnberg. With watercolor illustrations of Nârnberg festivals.
Physical Description: Bound in leather gilt over paper boards.
Belonged to Sebastian Schedel (bookplate). From the library of the counts of Lichtenstein.
Acquired from H.P. Kraus in 1961.
Gift of the Kress Foundation.
 

*170/352. Geschlechtsbuch (Nârnberg patrician family histories). Nârnberg. 1590-1600

Physical Description: Paper.
Physical Description: Bound in parchment over paper boards, s. XIX.

Scope and Content Note

Includes 83 iron engravings by the Nârnberg artist Johannes Kaler (1564-1638). Prologue and register of families included are printed.
Belonged to C.A. Tucher von Simmelsdorf (bookplate). From the library of the counts of Lichtenstein.
Acquired from H.P. Kraus in 1962.
Gift of the Kress Foundation.
 

*170/353. Geschlechtsbuch (Nârnberg patrician family histories). Nârnberg. ca. 1610

Physical Description: Paper, 396 ff.
Physical Description: Bound in brown calf over paper boards.

Scope and Content Note

81 iron engravings by Johnanes Kaler, watercolored. Manuscript prologue. Thought to be a second edition of *170/352 above.
Belonged to the Feuerlein and the Kress families (bookplates). From the library of the counts of Lichtenstein.
Acquired from H.P. Kraus, with nos. *170/354-355, in 1964.
 

*170/354. Geschlechtsbuch (Nârnberg patrician family histories). Nârnberg. ca. 1610

Physical Description: Paper, 110 ff. Prologue is printed, text varies somewhat from *170/353 above.
Physical Description: Bound in parchment over paper boards rebacked s. XVII.

Scope and Content Note

81 iron engravings by Johannes Kaler.
Acquired from H.P. Kraus in 1964.
 

*170/355. Chronicle of the city of Nârnberg, 1530-1603 with additions to 1627. Nârnberg. s. XVII 1 1530-1627

Physical Description: Paper, 368 ff.
Physical Description: Bound in parchment stained orange over paper boards.
From the library of the counts of Lichtenstein.
Acquired from H.P. Kraus in 1964.
 

170/366. Offices for the reception and burial of the dead at St. Denis. France. s. XVII

Physical Description: Parchment, 19 ff. Written at St. Denis.
Belonged to Sir Thomas Phillipps, no.1978.
Source and date of acquisition unknown.
 

170/413. Desiderius, or the readie way to the love of God. First ... in the Spanish tongue . . . after translated into Latin . . . and nowe lately into Englishe . . . by J[ohn] G[erard?] prisoner. England. ca. 1595

Physical Description: Paper, 84ff. Apparently the translator's autograph. Original Spanish by Miguel Comalada also translated into English by Lawrence Howell, ca. 1700.
Physical Description: Bound in English brown calf (s. XVII in) rebacked with the initials E.L. front and back.
Source and date of acquisition unknown.
 

*170/475. Francis I (king of France), 6 letters. France. 1523

Physical Description: Paper.
Belonged to Henry Stevens (1819-1886).
Acquired with the Henry Stevens papers in 1963.

Note

See N. Thrower, “New Light on the 1524 Voyage of Verrazzano,” Terrae incognitae 11 (1979) 59-65.
 

170/542. Ps. Augustine, Liber soliloquiorum. Netherlands. s. XV in

Physical Description: Parchment, 115 ff. Historiated opening initial and border.
Physical Description: Bound in stamped leather over boards, s. XV/XVI.
Acquired from L. Written in 1978.
 

170/543. Three Accounts of Violent Death, in Italian. Italy (Padua?). ca. 1600

Physical Description: Paper, 60 ff.

Scope and Content Note

The murder of Vittoria Accoramboni Orsini; the deaths of four brothers of the Massimi family who had been cursed by their father (1590); and the execution on 5 March 1562 of Don Carlo Carafa, cardinal, by order of Pope Pius IV.
Belonged to Sir Thomas Phillipps, no.2433.
Source and date of acquisition unknown.
 

170/546. Petrarch, Rime. Italy (Florence?). s. XIV/XV in

Physical Description: Parchment, 100 ff.
Physical Description: Bound in quarter leather over paper boards.
Belonged to Sir Thomas Phillipps, no. 4044.
Acquired from L. Written in 1978.

Note

See D. Dutschke, Census of Petrarch Manuscripts in the United States (Padua 1986) 155-157.
 

170/547. Petrarch, Trionfi, etc. Italy. 1426

Physical Description: Paper, 162 ff.
Physical Description: Bound in green calf over paper boards, s. XVIII.

Scope and Content Note

Includes the oldest dated manuscript of the life of Petrarch.
Owned by the Minocci family of Siena, s. XV. Belonged to Sir Thomas Phillipps, no. 9477.
Acquired from H.P. Kraus in, 1980.

Note

See Census of Petrarch Manuscripts, 157-159.
 

170/550. Statement of the hidalguia of Luis Perrote. Spain. 1590

Physical Description: Parchment, 28 ff.
Acquired in Spain in 1969.
 

170/551. Cicero, De amicitia (beginning only). Italy. s. XV/XVI

Physical Description: Paper, 1 quire of 10 leaves. Unbound, with remains of front cover.
Acquired with the collection of C.K. Ogden (1889-1957) in 1958.
 

170/552. Rabbi Samuel, Sermanes etc. Poland (Poznan). 1405

Physical Description: Paper, 166 ff. Written by Johannes Faber of Poznan in 1405.
Physical Description: Bound in parchment over boards, s. XV.
Acquired from B. James in 1980.
 

170/553. Fioretta novella estratto della Bibbia. Venice. 1447

Physical Description: Paper, 112 ff.
Physical Description: Bound in contemporary wooden boards rebacked, s. XV.
Acquired from B. Rosenthal in 1980.
 

170/558. Confessional manual (1 quire). S. France. s. XIII med

Physical Description: Parchment, 8 ff. Portable book in Latin and Provencal.
Physical Description: Bound in parchment over paper boards, s. XIX.
Acquired from S. Katz, Los Angeles, in 1981.
 

170/559. Francesco Priuli, Rifugio dei Miseri. Italy. s. XV 2

Physical Description: Paper, 59 ff.
Physical Description: Bound in parchment over paper boards, s. XVIII/XIX.
Belonged to the Rev. Walter Sneyd.
Acquired from B. Rosenthal in 1981.

Note

The first three novellas appear in the same order in Harvard University, Houghton Library MS Type. 24.
 

170/560. George of Trebizond, Commentary on Cicero, Pro Q. Ligario. Northern Italy. s. XV med

Physical Description: Paper, 70 ff.
Physical Description: Bound in inked paper over paper boards.
Acquired from B. Rosenthal in 1981.
 

170/561. Antonio de Pozzi, Torquato Tasso, Canzone, stanze. Italy. s. XVI 2

Physical Description: Paper, 1 quire of 8 ff. Unbound.
Acquired from Caldini (Florence) in 1981.
 

170/572. Henry of Rimini, De quattuor virtutibus. Germany. 1464

Physical Description: Paper, 174 ff. Written (signed in cyphers and dated) by Leonard Gulsa. Elaborate inhabited pen initials plain and in color, some incomplete.
Physical Description: Bound in stamped pigskin over beveled boards.
Acquired from L. Written in. 1981.
 

170/574. Ludolph of Saxony, Super Psalterium. Cologne. s. XV 1

Physical Description: Parchment, 234 ff.
Physical Description: Bound in stamped leather over reused boards, s. XV.
Belonged to the Carthusians of St. Barbara in Cologne (ex libris, erased). From the Bradfer-Lawrence Collection.
Acquired from Quaritch in 1982.
 

*170/575. Reinmar von Zweter, Poems, in German. Germany. s. XIII

Physical Description: Parchment, 2 fragments of a roll.

Scope and Content Note

Removed from the binding of **A1T36s St. Thomas Aquinas, Summae theologiae secundae partis pars secunda, Strasbourg: 1470.
Belonged to the Benedictines of St. Emmeram in Bavaria. From the collections of Eduardo J. Bullrich (bookplate), and C.K. Ogden (1889-1957), whose library came to the University of California in 1958.

Note

See R.H. Rouse, “Roll and Codex: The Transmission of the Works of Reinmar von Zweter,” Mûnchener Beitrâge 32 (1982) 107-123; and Rouse and F. Bâuml, “Roll and Codex: A New Manuscript Fragment of Reinmar von Zweter,” Beitrâge zur Geschichte der deutschen Sprache und Literatur 105 (1983) 192-231, 317-330.
 

170/583. Varia medica. S. Italy. s. XIII 1

Physical Description: Parchment, 51 ff.
Physical Description: Bound in half red leather over paper boards.
Acquired from B. Rosenthal. Given by Franklin Murphy and the Research Library in honor of Lynn T. White, jr., in 1983.
 

170/584. Ludolph von Suchen et al., Voyages to the East. Bavaria. s. XV ex

Physical Description: Paper, 96 ff.
Physical Description: Bound in red morocco (Spain), s. XX.
Belonged to the Benedictines of St. Sebastian, Ebersberg (ex libris).
Acquired from L. Witten. Given by Franklin Murphy and the Research Library in honor of Lynn T. White, jr., in 1983.
 

170/589. Giovanni da Sulmona, Opera. Sulmona. 1440

Physical Description: Paper, 105 ff. Only surviving copy of this poet's works.
Physical Description: Bound in mottled calf (worn), s. XVIII.
Belonged to the Franciscans of San Niccolò, Sulmona.
Acquired from H.P. Kraus in 1984. Given by the Friends of the Library. See Census of Petrarch Manuscripts, 159-165.

Note

Signed and dated by the scribe Antonius Marianicus Sulmotinus, who wrote one of the two extant copies of Barbato da Sulmona's works (also from S. Niccolò, Sulmona O.F.M.).
 

170/592. Politian, Letter regarding the origin of Florence, to Piero de Medici (n.d., n.p.). Italy. s. XV

Physical Description: Paper, 2 ff.

Scope and Content Note

In folder with nineteenth-century transcription.
Given by the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies in 1984.
 

170/593. Ps. Phalaris, Epistolae, trans. Francesco Griffolini Aretino. Italy (probably Naples). s. XV (early 1460s)

Physical Description: Parchment, 54 ff. Written in a well-formed humanistic script by Pietro Ursuleo of Capua who worked in Naples and then Rome. Occasional contemporary annotations.
Physical Description: Bound in crushed red morocco.
Belonged to Stanley Morrison (1889-1967).
Acquired from B. Rosenthal in 1984.
 

170/594. Anthony of Parma, Sermones. Germany. s. XV

Physical Description: Parchment, 112 ff. Front and back pastedowns from a Hebrew manuscript.
Physical Description: Bound in half leather over wooden boards reused and reinforced, s. XV.
Acquired from B. Rosenthal in 1983.
 

170/595. Trattato de Mascalcia. Italy. s. XV

Physical Description: Paper, 99 ff. Treatise in Italian on veterinary medicine (horses). Unbound.
Acquired from B. Rosenthal in 1983.
 

170/596. Florilegium of spiritual texts. Netherlands. s. XV

Physical Description: Paper, 331 ff. A small pocket book with model initials and decoration designs on the front flyleaf. Rear pastedown: liturgy, s. XII.
Physical Description: Bound in stamped leather over boards, s. XV.
Belonged to the Benedictines of Huys (ex libris). Bradfer-Lawrence Collection.
Acquired from Quaritch in 1984.
 

170/597. Florilegium from the works of St. Augustine. Germany. s. XV 1

Physical Description: Paper, 314 ff. A small pocket book in ledger format written by Fr. Albert de Hamm.
Physical Description: Bound in contemporary stamped parchment over wooden boards.
Belonged to the Brethren of the Cross, Ostberg (ex libris).
Acquired from B. Rosenthal in 1984.
 

170/598. Eusebius, etc. Germany. 1476

Physical Description: Paper, 58 ff.
Physical Description: Bound in stamped pigskin over wooden boards, s. XVI.
Belonged to the Carthusians of Buxheim (ex libris).
Acquired from B. Rosenthal in 1984.

Note

Item or items removed from binding before acquisition.
 

170/615. Johannes de Bado Aureo (John Trevor, d. 1410), De arte heraldica. England. 1449

Physical Description: Parchment, 29 ff. Written by Nicolas Warde.
Physical Description: Bound in parchment over paper boards, s. XVIII.
Belonged to Thomas Giffard s. XVI, and to Thomas Martin (1697-1791).
Acquired from A. Thomas in 1985.

Note

Part of the same manuscript is at Queen's College, Oxford.
 

170/616. Sermones de tempore et de sanctis. Germany. s. XV

Physical Description: Paper, 320 ff. Front and rear pastedowns from manuscripts, s. XIII.
Physical Description: Bound in stamped leather over wooden boards, s. XV, with fore-edge tabs.
Belonged to the Carthusians of Erfurt (ex libris). From the Bradfer-Lawrence Collection.
Acquired from B. Quaritch in 1984.
 

170/617. St. Augustine, De vita Christiana; Bonaventure, De septem donis Spiritus sancti; Nicholas of Dinkelsbühl, De septem malis . . . Germany. s. XV

Physical Description: Paper, 144 ff. Small pocket book.
Physical Description: Bound in stamped leather over boards (rebacked), s. XV.
Belonged to the Benedictines of Liesborn (ex libris).
Acquired from P. Pirages in 1983.
 

170/620. Hildebert of Lemans, De mysterio missae with gloss. France. s. XIII 2

Physical Description: Parchment, 12 ff.
Physical Description: Bound in brown calf, s. XVIII.

Scope and Content Note

One quire from a manuscript of Hildebert 's works not recorded in the standard edition of his Opera.
Belonged to the abbey of Billy in Besancon (stamp: Ex Bibliotheca Billiana).
Acquired from H.P. Kraus in 1985.
 

170/621. Nicolaus Upton, De militari officio. England. s. XV

Physical Description: Paper and parchment, 102 ff. With heraldic devices colored.
Physical Description: Bound in quarter green morocco over paper boards.

Scope and Content Note

Bound with the proof sheets of Joseph Haslewood's facsimile reprint of The Blasynge of Arms, Wynkyn de Worde, 1496.
Belonged to George Townsend, earl of Leicester 1755-1811 (bookplate); Joseph Haslewood 1760-1833 (stamp); Sir Thomas Phillipps (printed label on spine 8958).
Acquired from B. Quaritch in 1985. Given by the Friends of the Library.
 

170/622. Giunta Publishing House, stock book. Florence. ca. 1600-1610

Physical Description: Paper, 309 ff.
Physical Description: Bound in a limp leather wrapper, contemporary fore-edge tabs, s. XVI.
Belonged to Giorgio Uzielli (bookplate).
Acquired from H.P. Kraus in 1982.
 

170/623. Planctus Mariae. Italy. s. XIV

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