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Finding Aid for the Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts Collection - Library Special Collections, ca. 1198-1616
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Table of contents What's This?
  • Descriptive Summary
  • Administrative Information
  • History
  • Introduction
  • Index 1: Repository
  • Index 2: Place and Date
  • Index 3: Secundo Folio
  • Index 4: Binding Date
  • Abbreviations
  • Saints and Religious Feasts
  • Iconography
  • Persons Associated with the Manuscripts
  • Institutions and Places Asscoiated with the Manuscripts
  • Form of Entry

  • Descriptive Summary

    Title: Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts Collection - Library Special Collections
    Date (inclusive): ca. 1198-1616
    Collection number: medspeci
    Collector: Ferrari, Mirella.
    Abstract: This finding aid lists the Medieval and Renaissance manuscripts holdings of the Department of Special Collections as cited in Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts at the University of California, Los Angeles (1991), compiled by Mirella Ferrari and edited by R.H. Rouse (Call Number - Z6621 C123m 1991). The catalog identifies the contents, illumination, physical makeup, binding, and provenance for all Medieval and Renaissance manuscripts in the UCLA library system. These manuscripts can be found in the Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library's History and Special Collections Division, the John E. Anderson Graduate School of Management Library's Robert E. Gross collection of Rare Books in Business and Economics, the Music Library's Hathaway Collection, and UCLA Library Special Collections. The various Indexes are brief lists of all manuscripts in the UCLA library system while the Container List consists only of the holdings in UCLA Library Special Collections.
    Language: Finding aid is written in English.
    Language of the Material: Materials are in English.
    Repository: University of California, Los Angeles. Library Special Collections.
    Los Angeles, California 90095-1575
    Physical location: Materials located at the Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library's History and Special Collections Division, the John E. Anderson Graduate School of Management Library's Robert E. Gross collection of Rare Books in Business and Economics, the Music Library's Hathaway Collection, and UCLA Library Special Collections. Some materials are stored off-site at SRLF. Advance notice is required for access to those items in the collection. For items listed in the Container List please contact the UCLA Library Special Collections Reference Desk for paging information. For all other items listed in the various Indexes as not part of UCLA Library Special Collections, please contact the specified repository for more information.

    Administrative Information

    Restrictions on Access

    Open for research. STORED OFF-SITE AT SRLF. Advance notice is required for access to the collection. Please contact UCLA Library Special Collections for paging information.

    Restrictions on Use and Reproduction

    Property rights to the physical object belong to the UC Regents. Literary rights, including copyright, are retained by the creators and their heirs. It is the responsibility of the researcher to determine who holds the copyright and pursue the copyright owner or his or her heir for permission to publish where The UC Regents do not hold the copyright.

    Preferred Citation

    [Identification of item], Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts Collection - Library Special Collections. UCLA Library Special Collections, Charles E. Young Research Library, UCLA.

    History

    The present catalog, begun over a decade ago, stands at the beginning of modern cataloging of medieval manuscripts in North America. Its completion may serve as the occasion to pause for a moment and examine the beginnings and progress to date of manuscript cataloging in America, as well as to offer some comment on what it has taught us and how best to continue. 1
    By “modern” cataloging is meant the writing of catalogs that can stand comparison with those of European national collections, such as the catalog of the Prussian State Library by Rose, that of the Royal Collection in the British Library by Warner and Gilson, the still-growing catalog of the Latin manuscripts at the Bibliothéeque nationale, and the catalogs of various portions of the Vatican Library, such as the Vaticani latini by Pelzer and Ruysschaert and the Reginenses by Wilmart. 2 These works distinguish themselves from earlier catalogs by the fact that they involve extensive research into the identity of the contents, illumination, physical makeup, binding, and provenance of the manuscripts they describe.
    The manuscript collections of North America are at the same time substantial and dispersed. In this they are no different from the collections of any European country, save in degree: Europe's collections are larger, North America's collections more widely dispersed. Institutional cataloging of the great collections in Europe has moved at a slow but assured pace. Cataloging of smaller collections has been largely haphazard. In Germany after World War II, at the urging of Bernhard Bischoff the program for catalogs of state libraries was begun, providing scholars with modern catalogs of the libraries of Frankfurt, Stuttgart, and Nurnberg, among others. In England, N.R. Ker saw the cataloging of undescribed manuscripts in small collections as a major desideratum, and undertook to do it himself. Ker was part of that generation of English medievalists, formed in the 1930s, who shared a belief in the importance of the written page and who, when something needed doing, got up and did it. To them, knowledge of the medieval past lay in an understanding of its surviving manuscripts and, therefore, these were to be sought out and cataloged; order, in the form of bibliographic control, was gradually to be imposed upon chaos. This message was firmly transmitted to anyone who listened. Following in the footsteps of M.R. James, any scholar possessed of reasonable curiosity would find an interesting collection of manuscripts to describe. R.A.B Mynors explored Bishop Gray's manuscripts in Balliol College; Malcolm Parkes described the liturgical manuscripts at Keble College; and Ian Doyle with Alan Piper is cataloging the manuscripts of Bishop Cosin's library in Durham. 3 In California also, cataloging began as an individual effort, involving a number of scholars working in undescribed, isolated, and largely overlooked collections.
    At the first and simplest level was the undertaking by Dennis Dutschke, and later also by Consuelo Dutschke, of a general survey of manuscripts on the West Coast, ranging from Mount Saint Angel Abbey in Oregon to the San Diego Public Library. The initial intent was to present the results of the survey as a handlist, but in time the Dutschkes agreed that only a more thorough examination of the manuscripts would be of valid service to the academic community.
    The author of the present catalog, Mirella Ferrari, a member of the faculty of Classical Philology at the Università cattolica del Sacro cuore in Milan, was brought to UCLA in the spring quarter of 1977 by the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies to catalog the medieval and renaissance manuscripts then in the university's libraries. Her mentor, Giuseppe Billanovich, who had spent a term at UCLA as visiting professor, had seen the body of uncataloged manuscripts and recommended to Fredi Chiappelli, then director of the Center, that Ferrari be invited for the task.
    The opportunity to have a knowledgeable manuscript scholar as a colleague at UCLA and to assist her in whatever way possible with the library and the manuscripts was a great stimulus to catalog locally in Southern California and, in turn, to encourage cataloging in American collections generally. Ferrari delayed her return to Italy, and in the summer of 1977 she, Consuelo Dutschke, and I began with the Claremont Libraries, which housed the very sort of interesting but hitherto ignored collection endemic to the United States. Much of the summer went to the task. Undertaken at our own expense as an enjoyable experiment without deadlines or semi-annual progress reports, the catalog, frequently set aside when more urgent things came along, was finally completed and published in 1986, as the first volume in a series devoted to catalogs of manuscripts in California institutional libraries both private and public. 4
    In the late 1960s and '70s, with the prospect of the computer on the horizon, the production of a second supplement to De Ricci's Census 5 was frequently put forward as a worthy undertaking at meetings of the Medieval Academy's Standing Committee for Centers and Regional Associations (CARA). From the enormous effort it had cost W.H. Bond to produce the first supplement to De Ricci, however, it was obvious that the obstacles lying in the way of such a large undertaking made these suggestions impracticable. For one person, working for a research center or alone, however well equipped with research assistants, to catalog not only the new acquisitions of the Morgan, the Beinecke, and the Houghton but also the numerous uncataloged manuscripts in smaller out-of-the-way collections of manuscripts scattered across America, was impossible unless the researcher wanted to consecrate a lifetime to this task—which usually turned out not to be the case. An application to the NEH with the blessing of the Academy was the customarily preferred solution to the problems of financial support. There was a firm conviction in those heady days that a combination of graduate research assistants, computers, and NEH funding could produce manuscript descriptions. The essential missing ingredient, the broadly learned and well-trained cataloger willing to slog away at this task for years on end, was seldom mentioned. There were capable people on the scene, but the older among them already had too many irons in the fire to allow them to begin again, while younger scholars would have been ill advised to invest much effort on catalogs given that manuscript cataloging unfortunately counted little in hiring or tenure decisions. America did not and does not have a tax-funded Federal Academy of Sciences, like France's Centre national de recherche scientifique or West Germany's Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, to support a cadre of full-time catalogers.
    What was needed was a means of encouraging able younger scholars with secure positions to catalog defined collections in their own universities. The way to do this was to create a community of catalogers, who would work individually on collections of their choice with the support of the Endowment, who would share their knowledge and areas of first-hand observation with other catalogers, and who together would establish standards through practical experience. The human factor, the quality and motivation of the individual cataloger, was most important.
    In the 1970s, the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) became interested in developing programs to make collections of primary sources in North America better known Margaret Childs, then director of the Research Tools Program, expressed an interest in supporting the cataloging of manuscript collections. The first large collection to be described with NEH support was the Huntington Library, which had applied in 1974 for a grant to prepare guides to its extensive and varied manuscript collections. Its curator of manuscripts Jean Preston left in 1977 for Princeton, and the new curator Mary Robertson sought advice on the guide to the medieval manuscripts. Consuelo Dutschke of UCLA was invited to prepare the catalog, even though it would mean putting off completion of the Claremont catalog for a number of years. Dutschke's catalog of the medieval manuscripts at the Huntington appeared in two volumes in 1989, Shortly after the Huntington catalog was under way, the Endowment awarded the Newberry Library a grant to catalog its medieval manuscripts, the project to be carried out by Paul Saenger. The Newberry adopted the format for description that had been developed for the Claremont and Huntington catalogs, and Consuelo Dutschke and I served as editorial consultants. The major East Coast libraries also benefited from NEH-supported cataloging. In 1982, Barbara Shailor was awarded the first in a series of NEH grants to catalog the manuscripts of the Beinecke Library at Yale, a task begun by Cora Lutz in 1969. The Endowment's Research Tools Program under Margaret Childs was again instrumental in seeing that the catalog would adopt the format for description employed in the other cataloging projects that the Program funded, and Consuelo Dutschke and I again served as editorial consultants. More recently, the Houghton Library of Harvard University, at the initiative of Larry Dowler (formerly of the Beinecke Library), undertook to catalog its medieval manuscripts. Laura Light of UCLA was selected as cataloger, and after a time the Library was granted NEH support. Barbara Shailor, Consuelo Dutschke, and I have served as editorial consults. Dutschke is now cataloging the manuscripts of the Bancroft Library, Berkeley, with NEH support. The Bancroft catalog will form the third volume in the present series of catalogs of medieval manuscripts in California institutions. 6
    The detailed cataloging of manuscripts with NEH support was not limited to manuscripts in America, but was already being applied to American collections of microfilms of manuscripts in European libraries. In the late 1960s, the Hill Monastic Manuscript Library of St. John's University in Minnesota decided to catalog, as well as to microfilm. As the member of the External Advisory Board familiar with cataloging, I worked with the catalogers, Donald Yates and later Hope Mayo, in devising a format for describing manuscripts from microfilm. Catalogs of the manuscripts of Herzogenburg and Tarragona have been published. The Ambrosiana Microfilm Library at the Medieval Institute, University of Notre Dame, in 1980 embarked on a catalog of the filmed Ambrosiana manuscripts, with NEH support and an able cataloging team headed by Christine Eder and later Donald Yates. Leonard Boyle OP and I served as advisors, and the cataloging format adopted was that which had been successfully employed by Yates at the Hill Library. The dismantling of that project by Ralph McInerney, then director of the Institute, was a great loss. The catalog project has recently been resuscitated by Louis Jordan, and volumes have begun to appear. 7
    Not all modern cataloging in America found its origins in the community of catalogers described above. The first catalog of an American collection done in modern form was begun in 1982 by Lilian Randall at the Walters Art Gallery in Baltimore, with the support of the Kress Foundation and NEH. Randall, whose first volume appeared in 1989, brought both Barbara Shailor and me into contact with the Walters project, and she adopted a format similar to that used in the NEH-supported catalogs described above. In 1980, the Library of Congress decided to prepare a catalog of its medieval manuscripts.
    The project, supported by the Library rather than by NEH, has, nevertheless, also been in informal contact with various of the catalogers mentioned above, in particular Donald Yates, Lilian Randall, and me, and has followed something of the basic format of description adopted by the NEH catalogs. The first volume, by Svato Schutzner, appeared in 1989. 8 These catalogs are a testimony to the cooperation of scholars, libraries, and the federal government.
    From time to time it has been suggested that the community of scholars who catalog manuscripts develop a model format for description. An agreed-upon form would simplify the National Endowment's work and ensure a certain standard and uniformity of description. While this is an appealing notion, it has been resisted, and rightly so, for several reasons. As manuscripts are each unique items, a degree of flexibility is required in the way they are to be described. A fixed format, like a form to be filled in, tends to make one force the manuscript to fit the format. The form of N.R. Ker's descriptions is constantly adapted to suit the needs of the manuscript being described; for Ker, practicality and common sense overruled system and consistency every time. Catalogers, also, are each unique people who bring to their task specific insights, the expression of which should be allowed. Lastly, to establish a format for description inevitably freezes the format; it implies that we have determined the best way of describing what we see, and it is doubtful that this is so. There are a number of areas where the method of description will change, one hopes for the better. The cataloger's treatment of a manuscript's illumination and decoration has changed from being largely ignored, to being described as part of the physical make-up on a par with the dimensions and number of columns, to now receiving a separate section of its own. At present the treatment of binding fragments in a catalog description appears sometimes with the contents, sometimes in the binding section. The increased use of photographs to supplement words will certainly influence the form of future descriptions. Each of the American catalogs mentioned in this essay is based on the same basic model, yet each has adapted the model in one way or another to suit the specific situation.
    To catalog in depth has always required serious justification. Libraries and funding agencies ask, why spend three years describing 150 manuscripts when a brief contents list of the 150 could be prepared in six months? For the most part, American manuscript collections are not large enough to make this a serious problem. Both Consuelo Dutschke and Barbara Shailor have cataloged collections of 350 and 500 manuscripts in a reasonable time. The question itself, however, is poorly put, since it implies that one must choose one or the other, catalog or handlist. In fact, what one wants for massive collections such as the Hill Monastic Manuscript Library or the large European libraries, is both. A short-form inventory of known contents, rapidly produced, on-line so as to be constantly updatable, will satisfy the basic needs of users. The inventory can be followed by the in-depth research catalog moving at its own pace.
    National organizations of archivists and rare book librarians at present are expressing increasing interest in establishing a format for an on-line system of cataloging manuscripts. For the most part, these organizations are concerned with box-level descriptions of papers and, on occasion, modern bound manuscripts, where problems of identifying the contents are minimal and materials can be cataloged without leaving one's desk. The system under consideration, however, would theoretically be competent to receive indexable descriptions of any type of manuscript—including medieval documents and bound volumes. To date, no cataloger of medieval and renaissance manuscripts nor, indeed, any other medieval or renaissance scholar has been asked to participate in such a project. One hopes that situation will change—that those who catalog medieval and renaissance manuscripts will be consulted about the problems encountered in preparing descriptions, and that students of the Middle Ages and Renaissance will be asked what information they hope to find in a description. Data banks and on-line access hold great promise, but only if the information that goes into them is produced by competent and informed people. This is a time when the relationship between librarian and scholar needs to be one of interested and active cooperation, rather than protectionism and mutual exclusion. 9
    America has an abundance of medieval and renaissance manuscripts dispersed in numerous libraries across the country. Some libraries such as the J. Pierpont Morgan, the Houghton, and the Beinecke contain a thousand or more bound manuscripts. Others contain from several hundred to just a handful, and many contain only one manuscript or a few leaves. The manuscript holdings of the majority of these libraries have never been accurately described. This is in large part because the holdings are not substantial enough to permit the libraries in question to support curators of early manuscripts, and because accurate description requires specialized training in languages, scripts, textual history, art history, binding, and the history of collections, which neither general rare book librarians nor general medievalists have. Today, only four American institutions—the Beinecke Library, the Walters Gallery, the Morgan Library, and the Getty Museum—have curators of medieval and renaissance manuscripts. In addition, few manuscript librarians in American libraries, even the curators in the four institutions named above, can afford the time, above and beyond their normal curatorial duties, to engage in detailed cataloging of their collections. American librarians have been able to do little more than register the acquisition of medieval materials in the accession file, using information supplied by the bookseller. While this may be adequate for printed books (though it eliminates the recording of copy-specific information), it is not satisfactory for medieval and renaissance manuscripts, since too many book dealers, Sotheby's descriptions excepted, provide at best a rudimentary identification of the contents, often repeated from the previous dealer's description and not infrequently misleading. The establishment of national on-line data bases like RLIN does not solve the dilemma either, because a manuscript must first be cataloged by a competent scholar before there is accurate data to enter. This situation is not unique to medieval and renaissance manuscripts; it must exist to one degree or another in any area—e.g., oriental literature, history of science—that requires specialized knowledge.
    The prospect for bibliographic control is particularly dim in the case of the library, no matter how large, that has only one or two manuscripts. An item alone, without a context in which to be used, is generally ignored: For example, the State Historical Society of Wisconsin possesses a large and remarkable thirteenth-century Bible, which had belonged to a Midwestern farm family for over a century before it was given to the Society; the University of British Columbia has one medieval manuscript, a fifteenth-century copy of Cicero's Prior Academics; Los Angeles Public Library has an early thirteenth-century manuscript of Peter Comestor's Bible history; and Pasadena Public Library had, until it was stolen in 1984, a fifteenth-century Rouen book of hours, which was one of six Rouen horae available for comparative study in Greater Los Angeles. 10
    This problem, that medieval and renaissance manuscripts are broadly scattered among libraries unequipped and unstaffed to deal with them, makes cataloging uniquely difficult in America. The solution, cataloging done by manuscript scholars, can be sought in two ways. One solution lies in the willingness and ability of the library to enlist the cooperation of subject specialists from among its university faculty, scholars who have a vivid interest in the rare books and manuscripts of a given field. The benefits of such cooperation can be seen in the example of Cornell University, where the late George Healey, Professor of English Literature and distinguished Wordsworth bibliographer, was named curator of the university's Wordsworth Collection and then Curator of Rare Books, Many North American universities both public and private have on their faculties—whether in English literature, art history, classics, or history—scholars interested in and capable of developing a manuscript collection for research and study. They are a resource for librarians to draw on in developing university collections in the most effective way. In other cases, where the faculty interest is lacking, the appropriate solution would be cataloging by external scholars, funded by either the holding library or the National Endowment. In this fashion, the medieval and renaissance manuscripts in American libraries can be cataloged, and the scholarship of research catalogers, following in the footsteps of Wilmart and Ker, can be properly valued by their fellow medieval and renaissance scholars.
    Perhaps the time will come for an idea once considered but dismissed as premature: appealing to the Endowment or another agency to fund a program which would provide three years' support to a set number of postdoctoral scholars to attend a summer institute in manuscript description and then to catalog a collection of manuscripts in their home state. A group of experienced specialists in liturgy, illumination, canon law, and other specific areas including vernacular languages would be available for consultation. The descriptions would be entered in a single data bank which would in time become the central record (catalog) of manuscripts in American collections. An editorial team would review descriptions and assist in seeing the published volumes through the press in a national catalog series which would replace De Ricci and the Supplement and which could be periodically updated from its computer base. If this or something similar is done, I trust that one will have learned from the catalogs described above that the scholarly value of the descriptions produced depends almost entirely on the quality of the cataloger.
    The descriptions in the following catalog were prepared by Mirella Ferrari during her visit to UCLA in the spring of 1977. Working at a pace that would put most of us to shame, Ferrari prepared descriptions of the 65 manuscripts and 150 leaves described in this volume in less than six months. This is all the more remarkable because it was accomplished before the availability of computers. Manually produced, a preliminary version of the catalog was published in off-set form in 1978 from a text typed on an electric typewriter by Abigail Bok. The purpose of this version was to make Ferrari's work available to students and faculty using the library, as well as to provide the other University of California libraries with a record of UCLA's holdings. 11
    In the ten years which have passed since she returned to Italy, these manuscripts and Ferrari's descriptions have served UCLA graduate seminars and visiting scholars. Not surprisingly, in this time additional texts and provenances have been identified. The entire catalog has been edited, new information added, some entries expanded or corrected, the introductions updated, a list of additional acquisitions for the years 1978-1990 added, and the whole supplied with new indexes. It can be said that the original catalog has held up well to scrutiny, a testimony to the author's learning and energy.
    The production of this volume was completed as it was begun, namely, without extramural funding or cost to the University Library. The Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies has contributed the cost of photography, copyediting, and composition, as well as that of the initial cataloging in having brought Mirella Ferrari to UCLA. I am grateful to its successive directors Fredi Chiappelli and Michael Allen for their continued support of the catalog program.
    The staffs of the UCLA libraries whose manuscripts are described in this volume could not have been more helpful. I want in particular to thank Anne Caiger, Katharine Donahue, Simon Elliott, Joyce Ludmer, Jeffrey Rankin, Victoria Steele, and David Zeidberg for their professional help and good will. Behind them, of course, stand their predecessors, the great library builders m whose days these manuscripts were acquired, and the donors of three great collections. I am speaking of Wilbur Smith (first librarian of Special Collections), Lawrence Clark Powell, Robert Vosper, Dr. Franklin Murphy, Dr. John Benjamin, and the late Dr. Elmer Belt.
    My thanks to a discerning friend of many years who has again enhanced a volume of this series by the contribution of a color frontispiece.
    I am grateful to the following individuals for their considerate help. John Bernhardt read each of the manuscripts to check for typographical errors. My fellow series editors Consuelo Dutschke and Dennis Dutschke have read the whole of the catalog at various stages, and each has contributed information to a number of descriptions. Terry Nixon prepared the indexes, as he did those to the Claremont volume.
    This volume is dedicated to two scholar librarians, Edward Shreeves and Brooke Whiting, friends who shared with me their enjoyment of medieval manuscripts and early printed books.
    R.H.R.

    UCLA

    January 1990
    1. Regarding the history and growth of manuscript studies in America, see R.H. Rouse, “Latin Paleography and Manuscript Studies in North America,” in Un secolo di paleografia e diplomatica (1887-1986), ed. A. Petrucci and A. Pratesi (Rome, 1988) pp.307-327
    2. Valentin Rose, Verzeichniss der lateinischen Handschriften der kgl. Bibliothek zu Berlin, 3 vols., (Berlin 1893-1919); G F. Warner and J.P. Gilson, Catalogue of Western Manuscripts in the Old Royal and King's Collections, 4 vols. (London, 1921); Catalogue général des manuscripts latins . . . . ed. Ph. Lauer el al, (Paris, 1939- ); A. Pelzer. J. Ruysschaert, et al., Codices Vaticani latini (Vatican City, 1902-[1988]); A. Wilmart, Codices reginenses latini, 2 vols. (Vatican City, 1937-1945).
    3. N.R. Ker, Medieval Manuscripts, in British Libraries, 3 vols. (Oxford, 1969-1983); R.A.B. Mynors, Catalogue of the Manuscripts of Balliol College, Oxford (Oxford, 1963); M.B. Parkes, The Medieval Manuscripts of Keble College, Oxford (London, 1979).
    4. C.W. Dutschke and R.H. Rouse, with Mirella Ferrari, Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts in the Claremont Libraries (Berkeley 1986), vol.1 of the present series.
    5. Seymour De Ricci, Census of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts in the United States and Canada, 3 vols. (1935-1940; reproduced New York, 1961); and C.U. Faye and W.H. Bond, Supplement to the Census of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscript in the United States and Canada (New York, 1962).
    6. C.W. Dutschke, with R.H. Rouse, Guide to Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts in the Huntington Library, 2 vols. (San Marino, California, 1989); P. Saenger, A Catalogue of the Pre-1500 Western Manuscript Books at the Newberry Library (Chicago 1989); B.A. Shailor, Catalogue of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University (Binghamton, New York, 1984- ).
    7. Descriptive Inventories of Manuscripts Microfilmed for the Hill Monastic Manuscripts Library (Collegeville, Minnesota, 1981- ); Louis Jordan et al., Inventory of Western Manuscripts in the Biblioteca Ambrosiana, from the Medieval Institute of the University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, 1984- ).
    8. Lilian M. C. Randall, Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts in the Walters Art Gallery (Baltimore, 1988- ); Svato Schutzner, Medieval and Renaissance Manuscript Books in the Library of Congress: A Descriptive Catalog (Washington 1989- ).
    9. An equally pressing need is for on-line cataloging of incunabula. A generally agreed-upon form of description does not exist. For some comments on one aspect, see R.H. Rouse, “Copy-Specific Features of the Printed Book: What to Record and Why,” in Bibliography and the Study of Fifteenth-Century Civilization, ed. Lotte Hellinga, British Library Occasional Papers (London, 1987) pp.202-215.
    10. See R.H. Rouse, “Medieval Manuscripts and Early Printed Books in Los Angeles,” in A Bibliophile's Los Angeles: Essays for the International Association of Bibliophiles on the Occasion of Its XIVth Congress, 30 September-11 October 1985 , ed. John Bidwell (Los Angeles, 1985) pp.43-80.
    11. Mirella Ferrari, Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts at the University of California, Los Angeles; Preliminary Descriptions (Los Angeles 1978).

    Introduction

    This catalog contains descriptions of the medieval and renaissance manuscripts in Latin script that are scattered among the libraries of the University of California, Los Angeles. On the example of P.O. Kristeller's Iter italicum, A.D. 1600 has been taken as the upper boundary of the Renaissance. The manuscripts described here are those written in western Europe in a Latin alphabet, without regard to language; at least eleven European languages are represented among the UCLA manuscripts. Manuscripts in Greek and other Eastern European scripts have been excluded, as have the sixteenth-century Mexican manuscripts in the Charles E. Young Research Library.
    The method of description and the arrangement of the present catalog are basically those set forth by N.R. Ker on pages vii-xiii of his Medieval Manuscripts in British Libraries, vol.1 (Oxford, 1969). Abbreviations, signs, and formulas, at times different from Ker's, are given in full in the list below. But a further word of explanation is needed: this catalog was written primarily for teaching purposes, and is designed to introduce students to the manuscripts. Hence, the descriptions may seem lengthy and on occasion repetitive to scholarly readers: for example, I have noted the system of ruling in the description of each tenth-and eleventh-century item (e.g., ruled with drypoint); and I have generally given a double nomenclature for the script, a description in English and the technical name in Latin (e.g., gothic bookhand in liturgical style, littera textualis formata). In describing the script, moreover, I have often mentioned features which are normally found in a given type of hand (e.g., in twelfth-century ordinary minuscule d always appears in two forms, uncial and upright), whereas catalogs usually record only exceptional features.
    I should like to thank especially Fredi Chiappelli, Director of the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, who took the initiative in arranging my visit to California to work on this catalog and encouraged me at all stages. I am grateful to Dean Robert Hayes and to the Graduate School of Library and Information Science, who received me as a visiting professor; and to the librarians and staff of the campus libraries, who put at my disposal their materials cataloged and uncataloged, and without whose patience and assistance I could hardly have completed this work, especially Victoria Erpelding and Joyce Pellerano Ludmer (the Elmer Belt Library of Vinciana), Sandra Colville-Stewart (the Biomedical Library), Charlotte Georgi (the Anderson Graduate School of Management Library), Marsha Berman (the Music Library), and Brooke Whiting (the Department of Special Collections of the Charles E. Young Research Library). For the descriptions of eight medieval manuscripts in the Research Library I should like to thank the graduate students in R.H. Rouse's paleography course (History 224), whose descriptions, prepared as part of their course work, I used with profit; they are Leila Berner, John Bernhardt, Consuelo Dutschke, Susan Fuller, Jerry Kitzman, and Kathleen McDonough. Anna M. De Vore played a major role in describing the Research Library's collection of loose leaves. I am grateful to Eva Beyer and Abigail Bok who, while carefully typing my work, also took care to edit my English. It is difficult to say how much this catalog owes above all to the friendly help of Professor Richard H. Rouse of the Department of History; he made his advice, criticisms, and suggestions as well as his time freely available to me, from my first day in California, when he introduced me to the Department of Special Collections, to the last day of proofreading. I should like to thank him for everything and acknowledge my debt of gratitude.
    M.F.

    Los Angeles, 1977

    Index 1: Repository

    Note

    List of Manuscripts in the UCLA Library System organized by repository.
    The Elmer Belt Library of Vinciana
    • no.35) Leonardo da Vinci, Trattato della pittura, Italy, 1582, in Italian
    • no.65) Michelangelo Buonarroti, Ricordo, Italy, 1533
    • no.66) Pietro da Vinci, notarized deed, Italy, 1459
    • no.67) Petrus de Crescentiis, Ruralium commodorum libri, Italy, 1466
    • no.68) “Raffaello Sanzio,” forgeries, Italy(?), s. XIX(?)
    • no.70) Bartolomeo Ammannati, letter, Italy, 1570
    • no.73) Breviary, s. XVIII/XIX(?)
    The Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library: History and Special Collections Division
    • Benjamin 1) Medical miscellany, Italy, s. XV 2
    • Benjamin 3) Bernard of Gordon, fragment, France, s. XIV 1
    • Benjamin 4) Conoximent de las orines, Libre de reseptes, Catalonia, 1466, in Catalan
    • Benjamin 5) Recipes, Germany, s. XV med, in German
    • Benjamin 8) Sebastian Jäger, Artzney Buech, Austria, 1580, in German
    • Benjamin 9) Medical miscellany, Germany, s. XV med, in German
    • Benjamin 10) Medical miscellany, Czechoslovakia, s. XV med, partly in Czech
    • Benjamin 11) Medical miscellany, Germany, s. XV med, partly in German
    • Benjamin 12) Medical miscellany, Italy, s. XV 2, partly in Italian
    • Benjamin 13) Medical and scientific miscellany, Italy, s. XV 2
    • Benjamin WZ240/P719L/1553) Rare Liber amicorum, Germany, S. XVI med
    The John E. Anderson Graduate School of Management Library
    • Gross 1) Statutes of a mercantile court, Italy, 1577, in Italian
    • Gross 2) Business arithmetic, Italy, s. XVI 2, in Italian
    • Gross 3) Della Stufa account book, Italy, 1581-1590, in Italian
    • Gross 4) Commercial treatises, England, s. XVI 2 1 leaf
    The Music Library
    • Hathaway 1-24) 24 fragments of music, s. XI-XV
    The Charles E. Young Research Library: Department of Special Collections
    • Collection 100, Box 30: Letters, Germany, s. XVI
    • Collection 100, Box 102: Francesco Maria Della Rovere, letter, Italy, 1522, in Italian
    • Collection 100, Box 113/14: Delfino charters and cartulary, Italy, s. XIII-XVII
    • Collection 100, Box 178: Letters, etc., Italy and Spain, s. XIV 2 and XVI 2
    • 170/no.15) Francesco Berni, Life of Pietro Aretino, Italy, s. XVI 2, in Italian
    • 170/no.20) Breviary, Flanders, s. XVI in
    • 170/no.21) Nicholaus Cusanus, De visione dei, Germany, s. XV 2
    • 170/no.22) Pseudo Augustine, sermons, Italy, s. XV 2
    • 170/no.26) Book of hours, France, s. XV in
    • 170/no.43) Martyrology, Italy, s. XV 1
    • 170/no.49) Breviary, Paris, s. XV med
    • 170/no.50) Book of hours, France, s. XV 2
    • 170/no.55) Handbook of chronology, France, s. XVI 2
    • *170/no.84) Life of Jesus, France, s. XV 2, in French
    • 170/no.87) Medical notebook, Italy, s. XVII, in Italian
    • 170/no.199) Jacobus de Voragine, Legenda aurea, France, s. XV med
    • *170/no.281) Life of Cosimo I de' Medici, Italy, 1574/1587, in Italian
    • *170/no.282) Carlo de' Medici, account book, Italy, 1535-1536
    • *170/no.292) Tristano Caracciolo, works, Italy, s. XVII
    • 170/no.307) Ordinances of the Confraternity of St. Julian in Teruel, Spain, 1440-1574, in Spanish
    • *170/322) Paul of Venice, Summa naturalium, Italy, 1421
    • 170/no.323) Inventory of the library of Antoine IV Ebrard de Saint-Sulpice, bishop of Cahors, France, 1589, in French
    • 170/no.331) Stephen Langton, Interpretations of Hebrew names, England or France, s. XIII med
    • 170/no.348) Bible, Spain, s. XIII med
    • 170/no.358) Engineer's sketchbook, Italy, s. XVI 2, and France, s. XVII 2
    • * 170/380) Venetian ambassadors' reports, papal conclaves, Italy, s. XVI-XVII 1
    • 170/no.382) Jacobus de Voragine, sermons, Italy, s. XIV 2
    • 170/no.442) Gregory the Great, Dialogues, Italy, s. XV ex, in Italian
    • 170/no.521) Antiphonal, Italy, s. XV 1
    • * 170/524) Rasis, Liber Almansoris, fragment, Italy, s. XIII 2
    • 170/no.525) Diego Hurtado de Mendoza, De la guerra de Granada, Spain, s. XVI-XVII, in Spanish
    • * 170/no.527) Missal and records of Uckerath, Germany, s. XII-XVI
    • 170/no.529 Laurence Nowell, commonplace book, England, s. XVI med
    • Collection 902 Orsini family, archives, Italy, s. XIV-XX
    • Collection 952, Box 1: Giugni family, account book, Italy, 1580-1586
    • Collection 952, Box 2: Accounts, Italy, s. XVI-XVII
    • Collection 952, Box 3: Carlo di Andrea Cambini, account book, Italy, 1556-1616
    • Collection 952, Box 4: Biagio Castellani, notarial register, Italy, 1382-1391
    • Collection 952, Box 5: Sienese fiscal records, Italy, 1601-1615
    • Collection 953, Box 1.3: Neapolitan miscellany, Italy, s. XVI
    • Collection 968, Box 1.71: Pierre Gautier, miscellany, France, 1572-1575
    • Collection 1033: Antiphonals, leaves, Italy or Spain, s. XVI
    • Collection 2070: 16 dated documents, 1198-1585
    • ***170/403 (10 oversized ringed binders): Collection of loose leaves, s. IX-XV

    Index 2: Place and Date

    Note

    Manuscripts in the UCLA Library System organized by place and date.
    Austria 1368
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 16; Neuenstadt
    1580
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 8 (Vienna)
    Belgium ca. 1564
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - PA6648.P6A17 1527 (Appendix)
    1633
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.14 (Appendix; Mechelen)
    Catalonia 1466
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 4
    Czechoslovakia s. XV med
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 10 (Prague?)
    England s. XIII med
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.331 (or France?)
    1449
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.615 (Appendix)
    s. XV
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.621 (Appendix)
    1521
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 11
    1550
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 12
    ca. 1560-ca. 1571
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.529
    1585
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 13
    after 1587
    Contributing Institution: Management, Gross 4
    ca. 1595
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.412 (Appendix)
    Flanders s. XVI in
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.20
    1521
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100), Box 30 (item 1; Mons, Hainaut)
    France ca. 1240-1260
    Contributing Institution: Grunwald, s.n. (Appendix; Paris)
    s. XIII med
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.558 (Appendix; southern)
    s. XIII 2
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.620 (Appendix)
    s. XIII ex
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, MS Coll. 82 (Appendix; Figeac)
    ca. 1311-1325
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 3 (Paris?)
    1346
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 8
    1405
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 9; Paris
    1412
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100) Box 178 no.i (Appendix; Paris)
    s. XV med
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.49 (Paris)
    s. XV med
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.199 (northern)
    s. XV 2
    Contributing Institution: Belt 37 (Appendix; Rouen)
    s. XV 2
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.50
    s. XV 2 or XV ex
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*84 (northern)
    1478
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 10; Paris
    s. XV ex
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.633 (Appendix; southwest)
    s. XVI in
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.26
    1523
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - *(Appendix)
    1558
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 14; Paris
    1572-1575
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - L'Enseignement de l'Université du Collège de France et des collèges à Paris (Collection 968), Box 1, no.71 (Paris and Orléans)
    s. XVI 2
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.55 (northern)
    1589
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.323 (Cahors)
    s. XVII
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.366 (Appendix; St. Denis)
    s. XVII 2
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.358 (part II)
    Germany s. XII 1
    Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 4
    s. XII med or XII 2
    Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 13
    s. XII ex
    Contributing Institution: Grunwald, s.n. (Appendix; southern)
    s. XII ex
    Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 11 (or Switzerland?)
    s. XII-XIII
    Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 7 (Rhineland)
    s. XII-XIII
    Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 19, 20
    s. XII-XVI
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*527 (Uckerath)
    s. XIII 1
    Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 10 (or Switzerland?)
    s. XIII 1
    Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 23
    s. XIII
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*575 (Appendix)
    s. XIII-XIV
    Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 17 (Rhineland?)
    s. XIV
    Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 5
    s. XIV
    Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 14
    s. XIV
    Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 22
    s. XIV-XV
    Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 15 (Rhineland?)
    s. XIV-XV
    Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 18
    s. XV 1
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.574 (Appendix; Cologne)
    s. XV 1
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.597 (Appendix)
    s. XV 1
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.656 (Appendix)
    s. XV med
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 5
    s. XV med
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 9
    s. XV med
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 11
    s. XV med
    Contributing Institution: Grunwald, s.n. (Appendix; southern)
    s. XV med
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - BV4209 S97 1508 (Appendix)
    s. XV
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical *WZ230 A743b 1485 (Appendix; Nürnberg)
    s. XV
    Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 16
    s. XV
    Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 24 (or Low Countries?)
    s. XV
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.594 (Appendix)
    s. XV
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.616 (Appendix)
    s. XV
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.617 (Appendix)
    1464
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.572 (Appendix)
    s. XV 2
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.21
    1476
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.598 (Appendix)
    1476-1478
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.642 (Appendix; western)
    s. XV ex
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.584 (Appendix; Bavaria)
    s. XV ex
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - *A1 T36su (Appendix)
    s. XVI med
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - 112559 (Appendix)
    1559-1562
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin WZ240 P719L 1553 RARE
    1570
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100), Box 30 (item 4; Speyer)
    1590-1600
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*352 (Appendix; Nürnberg)
    1600
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*351 (Appendix; Nürnberg)
    ca. 1610
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*353 (Appendix; Nürnberg)
    ca. 1610
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*354 (Appendix; Nürnberg)
    s. XVII 1
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*355 (Appendix; Nürnberg)
    Germany (?) s. XVI
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100), Box 30 (items 2, 3)
    Italy s. XIII 1
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.583 (Appendix; southern)
    s. XIII-s. XVII
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100), Boxes 113/114 (Veneto)
    s. XIII 2
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*524
    1311
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of material about the Orsini family (Collection 902), Box 533 no.i (Appendix; Volterra)
    1313
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 2; Pisa
    1350
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 3; Pisa
    s. XIV
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, MS Coll. 71 (Appendix)
    s. XIV
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.623 (Appendix)
    s. XIV-s. XX
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of material about the Orsini family (Collection 902)
    1353
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of material about the Orsini family (Collection 902), Box 533 no.ii (Appendix)
    1358
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 4; Florence
    s. XIV 2
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100), Box 178 (item 1; central)
    s. XIV 2
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.382
    1378
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 5; Padua
    1382-1391
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 4 (Pistoia)
    s. XIV/XV in
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.546 (Appendix; Florence?)
    1411
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 6; Poggibonsi
    1421
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*322 (Rimini)
    s. XV 1
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.43 (northern)
    s.XV 1
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.521
    1426
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.547 (Appendix)
    1440
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.589 (Appendix; Sulmona)
    1447
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.553 (Appendix; Venice)
    s. XV med
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.560 (Appendix; northern)
    s. XV med
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.627 (Appendix; Ferrara)
    s. XV med/XV 2
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.22
    s. XV
    Contributing Institution: Management TN241 U82 1616
    s. XV
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.592 (Appendix)
    s. XV
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.595 (Appendix)
    s. XV
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - A1 B456 1495 (Appendix)
    1459
    Contributing Institution: Belt 66 (Florence)
    ca. 1460-1465
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.593 (Appendix; Naples?)
    1466
    Contributing Institution: Belt 67 (Bergamo)
    ca. 1473-1476
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 13 (Tuscany)
    s. XV 2
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 1 (Bergamo)
    s. XV 2(?)
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical Benjamin 12 (Lombardv)
    s. XV 2
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.559 (Appendix)
    s. XV 2
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.638 (Appendix)
    s. XV 2
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.653 (Appendix)
    s. XV 2
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - *A1 D621v 1475 (Appendix)
    s XV 2
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - *A1 J83d 1486 (Appendix)
    1478
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.635 (Appendix; Fondi)
    1481-1491
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 7; Piacenza
    s. XV ex
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.442 (Veneto)
    s. XV ex
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.643 (Appendix; Venice?)
    s. XV-XVI
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.551 (Appendix)
    1507-1513
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.634 (Appendix; Rome?)
    ca. 1510
    Contributing Institution: Belt D 2 (Appendix)
    1522
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100), Box 102 (Mantua)
    ca. 1525-1535
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.626 (Appendix; Rome?)
    s. XVI 1
    Contributing Institution: Belt D 3 (Appendix)
    1531-1647
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 2 (item 2: Florence)
    1533
    Contributing Institution: Belt 65
    1535-1536
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*282 (Tuscany)
    1540-1546
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 2 (item 1; Tuscany, Lucca?)
    1550
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 15; Rome, St. Peter
    s. XVI med
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - *Z233 A4T34 (Appendix)
    s. XVI
    Contributing Institution: Belt D 19 (Appendix)
    s. XVI
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of material about the history of Naples (Collection 953), Box 1, no.3 (Naples?)
    s. XVI
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Manuscript Leaves of Music (Collection 1033), item 1; or Spain[?]
    1553-s. XVII med
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.624 (Appendix; Rome)
    1556-1616
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 3 (Florence)
    ca. 1562
    Contributing Institution: Belt D 1 (Appendix)
    1570
    Contributing Institution: Belt 70 (Florence)
    1574-1587
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*281 (Tuscany)
    s. XVI 2
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.15
    s. XVI 2
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.358 (part I)
    s.XVI 2
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.561 (Appendix)
    1577
    Contributing Institution: Management, Gross 1 (Florence)
    1578-1584
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 6 (Appendix: Tuscany, Garbo?)
    before ca. 1580
    Contributing Institution: Management Gross 2 (Venice)
    1580-1586
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 1 (Tuscany. Garbo?)
    1581-1590
    Contributing Institution: Management, Gross 3 (Florence)
    1582
    Contributing Institution: Belt 35
    s. XVI-XVII
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*380 (part 1)
    ca. 1600
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.543 (Appendix; Padua?)
    ca. 1600-1610
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.622 (Appendix; Florence)
    1601-1615
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 5 (Siena)
    s. XVII 1
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*380 (parts 2. 3)
    s. XVII
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.87 (olim 85)
    s. XVII
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*292 (southern?)
    Low Countries s. XIV
    Contributing Institution: Music Hathaway 12
    s. XIV 1
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100), Box 178 no.ii (Appendix)
    s. XV in
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.542 (Appendix)
    before 1477
    Contributing Institution: Grundwald, s.n. (Appendix)
    s. XV
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.596 (Appendix)
    s. XV
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.630 (Appendix; Delft)
    Low Countries(?) s. XIV
    Contributing Institution: Music Hathaway 21
    Poland 1405
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.552 Appendix: Poznan)
    Spain 1093-1133(?)
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100), no.***179 (Appendix; Caaveirn, Galioia)
    1198
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of dated documents from England, France, Italy, Spain, and Austria (Collection 2070), item 1; Salamanca
    s. XIII in
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.648 (Appendix; northern)
    s. XIII med
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.348
    1440-1574
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.307 (Teruel)
    1539
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.***652 (Appendix)
    s. XVI-XVIII
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.***651 (Appendix)
    1562
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100), Box 178 (item 2)
    1575
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Collection 100), Box 178 (item 3)
    1590
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.550 (Appendix)
    s. XVI-XVII
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.525
    1762
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.***72 (Appendix)
    Spain (?) s. XVI ex
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Manuscript Leaves of Music (Collection 1033), item 2
    Switzerland s. XII 1
    Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 8
    Switzerland(?) s. XI
    Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 1,2,3
    s. XII 1
    Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 9
    s. XII
    Contributing Institution: Music, Hathaway 6
    Unknown s. XVIII-XIX (?)
    Contributing Institution: Belt 73
    s. XIX (?)
    Contributing Institution: Belt 68

    Index 3: Secundo Folio

    Note

    Manuscripts by Secundo Folio in the UCLA Library System.
    A conference of weyhtes
    Contributing Institution: Management, Gross 4
    Abinaam parts mei
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.331
    actencum nessele
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 9 (f.1)
    alteritate capitulum 14
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.21 [chapter list]
    amunt corn se
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 4
    Andreas in Achaia consistens
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.199
    Apud Ephesum natale
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.43 (text)
    Asperagy
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 12
    asplenis kleyne
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 9 (f. 2)
    benedictis si vos
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.21 (text)
    che io per la poverta
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.442
    Deus misereatur nostri
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.20
    die erste frag
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 8
    et cum volueris
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 1
    et debelitat nervos
    Contributing Institution: Belt 67
    ex discipulis suis
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.521
    festum sancti Landerici
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.49 (volume II)
    ffevrier
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.50 (calendar)
    fijo dexare
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.307 (chapter list)
    horam nisi casus
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.22
    in breviario ultimum
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.49 (volume I, text)
    Interlocutori Berni et
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.15
    KL Martius habet
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.26 (calendar)
    le lxviii e
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*84 (chapter list)
    lentes omnia
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical Benjamin 13 (f. 2)
    Martius apud hebreos
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.43 (calendar)
    Nym iii f. salbenbleter
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 11
    omnium nostrum salvatoris
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.49 (volume III, text)
    plagis est decalogo
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.348
    primerament prometemos
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.307 (text)
    primus inadentem
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.49 (vol. 1 and 3, calendar)
    Recipe
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 5
    resta il saper
    Contributing Institution: Management, Gross 2
    2 4 conclusio corpus naturale
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*322
    sempiterne peroptime
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 13 (text)
    si potest fieri
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 10
    soit neantmoins prudentement
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*84 (text)
    [sordida-]rum scilicet vestem nigram
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.382
    statuti ma della
    Contributing Institution: Management, Gross 1
    sue più secrete
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*281
    sui eum non receperunt
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.26 (text)
    tempus est dimensum
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.55

    Index 4: Binding Date

    Note

    List of Manuscripts in the UCLA Library System organized by binding date.
    s. XV
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 9 (Germany)
    s. XV
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 10 (Czechoslovakia)
    s. XV
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 11 (Germany)
    s. XV
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.21 (Germany, Buxheim)
    s. XV
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.43 (Italy)
    s. XV
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.199 (France)
    s. XV (remains)
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.307 (Spain)
    s. XV?
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.331
    s. XV (remains)
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.348
    s. XV-XVI
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 4 (Catalonia)
    s. XV-XVI
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 12 (Italy)
    s. XVI?
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 5 (Germany)
    s. XVI
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 8 (Austria)
    s. XVI
    Contributing Institution: Management, Gross 1 (Italy)
    s. XVI
    Contributing Institution: Management, Gross 2 (Italy)
    s. XVI
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.20 (Flanders)
    s. XVI
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.55 (France)
    s. XVI
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*84 (France)
    s. XVI
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*281 (Italy)
    s. XVI
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*282 (Italy)
    s. XVI
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.529 (England)
    s. XVI
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 1 (Italy)
    s. XVI
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 2 (item 1; Italy)
    s. XVI
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 2 (item 2; Italy)
    s. XVI
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library 968 bx 1, no.71 (France)
    1556
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin WZ240 P719L RARE (Germany)
    s. XVI-XVII
    Contributing Institution: Management, Gross 4 (England)
    s. XVI-XVII
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.26 (France)
    s. XVI-XVII
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*322 (Italy)
    s. XVI-XVII
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 3 (Italy)
    s. XVII
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 13
    s. XVII
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.87
    s. XVII
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*292
    s. XVII
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.358
    s. XVII
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.*380
    s. XVII
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 5
    s. XVIII
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of manuscripts from the Corsini collection of books on the plague (Collection 952), Box 4
    s. XVIII
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Collection of material about the history of Naples (Collection 953), Box 1, no.3
    s. XVIII-XIX
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.521
    s. XIX
    Contributing Institution: Belt 35
    s. XIX
    Contributing Institution: Belt 67
    s. XIX
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.15
    s. XIX
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.49
    s. XIX
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.382
    s. XIX
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.442
    s. XX
    Contributing Institution: Biomedical, Benjamin 1
    s. XX
    Contributing Institution: Management, Gross 3
    s. XX
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.22
    s. XX
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.50
    s. XX
    Contributing Institution: Young Research Library - Bound Manuscripts (Collection 170) no.323

    Abbreviations

    • AS J. Bollandus et al., eds. Acta sanctorum, vols.1- (Antwerp, 1643-).
    • BHL Bibliotheca hagiographica latina antiquœ et mediœ œtatis, 3 vols. (Brussels, 1898-1911).
    • Bond and Faye, Supplement Supplement to the Census of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts in the United States and Canada, originated by C.U. Faye, continued and edited by W.H. Bond (New York, 1962).
    • Briquet C.M. Briquet, Les filigranes, facsimile of the 1907 edition with supplementary material, ed. A. Stevenson, 4 vols. (Amsterdam, 1968).
    • CC Corpus christianorum series latina, vols.1- (Turnhout, 1953- ).
    • Clavis E. Dekkers, ed., Clavis patrum latinorum ed. 2, Sacris erudiri 3 (Bruges, 1961).
    • De la Mare, Lyell Cat. A. C. de la Mare, Catalogue of the Collection of Medieval Manuscripts Bequeathed to the Bodleian Library, Oxford, by James P. R. Lyell (Oxford, 1971).
    • De Ricci, Census S. De Ricci, Census of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts in the United States and Canada, 3 vols. (New York, 1935-1940).
    • Deshusses J. Deshusses, ed., Le sacramentaire grégorien 1: Le supplément d'Aniane (Fribourg/Suisse, 1971).
    • GW Gesamtkatalog der Wiegendrucke, vol. 1- (Leipzig etc., 1925- ).
    • Hain L. Hain, Repertorium bibliographicum . . . , 4 vols. (Berlin, 1925).
    • Hesbert R.J. Hesbert, ed., Corpus antiphonalium officii, 6 vols. (Rome, 1963-1979).
    • Kaeppeli, SOPMA T. Kaeppeli, Scriptores ordinis prædicatorum medii ævi, 3 vols. to date (Rome, 1970- ).
    • “Ketham” Fasciculus medicinæ (Venice: J. & G. de Gregoriis, 1491), printed under the name of Iohannes Ketham.
    • Kristeller, Iter ital. P.O. Kristeller, Iter italicum: A Finding List of Uncatalogued or Incompletely Catalogued Humanistic Manuscripts of the Renaissance. . . , 4 vols. to date (Leiden, 1963- ).
    • Leroquais V. Leroquais, Les livres d'heures manuscrits de la Bibliothèque Nationals, 2 vols. (Paris 1927); Supplément (Mâcon, 1943).
    • Levine P. Levine, “Palaeographic History Illustrated in Manuscript Collection,” UCLA Librarian vol.16, no.6, supplement (1963) pp.49-51.
    • O'Malley and Gnudi C.D. O'Malley and M.T. Gnudi, The John A. Benjamin Collection of Medical History: Catalogue and First Supplement, second printing (UCLA, 1968).
    • PL J.P. Migne, ed., Patrologia latina.
    • RH U. Chevalier, Repertorium hymnologicum, 6 vols. (Louvain, and Brussels, 1892-1921).
    • Schneyer J.B. Schneyer, Repertorium der lateinischen Sermones des Mittelalters, Beiträge zur Geschichte der Philosophie und Theologie des Mittelalters, Texte und Untersuchungen 43, in 9 vols. (Münster, 1969-1980).
    • Sonet J. Sonet, Répertoire d'incipit de prières en ancient français, Société de publications romanes et françaises 54 (Geneva, 1956).
    • Stegmüller F. Stegmüller, Repertorium biblicum medii aevi, 11 vols. (Madrid 1950-1980).
    • Thorndike and Kibre L. Thorndike and P. Kibre, A Catalogue of Incipits of Mediaeval Scientific Writings in Latin, revised edition (Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1963).
    • Walther, Initia H. Walther, Initia carminum ac versuum medii aevi posterioris latinorum (Göttingen, 1959).
    • Walther, Proverbia H. Walthcr, Proverbia sententiaeque latinitatis medii aevi: Lateinische Sprichwörter und Sentenzen des Mittelalters, 6 vols. and, in new series, vols. 7-8 to date (Göttingen, 1963- ).
    • Weale W.H.J. Weale, Bookbindings and Rubbings of Bindings in the National Art Library, South Kensington Museum (London, 1898).
    • Zumkeller A. Zumkeller, Manuskripte von Werken der Autoren des Augustiner-Eremitenordens in mitteleuropäischen Bibliotheken, Cassiciacum 20 (Würzburg, 1966).
    Accursius
    Adelgundis (30 January)
    Adjustus
    Aegydius (1 September)
    Agapitus (18 August)
    Agilulf (9 July)
    Alexander
    Alexis
    All Saints (1 November)
    Amandus (25 June)
    Andrew (30 November)
    Andrew, vigil of (29 November)
    Anne
    Anniversaries: 20 May (Cistercian)
    Ansbert (9 February)
    Antony
    Apostles
    Assumption (15 August)
    Audoenus
    Audomar and Lambert (17 September)
    Augustine, Apostle of the English (27 May)
    Austreberta (10 February)
    Balbina (31 March)
    Balthildis and Radegundis (30 January)
    Bartholomew
    Bede (26 May)
    Berard de Carbio
    Bernard of Clairvaux (20 August)
    Bernard of Clairvaux, octave (27 August)
    Bernardinus (20 May)
    Bernardinus, translation of (17 May)
    Blasius
    Boniface (5 June)
    Caecilia (22 November)
    Caesarius
    Cataldus, bishop of Taranto
    Catherine of Alexander (25 November)
    Chlodoald and Evurtius (7 September)
    Clarus (4 November)
    Cuthbert of Lindisfarne (20 March)
    Desiderius (23 May)
    Dionysius, invention (22 April)
    Dionysius, Rusticus, and Eleutherius (9 October)
    Dionysius, susceptio reliquiarum of (4 December)
    Dominic
    Dorothy (6 February)
    Edmund Rich (16 November)
    Eligius (1 December)
    Elisabeth
    Eutropius (30 April)
    Eventius
    Evergisil, translation of (28 March)
    Evurtius (7 September)
    Exaltation of the Cross (14 September)
    Felix, (14 January)
    Firminus
    Francis of Assisi (4 October)
    Geneviève (3 January)
    Genevieve, de miraculo ardentium (26 November)
    George (23 April)
    Gerald (13 October)
    Gertrude (17 March)
    Gervasius and Protasius (19 June)
    Goar (6 July)
    Heribert (16 March)
    Holy Spirit
    Honorina (27 February)
    Hubert (3 November)
    Innocents (28 December)
    Ivo Helory (19 May)
    James the Greater (25 July)
    Jerome
    John the Baptist
    John the Baptist, vigil of (23 June)
    John the Evangelist (27 December)
    Julianus
    Kilian (8 July)
    Lambert (17 September)
    Landericus, bishop (10 June)
    Launomar (19 January)
    Lawrence
    Lawrence, octave of (17 August)
    Leonard (6 November)
    Leufred (21 June)
    Louis IX, king of France (25 August)
    Louis of Toulouse (19 August)
    Ludger (26 March)
    Lupus and Chrodegang (3 September)
    Machabees
    Magloire (24 October)
    Martialis (30 June)
    Martin of Tours, translation of (4 July)
    Maurice (22 September)
    Maurice and his companions (22 September)
    Maurilius (13 September)
    Maurinus (10 June)
    Maurus
    Medard (8 June)
    Medard and Gildard (8 June)
    Mellonius (22 October)
    Michael
    Nativity of the Virgin (8 September)
    Nicasius (11 October)
    Nicolas
    Oswald (5 August)
    Otho
    Our Lady of the Snow (5 August)
    Pantaleon (28 July)
    Patrick
    Paul
    Peter
    Peter and Paul, octave of (6 July)
    Philibert (20 August)
    Pinnosa, translation of (28 February)
    Polychronius (17 February)
    Praejectus (25 January)
    Presentation of the Virgin (21 November)
    Privatus (21 August)
    Processus and Martinianus (2 July)
    Quiteria
    Reparata
    Restitutus (3 November)
    Robert (29 April)
    Romanus (23 October)
    Rufina and Secunda (10 July)
    Rupert (27 March)
    Sequanus (19 September)
    Servatius (13 May)
    Seven Brothers (10 July)
    Severinus
    Severus
    Sperandeo and Sperandea of Gubbio
    Stephen (26 December)
    Suitbert (1 March)
    Syrus
    Taurinus
    Theodulus
    Thomas of Canterbury
    Thuriaf (13 July)
    Tiburtius (14 April)
    Transfiguration (6 August)
    Trinity
    Ulric (4 July)
    Ursinus (30 December)
    Ursinus, translation of (12 June)
    Vedast and Amandius (6 February)
    Vincent
    Vivianus (27 August)
    William of Donjeon (10 January)
    William of York
    Abraham's sacrifice
    Adoration of the kings
    Adoration of the shepherds
    Anna Seeking her lost son Tobias
    Annunication
    Assumption of the Virgin
    Baptism of Christ
    Birds
    Bishop exorcising a man
    Bishop seeing a vision of the Virgin and Child
    Christ displaying his wounds to God the Father
    Christ in Majesty
    Circumcision
    Coronation of the Virgin
    Creation of Eve
    Cross
    Crucifix
    Crucifixion
    Crucifixion of three men in long tunics
    Daniel in the lions' den
    David and Nathan
    David playing the harp
    Doctor, talking with patients(?)
    Drowning of Pharaoh's army
    Female figure
    Flight into Egypt
    Flowers
    Francis of Assisi receiving the stigmata
    Fruits
    Haloed man being strung up on a pole
    Horse's head
    Human figure
    Human figure, bust
    Human figure, profile
    Human figure displaying open wounds
    Human figure displaying vital organs
    Instruments of the Passion
    Job on his dung heap
    Jonah and the whale
    Judas Macchabeus(?)
    Last Supper
    Nativity
    Noah's Ark
    Orb
    Peacock
    Pentecost
    Physician talking with patients(?)
    Pietà
    Rosary
    Saint, profile
    Saint Paul and the Corinthians
    Sainted bishop
    Solomon and two youths
    Stigmata
    Strawberries
    Students
    Teacher
    Three Living and Three Dead
    Urine flasks
    Vases
    Virgin and Child
    Virgin and Child sitting on a crescent
    Virgin and Child standing on a crescent, in glory
    Visitation
    Warship
    Whale
    Woman seeking her lost drachma
    Wounds of Christ
    Abbey, J.R.
    Anne de Polignac
    Argilagues, Franciscus. See Franciscus Argilagues
    Ascherson, C.S.
    Asher, Louis E.
    Bach, Herman. See Herman Bach
    Baldana, Zuan Maria. See Zuan Maria Baldana
    “Bardzhus, J.,”
    Barrow, Corby
    Belt, Elmer, xv
    Benali, Benalio. See Benalio Benali
    Benalio Benali
    Benjamin, John A., xv
    Benjamin, Mrs. John A.
    Biagio Castellani, notary
    Bloch, E. Maurice
    Bolzano, Franciscus de, Master
    Bonvin, Iohannes
    Bradfer-Lawrence Collection
    B.R.N., physician
    Brock, Bert J.
    Brown, Alfred Jerome
    Buckle, Henry Thomas
    Bullrich, Eduardo J.
    Caliari, Antonio
    Cambini family, Florence
    Charles II, due de Bourbon and constable of France
    Clement XI, pope
    Coates, Ronald
    Contarini family, Venice
    Cruse, D.A.
    Dick, Hugh
    Drury, Henry
    Egc, Otto F.
    Espinette, (sieur de l'?)
    Feuerlein family
    Fischer, Ernst
    Folchi, Niccolò di Antonio
    Foot, Isaac
    Fowles, Mr. Edward
    Fowles, Mrs. Edward
    Franciscus Argilagues
    Gautier, Pierre
    Giffard, Thomas
    Giugni, Raffaello
    Giugni family, Tuscany, Garbo
    Greg, Thomas Tylston
    Greg, W.W.
    Hambuechen, Joseph W.
    Hamilton, Sidney G.
    Haslewood, Joseph
    Hathaway, Mrs. Rebecca
    Herman Bach, physician
    Hougland, Willard
    Huntington, Archer
    Huntington, Mrs. Collis P.
    Jacob, William. See William Jacob
    Jäger, Sebastian
    Johannes, Catalan physician
    Juel-Jensen, Bent
    Kann, Rodolphe
    Keuther, Georg, of Königsberg
    Kingsley, Kenneth C.
    Kingsley, William J.
    Kress family
    Kühlen, Major
    Lambarde, William
    Lee, Arthur H., first viscount of Fareham
    Lichtenstein, counts of
    Loevenich, Karl
    Lothian, marquis of
    “Macciani,”
    McClurkin, J.R.
    Martin, Robert Walsingham
    Martin, Thomas
    Martini, Giuseppe
    Meyerstein, Edward Harry William
    Minocci family, Siena
    Moliné y Brasés, Ernesto
    Moretti, Felippo
    Moretti, Ottavio
    Morrison, Stanley
    Nitze, William A.
    North, Frederick, fifth earl of Guilford
    Nowell, Laurence
    Ogden, C.K.
    Oliva, Joannes Baptista
    Olschki. L.
    Orio family, Venice
    Orsini family
    Pagani, Gregorio
    Paladius, Lucretius
    Patetta, Fedcrico
    Phillipps, Sir Thomas
    Polignac, Anne de. See Anne de Polignac
    Ridgeway, Lawson
    Riese, Edmund M.
    “Sabbatino Sabbatini(?)”
    Salsa, marquis of
    Schedel, Sebastian
    Singer, S.W.
    Smith, Arthur Barry
    Sneyd, Rev. Walter
    Stevens, Henry
    Swaab, W.H.
    Tiberi, Antonio
    Tiberi, Bonzuano
    Toffholz von Colberg, Karl Freiherr, H.H. Hauptmann
    Townsend, George, earl of Leicester
    Trostberg, count of. See Wolkenstein
    Tucher von Simmelsdorf, C.A.
    Uzielli, Giorgio
    Varesi, Joseph, R.P.
    Vegnauld, F. de
    Von Feder Collection
    Wakers(?), Anthonius
    Walhers(?), See Wakers(?)
    Welch, D'Alté A.
    Wettengel, Christopher
    Wilhelmus Wismeers(?), See Wismeers(?), Wilhelmus
    William Jacob, priest in Pufflick, near Utrecht
    Wismeers(?), Wilhelmus
    Wolkenstein and Trostberg, count of
    Zeitlin, Jacob
    Zeitlin, Josephine
    Zuan Maria Baldana
    Albani Library
    “Archivio Sornmi Picenardi,”
    Avila, Bernardine nuns of St. Mary
    Besançon, abbey of Billy
    Buren, Society of Jesus
    Buxheim, Carthusians
    Cologne, Carthusians of St. Barbara
    Delft, Augustinian nuns of St. Agnes
    Ebersberg, Benedictines of St. Sebastian
    Erfurt, Carthusians
    Ferrara, Cistercians of San Bartolo
    Fondi, abbey of S. Onofrio
    Huys, Benedictines
    Liesborn, Benedictines
    London, St. Bride Foundation Typographical Library
    Mainz, Jesuit College
    Mechelen (Malines), Convent of Bethanie
    Orders, religious: Augustinians
    Benedictines
    Carthusians
    Celestines, Carthusians, Celestines, Cistercians, Dominicans, Franciscans, Society of Jesus
    Ostberg, Brethren of the Cross
    Paris, Celestines
    “Picenardi, Archivio Sommi.” See “Archivio Sommi Picenardi”
    St. Christopher, Carthusian house near Ferrara
    St. Emmeram, Benedictines
    Ste-Croix-sous-Offémont (Île de France), Celestines
    Salem, near Heidelberg, Cistercians
    Salzburg, Benedictines of St. Peter
    S. Maria degli Angeli, Dominican nuns
    Sulmona, Franciscans of S. Niccolò
    Teruel, confraternity of St. Julian
    Uekerath (archdiocese of Cologne), parish church
    Vatican Library

    Form of Entry

    The format used in the descriptions follows that employed by N.R. Ker in Medieval Manuscripts in British Libraries, 3 vols. (Oxford 1969-1983).
    1. HEADING. Each entry begins with library and call number, figure number (if any) in this catalog, author and brief title, and place and date. The place and date, when not specified in the manuscript, have been determined by style of script and decoration and, when applicable, by external evidence. Place names refer to geographical regions, rather than to modern political entities. The sigla used for the dates of the manuscripts are on this model: s. XIII in (saeculo XIII ineunte) for the beginning of the thirteenth century; s. XIII 1 for the first half of the century; s. XIII med (sacculo XIII medio) for the middle of the century; s. XIII 2 for the second half of the century; s. XIII ex (saeculo XIII exeunte) for the end of the century; s. XIII-XIV for the turn of the thirteenth to the fourteenth century.
    2. CONTENTS. In the case of composite volumes (volumes of two or more originally separate books subsequently bound together), the original books are described first in their contents, then in their physical aspect under roman numerals I and II (etc.). Within the contents section of all manuscripts, the text is broken into arabic-numbered sections for case of reference; the numbered sections, which were fixed by the compilers of this catalog do not always correspond to obvious divisions in the manuscripts (e.g., in long series of prayers in devotional books). A folio is referred to by a numeral alone if a recto is intended, and by a numeral with a lower case “v” for a verso; the form “f. 1r-v” means that both recto and verso of that leaf are considered; “a” and “b” refer to the first and the second column on a given page. In transcription, all abbreviations have been expanded silently. Square brackets signal an offered but uncertain transcription, enclosing either the doubtful words, word, or part of word, or a question mark which refers to the immediately preceding word. Angle brackets occur where no solution for the difficulty is attempted; they may enclose a question mark or a reason for the complete illegibility, such as “<damaged>.” The spelling of the manuscript has been preserved, with “[ sic]” added only when the form of the word seemed unlikely or such as to cause the reader to suspect a typographical error. We have retained the manuscripts' ę/e/æ, as they show relative distance from classical Latin; i/j, however, have been uniformly rendered as i; u/v have been distinguished according to modern use for ease of reading. Proper nouns are capitalized. Rubrics, whether in red ink, underlined, in a display script, or merely distinguished from the main body of the text by a space, are here rendered in italics. In the case of the series of brief texts or excerpts in patristic miscellanies, we have given only the rubric (omitting incipit and explicit of the text); in the case of series of prayers, we have preferred, as an aid to identification, to give a slightly longer incipit and no explicit, since the prayers tend to end with long, and frequently interchangeable, formulas. In liturgical books, saints' names are generally given in the form used by F.G. Holweck, A Biographical Dictionary of the Saints (St. Louis, 1924), a convenient standard. A double diagonal slash // means that a text begins or ends defectively; ellipses signal omitted text. Following each numbered section of the text, where applicable, is a brief bibliographical notice of editions, of lists of manuscripts, of identifying number in the appropriate repertory (e.g., Schneyer, Stegmüller, Walther).
    3. PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION. This is arranged in roughly the order in which the book was produced. The term “parchment” is used throughout for all animal skins, since the traditional distinction between parchment and vellum seems to have been based more on quality of preparation than on knowledge of biological differences between sheepskin and calfskin. For manuscripts on paper, we have attempted to identify watermarks according to their similarity, or least dissimilarity, to the tracings in Briquet. The number of leaves is in roman numerals for endleaves, arabic for those of the book itself. Measurements are in millimeters: first, height and width of the book; then, in parentheses, height and width of the ruled space. The numbers are, of course, approximations, since within any book there is considerable variation; we have preferred to measure ruled rather than written space, because it seemed to offer more consistency. The collation uses arabic numerals for the gatherings, with the number of leaves in that gathering in a suprascript arabic numeral; irregularities are given in parentheses, with the number showing the position in the quire of the irregular leaf; thus 1 8( - 6) means a quire of eight leaves of which the sixth is missing; 1 8( + 9) means that the quire of eight leaves has a leaf added in the ninth position, i.e. at the end. Ruling is specified as to device used or color (hard or dry point; lead, i.e. in a scratching gray or black; crayon, i.e. in a scratchy brown; ink; pale red ink); owner-produced manuscripts were often frame ruled, with no horizontal lines to guide the copyist. An effort has been made to distinguish the number of copyists and the leaves copied by each. Scripts are identified by a relatively restricted and simple nomenclature. As regards decoration, the height of initials is given in number of vertical lines of text space occupied; colors are mentioned summarily since their names are too subjective to be of value. The subjects of the miniatures have been given in brief terms and, in the case of liturgical books and particularly books of hours, tied to the text to which they belong, since the two function as a cohesive unit. The binding statement is somewhat more expansive for medieval or renaissance bindings than for early modern or modern bindings.
    4. PROVENANCE. This section deals with the origin and subsequent ownership of the manuscript. In it we have summarized the evidence regarding date and place of origin given in the contents and physical description sections.
    5. A SECUNDO FOLIO reference (the opening words of the second leaf) is supplied for manuscripts that may have belonged to an institution in the Middle Ages and thus have been listed in a medieval inventory.
    6. BIBLIOGRAPHY. The bibliography cited here refers to the manuscript as a whole, rather than to its parts.