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Inventory of the Konstantin Fotic Papers
69030  
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Collection Details
 
Table of contents What's This?
  • Access
  • Publication Rights
  • Preferred Citation
  • Acquisition Information
  • Accruals
  • Alternate forms Available
  • Related Materials
  • Biographical/Historical Note
  • Scope and Content of Collection

  • Title: Konstantin Fotic Papers
    Date (inclusive): 1927-1972
    Collection Number: 69030
    Contributing Institution: Hoover Institution Archives
    Language of Material: English
    Physical Description: 61 manuscript boxes, 3 oversize boxes (27 linear feet)
    Abstract: The papers contain office and personal correspondence, reports, writings, speeches, clippings, and printed matter, documenting the politics of the Royal Yugoslav government in exile during World War II, Yugoslav-American relations, and the post-war Serbian and Yugoslav émigré community organizations. Additionally, documents provide detailed information on Serbian and Yugoslav prisoners of war and their immigration to the Dominican Republic and an extensive volume of speeches and writings reflecting Fotic's views on Tito, New Yugoslavia, and communism. Also available on microfilm (73 reels).
    Language of the Materials : In English, French, German, and Serbo-Croatian.
    Physical Location: Hoover Institution Archives
    Creator: Fotic, Konstantin, 1891-1959.

    Access

    The collection is open for research.
    The Hoover Institution Archives only allows access to copies of audiovisual items. To listen to sound recordings or to view videos or films during your visit, please contact the Archives at least two working days before your arrival. We will then advise you of the accessibility of the material you wish to see or hear. Please note that not all audiovisual material is immediately accessible.

    Publication Rights

    For copyright status, please contact the Hoover Institution Archives.

    Preferred Citation

    [Identification of item], Konstantin Fotic Papers, [Box number], Hoover Institution Archives.

    Acquisition Information

    Acquired by the Hoover Institution Archives in 1982.

    Accruals

    Materials may have been added to the collection since this finding aid was prepared. To determine if this has occurred, find the collection in Stanford University's online catalog at http://searchworks.stanford.edu/ . Materials have been added to the collection if the number of boxes listed in the library catalog is larger than the number of boxes listed in this finding aid.

    Alternate forms Available

    Also available on microfilm (73 reels).

    Related Materials

    Milan Gavrilovic papers, Hoover Institution Archives
    Bo?idar Puric papers, Hoover Institution Archives
    ?arko Rista Popovic papers, Hoover Institution Archives

    Biographical/Historical Note

    Konstantin Fotic (1891-1959) was born in ?abac, Serbia. His professional career was in diplomacy, serving the Royal Yugoslav government as minister and ambassador to the United States, 1935-1944. Fotic was the last Yugoslav ambassador to the United States before the coalition of New Yugoslav government was formed in 1944.
    As an influential political figure in the Royal Yugoslav government, Fotic's later professional career was devoted to Serbian émigrés' call for freedom and democracy for the Serbian people in Yugoslavia. He was an active member of the Serbian émigré community in the United States and served as the president of the Serbian Central National Committee.
    Fotic was a political writer and lecturer, writing numerous articles and books expressing his views on the situation in Yugoslavia during World War II, particularly in regard to post-war communism in Yugoslavia and Tito's regime.

    Scope and Content of Collection

    The papers contain office and personal correspondence, reports, writings, speeches, clippings, and printed matter, documenting the politics of the Royal Yugoslav government in exile during World War II, the state of Yugoslav-American relations, and the Serbian and Yugoslav émigré community.
    The majority of Fotic's papers consist of office and personal correspondence collected during his diplomatic career as a Royal Yugoslav secretary and ambassador to the United States. The Office files are comprised of diplomatic correspondence, telegrams, reports, and clippings documenting the politics of the Royal Yugoslav government during World War II, Yugoslav-American relations, and the role of Petar II, King of Yugoslavia. Materials also document the part played by Allied countries in the creation of the new Yugoslavia. Fotic's exchanges of letters with Nikola Tesla, a Yugoslav inventor in the United States, indicating the Royal Yugoslav government support of Tesla's research, are of particular interest.
    A considerable number of Fotic's writings and speeches reflect his views on the situation in Yugoslavia during World War II, and post-war communism in Yugoslavia and Tito's regime.
    The Serbian Central National Committee (SCNO) file documents Fotic's active role in Serbian émigré organizations, and their call for freedom and democracy for the Serbian people in Yugoslavia. Extensive correspondence within the émigré community and its organizations document issues related to the political and economic situation in Yugoslavia under Tito's government, Serbian contributions to the Allied victory in World War II, and the communist dominated government. Among these are open letters addressed to the U.S. president and the General Assembly of the United Nations. The papers also include a Serbian National Federation file documenting the largest Serbian émigré organization's political views concerning émigré defense committees, Serbian prisoners of war, and refugees.
    The Yugoslav displaced persons and prisoners of war file consists of correspondence, detailed reports, lists of prisoners of war, clippings and photographs. Documents reveal the role that SCNO and the international refugee organization played in organizing the immigration of Serbian and Yugoslav prisoners of war to the Dominican Republic.
    The Subject file includes documents on the Serbian Orthodox Church's involvement in Serbian émigré organizations, materials describing Dra?a Mihailovic's capture and trial, including the Committee for Fair Trial for Dra?a Mihailovic report, and a petition to President Truman, as well as material on Petar II, King of Yugoslavia, documenting his finances and role in émigré politics.
    The Tatjana Fotic materials include correspondence of his wife with friends and the Serbian and Yugoslav émigré community. The material reveals Mrs. Fotic's professional academic work and her active role in organizing the United Yugoslav relief fund, particularly the knitting project to provide Yugoslav prisoners of war and refugees with warm clothing.
    The Printed matter documents political developments in Yugoslavia and Europe at the end of World War II and Yugoslav émigrés' views on post-war Yugoslavia.

    Subjects and Indexing Terms

    Diplomats--Yugoslavia.
    United States--Foreign relations--Yugoslavia.
    World War, 1939-1945--Yugoslavia.
    Yugoslavia--Emigration and immigration.
    Yugoslavia--Foreign relations--United States.
    Yugoslavia--History--Axis occupation, 1941-1945.