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Finding Aid for the Arthur Patch McKinlay Collection of Arator Manuscripts, 1500-1900
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Collection Overview
 
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Description
Arthur Patch McKinlay (1871-1958) was a professor of Latin at the Latin department at Lincoln High School, the University of California at Berkeley (1913), UCLA (1919-1941), and at the University of Texas (1943-44). He was known by his literary research, which dealt with parallels between ancient and modern times. Boxes 1-8, 24-27 include photostatic reproductions of manuscript copies (9th-14th centuries) of the works of Arator, subdeacon in Rome (fl. 513-544).
Background
McKinlay was born on April 8, 1871 in Osborn, Missouri; AB, University of Oregon, 1893; AM (1904) and Ph.D (1906), Harvard; assistant professor in Latin, University of Oregon (1902-3) and University of Idaho (1906-7); headed Latin department at Lincoln High School, Portland, Oregon (1907-12); instructor in Latin and Greek, University of California at Berkeley (1913); chairman, department of languages, Lincoln High School (1914-19); assistant professor (1919-26); associate professor (1926-29), professor (1929-41), and professor emeritus of Latin, UCLA; professor of Latin and Greek, University of Texas (1943-44); he was known by his literary research, which dealt with parallels between ancient and modern times; wrote articles for the Harvard Studies in Classical Philology series with emphasis on Arator, and wrote a series of articles on the classical attitude to drinking and sobriety; also translated letters of Cicero, published 3 books of his own sonnets, and edited Arator: the codices and Arator - de actibus apostolorum; died in Los Angeles, California on September 8, 1958.
Extent
26 boxes (13.0 linear ft.) 1 oversize box
Restrictions
Property rights to the physical object belong to the UCLA Library, Department of Special Collections. Literary rights, including copyright, are retained by the creators and their heirs. It is the responsibility of the researcher to determine who holds the copyright and pursue the copyright owner or his or her heir for permission to publish where The UC Regents do not hold the copyright.
Availability
COLLECTION STORED OFF-SITE AT SRLF: Advance notice required for access.