Finding Aid for the Sumitomo Bank of California photographs, 1976

Processed by Tiffany-Kay Sangwand in the Center for Primary Research and Training (CFPRT), with assistance from Kelley Wolfe Bachli, Winter 2008; machine-readable finding aid created by Caroline Cubé.
UCLA Library, Department of Special Collections
Manuscripts Division
Room A1713, Charles E. Young Research Library
Box 951575
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1575
Email: spec-coll@library.ucla.edu
URL: http://www.library.ucla.edu/libraries/special/scweb/
© 2008
The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.


Descriptive Summary

Title: Sumitomo Bank of California photographs
Date (inclusive): 1976
Collection number: 2010
Creator: Sumitomo Bank of California
Extent: 2 oversize boxes (Box 765 and 873)
Abstract: The Sumitomo Bank of California Photographs are enlarged and mounted black and white reproductions of photographs depicting the accomplishments and daily life of Japanese Americans from 1887 to 1976. The majority of the photographs document Japanese living on the west coast, particularly in California. These photograph reproductions were originally part of "The Japanese American Contribution" exhibit hosted by the Sumitomo Bank of California in 1976.
Language: Finding aid is written in English.
Repository: University of California, Los Angeles. Library. Department of Special Collections.
Los Angeles, California 90095-1575
Physical location: Stored off-site at SRLF. Advance notice is required for access to the collection. Please contact the UCLA Library, Department of Special Collections Reference Desk for paging information.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

COLLECTION STORED OFF-SITE AT SRLF: Open for research. Advance notice required for access. Contact the UCLA Library, Department of Special Collections Reference Desk for paging information.

Restrictions on Use and Reproduction

Property rights to the physical object belong to the UCLA Library, Department of Special Collections. Literary rights, including copyright, are retained by the creators and their heirs. It is the responsibility of the researcher to determine who holds the copyright and pursue the copyright owner or his or her heir for permission to publish where The UC Regents do not hold the copyright.

Provenance/Source of Acquisition

The Japanese American Research Project (JARP) was established in 1962 jointly by the Japanese American Citizens League and the University of California, Los Angeles. Materials in the collection were donated after JARP was established.

Processing Note

Processed by Tiffany-Kay Sangwand in the Center for Primary Research and Training (CFPRT), with assistance from Kelley Wolfe Bachli, Winter 2008.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Sumitomo Bank of California photographs (Collection Number 2010). Department of Special Collections, Charles E. Young Research Library, UCLA.

History

In 1953, the Sumitomo Bank of California was founded in Los Angeles and provided financial assistance to emerging Japanese businessmen. In 1955, it opened another branch in Sacramento. By 1976, it operated twenty-three branches in California and was headquartered in San Francisco. In 1976, it hosted a photograph exhibit entitled "The Japanese American Contribution" which celebrated the bicentennial of Japanese immigration to the U.S.

Scope and Content

The photographs from the Sumitomo Bank of California exhibit, "The Japanese American Contribution," document the accomplishments and daily life of the Japanese in the U.S., from early immigrants to contemporary figures. The photographs are in black and white and the originals from which they were produced range in date from 1887 to 1976. The original photographs were lent for reproduction by various contributors in California. The reproductions were enlarged and mounted on boards. The scope and content note for each photograph was taken directly from the exhibit's photo captions.
All of the photographs depict Japanese American life on the west coast; all the photographs were taken in California, with the exception of two photographs from Washington state and Hawaii. Photographs of accomplishments include the first Japanese-owned nursery in California, Issei (first generation Japanese) who served in World War I, Ken Nakazawa, the first Japanese professor at USC, Chiura Obata, the first Japanese art professor at UC Berkeley, actor / movie star Sessue Hayakawa, the founders of the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL), architect Minoru Yamasaki, Olympic coach Yoshihiro Uchida, Olympic athlete Makoto Sakamoto, Olympic medalist Tommy Kono, President Gerald Ford signing the termination of Executive Order 9066. Photographs of daily life include Gizaemon Akahoshi, a Japanese laundryman, Japanese railroad workers, fishermen, farmers, and students, Los Angeles Little Tokyo in the early 1900s, Nihonmachi (Little Tokyo) in San Francisco during the 1930s, an early group of newly naturalized Isseis, the Sumitomo Bank of California branches in Los Angeles and Sacramento, Nisei Week festival in Los Angeles, Cherry Blossom festival in San Francisco, and the Manzanar internment camp.

Organization and Arrangement

The photographs are separated by size and arranged by chronological order within each box.

Indexing Terms

The following terms have been used to index the description of this collection in the library's online public access catalog.

Subjects

Sumitomo Bank of California --Archives.
Japanese American Research Project (University of California, Los Angeles).

Genres and Forms of Material

Photographs.

Related Material


Container List

Box 765, Folder 1

1910: Japanese railroad workers in Washington state reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 1 photograph reproduction mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

Much has been written about the Chinese contribution to the building of the American railroads in the West. Little known is that their Japanese American counterparts played a significant role, as well, providing their brawn and sweat such as did this group of workers in Washington State. Photo contributor: Visual Communications, Los Angeles, California
Box 765, Folder 2

Left image, 1910: Gennosuke Kodani, co-founder of Point Lobos Canning Company among barrels and abalone; Right image, 1910: Gennosuke Kodani, co-founder of Point Lobos Canning Company with crates of abalone reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 2 photograph reproductions mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

The Japanese method of catching and drying abalone was introduced into California by Gennosuke Kodani, shown here in 1910 photos at Point Lobos, Carmel. Together with A.M. Allen, Kodani founded the Point Lobos Canning Company in 1898, and its delicious 'deep sea shell fish" was widely marketed. Photo contributor: Mr. S. Kodani, Carmel, California
Box 765, Folder 3

1915: One room elementary school with Japanese students in Clarksburg, Yolo County, California reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 1 photograph reproduction mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

Education was and still remains an important ingredient in the citizenship of Japanese Americans and their offspring. This 1915 photo depicts a one-room elementary school in Clarksburg, Yolo County, where numerous Japanese youth began their educational pursuit to learn about America. Photo contributor: Mr. M. Arikawa, San Francisco, California
Box 765, Folder 4

1918: Issei farmers harvesting sugar beets with their six mule team reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 1 photograph reproduction mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

The early Issei pioneers worked hard and long hours in their fields, just as their parents had done before them in Japan. In this 1918 photo taken in Artesia, California, Toshiro Kokawa (left, leaning on mule) and his family crew are harvesting sugar beets - with the help of a six-mule team. Photo contributor: Ms. K. Makihara, San Jose, California
Box 765, Folder 5

Undated: George Shima (born Kinji Ushijima), "The Potato King," with vast potato crop reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 1 photograph reproduction mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

Working with the land came naturally to the Japanese. George Shima (born Kinji Ushijima) came to California about 1888 and in due course became known as "The Potato King" for his vast production of potatoes and other crops in the delta region around Stockton. He died in 1926 at the age of 63. Photo contributor: Mr. N. Shirai, Sacramento, California
Box 765, Folder 6

Top inset photo, undated: Keisaburo Koda, founder of Koda Noen Company, a large rice producer in California; Bottom photo, undated: Koda Noen Company farm reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 2 photograph reproductions mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

Large-scale rice growing was introduced into California by the Japanese immigrants. Originally established in 1918 in Sacramento, the Koda Noen Company (now located in Dos Palos) is the largest rice producer in the State [1976]. Keisaburo Koda (shown in inset standing at left) is gone, but his descendants still know how to raise and market rice for American tables. Photo contributor: Mr. T Tsumori, San Francisco, California
Box 765, Folder 7

1929 April 5: Group of west coast Nisei who formed the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL) reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 1 photograph reproduction mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

On April 5, 1929, a group of West Coast Nisei leaders gathered in San Francisco to plan a national organization. Thus was born the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL) - one of the foremost champions in the cause of civil rights.
Box 765, Folder 8

1935: Japanese Tea Garden in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 1 photograph reproduction mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

In 1894, Makoto Hagiwara - who arrived from Japan in 1886 - designed and built the Japanese Tea Garden in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park. This 1935 photo shows the charm and beauty of the magnificent landmark that still attracts thousands of residents and visitors alike. Photo contributor: Mr. G. Hagiwara, San Francisco, California
Box 765, Folder 9

Undated: Group of naturalized Issei reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 1 photograph reproduction mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

When Congress passed the Walter-McCarran Immigration and Naturalization Act of 1952, the dream of a lifetime came true for thousands of joyous Issei, who had been working toward that goal for many years: full citizenship in their adopted land. Photo contributor: Mr. M. Sasaki, Monterey Park, California
Box 765, Folder 10

Left image, 1969 June 7: Former Governor Reagan at the 100th anniversary of the Wakamatsu Tea and Silk Farm Colony, the first settlement of pioneer Japanese immigrants; Right image: Grave site of Ito Okei, a 16-year-old girl who arrived with the first group of Japanese immigrants reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 2 photograph reproductions mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

Left image: Former Governor Reagan lent his presences at the 100th anniversary (June 7, 1969) of the establishment of the Wakamatsu Tea and Silk Farm Colony near Sacramento. This was the first settlement of pioneer Japanese immigrants. Photo contributor: Mr. S. Nakatani, Sacramento, California; Right image: Ito Okei was 16 when she arrived with the original immigrant group from Japan. A bright, perceptive girl, she succumbed to illness and died at 19. Her gravesite still stands atop Gold Hill, Placer County.
Box 765, Folder 11

Undated: Yoshihiro (Yosh) Uchida, U.S. coach for the 1964 Tokyo Olympics and consultant to President's Commission on Olympic Sports, coaching the San Jose University Judo Team reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 1 photograph reproduction mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

Yoshihiro (Yosh) Uchida, shown at left, coaches the San Jose University Judo Team that has won 15 consecutive national collegiate judo championships under his mentorship. Uchid was the U.S. judo coach for the 1964 Tokyo Olympics and serves as a consultant to the President's Commission on Olympic Sports. Photo contributor: Mr. Y. Uchida, San Jose, California
Box 765, Folder 12

Left image, undated: Minoru Yamasaki, architect of many distinguished buildings; Right image, undated: Century Plaza Hotel (Los Angeles) designed by Minoru Yamasaki reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 2 photograph reproductions mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

The influence of distinguished Japanese American architect Minoru Yamasaki is clearly visible across the U.S. Among his many design creations are the Reynolds Metal Company headquarters in Detroit, the St. Louis Airport and the Century Plaza Hotel in Los Angeles, rated a masterpiece. Photo contributor: M. Yamasaki and Associates; Century Plaza Hotel
Box 765, Folder 13

Undated: Japanese fisherman reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 1 photograph reproduction mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

Fish was a vital staple of the Japanese diet, so it is no wonder that many Japanese who came to America were already experienced hands. In 1901, a dozen sardine fishermen launched what was to become a thriving canning industry at Terminal Island, Los Angeles. And Captain Shigematsu Ishikawa, skipper of "The White Rose," introduced the "kinchaku" method of netting the elusive sardines. Photo contributor: Mr. T. Miyatake, Los Angeles, California
Box 765, Folder 14

Left image, undated: Makoto Sakamoto, high school student who led the U.S. Men's Gymnastic Squad to the 1964 Tokyo Olympics; Top right image: Tommy Kono who won Olympic Gold medals in weightlifting in 1952 and 1956; Bottom right image: Some of Kono's awards reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 3 photograph reproductions mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

Left image: Outstanding athletes from the ranks of Japanese Americans have made their contributions to the sports world. Makoto Sakamoto was only a high school student when he led the U.S. Men's Gymnastic Squad to the 1964 Olympics. Photo contributor: Mrs. M. Sakamoto, Los Angeles, California; Top right image: Tommy Kono, originally from San Jose, won the Olympic weightlifting Gold medals for the U.S. in 1952 and 1956 and broke more than 26 world records. (A few of his awards are shown at bottom right.) Photo contributor: Mr. S. Nakatani, Sacramento, California
Box 765, Folder 15

Top photo, 1976: Delegation of Japanese American political and civic leaders look on while President Gerald Form signs termination of Executive Order 9066; Bottom photo, undated: Historical plaque at site of Manzanar internment camp reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 2 photograph reproductions mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

Top photo: President Gerald Ford last February [1976] terminated Executive Order 9066, which provided the World War II basis for relocation camps, as a large delegation of Japanese American political figures and civic leaders looked on (including Senator Inouye, Congressmen Mineta and Matsunaga, and Congresswoman Patsy Takemoto Mink). Photo contributor: Japanese American Citizens League (JACL), San Francisco, California; Bottom photo: The historical landmark plaque at Manzanar, one of the 10 such camps. Photo contributor: Mr. E. Uno, San Francisco, California
Box 873, Folder 1

Top image, 1898: First Japanese-owned nursery in California, established by the Domoto Brothers in Oakland in 1887; Bottom image, 1915: Pico Street Nursery in Los Angeles reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 2 photograph reproductions mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

Top image: The Domoto Brothers established in 1887 the first Japanese-owned nursery in California. Their flourishing enterprise in Oakland set the precedent for other Japanese Americans to emulate in the floriculture industry in the State. Photo contributor: Mr. T Domoto, Hayward, California; Bottom image: The Pico Street Nursery in Los Angeles, illustrative of the early stores which provided Japanese immigrants with their vocation. Photo contributor: Mrs. Y. Yoshida, Los Angeles, California
Box 873, Folder 2

Top image, ca. 1906: Gizaemon Akahoshi, Japanese laundry business owner with horse and cart; Bottom image, 1911: Wholesale produce market produced by Japanese Americans on San Pedro and 9th Streets, Los Angeles reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 2 photograph reproductions mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

Top image: Beset by difficulties stemming from cultural differences, Japanese in America had to turn to their own initiative in order to make a living. In 1906, for example, Gizaemon Akahoshi operated a laundry business in Santa Clara County - a lot of area to cover with horse and wagon. Photo contributor: Mr. J.Y. Akahoshi, San Jose, California; Bottom image: To fill the special needs of their growing community, Japanese Americans established the busy wholesale produce market (shown in this 1911 photo) at San Pedro and 9th Streets, Los Angeles - where even today, a major marketing center still exists. Photo contributor: Visual Communications, Los Angeles, California
Box 873, Folder 3

1917: Unidentified Issei soldier who served in the U.S. Army during World War I reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 1 photograph reproduction mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

A little known fact in American history is that during World War I several hundred Issei, although denied citizenship, served in the U.S. Army, such as this smartly-attired trooper (unidentified) shown in front of an Army barrack in Hawaii. Photo contributor: Mr. S. Yoshida, Gardena, California
Box 873, Folder 4

Top image, ca. early 1900s: Little Tokyo, corner of 1st and San Pedro Streets; Bottom image, ca. mid-1930s: Post Street, Nihonmachi in San Francisco reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 2 photograph reproductions mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

Top image: Where the Japanese immigrants settled, their families and businesses also took root by natural extension. In this early 1900s photo of Los Angeles' "Little Tokyo," we look eastward along 1st Street from the corner of San Pedro - now the focal point for a modern, bustling community. Photo contributor: County Museum, Los Angeles, California; Bottom image: As it was with Los Angeles, so did the Japanese Americans settle into a distinctive nook of San Francisco, depicted in this mid-1930s photo of Post Street, Nihonmachi, where still today remnants of the colorful past can be found intermingled with contemporary living. Photo contributor: Mr. E. Uno, San Francisco, California
Box 873, Folder 5

Top image, 1935: Chiura Obata, first Japanese professor of art at UC Berkeley; Bottom image, undated: Ken Nakazawa, first Japanese professor appointed at a major U.S. university - USC reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 2 photograph reproductions mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

Top image: In the field of education, Japanese Americans of many disciplines have held positions of prominence. Professor Chiura Obata, the first Japanese professor of art at University of California, Berkeley, is shown in this 1935 photo lecturing to a group of 4-H youngsters. Photo contributor: Mrs. H. Obata, Berkeley, California; Bottom image: Professor Ken Nakazawa (at left) was the first Japanese educator appointed to a major U.S. university - University of Southern California, 1924. He taught Oriental Arts & Literature until retirement in 1941. Photo contributor: Mrs. T. Nakazawa, Los Angeles, California
Box 873, Folder 6

Undated: Veterans of Foreign Wars color guard parades in San Francisco reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 1 photograph reproduction mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

Their exploits were many; their "Go For Broke" valor unsurpassed. The Japanese Americans who served during World War II in the 442nd Regimental Combat Team and 100th Infantry Battalion received more than 5,900 medals and citations. Here, a Veterans of Foreign Wars color guard parades in San Francisco. Photo contributor: Mr. M. Iwamoto, Oakland, California
Box 873, Folder 7

Top image, 1955: Sumitomo Bank of California, Sacramento branch; Bottom image, 1953: Sumitomo Bank of California, first Los Angeles branch reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 2 photograph reproductions mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

Important financial help for the emerging Japanese American businessman was provided by The Sumitomo Bank of California, which operated its Sacramento branch in 1955 and its first in Los Angeles in 1953. The bank now operates 23 modern branches Statewide and is heardquartered in San Francisco. Photo contributor: Sumitomo Bank Library, San Francisco, California
Box 873, Folder 8

Top image, ca. 1965: Nobu McCarthy and Yuki Shimoda, actors in the East-West Players in Los Angeles; Inset photo, undated: Sessue Hayakawa, Bottom photo, ca. 1930s: Group of 8 girls women at a tribute event to Sessue Hayakawa reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 2 photograph reproductions mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

Top image: The East-West Players was formed in Los Angeles in 1965 to aid aspiring Japanese American entertainers. Nobu McCarthy and Yuki Shimoda (seated) in a scene from "Pineapple White." Photo contributor: East-West Players, Los Angeles, California; Inset photo: Sessue Hayakawa. Photo contributor: County Museum?, Los Angeles, California; Bottom photo: No American actor of Japanese ancestry has ever surpassed the star quality of Sessue Hayakawa, whose long and distinguished career began in Hollywood's silent film era. This 1930s photo was taken at a "tribute night" in Los Angeles. Photo contributor: County Museum, Los Angeles, California
Box 873, Folder 9

Top image, undated: Early Nisei Week festival in Los Angeles; Bottom image, 1968: First Cherry Blossom festival at Japan Town (Nihonmachi) in San Francisco reproduced ca. 1976

Physical Description: 3 photograph reproductions mounted on board

Scope and Content Note

Top image: Appreciation of different cultures enhances mutual understanding among peoples. Above, one of the earliest Nisei Week festivals in Los Angeles. Photo contributor: Mr. T. Miyatake, Los Angeles, California; Bottom image: The introduction of the first Cherry Blossom festival at Japan Town (Nihonmachi) in San Francisco. Photo contributor: Mr. S, Onodera, San Francisco, California