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Guide to the Donald E. Knuth Papers
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Series 1 The Art of Computer Programming

Scope and Content Note

Hand-written notes on The Art of Computer Programming , computer print-outs that were prepared for this book, various stages of the second edition of volume 2 of the book, 1980 revisions of the book, and the TeX form of the book. Also included is the correspondence received on the book, and correspondence between Knuth and his editor, Marion Howe.
The Art of Computer Programming describes the body of scientific knowledge on the programming of digital computers. The second edition led to Dr. Knuth's development of METAFONT, his computer design typeface system allowing subtle changes in alphabet design, and his page-formatting system, TeX; both systems are intended for the creation of beautiful books by the hand of the original author/printer.
Notes on the second edition of Volume 2, by Donald Knuth, July 30, 1980:
I began to revise the first edition in November 1974, just after finishing revisions for the second printing of Volume 3. Worked steadily until October 1975, preparing hundreds of hand-written inserts. The intent was to preserve the existing page numbering. Marion Howe at Addison-Wesley unscrambled my manuscript using scissors, tape, etc. During 1976, Addison-Wesley found that the number of changes necessitated a complete resetting of the book. Cost of Monotype had skyrocketed; tried to match fonts on Linotron 505, no luck. I discussed the problem with Addison-Wesley chairman (Cummings) during a visit to Boston; decision was made to prepare new fonts for Linotron 505 by photographing the old ones. First results of this were awful; they tried to tune things up. Finally in the spring of 1977, I decided to work on typography myself, and I told them to stop trying as their method was not going to work. During the rest of 1977, I developed TeX and proto-METAFONT; was ready to compose Volume 2 in spring of 1978. I mostly worked on METAFONT and refinements to TeX during 1979, then returned to Volume 2 in 1980, when I made further technical revisions during April-June to incorporate the research results accumulated since 1975.
I saved the following things for Archives: A. Original manuscript, as unscrambled by Marion Howe. B. Galley proofs from Universities Press, Belfast, showing why I got into typesetting. C. Galley proofs I made while recomposing the book in 1978. D. TeX form of Chapter 3 at the time I sent Addison-Wesley the first results of my work (June 1978). E. Marion Howe's comments on my initial try at Chapter 3. F. The state of the entire book as of the end of 1978: Chapter 3 revised, and Chapter 4 in its initial form. This copy also shows markings made by Marion Howe, and changes I made during 1980 (this was my source document for the final revision in 1980). G. The state of the entire book after 1980 revision but before proofreading by Aspvall and Liang, and before the final revision of the Computer Modern fonts. H. The state of the book just before final camera-ready copy made, showing last-minute refinements and the index. I. TeX form of the book as printed.
Boxes 31-36: Subsequent editions of Volumes 1, 2 and 3
Notes, by Donald Knuth, August 25, 1988
From February 1995 to February 1998, my major project was to produce new editions of the existing volumes of The Art of Computer Programming: Volume 1 (3rd edition), Volume 2 (3rd edition), and Volume 3 (2nd edition). These were the first new editions of Volumes 1 and 3 since 1975, and the first new edition of Volume 2 since 1981. My work on typesetting, and other projects such as Concrete Mathematics, 3:16 Bible Texts Illuminated, and The Stanford GraphBase, had occupied nearly all of my time since 1977; now I could best return to The Art of Computer Programming by applying the typesetting software I had constructed to the main task that had motivated it from the beginning.
The first major use of TeX had been to produce the second edition of Volume 2 in 1981. My secretary, Phyllis Winkler, then put the texts of Volumes 1 and 3 into the same form; but I never had had time to use the results of her work, because the international use of TeX had become so great that I knew I would have to completely revise that system. Thus in 1995 all I had "online" was a set of approximations to Volumes 1, 2, and 3, expressed in an old version of the TeX language that had become obsolete in 1982.
I also had received many hundreds of letters from readers, and had made significant amendments to the text; I began to put those changes into electronic form, as a 350-page list of errata to the old editions. Silvio Levy volunteered to convert the old TeX files to modern TeX form, and to incorporate all of the new errata, while carefully proofreading everything; he began this work in 1996, while I was still gather the errata together.
Finally in January of 1997, my errata lists were complete, and Silvio had also finished preparing the new electronic version of Volume 1. I began on January 11 to prepare the final version of that volume, and I had the first ten pages done on January 31.
Meanwhile another volunteer, Jeffrey Oldham, had begun to convert all of the illustrations to electronic form in the METAPOST language – a major undertaking involving more than 600 illustrations, many of which were quite complex. While I was working on Volume 1, Levy and Oldham continued to prepare the text and illustrations for Volumes 2 and 3.
I soon found that the existence of these documents in electronic form changed everything: The temptation to make small improvements (once prohibitively expensive but now easy) became irresistible. Therefore I soon found that I wanted to make dozens of improvements to every page. Fortunately the typographical tools now available made it possible for me to do this with reasonable speed, and I completed Volume 1 at 4am on April 21.
Volume 2 was more of the same; I began it on April 29 and finished on September 3 (this time at 5:30 am). Work on Volume 3 began on September 16 – coincidentally the day my first grandchild was born! -- and consumed most of my energy until 4:30 am on February 27, 1998. The completed volumes totaled 670 +776 + 794 = 2240 pages.
In these boxes I have placed the main things that seem to be worth archiving:
0a. Xerox of the notebook entries I made while doing the work. 0b. Copies of email correspondence with Silvio Levy, 1995-1998. 1a. Volume 1 illustration proofs, showing the figures as received from Jeffrey Oldham. Handwritten corrections show most of the changes that I incorporated into the master files as I polished the book. 1b. Volume 1 first proofs: Pages formatted as received from Levy, with markings to show changes that I made while proofreading. (Most of the corrections are in green ink; red ink shows later changes made after the "green" ones were already corrected. This saved paper!) When I made extensive amendments, my first pencil drafts are often interfiled; but the drafts of shorter amendments were not saved. 1c. Volume 1 after I had completed one pass over the entire book. I laserprinted just this one copy and had it velo-bound, for use in preparing the index; then I circled items that needed to be indexed. 1d. Volume 1 index proofs: An inverted index of the old edition (used to cross-check that my new indexing hadn't forgotten anything), followed by the first proof of the new index. 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d. Same as above, but for Volume 2. 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d. Same as above, but for Volume 3.
Box 1, Folder 1

Dedication and Introduction to The Art of Computer Programming

Box 1, Folder 2

The Art of Computer Programming , changes to the first edition

Box 1, Folder 3-5

The Art of Computer Programming , Chapter 1

Box 1, Folder 6-12

The Art of Computer Programming , Chapter 2

Box 1, Folder 13 - 15

The Art of Computer Programming , Chapter 3

Box 1, Folder 16

The Art of Computer Programming , Chapter 4 outline, notes

Box 1, Folder 17 - 31

The Art of Computer Programming , Chapter 4

Box 1, Folder 32

The Art of Computer Programming , Chapter 4 and 5 brief drafts

Box 1, Folder 33 - 45

The Art of Computer Programming , Chapter 5

Box 1, Folder 46

Sorting techniques

Box 1, Folder 47

The Art of Computer Programming , Chapter 5, p. 1-40

Box 1, Folder 48 - 55

The Art of Computer Programming , Chapter 6

Box 1, Folder 56

Correspondence and notes on chapter 7

Box 1, Folder 57

Chapter 9 and information on scanner

Box 1, Folder 58

p. 11-138

Box 1, Folder 59

p. 139-221

Box 1, Folder 60

p. 222-272

Box 1, Folder 61

p. 410-445

Box 1, Folder 62

p. 610-634

Box 1, Folder 63

Miscellaneous notes

Box 2, Folder 1

A3 - A23 Algorithm

Box 2, Folder 2

Algorithm, p. 507, 508, 540

Box 2, Folder 3

Algorithm for inverse pennutation

Box 2, Folder 4

The analysis of radix exchange

Box 2, Folder 5

Componological problem in group theory

Box 2, Folder 6

Chapter organization

Box 2, Folder 7

Combinational searching

Box 2, Folder 8

Correspondence

Box 2, Folder 9

Distribution for cascade

Box 2, Folder 10

Evaluation of polynomials

Box 2, Folder 11

Example, the boy and the apple tree

Box 2, Folder 12

Factor method tree

Box 2, Folder 13

Finite state language

Box 2, Folder 14

Formulas and readings

Box 2, Folder 15

Generalized zero-one principle

Box 2, Folder 16

A good scrambling function for hardware

Box 2, Folder 17

Historical names and places

Box 2, Folder 18

Historical roles

Box 2, Folder 19

Index and glossary

Box 2, Folder 20

Index entries

Box 2, Folder 21

Index material

Box 2, Folder 22

Information on integers

Box 2, Folder 23

Information on quick sort

Box 2, Folder 24

Introduction to the book

Box 2, Folder 25

latin square

Box 2, Folder 26

Maclaren's method/algorithm

Box 2, Folder 27

MIX: Math Department subroutine 10/8/62

Box 2, Folder 28

Names list

Box 2, Folder 29

Non-isomorphic solutions to "queens" problem

Box 2, Folder 30

Notes for class

Box 2, Folder 31

Optimal search tree

Box 2, Folder 32

Optinn.nn sorting

Box 2, Folder 33

Organizational outline for the book

Box 2, Folder 34

Organization of book

Box 2, Folder 35

Page conunentaries

Box 2, Folder 36

Pagination changes

Box 2, Folder 37

Permutations of a finite multi-set

Box 2, Folder 38

Polynomials

Box 2, Folder 39

Polynomial division

Box 2, Folder 40

The power tree

Box 2, Folder 41

Preface and index

Box 2, Folder 42

Preparing for polyphase merge

Box 2, Folder 43

Radix system

Box 2, Folder 44

Random mnnbers sorting

Box 2, Folder 45

Recurring series mod m

Box 2, Folder 46

References

Box 2, Folder 47

Run-distribution alternating directions

Box 2, Folder 48

SIAM Review 9 / 1967

Box 2, Folder 49

Sorting

Box 2, Folder 50

Sorting information

Box 2, Folder 51

statistical study of published algorithurns

Box 2, Folder 52

Subroutines p. 1-36, caltech, Fall 1963

Box 2, Folder 53

Summary for 1/29-30/72

Box 2, Folder 54

Tables I

Box 2, Folder 55

Tables II

Box 2, Folder 56

Tablet with book organization

Box 2, Folder 57

Theory and techniques for design of electronic digital computer

Box 2, Folder 58

38 exercises

Box 2, Folder 59

Three tran algorithm

Box 2, Folder 60

Traffic signal problem

Box 2, Folder 61

Unification problem

Box 2, Folder 62

Utility arithmetic subroutines

Box 3, Folder 1

Computer print-outs on experiments with sort routines, algorithms, cascade merge programs, Morteson table, source listing

Box 4, Folder 1

Manuscript of The Art of Computer Programming , p. 1-49

Box 4, Folder 2

Manuscript of The Art of Computer Programming , p. 69-135

Box 4, Folder 3

Manuscript of The Art of Computer Programming , p. 136-191

Box 4, Folder 4

Manuscript of The Art of Computer Programming , p. 192-236

Box 4, Folder 5

Manuscript of The Art of Computer Programming , p. 237-316

Box 4, Folder 6

Manuscript of The Art of Computer Programming , p. 317-380

Box 4, Folder 7

Manuscript of The Art of Computer Programming , p. 381-435

Box 4, Folder 8

Manuscript of The Art of Computer Programming , p. 436-501

Box 4, Folder 9

Manuscript of The Art of Computer Programming , p. 502-545

Box 5, Folder 1

The Art of Computer Programming , Volume II, p. 546-595

Box 5, Folder 2

The Art of Computer Programming , Volume II, p. 596-635

Box 5, Folder 3

The Art of Computer Programming , Volume II, p. 636-683

Box 5, Folder 4

The Art of Computer Programming , Volume II, p. 685-734

Box 5, Folder 5

The Art of Computer Programming , Volume II, p. 735-776

Box 5, Folder 6

The Art of Computer Programming , Volume II, p. 777-808

Box 5, Folder 7

The Art of Computer Programming , Volume II, p. 809-843

Box 5, Folder 8

The Art of Computer Programming , Volume II, p. 844-851

Box 5, Folder 9

The Art of Computer Programming , Volume II, p. 7-30 miscellaneous information

Box 6, Folder 1

The Art of Computer Programming, Volume II, Galley proofs from universities press

Box 6, Folder 2

Chapter 3 and introduction

Box 6, Folder 3

Chapter 3

Box 6, Folder 4

Chapter 3 continued

Box 6, Folder 5-10

Chapter 4

Box 6, Folder 11-13

Answers to exercises, section 3, section 4

Box 7

TeX form of chapter 3

Box 8, Folder 1

Marion Howe's comments on the state of the book, 1978

Box 8, Folder 2

State of the book, 1978, p. 1-36

Box 8, Folder 3

State of the book, 1978, p. 37-111

Box 8, Folder 4

State of the book, 1978, p. 112-175

Box 8, Folder 5

State of the book, 1978, p. 176-246

Box 8, Folder 6

State of the book, 1978, p. 247-298

Box 8, Folder 7

State of the book, 1978, p. 299-309

Box 8, Folder 8

State of the book, 1978, p. 310-386

Box 8, Folder 9

State of the book, 1978, p. 387-485

Box 8, Folder 10

State of the book, 1978, p. 486-494

Box 8, Folder 11

State of the book, 1978, p. 495-540

Box 8, Folder 12

State of the book, 1978, p. 541-632

Box 9, Folder 1

State of the book, 1980 revisions, p. 1-113

Box 9, Folder 2

State of the book, 1980 revisions, p. 114-177

Box 9, Folder 3

State of the book, 1980 revisions, p. 178-249

Box 9, Folder 4

State of the book, 1980 revisions, p. 250-312

Box 9, Folder 5

State of the book, 1980 revisions, p. 313-398

Box 9, Folder 6

State of the book, 1980 revisions, p. 399-466

 

Proofs for the 3rd edition of Volumes 1 and 2 and for the 2nd edition of Volume 3

Box 31, Folder 1

Notebook entries (photocopies)

Box 31, Folder 2

E-mail with Silvio Levy 1995 Aug. - 1996 Feb.

Box 31, Folder 3

E-mail with Silvio Levy 1996 Mar. - July

Box 31, Folder 4

E-mail with Silvio Levy 1996 Aug. - 1997 Mar.

Box 31, Folder 5

E-mail with Silvio Levy 1997 May - 1998 Jan.

Box 31, Folder 6

Volume 1 illustration proofs

Box 31, Folder 7

Volume 1 Proofs: Preface - p. 99

Box 31, Folder 8

Volume 1 Proofs: pp. 100-199

Box 31, Folder 9

Volume 1 Proofs: pp. 200-299

Box 31, Folder 10

Volume 1 Proofs: pp. 300-399

Box 32, Folder 1

Volume 1 Proofs: pp. 400-499

Box 32, Folder 2

Volume 1 Proofs: pp. 500-624

Box 32, Folder 3

Volume 1 Bound Proof

Box 33, Folder 1

Volume 1 Index Proofs

Box 33, Folder 2

Volume 2 illustration proofs

Box 33, Folder 3

Volume 2 Proofs: Preface - p. 99

Box 33, Folder 4

Volume 2 Proofs: pp. 100-300

Box 33, Folder 5

Volume 2 Proofs: pp. 301-500

Box 33, Folder 6

Volume 2 Proofs: pp. 501 - end

Box 34, Folder 1

Volume 2 Bound Proof

Box 34, Folder 2

Volume 2 Index Proofs

Box 34, Folder 3

Volume 3 illustration proofs

Box 35, Folder 1

Volume 3 Proofs: Preface and section 5.2

Box 35, Folder 2

Volume 3 Proofs: Section 5.2.1 - 5.2.3

Box 35, Folder 3

Volume 3 Proofs: Section 5.2.4 - 5.3.3

Box 35, Folder 4

Volume 3 Proofs: Section 5.3.4 - 5.4.4

Box 35, Folder 5

Volume 3 Proofs: Section 5.4.5 - 6.2.1

Box 35, Folder 6

Volume 3 Proofs: Section 6.2.2 - 6.3

Box 35, Folder 7

Volume 3 Proofs: Section 6.4 - end

Box 35, Folder 8

Volume 3 Index Proofs

Box 36, Folder 1

Volume 3 Chapter 5 Bound Proof

Box 36, Folder 2

Volume 3 Chapter 6 Bound Proof

Box 9, Folder 7

p. 467-505

Box 9, Folder 8

p. 506-546

Box 9, Folder 9

p. 601-647

Box 9, Folder 10

Appendices

Box 9, Folder 11

p. v-99

Box 9, Folder 12

p. 100-199

Box 9, Folder 13

p. 200-299

Box 10, Folder 1

p. 300-399

Box 10, Folder 2

p. 400-499

Box 10, Folder 3

p. 500-599

Box 10, Folder 4

p. 600-688

Box 11, Folder 1-22

TeX form of the book

 

Series 2 Computers and Typesetting

Scope and Content Note

This set of 14 boxes contains materials from nine years of work on computer systems for publishing at stanford. 'The main results of this work have been published in five volumes entitled Computers & Typesetting, Volumes A--E (Reading, Mass.: Addison Wesley, 1986).
The research introduced three major computer systems:
  • 1) TeX, a system for typesetting
  • 2) METAFONT, a system for typeface design
  • 3) Computer Modern, a family of typefaces
Another important byproduct was the WEB system for structured documentation of computer programs.
Included are the original manuscripts, revised drafts, logbooks, commentary from other experts, research files, and correspondence pertaining to three major computer systems: TeX, a system for typesetting, METAFONT, a system for typeface design, and Computer Modern, a family of typefaces. Also included are keepsakes and specimens of early use of these systems.
The manuscripts were written by Knuth as these systems were being created, together with intermediate versions and log books that show how things developed and changed over the years. Critical comments by leading experts, who helped to refine the ideas, are included. Many of the "first" editions printed by these new methods, at stanford and at many other places around the world, are also preserved here. The period 1977 - 1986 was one of dramatic change in the world of book publishing; numerous keepsakes and specimens from TeX and other systems have been collected.
 

Legal size documents

Box 12, Folder 1

log book and test program for debugging TeX78

Box 12, Folder 2

The first pages of output by TeX, Mar--Jul 1978

Box 12, Folder 3

Manuscript of first TeX Manual, 1978

Box 12, Folder 4

Manuscript of first METAFONT Manual, 1979

Box 12, Folder 5

original (inco:rrplete) draft of TeX82 , Aug--Sep 1981

Box 12, Folder 6

Pencil draft of WEB, Sep--oct 1981

Box 12, Folder 7

First use of WEB with TeX82 before it was complete

Box 12, Folder 8

Manuscript of TeX82 program, Jan--Jun 1982

Box 12, Folder 9

Log of the first bugs fround in TeX82, Jul--Sep 1982

Box 12, Folder 10

Original manuscript of the TeXBook, Oct 1982--Sep 1983

Box 12, Folder 11

Manuscript of the PROFILE program, Oct 1983

Box 12, Folder 12

Dcx::xnnentation of system used at Universities Press, Belfast, in 1977

Box 12, Folder 13

CTI Math System

 

Volume A, The TeXbook

Box 13, Folder 1

First TeX manual: draft copy for making the index, Jul 31 1978

Box 13, Folder 2

First TeX manual: as it was stored in the computer, Aug 27 1978

Box 13, Folder 3

First TeX manual, Sep 1978

Box 13, Folder 4

The TeXbook: first printed drafts

Box 13, Folder 5

The TeXbook: second printed drafts

Box 13, Folder 6

The TeXbook: third printed drafts

Box 13, Folder 7

The TeXbook: one-of-a-kind edition used to make the index

Box 13, Folder 8

Experiments with TeX done while writing the TeXbook

Box 13, Folder 9

The TeXbook illustrations by Duane Bibby

Box 13, Folder 10

The TeXbook: comments from readers of pre-publication drafts

Box 13, Folder 11

The TeXbook: as marked by Addison-Wesley copy editor

Box 13, Folder 12

The TeXbook: book and cover design

Box 13, Folder 13

The TeXbook: Permission letters

 

TeX milieu

Box 14, Folder 1

BBR System, world's first computer controlled printing of text

Box 14, Folder 2

Hershey's typographic systems

Box 14, Folder 3

American Math Society research on composition

Box 14, Folder 4

composition systems from commercial vendors

Box 14, Folder 5

Typesetting research at universities

Box 14, Folder 6

Typesetting research at Bell Laboratories

Box 14, Folder 7

Typesetting research at other laboratories

Box 14, Folder 8

Fancy word processing with math

Box 14, Folder 9

TeX in the Bay Area

Box 14, Folder 10

TeX elsewhere in the U.S.A.

Box 14, Folder 11

TeX in other countries

Box 14, Folder 12

Company business re: TeX

Box 14, Folder 13

Supplementary work on hyphenation and pagination

 

TeX memorabilia and auxiliary systems

Box 15, Folder 1

The "DOC" system (father of "WEB") Feb-Mar 1979

Box 15, Folder 2

The WEB manual

Box 15, Folder 3

TeXware" "

Box 15, Folder 4

Early use of WEB

Box 15, Folder 5

Software for the Alphatype CRS

Box 15, Folder 6

Samples from first interfaces between TeX or METAFDNT and devices

Box 15, Folder 7

Examples of early TeX output: (A) Things I made myself or with Jill

Box 15, Folder 8

Examples of early TeX output: (B) Things made by others

Box 15, Folder 9

Examples of early TeX output: (C) Books

Box 15, Folder 10

Miscellaneous correspondence, clippings, etc. relevant to TeX

Box 15, Folder 11

Correspondence with American Math Society

 

Volume B, TeX: The Program

Box 16, Folder 1

Prototype implementation of TeX, Aug 25 1977

Box 16, Folder 2

Beginnings of first TeX implementation, Oct 14 1977

Box 16, Folder 3

First implementation almost complete, Jan 29 1978

Box 16, Folder 4

First implementation complete and ready for debugging, 1978 Feb 10

Box 16, Folder 5

After initial debugging, Mar 29 1978

Box 16, Folder 6

The first version released" for general use Aug 2 1978 "

Box 16, Folder 7

Fully debugged" version Aug 1979 "

Box 16, Folder 8

TeX78 as it was in Jul 1981

Box 16, Folder 9

TeX in Pascal, written by Ignacio Zabala

Box 16, Folder 10

TeX in MESA, written by Leo Guibas, Bob Sedgewick, and Doug Wyatt

Box 16, Folder 11

First draft of TeX82, Sep 6 1981 (incomplete)

Box 16, Folder 12

Early draft of TeX82 , Jan 2 1982

Box 16, Folder 13

A more complete draft of TeX82, Mar 28 1982

Box 17, Folder 1

"Nearly complete" draft Jun 14 1982 "

Box 17, Folder 2

The first complete draft of TeX82, Jun 29

Box 17, Folder 3

TeX82 initial debugging, Jul 13 1982

Box 17, Folder 4

Version -0.25" of TeX82 Jul 25 1982

Box 17, Folder 5

Version 0 of TeX82, Sep 1982

Box 17, Folder 6

Version 0.999 of TeX82, Jul 1983

Box 17, Folder 7

Empirical runtime analysis of TeX

Box 18, Folder 1

Version 1.0 of TeX82, Dec 3 1983

Box 18, Folder 2

Version 1.3 of TeX82, Dec 1984

Box 18, Folder 3

Version 2.0 of TeX82, Nov 11 1985

Box 18, Folder 4

Copy editor's corrections to Volume B, Jan 1986

Box 18, Folder 5

Profiles (timing information) for TeX82, 1984

Box 18, Folder 6

TWILL (special variant of WEAVE for Volumes B and D)

Box 18, Folder 7

Volume B, front matter

Box 18, Folder 8

TeXHAX" messages among early users "

Box 18, Folder 9

TUG (TeX Users Group)

Box 18, Folder 10

First uses" of TeX continued "

Box 18, Folder 11

Addison-Wesley pUblicity brochures

Box 18, Folder 12

Other systems based on TeX

 

TeX addenda; Volume C, The METAFONTbook

Box 19, Folder 1

Miscellaneous correspondence from users

Box 19, Folder 2

A simple system that came before TeX, Jun 1976

Box 19, Folder 3

Experiments with the first hyphenation algorithm, 1978

Box 19, Folder 4

Hyphenation: TeX versus Webster's Collegiate, 1984

Box 19, Folder 5

TeX, the name

Box 19, Folder 6

Commercial software based on TeX

Box 19, Folder 7

Computers and Typesetting: cover designs

Box 19, Folder 8

Redesign of METAFONT logo, summer 1984

Box 19, Folder 9

First draft copies of the METAFONTbook, Chapters 1--13

Box 19, Folder 10

First draft copies of the METAFONTbook, Chapters 14--D

Box 19, Folder 11

Readers' comments on METAFONTbook first draft

Box 19, Folder 12

Penultimate draft of METAFONTbook

Box 19, Folder 13

METAFONTbook: quotations

Box 19, Folder 14

METAFONTbook: illustrations by Duane Bibby

Box 19, Folder 15

METAFONTbook: illustrations by computer

Box 19, Folder 16

METAFONTbook: copy editor's corrections

Box 19, Folder 17

Proto-METAFONT, 1977

Box 19, Folder 18

Initial design of METAFONT, summer 1978

Box 19, Folder 19

Handwritten code for the first METAFONT

Box 19, Folder 20

Complete logs for TeX, METAFONT, Computer Modern

Box 19, Folder 21

Knuth, Donald E., The Errors of TEX 1989

 

Volume D, METAFONT: The Program

Box 20, Folder 1

First draft of METAFONT interpreter, Dec 15 1978

Box 20, Folder 2

First draft of METAFONT with raster routines, Jan 1 1979

Box 20, Folder 3

First draft of testable METAFONT system, Apr 15 1979

Box 20, Folder 4

First complete" METAFONT system

Box 20, Folder 5

Released" METAFONT

Box 20, Folder 6

Tom Spencer's original algorithms for drawing in linear time

Box 20, Folder 7

Interim METAFONT manual, used from spring 1984 to fall 1985

Box 20, Folder 8

State of METAFONT code on Mar 11 1984

Box 20, Folder 9

The first camplete draft of METAFONT84, Mar 18 1984

Box 20, Folder 10

First working draft of METAFONT84

Box 20, Folder 11

First version of METAFONT to pass the TRAP" test

Box 20, Folder 12

Version 0.3 of METAFONT, Sep 27 1984

Box 20, Folder 13

Version 0.7 of METAFONT, Jan 17 1985

Box 20, Folder 14

Version 0.95 of METAFONT, Aug 12 1985

 

Volume D, continued; METAFONT milieu

Box 21, Folder 1

Version 1.0 of METAFONT, Jan 4 1986

Box 21, Folder 2

Profile (running time estimate) of METAFONT, Oct 1985

Box 21, Folder 3

Profile gathering program

Box 21, Folder 4

Typography course, spring 1984, with Bigelow and Southall

Box 21, Folder 5

Typography course homework: El Palo Alto and border designs

Box 21, Folder 6

Typography course homework: Font 1" "

Box 21, Folder 7

Equipment brochures, manuals, and samples

Box 21, Folder 8

Interfacing METAFONT84 to devices

Box 21, Folder 9

Use of my own laser printer!

Box 21, Folder 10

other letterform design systems

Box 21, Folder 11

Legibility

Box 21, Folder 12

Correspondence concerning fonts

Box 21, Folder 13

METAFONT connuentary

Box 21, Folder 14

Type specimens

 

Volume E, Computer Modern Typefaces

Box 22, Folder 1

What preceded Computer Modern

Box 22, Folder 2

Computer Modern, 1977

Box 22, Folder 3

Computer Modern, 1978

Box 22, Folder 4

Computer Modern, 1979

Box 22, Folder 5

Computer Modern published as a Stanford report, Jan 1980

Box 22, Folder 6

Computer Modern, 1980

Box 22, Folder 7

Computer Modern, 1981

Box 22, Folder 8

Computer Modern, early 1982

Box 22, Folder 9

Major revision of p~r 1982: lowercase letters

Box 23, Folder 1

Major revision of Apr 1982: uppercase letters

Box 23, Folder 2

Major revision of Apr 1982: numerals

Box 23, Folder 3

Major revision of Apr 1982: punctuation and accents

Box 23, Folder 4

Major revision of Apr 1982: math symbols

Box 23, Folder 5

Computer Modern, summer 1982

Box 23, Folder 6

Computer Modern, 1983

Box 23, Folder 7

Almost Computer Modern Roman 1984

Box 23, Folder 8

Almost Computer Modern Italic 1984

Box 23, Folder 9

Almost Computer Modern Symbols 1984

Box 23, Folder 10

Almost Computer Modern Extensib1es" 1984

Box 23, Folder 11

Computer Modern Roman, Jan--Apr 1985

 

Volume E, continued; font milieu

Box 24, Folder 1

Computer Modern: final tests, May 1985--Jan 1986

Box 24, Folder 2

Christmas card, 1985: Celtic knot font

Box 24, Folder 3

Manuscript copy for Volume E, 1986

Box 24, Folder 4

Miscellaneous documents about fonts

Box 24, Folder 5

Miscellaneous typographic keepsakes

Box 24, Folder 6

Arabic and Hebrew

Box 24, Folder 7

Math Symbols

Box 24, Folder 8

Chinese and Japanese

Box 24, Folder 9

Indian

Box 24, Folder 10

Cyrillic

Box 24, Folder 11

Work of Nazneen N. Bi11awa1a

Box 24, Folder 12

Work of Charles A. Bigelow

Box 24, Folder 13

Work of Georgia Tobin

Box 24, Folder 14

Work of Rudiger Pfeiffer-Rupp

Box 24, Folder 15

Work of Philippe Coueignoux

 

Miscellaneous additions

Box 25, Folder 1

The METAFONTbook: original manuscript

Box 25, Folder 2

METAFONT: The Program: original manuscript

Box 25, Folder 3

Computer Modern in I new METAFONT I: original manuscript, spring 1985

Box 25, Folder 4

Drafts of original TeX implementation

Box 25, Folder 5

The original memo that led to TeX: handwritten draft, May 1977

 

Series 3 Concrete Mathematics

Scope and Content Note

Archives from the development of Concrete Mathematics, a textbook by Ronald L. Graham, Donald E. Knuth and Oren Patashnik. 'This book, published in the surmner of 1988, is based on a Stanford course of the same name that I introduced in 1970 (and it has been taught ever since). It represents sort of a "manifesto" of the way I like to do mathematics, especially the mathematics associated with computer prograrrnning. After nearly twenty years teaching the course, I knew that it was time to put this textbook together and export the ideas to other universities. My goal was to produce the best exposition of mathematical manipulations since, say, cauchy's famous Cours de Mathematigue of the 1820's and 1830's. Ron Graham was a visiting professor who taught the Stanford course twice during my sabbatical leaves, both times with great success. Oren Patashnik was a graduate student in Computer Science who served as teaching assistant in the class several times, under both Graham and me.
Drafts, proofs, and correspondence pertaining to the textbook by Ronald L. Graham, Donald E. Knuth and Oren Patashnik, which was based on a Stanford course taught by Knuth.
 

Original Drafts

Scope and Content Note

Patashnik created a draft of the entire book, which was used by Stanford students for two or three years. During the last half of 1987 and the first half of 1988, I rewrote this draft and the result was used as a trial text at Stanford, Princeton, Brown, Columbia, Rice and CUNY. My handwritten manuscripts appear here, together with marked-up copies of Oren's draft, together with high-level notes I made to Graham letting him know the thrust of what I was doing so that he could provide maximum input. Correspondence and preprints of unpublished papers I consul ted during this time are also included.
This part of the archive consists of ten legal-size folders.
  • 1.0 Preface, Graffiti and permissions (see below)
  • 1.1 Chapter One, Recurrent Problems
  • 1.2 Chapter Two, Sums
  • 1.3 Chapter Three, Integer Functions
  • 1.4 Chapter Four, Number Theory
  • 1.5 Chapter Five, Binomial Coefficients
  • 1.6 Chapter Six, Special Numbers
  • 1.7 Chapter Seven, Generating Functions
  • 1.8 Chapter Eight, Discrete Probability
  • 1.9 Chapter Nine, Asymptotics
Each folder has comments written on the outside that were notes to myself about what sources to read as I was writing the material. 'Ihese references are keyed to sixteen years worth of classnotes from the Stanford course; those classnotes are not part of the archive but they do exist in Stanford's Mathematical Sciences Library.
Our book introduces a novel feature called "graffiti," borrowed from the non-mathematical brochure called Approaching Stanford. We asked stUdents to contribute their own cormnents so that we could print them in the margins of our book. These student contributions are included in folder I.O.
Box 26, Folder 1

Preface, Graffiti, Permission

Box 26, Folder 2

Chapter One: Recurrent Problems

Box 26, Folder 3

Chapter 'Two: Sums

Box 26, Folder 4

Chapter 'Three: Integer Functions

Box 26, Folder 5

Chapter Four: Number Theory

Box 26, Folder 6

Chapter Five: Binomial Coefficients

Box 27, Folder 1

Chapter Six: Special Numbers

Box 27, Folder 2

Chapter Seven: Generating Function

Box 27, Folder 3

Chapter Eight: Discrete Probability

Box 27, Folder 4

Chapter Nine: Asymptotics

 

Correspondence with the publisher

Scope and Content Note

Here are relevant letters from the production editor and book designer. These are of some interest because we wrote this book at a time when the process of book production is changing dramatically. Instead of sending a manuscript to the publisher and letting them carry the ball, this book was typeset by its authors. Still, we did not want to lose the professional services of a book designer, so we received advice on suitable format before we did the typesetting.
Our book is interesting from another standpoint because it is the first book to be published with a new family of typefaces designed by Hermann Zapf, especially for mathematics, called AMS Euler. Part of my work on this book, was devoted to fine tuning of these fonts, so that they can be used in other mathematical publications. With the book designers help I was able to create a compatible text face (called Concrete Roman and Italic) to complement Zapf's mathematical characters.
Box 27, Folder 5

Correspondence with Addison-Wesley

Box 27, Folder 6

Duplicate and erroneous pages from manuscript

 

First Early Draft

Scope and Content Note

Here are the pages used by students at Stanford, Princeton, 1987-1988, etc., together with corrections I noted in response to their feedback.
Box 28, Folder 1

Preface, Chapters One, Two and Three

Box 28, Folder 2

Chapters Four and Five

Box 28, Folder 3

Chapters six and Seven

Box 28, Folder 4

Chapters Eight, Nine and Exercises

 

Ron Graham's Remarks

Scope and Content Note

Ron took the responsibility for preparing the index; he marked up a copy of (III) with index terms and made other comments.
Box 28, Folder 5

Preface, Chapters One, Two, Three and Four

Box 28, Folder 6

Chapters Five and six

Box 29, Folder 1

Chapters Seven, Eight, Nine and Exercises

 

Copy editor's Remarks

Scope and Content Note

Another aspect of typesetting-by-author is shown here. We wanted the help of a professional copy editor as well as a book designer. In this case the copy editor could mark freely anything that needed to be double-checked, knowing that we would ignore all advice that we didn't like. The result, we think, is much better than in previous methods under which the copy editor would have supreme authority but would then be limited to making changes that would not upset the authors when page proofs appeared. This part of the archive also includes some correspondence I had with the copy editor.
Box 29, Folder 2

Correspondence, Style-sheet, Preface, Chapters One and Two

Box 29, Folder 3

Correspondence, Chapters Three and Four

Box 29, Folder 4

Chapters Five and six

Box 29, Folder 5

Chapters Seven and Eight

Box 29, Folder 6

Chapter Nine

 

Semi-final proofs

Scope and Content Note

The corrections to (III) based on (IV), (V) and other feedback are shown here in a special format that shows the first raw index we constructed. Final changes and graffiti are written on these laserprinted proofs.
Box 30, Folder 1

Preface, Chapters One and Two

Box 30, Folder 2

Chapters Three and Four

Box 30, Folder 3

Chapters Five and six

Box 30, Folder 4

Chapters Seven, Eight and Nine

Box 30, Folder 5

Appendices A: Exercises, B: Bibliography, C: Credits

Box 30, Folder 6

Index

Box 1-4

Accession ARCH-1989-278 Galleys and proofs for The Art of Programming

 

Accession ARCH-1996-147 Additional Material

Scope and Content Note

Addendum to the archives of the TeX-METAFONT project drafts, proofs, articles, notes, and other records pertaining to the project, as well as keepsakes and published materials using TeX and/or METAFONT.
Box 1, Folder 1

Galley proofs the second edition of The Art of Computer Programming, Volume 1, 1973

Box 1, Folder 2

Samples of repro copy used to make Volume 1 with Monotype by Wolf Composition

Box 1, Folder 3

Samples of repro copy used to make Surreal Numbers with Monotype by Clowes

Box 1, Folder 4

Samples of repro copy used to make volume 2, second edition, with TeX and METAFONT - Knuth's first production output with the Alphatype

Box 1, Folder 5

The WEB system, preliminary pre-release version, November 1981 (one of the first documents of what has become known as Literate Programming)

Box 1, Folder 6

The GFtoDVI processor: Version 0, April 1984

Box 1, Folder 7

The GFtoDVI processor: Version 1.6, September 1985

Box 1, Folder 8

Complete listing of TeX with frequency counts of actual usage, 22 October 1986

Box 1, Folder 9

Keepsakes from the early days of TeX:

Scope and Content Note

System uptime report for the SAIL computer on which Knuth worked The first proofs of proto-Computer Modern type, July 1977; Cover art for the first TeX user manual. American Math Society, 1978; Cover design by Scott Kim for Stanford Computer Forum, using an early draft of the AMS Euler lowercase, Fall 1981; Handouts for TeX mini-courses, Spring 1981; Photo of California vanity plate "DON TEX", n.d.; Formal invitation to TeX's "coming of age" party, December 9, 1983
Box 10, Folder 10

Notes made by Knuth while preparing revision of METAFONT, December 21, 1982 - January 18, 1984

Box 2, Folder 1

Technical notes related to the inner workings of TeX and METAFONT:

Box 2, Folder 1

Computer-aided footwear design by J.R. Manning, December 1972

Box 2, Folder 1

SCRIBE: A document specification language by Brian Reid, October 1980

Box 2, Folder 1

Geometric construction of Bernstein poly curves by G.M. Chaikin, Fall 1980

Box 2, Folder 2

Choosing spline directions at knots by John Hobby, Spring 1983

Box 2, Folder 2

Choosing velocity parameters for cubic splines by John Hobby, Spring 1983

Box 2, Folder 2

Correcting outlines for pen width by John Hobby March 1983

Box 2, Folder 2

A Chinese mete-font by John Hobby and Gu Guoan, ICTP83 proceedings, October 1983

Box 2, Folder 2

Ideas for the new METAFONT by John Hobby, Fall 1983

Box 2, Folder 2

METAFONT programming style by Per Bothner, December 12, 1983

Box 2, Folder 2

The 6-register method for plotting cubic spines by John Hobby, December 14, 1983

Box 2, Folder 2

Tension and mock curvature by John Hobby, December 15, 1983

Box 2, Folder 2

Adjustment to the raster by John Hobby, December 15, 1983

Box 2, Folder 2

Joints between Bezier curves by Lyle Ramshaw, December 15, 1983

Box 2, Folder 2

Convolving graph paper tracings by Lyle Ramshaw, December 16, 1983

Box 2, Folder 2

Alternatives to the splines of Manning by John Hobby, December 31, 1983-January 1, 1984

Box 2, Folder 2

Comments on curves by Leo Guibas and Knuth, January 1, 1984

Box 2, Folder 2

Reparameterization and other things by Lyle Ramshaw, January 3, 1984

Box 2, Folder 2

Compromise values of r and s by John Hobby, January 3 1984

Box 2, Folder 2

Nifty labeling of Bezier intermediate points by Lyle Ramshaw, February 8, 1985

Box 2, Folder 3

Proposed raster image processor by Victor Ostromoukhov, Spring 1988

Box 2, Folder 3

Adaptation of Liang's hyphenation to Russian by Dimitri Vulis 1988

Box 2, Folder 4

Proposed changes to TeX by Jan Rynning, August 16, 1989

Box 2, Folder 4

ISO standards for extended 8-bit codes, August 1989

Box 2, Folder 5

Subtle bugs in METAFONT, October 1989

Box 2, Folder 5

Samples of AMS Euler before re-tuning of Fraktur and script, March 1991

Box 2, Folder 5

Demillo and Mathur, Applying grammar-based fault classification to TeX, 1995

Box 2, Folder 6

Samples of repro copy used to make Computers & Typesetting:

Box 2, Folder 6

Volume A - The TeXbook (includes all chapter openers with Duane Bibby art) 1983

Box 2, Folder 7

Volume B - TeX: The Program 1986

Box 2, Folder 8

Volume D - METAFONT: The Program 1986

Box 2, Folder 9

Volume E - Computer Modern Typefaces 1986

Box 2, Folder 10

Samples of repro copy for Concrete Mathematics (the first major use of the AMS Euler typeface; 1988 sheets on Autologic 720dpi; 1990 on Linotron 1270dpi) 1988-1990

Box 2, Folder 11

Miscellaneous publications of the TeX Users Group:

Box 2, Folder 11

Membership list September 26, 1986

Box 2, Folder 11

Errata and changes for Computers & Typesetting, June 15, 1987

Box 3, Folder 1

Keepsakes from the later days of TeX and METAFONT

Box 3, Folder 1

Duane Bibby's announcement of his new home n.d.

Box 3, Folder 1

TeX Christmas from Irene Hyna, December 1986

Box 3, Folder 1

METAFONT Christmas card from Georgia Tobin, December 1986

Box 3, Folder 1

METAFONT Valentine for Jill, February 1987

Box 3, Folder 1

Wedding program for Diana Barnes and Robert Nicholus, August 29, 1987

Box 3, Folder 1

(one of the first uses of Computer Modern Sans Serif)

Box 3, Folder 1

Example DVIRGB output, IBM colorjet printer by Norman Naugle, November 1987

Box 3, Folder 1

"A dragon for you" text and picture by Norman Naugle n.d.

Box 3, Folder 1

Announcement of Knuth's lecture to Stanford Library Associates, December 1987

Box 3, Folder 1

Poster with Computer Modern, received from Oc\'e in Netherlands, April 1988

Box 3, Folder 1

Registration form when Knuth joined cyrTUG, the Russian TeX users group, May 1994

Box 3, Folder 1

Examples of TeX and METAFONT as used by Josef Gerbrich in Brno 1995

Box 3, Folder 1

Examples of TeX output for posted tram schedules in Brno and Prague 1995

Box 3, Folder 2

Early examples of TeX and METAFONT used in non-English languages:

Box 3, Folder 2

Irish

Box 3, Folder 3

Icelandic

Box 3, Folder 4

Russian (includes Cyrillic fonts to match Computer Modern Concrete Russian)

Box 3, Folder 5

Old Church Slavonic

Box 3, Folder 6

Polish (includes Samizdat literature for Solidarity!)

Box 3, Folder 7

Turkish

Box 3, Folder 8

Arabic

Box 3, Folder 9

Farsi

Box 3, Folder 10

Greek, Gothic, Hebrew, Sanskrit, etc.

Box 3, Folder 10

ScholarTeX by Yannis Haralambous, 1991

Box 3, Folder 10

TeX et las Langues Orientales by M. Fanton and Y. Haralambous, 1992

Box 3, Folder 11

Amharic

Box 3, Folder 12

Chinese

Box 3, Folder 13

Japanese

Box 3, Folder 14

Conference publications and handouts from TeX/METAFONT user groups:

Box 3, Folder 14

America -

Box 3, Folder 14

Delaware and Washington 1987

Box 3, Folder 14

Stanford 1989

Box 3, Folder 14

College Station, Texas 1990

Box 3, Folder 14

Boston 1991

Box 3, Folder 14

Santa Barbara 1994 (preprints)

Box 4, Folder 1

Florida 1995 (preprints and handouts)

Box 4, Folder 2

Europe -

Box 4, Folder 2

First European TeX Conference, Cork, Ireland 1990

Box 4, Folder 2

Cahiers GUTenberg no 8 (1991)

Box 4, Folder 2

Nordic TeX Users Group, Stockholm 1991

Box 4, Folder 3

Asia -

Box 4, Folder 4

cyrTUG publications and fonts

Box 4, Folder 5

Proceedings of the 7th UNICODE conference, September 1995

Box 4, Folder 5

Part 1

Box 4, Folder 6

Part 2

Box 5, Folder 1

Miscellaneous typographic keepsakes given to Knuth by Mell Hall and Bob McCann (former employees of Stanford News and Publications)

Box 5, Folder 2

_____.

Box 5, Folder 3

Miscellaneous typography - related keepsakes that Knuth acquired over the years:

Box 5, Folder 3

Demo page by leader of Lisa software at Apple Computer 1983

Box 5, Folder 3

Peter Koch, printer 1995

Box 5, Folder 3

Printing at the Wittington Press, 1972-1994

Box 5, Folder 3

Sample of Scripps College Oldstyle type (Goudy)

Box 5, Folder 3

Typography: Basic principles and applications--Oc\'e, Netherlands

Box 5, Folder 3

Character language resources: International software buyer's guide 1995

Box 5, Folder 3

Sample graphics from 1991 Stanford Art Directors Invitational

Box 5, Folder 3

Samples of David Kindersley's SuperVision spacing method 1985 & 1987

Box 5, Folder 3

Samples of Chinese fonts by Gu Guoan, Shanghai IKARUS Limited 1989

Box 5, Folder 3

Early example of Dave Siegel's Tekton font, used in PhoneNET poster 1991

Box 5, Folder 3

Poster made at Donnelley research laboratory 1988 (poor typesetting!)

Box 5, Folder 3

Fonts from Judith Sutcliffe of Santa Barbara

Box 5, Folder 3

INRIA poster that mixes Computer Modern Sans with Univers

Box 5, Folder 3

Correspondence and samples from Sumner Stone's type foundry

Box 5, Folder 3

Font coding system used in Beijing, November 1991

Box 5, Folder 3

SERIF: A typography magazine produced with TeX 1994

Box 5, Folder 4

Keepsake from Andrew Hoyem using types of Rudolph Koch

Box 5, Folder 4

Specimens of ITC Bodoni type

Box 5, Folder 4

ITC font brochure 1994

Box 5, Folder 4

Fundacion Tipografica Neufville font brochure 1994

Box 5, Folder 4

Linotype font brochure 1994

Box 5, Folder 4

Bitstream GX fonts 1994

Box 5, Folder 4

ATypI Congress 1994, San Francisco, brochure and program

Box 5, Folder 4

D\"urer: So will I be perfect; keepsake by Jeff Level, Robert Kobodaishi

Box 5, Folder 4

Miscellaneous handouts from ATypI Congress 94: TypeLab, etc.

Box 5, Folder 4

Decorated Hebrew alphabet from Jerusalem

Box 5, Folder 4

Erich Wronker, Picture portfolio of printing medals 1993

Box 5, Folder 4

Bigelow and Holmes, examples of new Lucida mathematics fonts 1992

Box 5, Folder 4

A "meta-painting" (printed 1977 in Munich, but probably from 19th century)

Box 5, Folder 5

Samples from correspondence from Sumner Stone's type foundry

Box 5, Folder 6

Samples from Gunnlaugur Briem

Box 5, Folder 7

Christmas and New Year's Cards:

Box 5, Folder 7

Andrea Grimes, Susie Taylor; Sheila and Julian Waters; Friedrich and Edith Neugebauer; Gunnlaugur Briem; Christine and Friedrich Peter; Gudrun and Hermann Zapf

Box 5, Folder 8

Brochures and Publications of TeX and/or METAFONT Vendors:

Box 5, Folder 8

Preliminary user guide to Micro-TeX 1986

Box 5, Folder 8

Donald E. Knuth und MicroTeX im Gutenbergmuseum zu Mainz, September 17, 1987

Box 5, Folder 8

Handouts from Jonathan Fine 1993

Box 5, Folder 8

Alex Warman's letter describing TeXworks publishing in Australia

Box 5, Folder 8

St\"urtz typesetting of TeC documents

Box 5, Folder 8

TeX-to-type at Cambridge University Press

Box 5, Folder 8

Look to Springer for the latest in TeXnology

Box 6, Folder 1

Talaris Systems Newsletters: The Laser Line 1986-1988

Box 6, Folder 1

Kinch Computer Company: TurboTeX buyer's guide

Box 6, Folder 1

Mimi Lafrenz's letter about ETP composition services in Portland

Box 6, Folder 1

Oc\'e's new 508dpi laserprinter with Computer Modern samples 1988

Box 6, Folder 1

Lance Carnes' letter about his typesetting services for DVI files 1988

Box 6, Folder 1

Brochure from FTL systems 1987

Box 6, Folder 1

Paul M. Muller's letter and proposal for Chinese typesetting 1987

Box 6, Folder 1

FaSTeX flip card by Norman Paul 1986

Box 6, Folder 2

ST-TeX and ST-METAFONT from TOOLS GMBH, Bonn 1986

Box 6, Folder 2

The Publisher from ArborText, Inc. 1987

Box 6, Folder 2

Georgia Tobin's fonts (1980-1987):

Box 6, Folder 2

Hebrew and Decorative

Box 6, Folder 3

Roman

Box 6, Folder 4

Chel

Box 6, Folder 5

Slavic

Box 6, Folder 6

M. D. Spivak, Mathtime fonts (PostScript Times Roman and Italic for mathematics)

Box 6, Folder 6

Douglas Henderson, pcMF manual (for the METAFONT system to accompany pcTeX)

Box 6, Folder 6

Scientific Word and Scientific WorkPlace, from TCI Software Research

Box 6, Folder 6

NAR Associates: Mathematical, scientific, and historical typesetting

Box 6, Folder 6

Blue Sky Research brochures (1989-1995)

Box 6, Folder 7

Projective Solutions on converting bitmap fonts to outline fonts

 

Books and publications using TeX and/or METAFONT

Box 7

Robert Messer. Introduction to Topology 1981 (first TeX use at Vanderbilt University)

Box 7

Canzii, Lucarella, & Pilenga. TeX: Primo rapporto. Milano, 1981

Box 7

Philosophie de la recherche pedagogique en Suede (first TeX book in Sweden)

Box 7

Lecture Notes in Physics 189, 1983 (first book in TeX in Mexico)

Box 7

Arthur Keller. Programmare in PASCAL 1984 (first book in TeX in Italy)

Box 7

Middle East Studies Association Bulletin 18, 1984 (their switch to TeX)

Box 7

The Political Economy of Saudi Arabia 1984 (early use of Computer Modern)

Box 7

Walter Gander. Computer Mathematik 1985. (first Book in TeX in Switzerland)

Box 7

D\'esarm\'enien. La division par ordinateur des nots francais 1986

Box 7

TeX in Osnabr\'uck 1986

Box 7

Tsunetoshi Hayashi. Guide to TeX implementation at Hokkaido University 1986

Box 7

Tsunetoshi Hayashi. Improvement of DVIwrite for Japanese text

Box 7

NRL Memo 6044. TeXing the Formulary 1987 (shows TeX input, formulas output)

Box 7

Spivak's T2D4: Tables to Die For 1987 (with illustrations by Duane Bibby)

Box 7

Borde. An absolute beginner's guide to using TeX 1987

Box 7

Miguel Navarro Saad. Aztec calendar formatted with TeX macros 1987

Box 7

ABC om TeX og LsTeX n.d. (from computer center at Oslo University)

Box 7

Lokale utvidelser I TeX ved USEs VAX-cluster 1988 (Oslo University)

Box 7

Nobuo Saito. Sample pages of Japanese translation of the TeXbook 1988

Box 7

Peter Bruun. PiTeX: A graphical editor for pictures in LaTeX 1988

Box 7

Maarten van Emden. Slitex-sized poems for font freaks 1989

Box 7

Sherry P. Ketterer. TeXnical typesetting 1989 (by a secretary for secretaries)

Box 7

Kim Kubik. Bibliography of publications related to TeX and METAFONT 1990

Box 7

User manual for Japanese TeX 1990

Box 7

Sandra Wimbish. Introduction to Pagu 1991 (interlinear texts done with TeX)

Box 7

Charles Bortle. Poetry books done on his PC 1991

Box 7

Kai Borre. Mindste Kvadraters Princip 1992 (Danish book using AMS Euler)

Box 7

ASCII Corporation PC software for TeX 1992 (for Japanese texts)

Box 7

Vzgliahi na dom svoi, Pytnik! (one of several Russian novels published in New York)

Box 7

Programmirovanie 1992 (Russian technical journal typeset in TeX)

Box 7

Mnogoiazychnyi LaTeX 1993 (one of many Czech publications in TeX/METAFONT)

Box 7

Magicke rostliny 1994 ("Multilingual LaTeX")

Box 7

Shinsaku Fujita. Examples of chemical formulas typeset with XuMTeX 1992-1995

Box 7

W{\l}odek Byzl. Plain TeX 1995 (literate programming applied to TeX macros)

Box 7

Yannis Haralambous. METAFONT improves on multiple master fonts. Preprint, 1995

Box 8

Samples by Gloria Stuart and Ward Ritchie 1994

 

Accession ARCH-1996-148 GraphBase project records

Scope and Content Note

Material from the making of The Stanford GraphBase , a book published by ACM Press and Addison-Wesley Publishing Company in 1993. It includes the notes I made to myself and to Stanford students during the 20-year period I was compiling material for that book. The book is based on a series of interesting computer programs and interesting data from which many experiments in computer science have been made; I expect many additional researches to be based on this system in the years to come, because experimental computer science is expanding rapidly. The book itself was named the Best New Book in Computer Science by the Association of American Publishers in 1994.
Box 1

Notes from student meetings of the GraphBase Project

Box 1

GB_BOOKS: Novels and when their characters meet

Box 1

GB_ECON: Input-output data for the US economy

Box 1

GB_GAMES: College football scores

Box 1

GB_LISA: Pixels of Mona Lisa

Box 1

GB_MILES: Highway distances between US cities

Box 1

GB_ROGET: Thesaurus cross-reference

Box 1

GB_WORDS: Five-letter words of English

Box 1

Pencil draft of the book manuscript, except for the programs

Box 1

First typeset draft of the GraphBase programs (August 1992)

Box 1

Second typeset draft of the entire book (March 1993)

Box 1

Copy editor's remarks (June 1993)

 

Accession ARCH-1998-154 Computer Science 209, Mathematical Writing, lectures [videorecordings] 1987

Box 1

174.1 1987 Sep 30

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 1

174.2 1987 Oct 2

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 1

174.3 1987 Oct 5

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 1

174.4 1987 Oct 7

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 1

174.5 1987 Oct 9

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 1

174.6 1987 Oct 12

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 1

174.7 1987 Oct 14

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 1

174.8 1987 Oct 16

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 1

174.9 1987 Oct 19

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 1

174.1 1987 Oct 21

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 1

174.11 1987 Oct 23

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 2

174.12 1987 Oct 26

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 2

174.13 1987 Oct 28

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)

Scope and Content Note

Herbert Wilf, guest lecturer
Box 2

174.14 1987 Oct 30

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 2

174.15 1987 Nov 2

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 2

174.16 1987 Nov 4

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 2

174.17 1987 Nov 6

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 2

174.18 1987 Nov 9

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 2

174.19 1987 Nov 11

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 2

174.2 1987 Nov 13

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 2

174.21 1987 Nov 16

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 2

174.22 1987 Nov 18

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)

Scope and Content Note

Jeff Ullman, guest lecturer
Box 3

174.23 1987 Nov 20

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)

Scope and Content Note

Leslie Lamport, guest lecturer
Box 3

174.24 1987 Nov 23

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)

Scope and Content Note

Nils Nilsson, guest lecturer
Box 3

174.25 1987 Nov 25

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)

Scope and Content Note

Mary-Claire van Leunen, guest lecturer
Box 3

174.26 1987 Nov 30

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 3

174.27 1987 Dec 2

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)

Scope and Content Note

Mary-Claire van Leunen, guest lecturer
Box 3

174.28 1987 Dec 4

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 3

174.29 1987 Dec 7

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)

Scope and Content Note

Rosalie Stemer, guest lecturer
Box 3

174.3 1987 Dec 9

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)

Scope and Content Note

Paul Halmos, guest lecturer
Box 3

174.31 1987 Dec 11

Physical Description: videotape (VHS)
Box 1

Accession ARCH-1999-102 Burroughs Corporation. Lectures on Software Design by Donald E. Knuth (photocopy), along with a computer printout: Q & D Version of Classroom Assembly Program 1964 Fall

Burroughs Corporation. Lectures on Software Design by Donald E. Knuth (photocopy), along with a computer printout: Q & D Version of Classroom Assembly Program, 1964 Fall

 

Accession ARCH-2001-078 Additional Material

Scope and Content Note

Correspondence, drafts, galleys, and other materials pertaining to the following publications: Selected Papers in Computer Science, Digital Typography, Analysis of Algorithms, and MMIXware.
 

Selected Papers in Computer Science

Box 1, Folder 1 (CS1)

Correspondence 1995-2000

 

Digital Typography

Box 1, Folder 2 (DT1)

Correspondence, 1994-2000

Box 1, Folder 3 (DT2)

Chapter 1: Digital Typography – drafts

Box 1, Folder 4 (DT 3)

Chapter 2: Mathematical Typography – galleys and draft of addendum

Box 1, Folder 5 (DT4)

Chapter 3: Breaking Paragraphs into Lines – galleys

Box 1, Folder 6 (DT5)

Chapter 4: Mixing Right-to-Left Texts with Left-To-Right Texts – galleys and proofs of illustrations

Box 1, Folder 7 (DT6)

Chapter 5: Recipes and Fractions – galleys and proofs of a "holly" font not used

Box 1, Folder 8 (DT7)

Chapter 6: The TeX Logo in Various Fonts – galleys

Box 1, Folder 9 (DT8)

Chapter 7: Printing Out Selected Pages – galleys and draft of addendum

Box 1, Folder 10 (DT9)

Chapter 8: Macros for Jill – galleys

Box 1, Folder 11 (DT10)

Chapter 9: Problem for a Saturday Morning – galleys

Box 1, Folder 12 (DT11)

Chapter 10: Exercises for TeX: The program – galleys

Box 1, Folder 13 (DT12)

Chapter 11: Mini-Indexes for Literate Programs – galleys

Box 1, Folder 14 (DT13)

Chapter 12: Virtual Fonts – galleys

Box 1, Folder 15 (DT14)

Chapter 13: The Letter S – galleys and draft of addendum

Box 1, Folder 16 (DT15)

Chapter 14: My First Experience with Indian Scripts – galleys and initial proof of Figure 1

Box 1, Folder 17 (DT16)

Chapter 15: The Concept of a Meta-Font – galleys and initial proofs of two fonts

Box 1, Folder 18 (DT17)

Chapter 16: Lessons Learned from METAFONT – galleys

Box 1, Folder 19 (DT18)

Chapter 17: AMS Euler – A New Typeface for Mathematics – galleys, proofs of illustrations, and first proof of the typeface sample

Box 1, Folder 20 (DT19)

Chapter 18: Typesetting Concrete Mathematics – galley proof

Box 1, Folder 21 (DT20)

Chapter 19: A Course on METAFONT Programming – galleys and first proofs of illustrations

Box 1, Folder 22 (DT21)

Chapter 20: A Punk Meta-Font – galleys

Box 1, Folder 23 (DT22)

Chapter 21: Fonts for Digital Halftones – galleys and some test pages supplied by the printer

Box 1, Folder 24 (DT23)

Chapter 22: Digital Halftones by Dot Diffusion – galleys

Box 1, Folder 25 (DT24)

Chapter 23: A Note on Digitized Angles – galleys

Box 1, Folder 26 (DT25)

Chapter 24: TEXDR.AFT – Knuth's trial proof dated 14 June 1998

Box 1, Folder 27 (DT26)

Chapter 25: TEX.ONE – Knuth's trial proof dated 14 June 1998

Box 1, Folder 28 (DT27)

Chapter 26: TeX Incunabula – galleys

Box 1, Folder 29 (DT28)

Chapter 27: Icons for TeX and METAFONT – galleys

Box 1, Folder 30 (DT29)

Chapter 28: Computers and Typesetting – galleys and draft of new material

Box 1, Folder 31 (DT30)

Chapter 29: The New Versions of TeX and METAFONT – galleys

Box 1, Folder 32 (DT31)

Chapter 30: The Future of TeX and METAFONT – galleys

Box 1, Folder 33 (DT32)

Chapter 31: Questions and Answers, I – galleys

Box 1, Folder 34 (DT33)

Chapter 32: Questions and Answers, II – galleys

Box 1, Folder 35 (DT34)

Chapter 33: Questions and Answers, III – galleys

Box 1, Folder 36 (DT35)

Working copy of the entire book: pp. vii-65

Box 1, Folder 37 (DT35)

Working copy of the entire book: pp. 67-155

Box 1, Folder 38 (DT35)

Working copy of the entire book: pp. 157-223

Box 1, Folder 39 (DT35)

Working copy of the entire book: pp. 225-313

Box 1, Folder 40 (DT35)

Working copy of the entire book: pp. 315-414

Box 1, Folder 41 (DT35)

Working copy of the entire book: pp. 415-545

Box 1, Folder 42 (DT35)

Working copy of the entire book: pp. 547-end

 

Analysis of Algorithms

Box 1, Folder 43 (AA1)

Correspondence, 1997-2000

Box 1, Folder 44 (AA2)

Preface

Box 1, Folder 45 (AA3)

Chapter 1: Mathematical Analysis of Algorithms – copy of original article, galleys, copy of a bibliographic item

Box 1, Folder 46 (AA4)

Chapter 2: The Dangers of Computer Science Theory – copy of original article, galleys

Box 1, Folder 47 (AA5)

Chapter 3: The Analysis of Algorithms - copy of original article, galleys

Box 1, Folder 48 (AA6)

Chapter 4: Big Omicron and Big Omega and Big Theta - copy of original article, galleys

Box 1, Folder 49 (AA7)

Chapter 5: Optimal Measurement Points for Program Frequency Counts - copy of original article, galleys

Box 1, Folder 50 (AA8)

Chapter 6: Estimating the Efficiency of Backtrack Programs – copy of letter to I. J. Good, 1975, copy of original article, galleys, proofs of new illustrations

Box 1, Folder 51 (AA9)

Chapter 7: Ordered Hash Tables – notes, copy of original article, galleys

Box 1, Folder 52 (AA10)

Chapter 8: Activity in an Interleaved Memory – copy of original article, galleys

Box 1, Folder 53 (AA11)

Chapter 9: An Analysis of Alpha-Beta Pruning – copy of relevant correspondence, copy of original article, galleys, first proofs of illustrations, draft of addendum

Box 1, Folder 54 (AA12)

Chapter 10: Notes on Generalized Dedekind Sums – notes, copy of original article, galleys

Box 1, Folder 55 (AA13)

Chapter 11: The Distribution of Continued Fraction Approximations – copy of original article, galleys

Box 1, Folder 56 (AA14)

Chapter 12: Evaluation of Porter's Constant – copy of original article, correspondence from John Wrench, galleys, draft of addendum

Box 1, Folder 57 (AA15)

Chapter 13: The Subtractive Algorithm for Greatest Common Divisors – copy of correspondence with co-author A. C. Yao, galleys, draft of addendum

Box 1, Folder 58 (AA16)

Chapter 14: Length of Strings for a Merge sort – copy of original article, galleys, draft of addendum

Box 1, Folder 59 (AA17)

Chapter 15: The Average Height of Planted Plane Trees – corrections, copy of original article, galleys, proofs of illustrations

Box 1, Folder 60 (AA18)

Chapter 16: The Toilet Paper Problem – copy of original article and one of its sequels, galleys, proofs of illustrations

Box 1, Folder 61 (AA19)

Chapter 17: An Analysis of Optimum Caching – letter from H. S. Wilf, copy of original and related articles, galleys

Box 1, Folder 62 (AA20)

Chapter 18: A Trivial Algorithm Whose Analysis Isn't – copies of related correspondence, copy of original article, galleys

Box 1, Folder 63 (AA21)

Chapter 19: Deletions That Preserve Randomness – copy of original article, galleys, references used in preparing addendum

Box 1, Folder 64 (AA22)

Chapter 20: Analysis of a Simple Factorization Algorithm – notes, copy of original article, galleys

Box 1, Folder 65 (AA23)

Chapter 21: The Expected Linearity of a Simple Equivalence Algorithm – notes, copy of original article, galleys, draft of addendum

Box 1, Folder 66 (AA24)

Chapter 22: Textbook Examples of Recursion – copies of related correspondence 1990-96, galleys, correspondence 2000 regarding error and its correction

Box 1, Folder 67 (AA25)

Chapter 23: An Exact Analysis of Stable Allocation – correspondence re the bibliography, galleys

Box 1, Folder 68 (AA26)

Chapter 24: Stable Husbands – galleys

Box 1, Folder 69 (AA27)

Chapter 25: Shellsort With Three Increments – copy of original article, galleys

Box 1, Folder 70 (AA28)

Chapter 26: The Average Time for Carry Propagation – copy of original article, galleys

Box 1, Folder 71 (AA29)

Chapter 27: Linear Probing and Graphs – related correspondence, copy of original article, galleys

Box 1, Folder 72 (AA30)

Chapter 28: A Terminological Proposal – copy of original article, galleys

Box 1, Folder 73 (AA31)

Chapter 29: Postscript about NP-Hard Problems – copy of original article, galleys

Box 1, Folder 74 (AA32)

Chapter 30: An Experiment in Optimal Sorting – copy of original article, galleys

Box 1, Folder 75 (AA33)

Chapter 31: Duality in Addition Chains – copy of original article, galleys

Box 1, Folder 76 (AA34)

Chapter 32: Complexity Results for Bandwidth Minimization – correspondence with co-author David Johnson, copy of original article, galleys, citations used in preparing the addendum

Box 1, Folder 77 (AA35)

Chapter 33: The Problem of Compatible Representatives – copy of original article, galleys

Box 1, Folder 78 (AA36)

Chapter 34: The Complexity of Nonuniform Random Number Generation – copy of original article, galleys, proofs of illustrations

Box 2, Folder 1 (AA37)

Working copy of the entire book: pp. vii-75

Box 2, Folder 2 (AA37)

Working copy of the entire book: pp. 77-148

Box 2, Folder 3 (AA37)

Working copy of the entire book: pp. 149-256

Box 2, Folder 4 (AA37)

Working copy of the entire book: pp. 257-390

Box 2, Folder 5 (AA37)

Working copy of the entire book: pp. 391-492

Box 2, Folder 6 (AA37)

Working copy of the entire book: pp. 493-end

 

MMIXware

Box 3, Folder 1

MMIX in 1991 and 1992 – first and second draft of the program, presentation letter to John Hennessy, and his comments

Box 3, Folder 2

MMIX-PIPE, 17 January 1999 – earliest printed draft with handwritten corrections

Box 3, Folder 3

MMIX-PIPE, 5 February 1999 – draft

Box 3, Folder 4

MMIX-PIPE, 16 February 1999 – draft with documentation of the MMIX hardware as it existed at the time

Box 3, Folder 5

MMIXware, 13 April 1999 – earliest surviving drafts of MMIX-ARITH and MMIX-SIM

Box 3, Folder 6

MMIXware, 19 April 199 – earliest surviving drafts of MMIX-IO and MNOtype with current versions of MMIX-SIM and the MMIX documentation

Box 3, Folder 7

Fascicle 1, 8 May 1999 – first galley proofs of new expository material for The Art of Computer Programming (section 1.3.1')

Box 3, Folder 8

Fascicle 1, 26 May 1999 – galley proofs, including section 1.3.2'

Box 3, Folder 9

Fascicle 1, 8 June 1999 – galley proofs, now including section 1.4.1'

Box 3, Folder 10

Fascicle 1, 21 June 1999 – galley proofs, including sections 1.4.2' and 1.4.3', and first draft of index and glossary

Box 3, Folder 11

Fascicle 1, 27 June 1999 – galley proofs of first complete "clean" version

Box 3, Folder 12

Fascicle 1, 23 August 1999 – Knuth's working reference copy

Box 3, Folder 13

CTWILL – text for CTWILL program (version 3.43) and companion programs REFSORT and TWINX

Box 3, Folder 14

MMIX-ARITH – proofmode output of program MMIX-ARITH dated 27 September 1999, with handwritten corrections, and book pages dated 2 October 1999

Box 3, Folder 15

MMIX-CONFIG – proofmode and book pages

Box 3, Folder 16

MMIX-PIPE – proofmode and book pages

Box 3, Folder 17

MMIX-SIM – proofmode and book pages

Box 3, Folder 18

MMIXAL – proofmode and book pages

Box 3, Folder 19

MMIX – proofmode and book pages

Box 3, Folder 20

MMIXware front matter and short chapters

Box 3, Folder 21

MMIXware correspondence with publisher Springer-Verlag, 1998-99

Box 3, Folder 22

The Joy of TeX, A Gourmet Guide to Typesetting Technical Text by Computer by Michael Spivak, Ph.D. [with annotations] 1980

 

Accession ARCH-2001-235 Materials from Things a Computer Scientist Rarely Talks About 1998-2001

Materials from Things a Computer Scientist Rarely Talks About, 1998-2001

Scope and Content Note

This accession pertains to the lecture series on the general topic of faith and science delivered at MIT in the fall of 1999, which resulted in the book Things a Computer Scientist Rarely Talks About . Included are correspondence, notes, transcripts of the taped lectures, drafts, and illustrations.
"Materials from a unique episode in my life, when I was asked to give a series of six public lectures at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the general topic of faith and science. The lectures, delivered in the fall of 1999, were broadcast live on the Internet, and I'm told that tens of thousands of people watched them. Each 90-minute lecture consisted of a prepared talk followed by an impromptu question-and-answer session, with about 45 minutes devoted to each portion. Transcripts were made from the videotapes and I edited then during the summer of 2000, adding notes and references to the literature. They were published in 2001 by Stanford's Center for the Study of Linguistics and Information (CSLI), with the title "Things a Computer Scientist Rarely Talks About"--which was also the general title of the lectures when I gave them originally. A complete archive of that book appears here."
Box 1, Folder 1

Correspondence regarding lectures, including email announcements of the lectures and some of the typical feedback 1998-1999

Scope and Content Note

Includes the original letters of invitation, letters about practical details of moving to Massachusetts, email announcenents of the lectures themselves, and some of the typical feedback received from the audience.
Box 1, Folder 2

Lecture 1: Introduction– notes and brochure 1999 Oct 6

Scope and Content Note

The page of handwritten notes I used while preparing the first lecture, fol1owed by the notes I used during the Lecture itself. Also the widely distributed brochure that had been used to announce the series.
Box 1, Folder 3

Lecture 2: Randomization and Religion-notes 1999 Oct 13

Scope and Content Note

The notes I used to prepare and deliver the second lecture.
Box 1, Folder 4

Lecture 3: Language Translation– notes and overhead transparencies 1999 Oct 27

Scope and Content Note

The notes I used to prepare and deliver tbe third lecture, together with overhead transparencies used to illustrate it. (Included are several dozen additlonal transparencies that I had made just in case they night be needed when I was answering questions from the audience.)
Box 1, Folder 5

Lecture 4: Aesthetics– notes 1999 Nov 3

Scope and Content Note

The notes I used to prepare and deliver the fourth lecture. This lecture was illustrated by 35mm slides, see Folder 17 below.
Box 1, Folder 6

Lecture 5: Glimpses of God – notes and copy of Raymond Smullyan's story "Planet without Laughter," statistics about "key verses" of the Bible, and an email from Douglas Hofstadter re "laughter yoga" 1999 Dec 1

Scope and Content Note

The notes I used to prepare and deliver the fifth lecture. Also includes a xerox copy of Raymoud Smullyan's short story "Planet Without Laughter"; statistics about so-called "key verses" of the Bible and some materials collected subsequent to the lecture: an obituary of Raymond E. Brown; email from Douglas Hofstadter re "laughter yoga"; and an excerpt fron George Buttrick's lectures on Biblical Thougbt and the Secular University.
Box 1, Folder 7

Lecture 6: God and Computer Science – notes and relevant sources 1999 Dec 8

Scope and Content Note

The notes I used to prepare ald deliver the sixth lecture, including several magazine articles and other relevant materials found on the Internet (e.g., Einstein's renarks on Science, Philosophy and Rellgion).
Box 1, Folder 8

Panel discussion: Creativity, Spirituality, and Computer Science, 17 – notes 1999 Nov

Scope and Content Note

The single page of notes I used during that session.
Box 1, Folder 9

Raw transcripts (from videotapes of the lectures)

Scope and Content Note

The videotapes of all six lectures and the panel discussion were transcribed by staff members of Dr. Dobb's Journal, the company that did the webcasts. These transcriptions, though riddled with errors, provided a good basis fron which I could attempt to recreate the feeling of the original lectures (while watching the videotapes several times myself).
Box 1, Folder 10

Half-baked transcripts

Scope and Content Note

This is how the transcripts looked after I had converted them to simple ASCII text format and inserted time coordinates to correlate them with the videotapes. My editing of the lectures essentially began here.
Box 1, Folder 11

Illustrations – includes original proofs of TV frames, poster illustration, and 35mm slides; and first proofs after conversion to black-and-white

Scope and Content Note

One of the interesting tasks I faced was to convert videotape frames to illustrations that could be used in the book. The quality of video data is insufficient for large pictures, so I decided to render each image at the largest size that would retain reasonably sharp details. This limited me to slightly nore than 1 inch in each dimension, so it strongly affected the design of the book. The original pictures shown here in black and white were actually in color when viewed by computer, but color did not add anything important. Indeed, when I edited the pictures later, converting then to black and white, the lack of color made it possible for me to enhance nany details that would have looked strange if I had distorted the colors in a similar fashion.
This folder contains: Original proofs of captured TV frames; An experinent with TV frames printed in color (fron the paael discussion); 0riginal proofs of the Poster illustration (scanned in parts); Original proofs of inages taken from 35mm slides; First proofs after conversion to black-and-white.
Box 1, Folder 12

First drafts for lectures 1-6

Scope and Content Note

The result after initial editing of the "haIf-baked transcripts", showing many handwritten editorial changes and the places where illustrations are to be inserted. (These drafts cover Lectures 1-6 on1y. The first draft of the panel discussion was emailed to other panelists on 15 April 2000; see folder 16 below.)
Box 2, Folder 1

Second drafts, with illustrations

Scope and Content Note

The result after inserting all illustrations (ear1y July 2000); this was shown to several readers asking for comments.
Box 2, Folder 2

Comments from the copy editors

Scope and Content Note

After a few changes to the drafts in Box 2, Folder 1, the copy editors made numerous further suggestions.
Box 2, Folder 3

Near-final copy

Scope and Content Note

Most of the copy editors, suggestions, and further corrections noticed on rereading, 1ed to these pages, which were used to prepare the index.
Box 2, Folder 4

Correspondence re publication 2000-2001

Scope and Content Note

The bumpy road to publication of a complex book such as this is well documented by this sequence of more than 100 letters.
 

slides used in lecture 4

Physical Description: 48 computer file(s) (PCD)

Scope and Content Note

The 35mm slides used in Lecture 4, converted to digital form, appear on this conpact disk in several sizes.
Box 2, Folder 6

Hand-bound proof [missing lecture 5, pages 138-166] April 2001

Scope and Content Note

A xerox-copy mockup of the book, several copies of which were sent to potential reviewers. Also contains a few last-minute changes, especially to the index.
 

Accession ARCH-2004-044 Additional Material

 

Selected Papers on Computer Languages

Box 1, Folder 1

CL1, Chapter 1: The Early Development of Programming Languages

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; correspondence and additional references used to prepare the addendum; marked galleys; edited version
Box 1, Folder 2

CL 2, Chapter 2: Backus Normal Form versus Backus Naur Form

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; edited version
Box 1, Folder 3

CL3, Chapter 3: Teaching ALGOL 60

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 1, Folder 4

CL4, Chapter 4: ALGOL 60 confidential

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 1, Folder 5

CL5, Chapter 5: SMALGOL-61

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 1, Folder 6

CL6, Chapter 6: Man or Boy?

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 1, Folder 7

CL7, Chapter 7: A Proposal for Input-Output Conventions in ALGOL 60

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; subsequent correspondence; marked galleys; edited version
Box 1, Folder 8

CL8, Chapter 8: The Remaining Trouble Spots in ALGOL 60

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; correspondence; marked galleys; edited version
Box 1, Folder 9

CL 9, Chapter 9: SOL – A Symbolic Language for Systems Simulation

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 1, Folder 10

CL10, Chapter 10: A Formal Definition of SOL

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 1, Folder 11

CH11, Chapter 11: The Science of Programming Languages

Scope and Content Note

Copy of old manuscript notes; manuscripts for newly added material, including computer programs to check the examples; edited version
Box 2, Folder 1

CL12, Chapter 12: Programming Languages for Automata

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 2, Folder 2

CL13, Chapter 13: A Characterization of Parenthesis Languages

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 2, Folder 3

CL14, Chapter 14: Top-Down Syntax Analysis

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 2, Folder 4

CL15, Chapter 15: On the Translation of Languages from Left to Right

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 2, Folder 5

CL16, Chapter 16: Context-Free Multilanguages

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 2, Folder 6

CL17, Chapter 17: Semantics of Context-Free Languages

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article and errata; marked galleys; edited version
Box 2, Folder 7

CL18, Chapter 18: Examples of Formal Semantics

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 2, Folder 8

CL19, Chapter 19: The Genesis of Attribute Grammars

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 2, Folder 9

CL20, Chapter 20: A History of Writing Compilers

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; errata; marked galleys; edited version
Box 2, Folder 10

CL21, Chapter 21: RUNCIBLE – Algebraic Translation on a Limited Computer

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; worksheets to make the illustrations; marked galleys; manuscript for supplementary material; edited version
Box 2, Folder 11

CL22, Chapter 22: Computer-Drawn Flowcharts

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 3, Folder 1

CL23, Chapter 23: Notes on Avoiding ‘go to’ Statements

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; errata and correspondence; marked galleys; edited version
Box 3, Folder 2

CL24, Chapter 24: An Empirical Study of FORTRAN Programs

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 3, Folder 3

CL25, Chapter 25: Efficient Coroutine Generation

Scope and Content Note

Edited version (This article was composed for a festscrift publication that actually didn’t appear until 2004.)
Box 3, Folder 4

CL26, Miscellaneous scraps:

Scope and Content Note

Proof of frontispiece; first draft of the index; correspondence re index
Box 3, Folder 5

CL27, First printout of entire book, chapters 1-8

Box 3, Folder 6

CL27, First printout of entire book, chapters 9-14

Box 3, Folder 7

CL27, First printout of entire book, chapters 15-21

Box 3, Folder 8

CL27, First printout of entire book, chapters 22-end

 

Selected Papers on Discrete Mathematics

Box 4, Folder 1

DM01, Chapter 1: Combinatorial Analysis and Computer

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 4, Folder 2

DM02, Chapter 2: Two Notes on Notation

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; correspondence; marked galleys; edited version
Box 4, Folder 3

DM03, Chapter 3: Bracket Notation for the ‘Coefficient of’ Operator

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; correspondence; marked galleys; edited version
Box 4, Folder 4

DM04, Chapter 4: Johann Faulhaber and Sums of Powers

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; correspondence; marked galleys; edited version
Box 4, Folder 5

DM05, Chapter 5: Notes on Thomas Harriot

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 4, Folder 6

DM06, Chapter 6: A Permanent Inequality

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 4, Folder 7

DM07, Chapter 7: Overlapping Pfaffians

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original electronic publication; marked galleys; edited version
Box 4, Folder 8

DM08, Chapter 8: The Sandwich Theorem

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original electronic publication; correspondence; marked galleys; edited version
Box 4, Folder 9

DM09, Chapter 9: Combinatorial Matrices

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original electronic preprint; correspondence; marked galleys; edited version
Box 4, Folder 10

DM10, Chapter: Aztec Diamonds, Checkerboard Graphs, Spanning Trees

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; correspondence; marked galleys; edited version
Box 4, Folder 11

DM11, Chapter: Partitioned Tensor Products and Their Spectra

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 4, Folder 12

DM12, Chapter: Oriented Subtrees of an Arc Digraph

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 5, Folder 1

DM13, Chapter 13: Another Enumeration of Trees

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 5, Folder 2

DM14, Chapter 14: Abel Identities and Inverse Relations

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 5, Folder 3

DM15, Chapter 15: Convolution Polynomials

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; correspondence; marked galleys; edited version
Box 5, Folder 4

DM16, Chapter 16: Polynomials Involving the Floor Function

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; correspondence; marked galleys; edited version
Box 5, Folder 5

DM17, Chapter 17: Construction of a Random Sequence

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 5, Folder 6

DM18, Chapter 18: An Imaginary Number System

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article and errata; marked galleys; edited version
Box 5, Folder 7

DM19, Chapter 19: Tables of Finite Fields

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 5, Folder 8

DM20, Chapter 20: Finite Semifields and Projective Planes

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 5, Folder 9

DM21, Chapter 21: A Class of Projective Planes

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; correspondence; marked galleys; edited version
Box 5, Folder 10

DM22, Chapter 22: Notes on Central Groupoids

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; correspondence; computer programs and articles used for supplementary material; marked galleys; edited version
Box 5, Folder 11

DM23, Chapter 23: Huffman’s Algorithm via Algebra

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 5, Folder 12

DM24, Chapter 24: Wheels Within Wheels

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 5, Folder 13

DM25, Chapter 25: Complements and Transitive Closures

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; correspondence; marked galleys; edited version
Box 5, Folder 14

DM26, Chapter 26: Random Matroids

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; correspondence; computer programs used to check examples; marked galleys; edited version
Box 6, Folder 1

DM27, Chapter 27: The Asymptotic Number of Geometries

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 6, Folder 2

DM28, Chapter 28: Permutations with Nonnegative Partial Sums

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 6, Folder 3

DM29, Chapter 29: Efficient Balanced Codes

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; reprint of paper used to prepare addendum; marked galleys; edited version
Box 6, Folder 4

DM30, Chapter 30: The Knowlton\with Graham Partition Problem

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 6, Folder 5

DM31, Chapter 31: Permutations, Matrices, Generalized Young Tableaux

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 6, Folder 6

DM32, Chapter 32: Enumeration of Plane Partitions

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; correspondence; marked galleys; edited version
Box 6, Folder 7

DM33, Chapter 33: A Note on Solid Partitions

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; computer program used to check the algorithm; marked galleys; edited version
Box 6, Folder 8

DM34, Chapter 34: Identities from Partition Involutions

Scope and Content Note

Correspondence; computer program; marked galleys; edited version
Box 6, Folder 9

DM35, Chapter 35: Subspaces, Subsets, and Partitions

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 6, Folder 10

DM36, Chapter 36: The Power of a Prime...

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 6, Folder 11

DM37, Chapter 37: An Almost Linear Recurrence

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; edited version
Box 6, Folder 12

DM38, Chapter 38: Recurrence Relations Based on Minimization

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; reprint of related article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 6, Folder 13

DM39, Chapter 39: A Recurrence Related to Trees

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 6, Folder 14

DM4, Chapter 40: The First Cycles in an Evolving Graph

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; marked galleys; edited version
Box 7, Folder 1

DM41, Chapter 41: The Birth of the Giant Component

Scope and Content Note

Copy of original article; correspondence;; computer programs and results used to correct the originally reported data; marked galleys; edited version
Box 7, Folder 2

DM42, Miscellaneous scraps

Scope and Content Note

List of chapters and number of errors caught by spell-checker; proofs of some illustrations; list of names to complete for the index; first draft of the index
Box 8

DM43, First Printout of Entire Book

 

Accession ARCH 2011-200 Additional Material 1977-2010

 

Selected papers

Scope and Content Note

Materials accumulated while preparing the final three volumes of the series of Knuth's technical papers, namely Selected Papers on Design of Algorithms (published in 2009) Selected Papers on Fun and Games (published in 2010) Companion to the Papers of Donald Knuth (to be published in January 2011)
Also included are relevant letters written back and forth since 2003, relating not only to the creation of the final three volumes but also to reprints of the first six, and translations into other languages.
Box 1, Folder 1

DA02: The Bose--Nelson Sorting Problem P55

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs; test of illustrations
Box 1, Folder 2

DA03: A One-Way, Stackless Quicksort Algorithm P115

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 3

DA04: Optimum Binary Search Trees P41

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 4

DA05: Dynamic Huffman Coding P103

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 5

DA06: Inhomogeneous Sorting P92

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 6

DA07: Lexicographic Permutations with Restrictions P93

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 7

DA08: Nested Satisfiability P134

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 8

DA09: Fast Pattern Matching in Strings P71

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 9

DA10: Addition Machines P126

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 10

DA11: A Simple Program Whose Proof Isn't P133

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 11

DA12: Verification of Link-Level Protocols P99

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 12

DA13: A Problem in Concurrent Programming Control Q17

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 13

DA14: Optimal Prepaging and Font Caching P105

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 14

DA15: A Generalization of Dijkstra's Algorithm P85

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 15

DA16: Two-Way Rounding P145

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 16

DA17: Matroid Partitioning R28

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original tech report; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 17

DA18: Irredundant Intervals P151

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; copies of correspondence; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 18

DA19: Simple Word Problems in Universal Algebras P34

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 19

DA20: Efficient Representation of Perm Groups P123

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 20

DA21: An Algorithm for Brownian Zeros P107

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 21

DA22: Semi-Optimal Bases for Linear Dependencies P113

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 22

DA23: Evading the Drift in Floating-Point Addition P73

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 23

DA24: Deciphering a Linear Congruential Encryption P97

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 24

DA25: Computation of Tangent, Euler, and Bernoulli Numbers P27

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 25

DA26: Euler's Constant to 1271 Places P8

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 26

DA27: Evaluation of Polynomials by Computer P9

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 27

DA28: Minimizing Drum Latency Time P5

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original article; marked proofs; appendix on modern solution
Box 1, Folder 28

DA29: first draft of entire book, used to make the index

Box 1, Folder 29

DA30: results of proofreading

Box 1, Folder 30

FG00: Front matter

Scope and Content Note

 early outline and notes; early drafts
Box 1, Folder 31

FG01: The Potrzebie System of Weights and Measures P1

Scope and Content Note

 marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 32

FG02: Official Tables of the Potrzebie System 10p

Box 1, Folder 33

FG03: The Revolutionary Potrzebie R4a

Scope and Content Note

 marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 34

FG04: A {\mc MAD} Crossword 4p

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original editorial correspondence from 1960; marked proofs and trials
Box 1, Folder 35

FG06: The Complexity of Songs Q48

Scope and Content Note

 marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 36

FG07: TPK in {\mc INTERCAL} 18p

Scope and Content Note

 early draft notes; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 37

FG08: Math Ace: The Plot Thickens R4cd

Scope and Content Note

 marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 38

FG09: Billiard Balls in an Equilateral Triangle P14

Scope and Content Note

 marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 39

FG10: Representing Numbers Using Only One 4 P18

Scope and Content Note

 marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 40

FG11: Very Magic Squares P31

Scope and Content Note

 marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 41

FG12: The Gamow--Stern Elevator Problem P35

Scope and Content Note

 marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 42

FG13: Fibonacci Multiplication P117

Scope and Content Note

 marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 43

FG14: A Fibonacci-Like Sequence of Composite Numbers P119

Scope and Content Note

 marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 44

FG15: Transcendental Numbers Based on the Fibonacci Sequence P13

Scope and Content Note

 marked proofs; copy of recent research cited in addendum
Box 1, Folder 45

FG16: Supernatural Numbers P95

Scope and Content Note

 marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 46

FG17: Mathematical Vanity Plates Q210

Scope and Content Note

 proofs of illustrations; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 47

FG18: Diamond Signs 18p

Scope and Content Note

 proofs of illustrations; handwritten drafts; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 48

FG19: The Orchestra Song 6p

Scope and Content Note

 first proofs of music setting with METAPOST; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 49

FG20: Gnebbishland 4p

Scope and Content Note

 handwritten MS; web research on nebbishes; correspondence; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 50

FG21: A Carol for Advent 3p

Scope and Content Note

 original music and lyrics sent out Christmas 2001; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 51

FG22: Randomness in Music 6p

Scope and Content Note

 proofs of illustrations; library search re Strindberg; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 52

FG23: Basketball's Electronic Coach 10p

Scope and Content Note

 original notes; marked proofs; correspondence about players' names
Box 1, Folder 53

FG24: The Triel: A New Solution P58

Scope and Content Note

 marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 54

FG25: The Computer as Master Mind P81

Scope and Content Note

 marked proofs; correspondence re early sets and new results
Box 1, Folder 55

FG26: Move It Or Lose It Q223

Scope and Content Note

 copy of original letter to Martin Gardner; marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 56

FG27.1: Adventure 160p

Scope and Content Note

 original CTWILLed program before converting to book pages
Box 1, Folder 57

FG27.2: Adventure 160p

Scope and Content Note

 early proofs of cave map; first version of the program in book-page format
Box 1, Folder 58

FG27.3: Adventure 160p

Scope and Content Note

 marked proofs of May 2010
Box 1, Folder 59

FG28: Ziegler's Giant Bar 6p

Scope and Content Note

 tests of illustrations; marked proofs; correspondence re Milwaukee TV etc; material from the dictionary I used in 1952; copies of news clippings
Box 1, Folder 60

FG29: The Chemical Caper R4b

Scope and Content Note

 marked proofs; info about original names of newly discovered elements
Box 1, Folder 61

FG31: Disappearances Q54

Scope and Content Note

 marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 62

FG32: Lewis~Carroll's word--ward--ware--dare--dame--game Q51

Scope and Content Note

 marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 63

FG34: Biblical Ladders Q172

Scope and Content Note

 marked proofs
Box 1, Folder 64

FG36: {\it Quadrata Obscura\/} (Hidden Latin Squares) Q224

Scope and Content Note

 words tests done while composing this puzzle
Box 1, Folder 65

FG38: Dancing Links P159

Scope and Content Note

 marked proofs, before and after major changes
Box 1, Folder 66

FG40: Uncrossed Knight's Tours Q23

Scope and Content Note

 samples of marked proofs and illustration tests as I was writing this chapter
Box 1, Folder 67

FG41: Celtic Knight's Tours 21p

Scope and Content Note

 samples of marked proofs and illustration tests as I was writing this chapter
Box 2, Folder 1

FG42: Long and Skinny Knight's Tours 29p

Scope and Content Note

 handwritten MS; marked proofs
Box 2, Folder 2

FG43: Leaper Graphs P147

Scope and Content Note

 marked proofs, before and after major changes
Box 2, Folder 3

FG44: Number Representations and Dragon Curves P37

Scope and Content Note

index to files re dragon curves; tests of illustrations;  marked proofs, before and after major changes
Box 2, Folder 4

FG45: Mathematics and Art: The Dragon Curve in Ceramic Tile P59

Scope and Content Note

 tests of illustrations; marked proofs
Box 2, Folder 5

FG46: Christmas Cards 34p

Scope and Content Note

 samples of proof pages and other tests as I was writing this chapter
Box 2, Folder 6

FG47: Geek Art 48p

Scope and Content Note

 samples of proof pages and other tests as I was writing this chapter
Box 2, Folder 7

FG49: An Earthshaking Announcement Q227

Scope and Content Note

 handwritten MS, test illustrations, marked proofs, correspondence
Box 2, Folder 8

FG50: index

Scope and Content Note

 ideas for the index (noted while writing the material); first draft pages
Box 2, Folder 9

FG51: early copy of many chapters, used to index them

Scope and Content Note

(before the final order of chapters was decided, and before many of the chapters were written) [I brought these with me to work on in odd moments, during a long trip East]
Box 2, Folder 10

FG52: first copy of the entire book, sent to proofreading team

Scope and Content Note

 (and also used to index several chapters)
Box 2, Folder 11

FG53: feedback from the proofreaders

Box 2, Folder 12

CP00: miscellaneous notes and trial pages saved while making the CPbook

Box 2, Folder 13

CP01: rough transcriptions of the taped luncheon conversations between Dikran Karagueuzian and Don Knuth in 1996 (these became Chapters 7--17)

Box 2, Folder 14

CP02: first working copy of the entire CPbook as sent to proofreaders

Box 2, Folder 15

CP03: extensive files of correspondence relating to all nine volumes of the series

Scope and Content Note

a few of these are from the 1990s, but the vast majority are from the period 2004--2011
 

The Art of Computer Programming

Scope and Content Note

Volume 4A of The Art of Computer Programming was published in January 2011; it represents the culmination of a project that Knuth had begun to write in 1973, when the first edition of Volume 3 was completed. More precisely, Volume 4A represents the "first part of the culmination" of this project, because it's only the first part of a "Volume 4", Combinatorial Algorithms.
Table of contents of Volume 4A:
  • 7. Introduction to combinatorial searching
  • 7.1. Zeros and ones
  • 7.1.1. Boolean basics
  • 7.1.2. Boolean evaluation
  • 7.1.3. Bitwise tricks and techniques
  • 7.1.4. Binary decision diagrams
  • 7.2. Generating all possibilities
  • 7.2.1. Generating basic combinatorial patterns
  • 7.2.1.1. Generating all $n$-tuples
  • 7.2.1.2. Generating all permutations
  • 7.2.1.3. Generating all combinations
  • 7.2.1.4. Generating all partitions
  • 7.2.1.5. Generating all set partitions
  • 7.2.1.6. Generating all treesv
  • 7.2.1.7. History and further references

Biography/Organization History

Background notes from Knuth:
I began to collect material already in 1962, but began to work on Volume 4 in earnest in 1973, while visiting the University of Oslo on leave of absence from Stanford. For many years I made scribbled notes and continued to follow the literature as new techniques were discovered. However, I also took time out for other projects (notably typography) and other books (notably Concrete Mathematics and 3:16); then I spent a few years bringing Volumes 1--3 up to date in the 1990s. During 1999 I prepared "Volume 1 Fascicle 1", a paperback booklet about the MMIX computer; MMIX is a new computer intended for use in Volume 4 as well as in future editions of Volumes 1, 2, and 3. (All archives for that fascicle are included in the "MMIX archives" that were donated to Stanford in 2001, except that I recently found a few additional page proofs that I've included here.)
I began to write the final copy of Volume 4A in the spring of 2001, in longhand as usual. My diary shows that I began to enter it into the computer on 22 July 2001: "happiness as I resume typing Volume 4 for the first time since 1977". (I had spent four months at the beginning of 1977 preparing what I thought would be Section 7.1; it was an 83-page typewritten manuscript, plus 22 pages of answers to exercises. About 100 copies were made and circulated at that time to interested computer scientists in various universities. The original of that MS is included below. Fate was, however, to intervene, because 1977 was the year that I realized I should drop everything else and work "temporarily" on typography. The TeX project began in the spring of that year and ran for roughly ten years.)
In 2001 I actually began to work on Section 7.2.1.1, because I wasn't ready yet to write the opening parts of Chapter 7 (and Volume 4). I needed to flesh out the "middle" of the volume first, so that I'd have a better idea of what tone ought to be set in the opening pages. I continued with the next subsections, 7.2.1.2 through 7.2.1.7, which took several years because they cover a substantial amount of material. These drafts were first made available online as "prefascicles", beginning with prefascicle 2A --- which first went on the Web at 1am on 17 September 2001 [a few days after a somewhat more memorable event in the history of the USA]. Prefascicle 2B went online just before midnight on 31 December of that year.
In 2002 I posted prefascicle 2C at noon on 13 June, and began to work on prefascicle 2d. Those two were however subsequently renamed 3A and 3B; prefascicle 3B went online on 14 February 2004. The prefascicles became true "fascicles", printed in paperback by Addison-Wesley, in 2005 when Volume 4 Fascicle 2 and (later) Volume 4 Fascicle 3 were ready.
The same pattern was repeated as I continued to write: Prefascicles 4A and 4B went online in 2005, then Volume 4 Fascicle 4 was published in 2006. After finishing Section 7.2.1.7 I was ready to turn to the opening pages of the book; well, not quite: I began now with Section 7.1, still postponing the actual introductory pages. On 27 May 2005 I reread my draft of 7.1 from 1977 and made vague plans for reorganizing it substantially. By 30 May I had typed seven pages into the computer, and had accumulated a long list of things to look up in the library. (This was incidentally before Volume 4 Fascicle 3 was sent to the publisher in June of 2005.) I finished the first draft of Section 7.1.1 on 7 September 2005, and put it online as prefascicle 1B.
However, I was soon to learn that Section 7.1.1 should be followed by hundreds of pages of new material, because Sections 7.1.2 and 7.1.3 were growing like crazy. Fascicle 2 had already been published, but at least two fascicles' worth of copy would be needed to precede it! So I decided to create a Fascicle 0, to precede Fascicle 1; and prefascicle 1B was renamed prefascicle 0B. I finished Section 7.1.2 (prefascicle 0C) on 17 March 2006. [Incidentally I had undergone surgery for prostate cancer at the end of 2005, and had radiation therapy during the spring of 2006.] By the end of 2006 I was ready to release Section 7.1.3, aka prefascicle 1A.
I turned to the introductory material, prefascicle 0A, at the beginning of 2007, trying to be careful to make it "match" the end of Volume 3 without too much of a change in style even though the end of Volume 3 had been written some 35 years earlier. That prefascicle went public on 28 April 2007; Volume 4 Fascicle 0 was printed in paperback at the beginning of 2008.
The remaining piece of the puzzle was Section 7.1.4, which turned out to be extremely interesting material for which I needed to do extensive research. I had typed two sample exercises destined for prefascicle 1B into my home computer on 30 June 2007, and had finished the first three pages by 2 July, thinking that the whole section would amount to roughly 30 pages max. In fact, Section 7.1.4 wound up 80 pages long, with 267 exercises(!), plus almost 60 pages more for answers to those exercises; and I didn't finish prefascicle 1B until 8 September 2008. Addison-Wesley published Volume 4 Fascicle 1 in 2009.
The paperback fascicles went through several reprintings, and hundreds of readers sent comments. Much of this material had never before been published in book form, and in fact about a hundred of the exercises are original material that had never appeared before in any form. Therefore it was important to get extensive feedback from readers, and in this I was extremely fortunate. Finally at the end of 2010 I combined all the material from Fascicles 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 of Volume 4, added some appendices, and sent the completed manuscript to Addison-Wesley's production department (in the form of PostScript files) on 3 December 2010 --- curiously on the very same day that I submitted the final PostScript files for another just-completed book, Selected Papers on Fun and Games, to CSLI's production department at Stanford.
Box 3, Folder 1

Original typewritten manuscript of the opening pages of Volume 4

Scope and Content Note

[This MS was incidentally typed on a "historic" early IBM Selectric Typewriter, which is now in the collection of the Computer History Museum.]
Box 3, Folder 2

Changes to my working copy of Volume 1 Fascicle 1 (MMIX) Apr 2000- Jun 2002

Box 3, Folder 3

Section 7.2.1.1, the first hardcopy proofs of all pages,  1-Aug-2001

Box 3, Folder 4

Section 7.2.1.1, page proofs to make the index of prefascicle 2A,  4-Aug-2001

Box 3, Folder 5

Section 7.2.1.2, the first complete page proofs 8-Dec-2001

Box 3, Folder 6

Changes to my working copies of prefascicles 2A&2B summer 2001 - summer 2002

Box 3, Folder 7

Sections 7.2.1.1 and 7.2.1.2, drafts after November 2002

Box 3, Folder 8

Section 7.2.1.3, proof copy used to make index 11-Jun-2002

Box 3, Folder 9

Section 7.2.1.3, first copy (with subsequent corrections) 13-Jun-2002

Box 3, Folder 10

Section 7.2.1.3, version (with subsequent corrections) 29-Aug-2003

Box 3, Folder 11

Section 7.2.1.4, drafts 2001 Nov-2003 Nov

Box 3, Folder 12

Sections 7.2.1.4 and 7.2.1.5 10-Jan-2004

Box 3, Folder 13

Sections 7.2.1.4 and 7.2.1.5 (now called prefascicle 3B) 12-Jun-2004

Box 3, Folder 14

Section 7.2.1.6, early drafts Apr 2004 -- Jul 2004

Box 3, Folder 15

Section 7.2.1.7, my first printed copy 12-Oct-2004

Box 3, Folder 16

Section 7.2.1.7 as marked by Robin Wilson, given to me early 2005

Box 3, Folder 17

First draft of special copy for the paperback Fascicle 3 13-Jun-2005

Box 3, Folder 18

Sections 7.1.1 and 7.1.2, early drafts May 2005 -- Mar 2006

Box 3, Folder 19

Section 7.1.3, early drafts Dec 2006-Oct 2008

Box 3, Folder 20

Section 7 (introduction to whole chapter, early draft) 2007 Apr

Box 3, Folder 21

Robin Wilson's comments on Section 7 26-Jul-2007

Box 3, Folder 22

Section 7.1.4, early drafts Oct 2007-Nov 2008

Box 3, Folder 23

Miscellaneous notes and pages saved while writing Volume 4A; 2001-2010

Scope and Content Note

often shows tests of illustrations, or samples of computer program output, or sketches of ideas that didn't go into the main manuscript
 

Accession ARCH-2014-127 Teaching Material 1969-1989

 

Course materials

Box 1, Folder 1

Computer Science 144 Course Materials Master Compilation 1969

Box 1, Folder 2

Computer Science 144A Course Materials Winter 1977 1977

Box 1, Folder 3

Computer Sciecne 144B Course Materials Spring 1975 1975

Box 1, Folder 4

Computer Science 150 Course Materials Master Compilation 1970-1971

Box 2, Folder 1

Computer Sicence 155 Course Materials Master Compilation 1971-1975

Box 2, Folder 2

Computer Science 155 Course Materials Master Compilation 1976-1979

Box 2, Folder 3

Computer Science 255 Course Materials Master Compilation 1974-1978

Box 3, Folder 1

Computer Science 155 Course Materials Master Compilation 1980-1981

Box 3, Folder 2

Computer Science 155 Course Materials Master Compilation 1982-1984

Box 3, Folder 3

Computer Science 204 Course Materials Master Compilation 1975-1979

 

Handouts

Box 4, Folder 1

Computer Sicence 279 Spring '84 Profs. Chuck Bigelow, Donald Knuth & Richard Southall Handouts 1984

Box 4, Folder 2

Computer Sicence 204 Winter 85' Handouts 1985

Box 4, Folder 3

Computer Science 260 Autumn '86 Handouts 1986

Box 4, Folder 4

Computer Science 204 Autumn 82' Handouts 1982

Box 4, Folder 5

Computer Science 304 Winter '87 Handouts 1987

Box 4, Folder 6

Computer Science 349 Spring 87' Handouts 1987

Box 4, Folder 7

Computer Science 209 Autumn 87' Handouts 1987

Box 5, Folder 1

Computer Science 260 Autumn 88' Handouts 1988

Box 5, Folder 2

Computer Science 304 1989

Box 5, Folder 3

Computer Science 260 Autumn 89' Handouts 1989

 

Examinations

Box 6, Folder 1

Computer Science 144 Examinations Master Compilation 1969-1977

Box 6, Folder 2

Computer Science 155 Examinations Master Compilation 1971-1980

Box 6, Folder 3

Computer Science 255 Examinations Master Compilation 1974-1976

Box 6, Folder 4

Computer Science 150 Examinations Master Compilation 1974-1978

Box 6, Folder 5

Computer Science 144A Examinations Winter 1977 1977

Box 6, Folder 6

Computer Science 360 Examinnations Winter 1988 1988