Finding Aid for the Hei Sop Chin Archival Collection, 1906-1970

Processed by Hyung-ju Ahn and Eiichiro Azuma; machine-readable finding aid created by Caroline Cubé
© 2003
The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.

Finding Aid for the Hei Sop Chin Archival Collection, 1906-1970

Collection number: 367

UCLA Library Special Collections

UCLA Library Special Collections staff



Los Angeles, CA
Processed by:
Hyung-ju Ahn and Eiichiro Azuma
Revised by:
Jin na Choi and Octavio Olvera, May 2003
Encoded by:
Caroline Cubé
Online finding aid edited by:
Josh Fiala, October 2003
© 2003 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.

Descriptive Summary

Title: Hei Sop Chin Archival Collection,
Date (inclusive): 1906-1970
Collection number: 367
Creator: Chin, Hei Sop
Extent: 37 boxes (19 linear ft.) 5 oversize flat boxes
Repository: University of California, Los Angeles. Library Special Collections.
Los Angeles, California 90095-1575
Abstract: Hei Sop Chin (1905- ) was the editor of the World Literary Dictionary (1955), wrote the textbooks Korean reader (1958) and Fundamental Korean for English speaking people (1959), founded, edited, and published the news weekly Hanmi t'ongsin, or The Korean American news bulletin (1961-1965), was the head of the lithograph department at the University of Southern California Press, founded Johnny International men's clothing importing company (1970), and founded two corporations (1983), Harry and Sons, and Asia International to promote joint ventures and business development in China. The collection consists of materials related to the Korean independence movement in Hawaii and the mainland United States prior to 1945, organizational papers pertaining to Tongjihae, and documents pertaining to the United Korean Committee, Korean Interim Government and Assembly and the Korean Community Center in Los Angeles.
Physical location: Stored off-site at SRLF. Advance notice is required for access to the collection. Please contact the UCLA Library Special Collections Reference Desk for paging information.
Language: English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Use and Reproduction

Property rights to the physical object belong to the UCLA Library Special Collections. Literary rights, including copyright, are retained by the creators and their heirs. It is the responsibility of the researcher to determine who holds the copyright and pursue the copyright owner or his or her heir for permission to publish where The UC Regents do not hold the copyright.

Restrictions on Access

COLLECTION STORED OFF-SITE AT SRLF: Advance notice required for access.

Provenance/Source of Acquisition

Gift of Hei Sop Chin, 1997.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Hei Sop Chin Archival Collection (Collection 367). UCLA Library Special Collections, Charles E. Young Research Library.

UCLA Catalog Record ID

UCLA Catalog Record ID: 4232680 

Biography

Hei Sop Chin, or Harry Chin, was born in Jirin, China, his father having left Korea in 1905, after the Japanese takeover; came to Seoul when Korea was liberated in 1945; graduated with a degree in Korean language and literature from the College of Liberal Arts and Science at Seoul National University, 1954; attended graduate school there; was an editor of the World Literary Dictionary (1955); came to the U.S. and continued graduate school at the University of Southern California in comparative literature and Asiatic studies; became instructor at the Korean language school run by the Korean National Association; wrote the textbooks Korean reader (1958) and Fundamental Korean for English speaking people (1959); founded, edited, and published news weekly Hanmi t'ongsin, or The Korean American news bulletin, 1961-1965; in 1962 the Republic of Korea gave him an Official Commendation and Award for Excellent Achievement in Korean Culture; head of lithograph department, University of Southern California Press; instructor, Los Angeles City College, 1968-69; founded Johnny International men's clothing importing company in 1970, and in 1983 founded two corporations, Harry and Sons, and Asia International to promote joint ventures and business development in China; appointed by Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley to the Korea America Centennial Committee in 1982.

Biographical Narrative

Hei Sop Chin, or Harry Chin, was born in Jirin, China. His father emigrated there after Japan made itself suzerain of Korea in 1905. Hei Sop Chin came to Seoul when Korea was liberated in 1945.
From early on, Chin's literary talent was noticed by others. He received private tutoring from renowned essayists and literary critics. Having earned a scholarship, Chin attended the College of Liberal Arts and Science at Seoul iv ationai University. He was elected to the student council and was named editor of the Journal of the College of Liberal Arts and Science. He graduated with the degree in Korean language and literature in 1954. While he attended the graduate school of Seoul National University in subsequent years to continue his study in Korean culture, he was a teaching assistant and an editor of World Literary Dictionary (Seoul Minjung Publishing Company, 1955).
Hei Sop Chin then came to the United States to continue his graduate work at the University of Southern California. He chose to major in comparative literature and Asiatic Studies. He earned his California Junior College teaching credential and was an instructor at the Korean language school run by the Korean National Association. He wrote the textbooks Korean Reader, published in 1958, and Fundamental Korean for English Speaking People, published in 1959.
Chin was the founder, editor, and publisher of the weekly “Hanmi t'ongsin,” The Korean American News Bulletin]. This was his community service, for there was no Korean-language newspaper popular among Korean residents, many of whom were students who had arrived in America after World War II. He published this newspaper from 1961 to 1965.
Chin helped to get the Korean American community in Southern California recognized and respected by others. In 1962, the Republic of Korea gave him an Official Commendation and Award for Excellent Achievement in the Korean Culture. Also in 1962, Los Angeles Mayor Sam Yorty appointed him to be on the Permanent Host Committee for the Reception of International Visitors. Continuing his ties to the University of Southern California, Chin was appointed head of the lithograph department at USC Press. He also served as an instructor between 1968 and 1969 at Los Angeles City College.
In 1970, Chin established Johnny International Incorporated, a men's clothing importing company, in Los Angeles. He remained the president of the company until 1982, when he was appointed by Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley to the Korea America Centennial Committee to commemorate the one hundredth anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between Korea and the United States.
In 1983, Chin established two corporations--Harry and Sons, Incorporated, and Asia International, Limited, to promote the joint ventures and business development in China. To date, he has remained the president and chairman of both corporations.
Recognizing the importance of Korean American historical documents for future generations, Chin spent the last four decades gathering various primary materials. Scholars and students of Korean American studies are indebted to him for his collection and preservation of rare and important Korean American primary materials.
The Hei Sop Chin Archival Collection consists primarily of documents and correspondence files pertaining to the Korean independence movement in Hawaii and the mainland United States prior to 1945. The first group of documents consists of letters exchanged between Yang K. Kim and key Korean leaders in America following the March First Movement The files of incoming correspondence include: Syngman Rhee, Philip Jaisohn, and Henry Chung. These three men were members of the Korean Commission in Washington D.C. from 1919 to 1923.
These individuals were extremely important both in modern Korean history and Korean American history. With the encouragement of Philip Jaisohn, Young-gi Kim, who had attended a college in Ohio, went to Hawaii and became a community leader actively involved in the independence movement there. After Korea was liberated from Japan, he was later appointed South Korean ambassador to Italy. Syngman Rhee came to America in 1904 and became the first Korean Ph.D, and after the defeat of Japan, he became the first President of the Republic Korea. Philip Jaisohn entered the United States after a failing coup d'etat in Seoul in 1884. He became the first Korean medical doctor in America and then returned to Korea, where he organized the progressive Independence Club and published the first Korean newspaper in 1896. Henry Chung, the second Korean Ph.D, came to the United States in 1904 and published books and articles calling for Korea's independence from Japan.
The second group of documents consists of correspondence and cablegrams exchanged between the Korean Provisional Government in China and the Korean National Association offices in Hawaii and San Francisco from 1919 to 1945. There are also many rare documents in relation to the activities of the above organizations, including financial statements, receipts, public statements and announcements. The Korean National Association was established in 1909 through the consolidation of Korean organizations in the mainland United States, Hawaii, and Mexico. It became the de-facto Korean government in exile following Japan's annexation of Korea in 1910. By 1914, it had 120 local chapters in the United States, Hawaii, Mexico, Cuba, Manchuria, and Russia. The association laid the foundation for the Korean Provisional Government, which was established in Shanghai in 1919 after the mass demonstration for Korean independence that transpired in Seoul on March 1st and that resulted in the execution of hundreds of unarmed demonstrators by Japanese police and military. The demonstrators of this so-called March First Movement were inspired by American President Wilson's call for the self-determination of native peoples set forth in his Fourteen Point proposal for postwar peace.
The third group of the primary sources in this collection includes various organizational papers pertaining to Tongjihoe which was founded by Syngman Rhee and his allies in July 1921. This organization maintained a very conflictual relationship with the Korean National Association and its affiliates over the issue of authenticity in Korean immigrant society and independence movement, which resulted in a court battle in 1930-1931. The various publications of Tongjihoe, including magazines and newsletters are among the most important materials in this group. Researchers should note that there is a bundle of financial records related to the Korean Provisional Government's Savings Bond drive, which was carried out under the unauthorized leadership of Syngman Rhee.
The fourth group contains the documents pertaining to the activities of Korean immigrants during the wartime and postwar period in the United States amd Korea; The wartime papers are from the United Korean Committee which was the federation of Korean organizations in the mainland United States and Hawaii between 1941 and 1947. The postwar papers pertain to the Korean Interim Government and Assembly between 1945 and 1947. Materials related to the establishment of the Korean Community Center Incorporated, in Los Angeles during the 1960s are also available.
In this collection, there are also many Korean-immigrant newspapers and newsletters, as well as books, magazines and journals published in the mainland and Hawaii. Many of these materials are non-existent in other academic institutions and archives. For example, earlier issues of the Korean National Herald, or “Kungminbo” have not been available even in microfilms, while the Tansan Times, or “Tansan sibo” is a new discovery. Books and magazines are also considered to be very rare.
Finally, although not directly related to Korean American history, this collection has a large number of Korean-language books and magazines published in Korea before and after the Korean liberation. Many are about Korean literature, linguistics, and culture. There are also some English-language books in the same categories.

Scope and Content

Collection consists of materials related to the Korean independence movement in Hawaii and the mainland United States prior to 1945, including correspondence, documents, and various printed materials. Includes letters exchanged between Yang K. Kim and Korean Commission members Syngman Rhee, Philip Jaisohn, and Henry Chung; correspondence and cablegrams exchanged between the Korean Provisional Government in China and the Korean National Association offices in Hawaii and San Francisco; organizational papers pertaining to Tongjihae; documents pertaining to the United Korean Committee, Korean Interim Government and Assembly, and the Korean Community Center in Los Angeles; and the Korean-immigrant newspapers, The Korean National Herald ( Kungminbo) and Tansan Times ( Tansan sibo).
The majority of the collection is in Korean.

Organization and Arrangement

Arranged in the following series:
  1. Korean immigrant history materials (Boxes 1-9).
  2. Magazines and books published in Korea and China (Boxes 10-16).
  3. English-language books and magazines on Korea (Boxes 17-30).
  4. Reference materials (Boxes 31-37).
  5. Korean immigrant newspapers (Boxes 38-42).

Indexing Terms

The following terms have been used to index the description of this collection in the library's online public access catalog.
Chin, Hei Sop--Archives.
Korean Americans--California--Los Angeles--Archival resources.
Korea--Politics and government, 1910-1945--Archival resources.

Related Material

Korean-American Oral History Project (Collection 1414)  . Available at the UCLA Library Special Collections, Charles E. Young Research Library.

Container List

 

Young K. Kim Correspondence

Box 1, Folder 1

Letters from Syngman Rhee, May 1919-September 1930.

Physical Description: 21 items (11 letters in Korean).
Box 1, Folder 2

Letters from Philip Jaisohn, March 1919-May 1922.

Physical Description: 26 items.
Box 1, Folder 3

Letters from Henry Chung, December 1918-March 1922.

Physical Description: 9 items.
Box 1, Folder 4

Miscellaneous Incoming Letters, January 1919-March 1925.

Physical Description: 20 items.
Box 1, Folder 5

Outgoing Letters, August 1921-February 1925.

Physical Description: 16 items.
Box 1, Folder 6

Student Newsletters, ca. 1930s, 1950s.

Physical Description: 7 items.
Box 1, Folder 7

Student Writings.

Box 1, Folder 8

Rocky (no.7), 1936.

Physical Description: 1 issue.
Box 1, Folder 9

Newspaper Clippings.

Box 1, Folder 10

“Taedong tan'gyol minjung taehoe,” April-October 1960.

Box 1, Folder 11

Minutes, 1960.

Physical Description: 1 notebook.
Box 1, Folder 12

Korean Community Center Papers, 1962.

 

Correspondence & Documents

 

Korean Community Center Papers

Box 2, Folder 1

Financial Papers, 1960s.

Box 2, Folder 2

“Kosi: Notice,” August 1903.

Box 2, Folder 3

Stevens Incident Papers, 1908-1909.

Physical Description: 2 items.
Box 2, Folder 4

Scripts of Plays.

Physical Description: 3 items.
Box 2, Folder 5

Miscellaneous papers.

Box 2, Folder 6

“Imsi kyomindan kwan'gye pomnyongjip,” ca. 1920.

Box 2, Folder 7

Public Statements & Announcements, April 1919-January 1925.

Physical Description: 16 items.
Box 2, Folder 8

Cablegrams, March-December 1919.

Physical Description: 92 items.
Box 2, Folder 9

“Kumi wiwonbu t'ongsin,” June 1922-July 1925.

Physical Description: 17 items.
Box 2, Folder 10

“Kumi wiwonbu choejong pogo,” September 1926-October 1929.

Physical Description: 1 item.
Box 2, Folder 11

Korean Pamphlets, ca. 1920s.

Physical Description: 3 items.
Box 2, Folder 12

English Pamphlets and Reports.

Physical Description: 6 items.
 

Korean Provisional Government Papers

Box 3, Folder 1

“Hanmin,” July and October 1940.

Physical Description: 3 items.
Box 3, Folder 2

Miscellaneous Documents.

Box 3, Folder 3

Charters and Regulations, ca. 1920s-1930s.

Physical Description: 5 items.
Box 3, Folder 4

Financial Reports and Records, ca. 1919-1930.

Box 3, Folder 5

“Tongji pyolbo,” September-December 1930.

Physical Description: 3 items.
Box 3, Folder 6

“Kongdongbo,” December 1930-May 1931.

Physical Description: 20 items.
Box 3, Folder 7

Korean Pacific Weekly, December 1930-January 1933.

Physical Description: 18 issues.
 

Tongjihoe Papers

Box 4, Folder 1

Korean Pacific Magazine, July 1923-May 1930.

Physical Description: 5 issues.
Box 4, Folder 2

Public Statements and Announcements, 1930-1933.

Physical Description: 13 items.
Box 4, Folder 3

Public Statements and Announcements.

Physical Description: 12 items.
Box 4, Folder 4

Miscellaneous Documents, ca. 1918-1930s.

Box 4, Folder 5

Charters and Regulations, 1909-1950s.

Physical Description: 15 items.
Box 4, Folder 6

Financial Records and Reports.

Box 4, Folder 7

Receipts.

Physical Description: 7 items.
 

Korean National Association Papers

Box 5, Folder 1

Court Documents, ca. 1930-1931.

Box 5, Folder 2

Petitions, ca. 1930-1940s.

Physical Description: 4 items.
Box 5, Folder 3

Kong Go Suh, February-July 1918.

Physical Description: 35 items.
Box 5, Folder 4

Miscellaneous Statements & Announcements, ca. 1918.

Physical Description: 20 items.
Box 5, Folder 5

Miscellaneous Statements and Announcements, ca. 1925, 1930.

Physical Description: 7 items.
Box 5, Folder 6

Postwar Documents, 1945-1950s.

Box 5, Folder 7

Miscellaneous Documents.

Box 5, Folder 8

Letters to Korean Provisional Government, 1944.

Physical Description: 6 items.
Box 5, Folder 9

Letters to & from Branches, October 1942-November 1944.

Physical Description: 5 items.
Box 5, Folder 10

Outgoing Letters, June 1942-December 1944.

Physical Description: 15 items.
 

United Korean Committee Papers

Box 6, Folder 1

Incoming Letters, June 1942-January 1946.

Physical Description: 7 items.
Box 6, Folder 2

Cablegrams, January-December 1942.

Physical Description: 32 items.
Box 6, Folder 3

Cablegrams, January 1943.

Physical Description: 20 items.
Box 6, Folder 4

Cablegrams, August-November 1944.

Physical Description: 16 items.
Box 6, Folder 5

Cablegrams, 1942-1944.

Physical Description: 15 items.
Box 6, Folder 6

Cablegrams, October-November 1946.

Physical Description: 8 items.
Box 6, Folder 7

U.K.C.- Korean Commission Friction, 1942-1943.

Physical Description: 2 items.
Box 6, Folder 8

Meeting Reports & Announcements, 1943-1948.

Physical Description: 12 items.
Box 6, Folder 9

Reports & Resolutions, 1942-1946.

Physical Description: 9 items.
Box 6, Folder 10

English Publications, 1942-1943.

Physical Description: 2 items.
Box 7, Folder 1

U.K.C. Financial Papers, ca. 1941-1948.

Physical Description: 3 items.
Box 7, Folder 2

Miscellaneous Documents.

Physical Description: 10 items.
Box 7, Folder 3

Government Documents.

Physical Description: 6 items.
Box 7, Folder 4

U.S. Military Government Reports, ca. 1947.

Physical Description: 2 items.
Box 7, Folder 5

U.S.-U.S.S.R. Joint Commission Papers, 1946-1947.

Box 7, Folder 6

South Korean Interim Assembly, 1946-1947.

Physical Description: 5 items.
Box 7, Folder 7

Sinjin-dang Documents, ca. 1946-1947.

Box 7, Folder 8

Political Terrorism, ca. 1947.

Physical Description: 3 items.
Box 7, Folder 9

“Kunjongch'ong pomnyong,” 1946.

 

South Korean Interim Government Papers

Box 8, Folder 1

“Mi kunjong ha ui ippop uiwon,” 1970.

Box 8, Folder 2

“Haebang choson,” 1948.

Box 8, Folder 3

Miscellaneous Books, 1945-1952.

Physical Description: 4 items.
Box 8, Folder 4

“Taedo,” 1911-1912.

Physical Description: 4 issues.
Box 8, Folder 5

“Hanin kidokkyobo,” November 1924-March 1925.

Physical Description: 2 issues.
Box 8, Folder 6

“Hanin kyohoebo,” 1925 and 1929.

Physical Description: 5 issues.
Box 8, Folder 7

Miscellaneous Publications, 1907, 1910s and 1920s.

Physical Description: 4 items.
 

Korean Immigrant Publications

Box 9, Folder 1

“Tongnip chongsin,” 1910.

Box 9, Folder 2

“Tongnip chongsin,” 1917.

Box 9, Folder 3

“Han'guk kyohoe p'ippak,” 1913.

Box 9, Folder 4

“Han'guk T'ongsa,” 1917.

Box 9, Folder 5

“Tongnip hyolchon'gi,” 1919.

Box 9, Folder 6

“Chaemi hanin saryak sang,” 1951.

 

Hanmi t'ongsin

Box 10

1961-1962.

Physical Description: 3 books.
Box 10, Folder 1

“Chaemi hanin osimnyonsa,” 1959.

Box 10, Folder 2

“Koreans in America,” 1971.

Box 10, Folder 3

“America's Finest Gift to Korea,” 1952.

Box 11

1962-1964.

Physical Description: 7 books.
 

The Voice of Korea

Box 12

1961.

Physical Description: 1 book.
 

Korean Language Magazines

Box 13, Folder 1

Kaebyok, August 1921 and June 1922. no.14 and 24.

Box 13, Folder 2

Kaebyok, March 1923 and October 1923. no.33 and 40.

Box 13, Folder 3

Kaebyok, February 1924 and November 1925. no.44 and 63.

Box 13, Folder 4

Kaebyok, March-May 1926. no.67-69.

Box 13, Folder 5

Kaebyok, January 1935. vol.2 no.1.

Box 13, Folder 6

Choson mundan, ca. 1925-1926. no.5 and 12.

Box 13, Folder 7

Taep'yongyang, November 1934. vol.1 no.1.

Box 13, Folder 7

Tonggwang ch'ongso, June 1933. vol.1 no.1.

Box 13, Folder 8

Chingwang, January-March 1934. no.2 and 3.

Box 13, Folder 8

Chonson, October 1934. no.1.

 

Korean Magazines & Textbooks

Box 14, Folder 1

Tonggwang, May and August 1932. vol.4 no.5 and 8.

Box 14, Folder 2

Tonggwang, September and November 1932. vol.4 no.9 and 11.

Box 14, Folder 3

Chogwang, May 1940. vol.6 no.5.

Box 14, Folder 3

Samch'olli, May 1940. vol.6 no.5.

Box 14, Folder 4

Tongguk saryak, 1907.

Physical Description: 2 books.
Box 14, Folder 5

Tongguk saryak, 1908.

Physical Description: 1 book.
Box 14, Folder 6

“Kungmin pogam,” 1910.

Box 14, Folder 6

“Ch'oktok wanp'yon,” 1908.

Box 14, Folder 7

“Ch'ohak chiji,” 1906.

 

Books on Korean Independence Movement

Box 15, Folder 1

“Samil undong pisa,” 1959.

Box 15, Folder 2

“Taehan min'guk tongnip undong konghunsa,” 1971.

Box 15, Folder 3

“Chosonsa kyojong,” 1948.

Box 15, Folder 3

“Haebang chonhu ui Choson chinsang,” 1945.

Box 15, Folder 4

“Tansang tanha,” 1956.

 

Books on Korean Politics and Unification Problem

Box 16, Folder 1

“Minju chungniphwa t'onghan ui sin pangan,” 1961.

Box 16, Folder 2

“Uri minjok ui nagalkil,” 1962.

Box 16, Folder 3

“Han'guk t'ongil munje,” 1961; “T'onghan kakso,” 1961; “Han'guk tongnan hyujon isimnyon ui palchach'wi,” 1973.

Physical Description: 3 items.
Box 16, Folder 4

“Samguk sagi,” 1953.

Box 16, Folder 5

“Ijo kon'guk ui yon'gu,” 1947; “Ijo sahoe kyongjesa yon'gu,” 1947.

 

Books on General Korean History and Society

Box 17, Folder 1

“Haehak yuso,” 1955.

Box 17, Folder 2

“Maech'on yarok,” 1955.

Box 17, Folder 3

“Han'guk nongch'on ui sahoe kujo,” 1960.

Box 17, Folder 4

[No further description available].

Physical Description: 1 item.
Box 17, Folder 5

[No further description available].

Physical Description: 2 items.
 

Miscellaneous Books on History of Korean Literature

Box 18, Folder 1

[No further description available].

Physical Description: 3 items.
Box 18, Folder 2

[No further description available], 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 2 items.
Box 18, Folder 3

[No further description available], 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 2 items.
 

Selected Works of Korean Literature

Box 19, Folder 1

[No further description available], 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 1 item.
Box 19, Folder 2

[No further description available], 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 2 items.
Box 19, Folder 3

[No further description available], 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 4 items.
Box 19, Folder 4

[No further description available], 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 2 items.
 

Studies in Korean Literature

Box 20, Folder 1

[No further description available], 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 2 items.
Box 20, Folder 2

[No further description available], 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 2 items.
Box 20, Folder 3

[No further description available], 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 3 items.
 

Studies in Korean Literature & Language

Box 21, Folder 1

Studies in Korean Literature, 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 2 items.
Box 21, Folder 2

Korean Language Usage, 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 3 items.
Box 21, Folder 3

Korean Language Usage, 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 2 items.
 

Books on Korean Language

Box 22, Folder 1

Korean Grammar, 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 2 items.
Box 22, Folder 2

Korean Linguistics and Phonetics, 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 2 items.
Box 22, Folder 3

History of Korean Linguistics, 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 1 item.
 

Korean Poetry

Box 23, Folder 1

Studies in Korean Poetry, 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 2 items.
Box 23, Folder 2

Studies in Korean Poetry, 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 2 items.
Box 23, Folder 3

Collections of Korean Poems, 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 4 items.
Box 24, Folder 1

Collections of Korean Poems, 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 2 items.
Box 24, Folder 2

Collections of Korean Poems, 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 2 items.
Box 24, Folder 3

Collection of Korean Poems, 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 1 item.
Box 24, Folder 4

Collection of Korean Poems, 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 1 item.
 

Books on Korean Culture

Box 25, Folder 1

Korean Culture and Thought, 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 3 items.
Box 25, Folder 2

Korean Cultural History, 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 2 items.
Box 25, Folder 3

Korean Music and Architecture, 1940s-1960s.

Physical Description: 2 items.
 

Books Published in North Korea

Box 26, Folder 1

“Choson t'ongsa,” 1956.

Box 26, Folder 2

“Hyangga haesok,” 1956.

Box 26, Folder 3

“Uri nara ui kojon munhak,” 1957; “Munhak,” 1956.

Box 26, Folder 4

“Choson umak,” 1956.

 

English Books and Magazines on Korea

Box 27, Folder 1

“The Russians Came to Korea,” 1947.

Box 27, Folder 2

“Undiplomatic Memories,” 1930.

Box 27, Folder 3

“Modern Korea,” 1944.

Box 27, Folder 4

Magazines & Pamphlets, 1945-1961.

Physical Description: 6 items.
Box 28, Folder 1

“Korean Arts” Painting and Sculpture, 1956.

Physical Description: vol.1.
Box 28, Folder 2

“Korean Arts” Ceramics, 1961.

Physical Description: vol.2.
Box 28, Folder 3

“Korea's Heritage” A Regional and Social Geography, 1956.

Box 28, Folder 4

[No further description available], 1967.

Box 28, Folder 5

“The Ancient History of Korean Peoples,” 1962.

Box 28, Folder 6

Miscellaneous Magazines & Pamphlets.

Physical Description: 4 items.

Scope and Content Note

“Early Korean Printing” (1959), “Korean Survey” (1959), “Korean Buddhism” (1930), “Introduction to Korea” (1961).
Box 29, Folder 1

“UNESCO Korean Survey,” 1960.

Box 29, Folder 2

“Korea: Its Land, People, and Culture of All Ages,” 1960.

Box 30, Folder 1

“Korea Tomorrow,” 1956; “Disguised Unemployment in Underdeveloped Areas,” 1963.

Box 30, Folder 2

“The Living Reed,” 1963; “Foreign Relations of the U.S.,” 1955.

 

Reference Materials

 

Korean Dictionaries

Box 31

K'unsajon, 1957. vol.1-3.

Box 32

“K'unsajon”. vol.4-6.

 

Korean Encyclopedias

Box 33

Taebaekkwa sajon, 1958. vol.1-2.

Box 34

Taebaekkwa sajon. vol.3-4.

Box 35

Taebaekkwa sajon. vol.5-6.

Physical Description: 2 books.
 

Korean Encyclopedia & Map

Box 36

Taebaekkwa sajon, “Taehan min'guk chido,” 1960. vol.7.

 

Miscellaneous Reference Books

Box 37, Folder 1

“Han-Yong sajon,” 1911.

Box 37, Folder 2

“Chosono p'yojunmal moum” and “Hunmin chongum,” 1946.

Box 37, Folder 3

“Kak to pu up myon kan yojongp'yo,” 1945; “Manseryok,” 1951.

 

Korean Immigrant Newspapers

Box 38

“Kungminbo.” The Korean National Herald, 1918-1919.

Physical Description: Oversize.
Box 39

“Kungminbo.” The Korean National Herald, 1919-1922.

Physical Description: Oversize.
Box 40

“Kungminbo.” The Korean National Herald, 1930-1955.

Physical Description: Oversize.
Box 41

“Kungminbo.” The Korean National Herald, 1956.

Physical Description: Oversize.
Box 42, Folder 1

“Tansan sibo.” The Tansan Times, 1925.

Physical Description: Oversize.
Box 42, Folder 2

“Hanmi sinmun.” The Korean American News, 1965.

Physical Description: Oversize.
Box 42, Folder 3

Miscellaneous Korean Newspapers, 1946.

Physical Description: Oversize.
Box 42, Folder 4

Miscellaneous English Newspapers.

Physical Description: Oversize.