Guide to the Santa Clara Center for Occupational Safety and Health (SCCOSH) and Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition (SVTC) Records MSS.2007.04.06

SJSU Special Collections & Archives
© 2010
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library
San José State University
One Washington Square
San José, CA 95192-0028
special.collections@sjsu.edu


Language of Material: English
Contributing Institution: SJSU Special Collections & Archives
Title: Santa Clara Center for Occupational Safety and Health (SCCOSH) and Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition (SVTC) Records
creator: Santa Clara Center for Occupational Safety and Health
source: Smith, Ted
Identifier/Call Number: MSS.2007.04.06
Physical Description: 20 boxes (20 linear feet)
Date (inclusive): 1976 - 2003
Date (bulk): 1982 - 1995
Abstract: This collection consists of administrative files, correspondence, research, publications, official reports, newspaper clippings, photographs, notes, congressional testimony, and legislative material concerning these organizations and their mission to reduce toxins and hazardous waste in the Silicon Valley.
Physical Location: Vault 1: Range 29B, Bays 06-07

Access

The collection is open for research.

Publication Rights

Copyright is assigned to the San José State University Special Collections & Archives. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Director of Special Collections. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the Special Collections & Archives. Copyright restrictions may apply to digital reproductions of the original materials. Use of digital files is restricted to research and educational purposes.

Preferred Citation

Santa Clara Center for Occupational Safety and Health (SCCOSH) and Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition (SVTC) Records, MSS-2007-04-06, San José State University Library Special Collections & Archives.

Processing Information

The bulk of the arrangement and description work was completed by Josh Palmer, and edited and reviewed by Danelle Moon. The rearrangement was completed by Alberta A. Jiminez and Robert Donahue, The EAD encoding was completed by Robert Donahue. Folders were relabeled by Samira Habibi in September 2017.
The rearrangement and reappraisal was completed by Lale Yasemin Kaya and Nissa Nack (July-August 2015).

Organizational History

The Santa Clara Center for Occupational Safety and Health (SCCOSH) grew from the efforts of three women's health and labor rights organizers - Robin Baker, Amanda Hawes, and Pat Lamborn - who had come to focus on the Silicon Valley's largely unrepresented working-class minorities in the late 1970s. The three met sometime in 1977 at the Pacific Studies Center in Mountain View, where a small group had been meeting intermittently to discuss occupational health. Not long after, Baker, Hawes, and Lamborn together applied for and received a workers training grant from the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), which they used to fund the Project on Health and Safety in Electronics (PHASE, 1978-1980).
During the three years covered by the initial federal grant, PHASE produced a series of occupational hazards factsheets for electronics workers (See Series III). First introduced in 1979, the program also included a multilingual telephone consultation service for electronics workers. While not a program to organize workers, PHASE efforts to raise awareness of occupational hazards resulted in open conflict with many Silicon Valley electronics companies. In 1979 the three women established a sister group to PHASE, the Electronics Committee on Safety and Health (ECOSH), to undertake more direct worker organizing while PHASE remained focused on voluntary educational programming. SCCOSH became the overarching agency for these two groups, PHASE and ECOSH, formally established on July 19, 1979, with a five-member Governing Board of Robyn Baker, Amanda Hawes, Pat Lamborn, Mark Fee, and Andy Rowland. SCCOSH expanded its governing board to seven members in 1980, and again to nine members in 1981.
In April of 1979, PHASE employees began staffing an "Electronics Hazard" telephone hotline for workers concerned about chemicals encountered in the workplace. In addition to chemicals encountered in industrial occupations, SCCOSH outreach addressed potential health hazards for office laborers, including the combined psychological and physiological effects of working for long periods at video display terminals (VDTs, or computer monitors).
The Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition (SVTC) developed from a SCCOSH project into a wide-ranging, independent nonprofit organization. Ted Smith (1945-), attorney and activist founded the SVTC in 1982 in response to the suspicion that leaks at manufacturing sites for IBM and Fairchild Electronics were causing health issues in nearby Silicon Valley homes. The SVTC is a San José, California-based research and advocacy group that promotes safe environmental practices in the high tech industry. SVTC is composed of high tech workers, community members, law enforcement, emergency workers and environmentalists. They aim to educate the masses on best practices for computer recycling and promote corporate social responsibility on subjects ranging from nanotechnology, solar, and consumer e-waste.
Smith is currently the Senior Strategist of SVTC, and is co-founder and coordinator of the International Campaign for Responsible Technology (ICRT), and international network committed to the development of sustainable and non-polluting technologies. He also serves as the steering committee chair of the Computer TakeBack Campaign, an organization focused on promoting life-cycle producer responsibility in high-tech electronics. He co-edited the book Challenging The Chip: Labor Rights and Environmental Justice in the Global Electronics Industry (2006). Smith has been recognized by the Dalai Lama for his environmental leadership. (See Series IX)
Glenna Matthews Oral History Collection, MSS 2010-05-11, San José State University Special Collections and Archives, http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/kt8k40382g/

Scope and Content of Collection

The Santa Clara Center for Occupational Safety and Health (SCCOSH) and Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition (SVTC) Records, 1976-2003 document the history of SCCOSH and SVTC. The Santa Clara Center for Occupational Safety and Health (SCCOSH) grew from the efforts of three women's health and labor rights organizers - Robin Baker, Amanda Hawes, and Pat Lamborn. SCCOSH organized various campaigns in the fields of worker's rights advocacy and occupational safety and health training, particularly within the region's electronics industries. At the group's outset, SCCOSH envisioned itself as representing three constituencies: local labor unions and labor councils, ill and injured workers, and community residents affected by wildfire industrial development of the Santa Clara Valley since the mid-1970s. The Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition (SVTC) developed from a SCCOSH project into a wide-ranging, independent nonprofit organization. Founded by Ted Smith (1945-), attorney and activist, in 1982 in response to the suspicion that leaks at manufacturing sites for IBM and Fairchild Electronics were causing health issues in nearby Silicon Valley homes. The SVTC is a San José, California-based research and advocacy group that promotes safe environmental practices in the high tech industry. The records consist of administrative files, correspondence, research, publications, official reports, newspaper clippings, photographs, notes, congressional testimony, and legislative material concerning these organizations and their mission to reduce toxins and hazardous waste in the Silicon Valley.

Arrangement

This collection is arranged into 15 series: Series I: SCCOSH, Activism, 1976-2003; Series II: SCCOSH, Workplace Hazard Files, 1978-1999; Series III: SCCOSH, Administrative Files, 1978-2001; Series IV: SCCOSH, Legal Cases, 1980-1998; Series V: SVTC, Model Hazardous Materials Storage, 1981-1986; Series VI: SVTC, Groundwater Cleanup, 1978-1997; Series VII: SVTC, Toxic Gas Model Ordinance, 1982-1997; Series VIII: SVTC, Administrative Files, 1982-1999; Series IX: SVTC, Founder Ted Smith, 1983-2000; Series X: SVTC, United Technologies Corporation, 1984-1995; Series XI: SVTC, Toxics Coordinating Project, 1985-1990; Series XII: SVTC, Tanner Bill, 1986-1991; Series XIII: SVTC, Stanford University/Biotechnology Activism, 1987-1991; Series XIV: SVTC, Earth Day, 1987-1993; and Series XV: Newspaper Articles, 1987-1997.

Bibliography

About us. (n.d.). Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition. Retrieved from http://www.svtc.org/site/PageServer?pagename=svtc_about_us
Interview with Ted Smith. (n.d.). Temple University Press. Retrieved from http://www.temple.edu/tempress/authors/1788_qa.html
Santa Clara Center for Occupational Health (SCCOSH) and Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition (SVTC) Records, 1978-2002 (bulk 1982-1995), MSS-2007-04-06, San José State University Special Collections & Archives.
Smith, Ted, David A. Sonnenfeld, and David Naguib Pellow, editors. Challenging the Chip: Labor Rights and Environmental Justice in the Global Electronic Industry. Temple University Press, 2006.

Subjects and Indexing Terms

Industrial safety -- Santa Clara County (Calif.)
Industrial hygiene -- Santa Clara County (Calif.)
Employee rights -- Santa Clara County (Calif.)
Environmental justice -- Santa Clara County (Calif.)
Electronic industry workers -- Health and hygiene -- Santa Clara County (Calif.)
Santa Clara Center for Occupational Safety and Health
Smith, Ted

 

Series I: SCCOSH, Activism 1976-2003

Series Scope and Content Summary

The contents in this series document the activism of the Santa Clara Center for Occupational Health (SCCOSH) through various campaigns in the fields of worker's rights advocacy and occupational safety and health training, particularly within the region's electronics industries. At the group's outset, SCCOSH envisioned itself as representing three constituencies: local labor unions and labor councils, ill and injured workers, and community residents who had been affected by the wildfire industrial development of the Santa Clara Valley since the mid-1970s. One of the group's earliest organizing efforts was a breast cancer screening program for workers working with the industrial solvent trichloroethylene (TCE), which led to the successful "Campaign to Ban TCE" in 1981 and 1982. The TCE campaign used two strategies, pressuring employers directly and litigating through state and federal regulatory agencies, both of which became common elements in later SCCOSH programs. Other formative SCCOSH projects include a telephone worker's consultation service, the Hazard Hotline, managed under the project banner of Electronics Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (ECOSH), and a legal consultation and political activism network, Injured Workers United (IWU), formed in 1983 for electronics workers disabled by chemical exposure.
The Campaign to End the Miscarriage of Justice (CEMJ) was designed to pressure electronics manufacturers into eliminating certain widely used chemical solvents, ethylene-based glycol ethers, which had been linked by occupational health studies to increased miscarriages and other reproductive problems among workers.

Arrangement

This series is arranged by subject. Materials within folders are in original order.
 

Administrative, Project, and Campaign Files 1976 - 2003

Box 1, Folder 1

Project on Health and Safety in Electronics (1 of 4) 1978-1996

Box 1, Folder 2

Project on Health and Safety in Electronics (2 of 4) 1978-1996

Box 1, folder 3

Project on Health and Safety in Electronics (3 of 4) 1978-1996

Box 1, Folder 4

Project on Health and Safety in Electronics (4 of 4) 1978-1996

Box 1, Folder 5

Electronics Committee on Safety and Health 1978-1980

Box 1, Folder 6

Campaign to End the Miscarriage of Justice (1 of 4) 1981-2003

Box 1, Folder 7

Campaign to End the Miscarriage of Justice (2 of 4) 1981-2003

Box 1, Folder 8

Campaign to End the Miscarriage of Justice (3 of 4) 1981-2003

Box 1, folder 9

Campaign to End the Miscarriage of Justice (4 of 4) 1981-2003

Box 1, Folder 10

CEMJ Meeting Minutes, Agenda, and Notes 1994-1995

Box 1, Folder 11

Working Women's Leadership Program (1 of 6) 1981-2001

Box 1, folder 12

Working Women's Leadership Program (2 of 6) 1981-2001

Box 1, Folder 13

Working Women's Leadership Program (3 of 6) 1981-2001

Box 1, folder 14

Working Women's Leadership Program (4 of 6) 1981-2001

box 1, folder 15

Working Women's Leadership Program (5 of 6) 1981-2001

Box 1, folder 16

Working Women's Leadership Program (6 of 6) 1981-2001

 

Multimedia, News Segments, Educational Material 1978-1999

Box 2

Trust in Training

Box 2

Partnering to Preserve Our Water Supply

Box 2

La Jomaleros del Norte: La Fraseitsita

Box 2

Pre-Injury

Box 2

OLPPP lead video, California Department of Health Services

Box 2

Hazardous Waste: "Whose Problem is it Anyway?"

box 2

Dragout Reduction for Metal Finishers

box 2

Children and the Environment

Box 2

ABC news and Old Model Nailuent Manual

box 2

"Hi Tech Calaca" Sacred Heart Church

Box 2

Health Talk: Understanding Material Safety Data Sheets

Box 2

Bad Quality: Teatro

Box 2

Honda Health and Safety Video

Box 2

"It's not where you Start, It's where you finish" American Musical Theater

Box 2

PowerPoint Disks

Box 2

VDN

Box 2

Allergies and Runcard Soundtrack

Box 2

Loan/Debt: Toxic Avengers Viet Radio Theater

Box 2

Theo Colburn Endocrine Disrupters, 7/11/1996: News Release on Pesticides

Box 2

Side A: Nail Salon, Side B: Sad Brokers Pes of Age

Box 2

Allergies Master

Box 2

Nail Salon Master

Box 2

Runcard

Box 2

Loan/Debt

Box 2

Side A: Broken Pieces redo take 2 of 3, Side B: Broken Pieces redo take 1 of 3

Box 2

Untitled Disks and Cassettes

 

Health Based Research Files 1978-1999

Box 3, folder 1

Research Files (1 of 18)

Box 3, folder 2

Research Files (2 of 18)

Box 3, folder 3

Research Files (3 of 18)

Box 3, Folder 4

Research Files (4 of 18)

Box 3, Folder 5

Research Files (5 of 18)

Box 3, folder 6

Research Files (6 of 18)

Box 3, Folder 7

Research Files (7 of 18)

Box 3, Folder 8

Research Files (8 of 18)

Box 3, folder 9

Research Files (9 of 18)

Box 3, Folder 10

Research Files (10 of 18)

Box 3, folder 11

Research Files (11 of 18)

Box 3, Folder 12

Research Files (12 of 18)

Box 3, Folder 13

Research Files (13 of 18)

Box 3, folder 14

Research Files (14 of 18)

Box 4, folder 1

Research Files (15 of 18)

Box 4, folder 2

Research Files (16 of 18)

Box 4, Folder 3

Research Files (17 of 18)

Box 4, Folder 4

Research Files (18 of 18)

 

Series II: SCCOSH, Workplace Hazard Files 1978-1999

Series Scope and Content Summary

This series contains all the files on individual workplace hazards amassed by the Santa Clara Center for Occupational Health (SCCOSH). The primary focus of this series relates to chemical hazards, especially those chemicals used intensively by Silicon Valley computer and electronics plants. In the early years of the organization, SCCOSH leaders Robin Baker, Amanda Hawes, Pat Lamborn, and other staff members found themselves charged with gathering, as well as disseminating, information on many of the chemicals used in high-tech manufacturing, despite the limited existing toxicological or epidemiological research.

Arrangement

The original order of the materials in this series was maintained.
 

Workplace Hazard Research and Educational Material 1978-1999

Box 4, folder 5

Childcare in Industrial Zones

box 4, Folder 6

Educational Booklets

Box 4, Folder 7

Environmental Hazards Correspondence

Box 4, Folder 8

Health Hazard Correspondence for Cosmetologists (1 of 4)

Box 4, Folder 9

Health Hazard Correspondence for Cosmetologists (2 of 4)

Box 4, folder 10

Health Hazard Correspondence for Cosmetologists (3 of 4)

Box 4, Folder 11

Health Hazard Correspondence for Cosmetologists (4 of 4)

Box 4, Folder 12

Health Risk Factsheets

Box 4, Folder 13

Petition Letters

Box 4, folder 14

Safety and Health Standard for Trichloroethyleric

Box 4, folder 15

SCCOSH News Clips

Box 4, Folder 16

Workplace Hazards Research (1 of 3)

Box 4, Folder 17

Workplace Hazards Research (2 of 3)

Box 4, Folder 18

Workplace Hazards Research (3 of 3)

Box 5, Folder 1

Case Studies and Fact Sheets (1 of 5)

Box 5, Folder 2

Case Studies and Fact Sheets (2 of 5)

Box 5, Folder 3

Case Studies and Fact Sheets (3 of 5)

Box 5, Folder 4

Case Studies and Fact Sheets (4 of 5)

box 5, Folder 5

Case Studies and Fact Sheets (5 of 5)

Box 5, Folder 6

Electronics Research (1 of 2)

Box 5, Folder 7

Electronics Research (2 of 2)

Box 5, Folder 8

Epidemiological Study of Reproductive and Other Health Effects

Box 5, folder 9

Health and Safety Correspondence (1 of 6)

Box 5, Folder 10

Health and Safety Correspondence (2 of 6)

Box 5, Folder 11

Health and Safety Correspondence (3 of 6)

Box 5, Folder 12

Health and Safety Correspondence (4 of 6)

Box 5, Folder 13

Health and Safety Correspondence (5 of 6)

Box 5, Folder 14

Health and Safety Correspondence (6 of 6)

Box 5, Folder 15

Safe Practices Bulletins

 

Series III: SCCOSH, Administrative Files 1978-2001

Scope and Contents

The contents in this series describe the Santa Clara Center for Occupational Health (SCCOSH) organizational growth from its inception in 1978 to 2003 (bulk 1980-1990s). The middle years of the organization's history (1980s-1990s) are particularly well-documented. SCCOSH came into being as the unifying agency for two prior established women's health and labor rights campaigns, the Project on Health and Safety in Electronics (PHASE) and the Electronics Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (ECOSH), both of which continued in some form as programs under SCCOSH. The administrative files contained here document this growth through board meeting minutes, financial statements, and correspondence with other regional "COSH" groups around the country. Researchers interested in U.S. labor movements of the late twentieth century, particularly those involving issues of worker's health and labor justice will find this series useful.

Arrangement

The original of the materials in this series was maintained.
 

Financial Files 1978-2000

Box 6, Folder 1

Financial Reports 1978-1990

Box 6, Folder 2

Financial Reports 1995-2000

 

Meeting Minutes, Incorporation Papers, Correspondence 1978-2001

Box 6, folder 3

Board Meeting Transcripts 1986

Box 6, Folder 4

Board Meeting Transcripts 1997

Box 6, folder 5

Board Meeting Transcripts 1998-2001

Box 6, folder 6

By-laws and Consultation Reports (1 of 2)

Box 6, Folder 7

By-laws and Consultation Reports (2 of 2)

Box 6, Folder 8

Correspondence (1 of 8)

Box 6, Folder 9

Correspondence (2 of 8)

Box 6, Folder 10

Correspondence (3 of 8)

box 6, folder 11

Correspondence (4 of 8)

Box 6, Folder 12

Correspondence (5 of 8)

Box 6, Folder 13

Correspondence (6 of 8)

Box 6, Folder 14

Correspondence (7 of 8)

Box 6, Folder 15

Correspondence (8 of 8)

box 6, Folder 16

Ergonomic Hearing Correspondence 2000

Box 7, Folder 1

Environmental Protection Agency (1 of 3)

Box 7, folder 2

Environmental Protection Agency (2 of 3)

Box 7, folder 3

Environmental Protection Agency (3 of 3)

Box 7, Folder 4

Incorporation Papers/By Laws (1 of 2) 1978-2000

Box 7, folder 5

Incorporation Papers/By Laws (2 of 2) 1978-2000

Box 7, Folder 6

National COSH Conference Correspondence 2000

 

Series IV: SCCOSH, Legal Case Files Series IV: 1980-1998

Scope and Contents

The contents in this series document the Campaign to End the Miscarriage of Justice (CEMJ) organized by the Santa Clara Center for Occupational Health (SCCOSH) and the Silicon Valley Toxic Coalition (SVTC). The CEMJ pressured electronics manufacturers into eliminating certain widely used chemical solvents such as ethylene-based glycol ethers, which occupational health studies linked to increased miscarriages and other reproductive problems among workers. The collection consists of legal case files and VHS tapes recording depositions and legal hearings. The lawsuits represented include Cruz v. Wilson Safety Products (199?), Perez v. Varian Association & Liberty Mutual Insurance Company (1997), Carreon v. Skywest Technology (1989), Carreon v. Shugart Company (1989), and Romic v. OSHA (1998). Much of the CEMJ campaign focused on obtaining justice for Rodrigo Cruz, a former employee of Romic Environmental Technologies. Silicon Valley technology firms hired Romic to collect and haul toxic waste. The company had a long-term record as a violator of health and safety laws, and their employees were forced to use faulty equipment or faced being fired. Cruz was critically injured on the job as result of a defective protective mask that slowly suffocated him while working on a job site. The CEMJ and SCCOSH protested on his behalf through public demonstrations and together they formed the "Justice for Rodrigo Cruz Campaign." The collection of research files and the VHS tapes document the role of grassroots coalitions to support worker's rights and to force tech companies to comply with state and local environmental regulations, and specifically to end their contracts with Romic. The big firms associated with Romic included: Intel, Hewlitt Packard, Linear Tech, National Semiconductor, Seagate, NEC Electronics, and Boeing.

Arrangement

The original order of the materials in this series was maintained.
Box 7, Folder 7

Legal Case Files (1 of 7)

Box 7, folder 8

Legal Case Files (2 of 7)

Box 7, Folder 9

Legal Case Files (3 of 7)

box 7, Folder 10

Legal Case Files (4 of 7)

Box 7, folder 11

Legal Case Files (5 of 7)

box 7, folder 12

Legal Case Files (6 of 7)

Box 7, Folder 13

Legal Case Files (7 of 7)

 

SVTC, Model Hazardous Materials Storage Series V: 1981-1986

Scope and Contents

This series document the Silicon Valley Toxic Coalition's (SVTC) role in the drafting and implementation of the Model Toxics Storage Ordinance for Santa Clara County. This ordinance was approved by the county Intergovernmental Council in May of 1983, and had been implemented in some form by fifteen municipalities in the region by 1984. This Santa Clara County Ordinances served as the blueprint for a statewide groundwater contamination legislation under State Assembly Bill AB 1362, which the state legislature adopted in the fall 1983. Ted Smith and other SVTC members led the drafting of the model ordinance and frequently participated in or spoke out at city hearings about its implementation. One controversial facet was a "right-to-know" provision requiring companies to disclose the location and contents of all potentially hazardous chemicals stored on their premises. An interrelated debate, well represented in this series, focused on the number of chemicals that should fall under the scope of the ordinance. The debate concerned whether the ordinance would apply to the full spectrum of chemicals listed as hazardous by the California Occupational Health and Safety Administration (CAL/OSHA). Between the years 1982-1983, the SVTC lobbied for similar chemical storage regulations at the state level in the form of California Assembly Bill 1362 (1985).

Arrangement

This series is arranged chronologically.
 

Trial Recordings 1989-1997

Box 8, Folder 1

Adele Perez VS. Varian Associates July 22, 1991

box 8, Folder 2

Carreon VS. Shugart Corp. May 26, 1989

Box 8, Folder 3

Carreon VS. Skywest Tech May 18, 1989

Box 8, Folder 4

Cruz VS. Wilson Safety Production (1 of 3) January 9-February 7, 1997

Box 8, Folder 5

Cruz VS. Wilson Safety Production (2 of 3) January 9-February 7, 1997

Box 8, Folder 6

Cruz VS. Wilson Safety Production (3 of 3) January 9-February 7, 1997

 

Hazardous Materials Storage 1981-1986

box 8, folder 7

Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition 1983

Box 8, Folder 8

List of Hazardous Substances (1 of 2) 1985

Box 8, Folder 9

List of Hazardous Substances (2 of 2) 1985

box 8, folder 10

City Task Force Meetings (1 of 2) 1982-1983

box 8, folder 11

City Task Force Meetings (2 of 2) 1982-1983

Box 8, Folder 12

Storage Ordinance Implementation Surveys 1984-1986

box 8, Folder 13

Press Clippings (1 of 3) 1981-1986

Box 8, folder 14

Press Clippings (2 of 3) 1981-1986

Box 8, Folder 15

Press Clippings (3 of 3) 1981-1986

 

Series VI: SVTC, Groundwater Cleanup 1978-1997

Scope and Contents

This series documents the role of Silicon Valley Toxic Coalition (SVTC) and other South Bay area community activists in documenting, publicizing, and then attaining state and federal intervention for the contamination of local groundwater supplies by Silicon Valley area electronics manufacturers. Eventually nineteen sites polluted by faulty chemical storage had been declared Superfund cleanup sites under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). More leaking chemical tanks were discovered in 1983-1984, and SVTC continued to push for greater intervention by the Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) and U.S. EPA, especially through the local forum provided by the South Bay Groundwater Contamination Task Force (SBGTCF). In 1985 Ted Smith testified before a California congressional investigation of groundwater contamination in the Valley. The full transcript of this investigation is located in box 11, folder 4 of this series.
Also included in this series are Smith's notes from the SBGTCF meetings from 1984 to 1990. In January of 1985, the California Department of Health Services (DOHS) released an epidemiological study of South San José near the contaminated public wells. This series includes draft copies of the DOHS report and correspondence between SVTC and various parties regarding its implications. Also included are records of SVTC and other Bay area environmental groups protesting the appointment of Gary Burke, then president of the Santa Clara County Manufacturing Group, to the RWQCB in 1993. This series illustrates how grassroots organizations came together to force industrial responsibility through city and state environmental regulations.

Arrangement

The original order of the materials in this series was maintained.
 

Groundwater Cleanup 1978-1997

box 8, folder 16

Great Oaks Water Company 1981-1988

Box 9, Folder 1

Early Newspaper Coverage (1 of 3) 1981-1991

Box 9, folder 2

Early Newspaper Coverage (2 of 3) 1981-1991

Box 9, folder 3

Early Newspaper Coverage (3 of 3) 1981-1991

Box 9, folder 4

EPA/SBGTCF (1 of 4) 1984-1990

Box 9, folder 5

EPA/SBGTCF (2 of 4) 1984-1990

box 9, folder 6

EPA/SBGTCF (3 of 4) 1984-1990

Box 9, Folder 7

EPA/SBGTCF (4 of 4) 1984-1990

Box 9, Folder 8

Smith Congressional Testimony (1 of 2) 1985

Box 9, Folder 9

Smith Congressional Testimony (2 of 2) 1985

Box 9, Folder 10

DOHS Epidemiological Study 1978-1986

Box 9, folder 11

Gary Burke Appointment (1 of 5) 1993-1994

Box 9, Folder 12

Gary Burke Appointment (2 of 5) 1993-1994

Box 9, folder 13

Gary Burke Appointment (3 of 5) 1993-1994

Box 9, folder 14

Gary Burke Appointment (4 of 5) 1993-1994

Box 9, Folder 15

Gary Burke Appointment (5 of 5) 1993-1994

Box 9, Folder 16

Monsanto 1985-1990

Box 9, Folder 17

Research Materials, Santa Clara Groundwater (1 of 4) 1983-1996

Box 9, folder 18

Research Materials, Santa Clara Groundwater (2 of 4) 1983-1996

Box 9, Folder 19

Research Materials, Santa Clara Groundwater (3 of 4) 1983-1996

Box 9, Folder 20

Research Materials, Santa Clara Groundwater (4 of 4) 1983-1996

Box 10, Folder 1

Owens-Corning Report 1985-1991

Box 10, Folder 2

Lorraine Ross 1986-1987

Box 10, Folder 3

Romic (1 of 2) 1989-1996

Box 10, Folder 4

Romic (2 of 2) 1989-1996

Box 10, folder 5

National Semiconductor (1 of 2) 1985-1994

box 10, Folder 6

National Semiconductor (2 of 2) 1985-1994

Box 10, Folder 7

City of San Jose Environmental Committee 1991

Box 10, Folder 8

Testing Analysis 1985-1997

Box 10, folder 9

IBM Letters (1 of 2) 1991

Box 10, Folder 10

IBM Letters (2 of 2) 1991

Box 10, Folder 11

IBM Clean Up Standards Revisited

 

Series VII: SVTC, Toxic Gas Model Ordinance 1982-1997

Scope and Contents

The contents in this series describe the Silicon Valley Toxic Collation's (SVTC) part in developing a toxic gas model ordinance for Santa Clara County, which like the county's Model Hazardous Material Storage Ordinance (see Series IV) became a model for similar laws statewide and nationally. Beginning in 1985, SVTC activism came to focus increasingly on the dangers of gases used in Silicon Valley semiconductor (microelectronics) manufacturing, in part reflecting global anxieties raised by the disastrous Union Carbide plant explosion in Bhopal, India, in December of 1984. With the 1986 passage of California Assembly Bill 3777, requiring each county in the state to develop a toxic gas emergency plan, Ted Smith was appointed as a task force member for Santa Clara County alongside elected officials, city fire chiefs, and representatives of the area's electronics industry.

Arrangement

The original order of the materials in this series was maintained.
 

Company Sites and Clean up Plans, Newspaper Clippings, Correspondence, SB14, Jeff Lake 1982-1992

Box 10, folder 11

TRW Microwave, Inc. 1994

Box 10, Folder 12

UTC: Chemical Systems Division (1 of 5)

Box 10, Folder 13

UTC: Chemical Systems Division (2 of 5)

Box 10, Folder 14

UTC: Chemical Systems Division (3 of 5)

Box 10, folder 15

UTC: Chemical Systems Division (4 of 5)

Box 10, Folder 16

UTC: Chemical Systems Division (5 of 5)

Box 10, Folder 17

NCH Corporation and Mohawk Laboratories

box 10, folder 18

Van Waters and Rogers, Inc.

Box 10, Folder 19

Westinghouse (1 of 6)

Box 10, folder 20

Westinghouse (2 of 6)

Box 10, Folder 21

Westinghouse (3 of 6)

Box 10, folder 22

Westinghouse (4 of 6)

Box 10, Folder 23

Westinghouse (5 of 6)

box 10, folder 24

Westinghouse (6 of 6)

Box 10, Folder 25

Varian

Box 10, Folder 26

Waste Management

Box 10, Folder 27

Xebek

Box 11, folder 1

Sandia

Box 11, folder 2

Spectra-Physics

Box 11, Folder 3

Synertek

Box 11, Folder 4

Syntex

Box 11, Folder 5

Teledyne

Box 11, folder 6

Watkins Johnson

Box 11, Folder 7

Southern Pacific Pipe Line

Box 11, Folder 8

Santa Clara County Transportation Agency

Box 11, Folder 9

Solvent Service, Inc.

Box 11, Folder 10

Santa Clara City Data

Box 11, Folder 11

Milpitas Copy of Letters

Box 11, Folder 12

Sunnyvale

Box 11, Folder 13

Letters to Robert Gross

box 11, folder 14

Lorentz Barrel and Drum, Co. (1 of 3)

box 11, folder 15

Lorentz Barrel and Drum, Co. (2 of 3)

Box 11, folder 16

Lorentz Barrel and Drum, Co. (3 of 3)

Box 11, folder 17

Jeff Lake 1987

box 11, folder 18

Newspaper Clippings 1982-1990

Box 11, folder 19

Correspondence, Legislative Files on SB14: Hazardous Waste Source Retention and Mgmt. Act 1987-1992

 

Research Notes 1986-1997

Box 11, Folder 20

Research Materials (1 of 2) 1987

box 11, Folder 21

Research Materials (2 of 2) 1987

Box 11, Folder 22

Notes and Correspondence (1 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 11, Folder 23

Notes and Correspondence (2 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 11, folder 24

Notes and Correspondence (3 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 11, Folder 25

Notes and Correspondence (4 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 11, Folder 26

Notes and Correspondence (5 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 11, Folder 27

Notes and Correspondence (6 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 11, Folder 28

Notes and Correspondence (7 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 11, Folder 29

Notes and Correspondence (8 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 11, Folder 30

Notes and Correspondence (9 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 11, Folder 31

Notes and Correspondence (10 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 12, Folder 1

Notes and Correspondence (11 of 27) 1986-1988

box 12, Folder 2

Notes and Correspondence (12 of 27) 1986-1989

Box 12, folder 3

Notes and Correspondence (13 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 12, Folder 4

Notes and Correspondence (14 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 12, Folder 5

Notes and Correspondence (15 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 12, Folder 6

Notes and Correspondence (16 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 12, Folder 7

Notes and Correspondence (17 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 12, folder 8

Notes and Correspondence (18 of 27) 1986-1988

box 12, Folder 9

Notes and Correspondence (19 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 12, Folder 10

Notes and Correspondence (20 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 12, Folder 11

Notes and Correspondence (21 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 12, Folder 12

Notes and Correspondence (22 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 12, Folder 13

Notes and Correspondence (23 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 13, Folder 1

Notes and Correspondence (24 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 13, folder 2

Notes and Correspondence (25 of 27) 1986-1988

box 13, Folder 3

Notes and Correspondence (26 of 27) 1986-1988

box 13, folder 4

Notes and Correspondence (27 of 27) 1986-1988

Box 13, Folder 5

Toxic Gas Ordinance Milpitas (1 of 4) 1990-1997

Box 13, Folder 6

Toxic Gas Ordinance Milpitas (2 of 4) 1990-1997

box 13, Folder 7

Toxic Gas Ordinance Milpitas (3 of 4) 1990-1997

Box 13, Folder 8

Toxic Gas Ordinance Milpitas (4 of 4) 1986-1988

 

SVTC, Administrative Files Series VIII: 1982-1999

Scope and Contents

This series includes administrative files providing insight into the internal proceedings, external correspondence, fundraising, and organizing of the Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition (SVTC) as it developed from a SCCOSH project into a wide-ranging, independent nonprofit organization.
Included is a group of materials pertaining to a 1985 "High-Tech Organizer's Retreat" held in Redwood City, California, organized by Ted Smith, Amanda Hawes, and some twenty other labor, occupational health, and environmental organizers. The Integrated Circuit, a national coalition formed out of the retreat and resulted in the publication of the newsletter Around the Circuit. In early 1986, SVTC separated from SCCOSH and established itself as a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation with its own Board of Directors. SVTC's funding in its early years came from The Public Welfare Foundation. Other grassroots groups, including San Francisco-based Citizens for a Better Environment (CBE) and the Citizen's Clearing House for Toxic Waste in New York, were influential and provided the SVTC with important fundraising advice.

Arrangement

This series is arranged chronologically.
 

Administrative Files 1982-1999

Box 13, folder 9

Great Oaks Water Company Correspondence 1982-1986

Box 13, Folder 10

High-Tech Organizers Retreat (1 of 5) 1985

Box 13, folder 11

High-Tech Organizers Retreat (2 of 5) 1985

box 13, folder 12

High-Tech Organizers Retreat (3 of 5) 1985

box 13, folder 13

High-Tech Organizers Retreat (4 of 5) 1985

Box 13, folder 14

High-Tech Organizers Retreat (5 of 5) 1985

Box 13, Folder 15

Bylaws/Application for 501(c)(3) Status 1986

Box 13, Folder 16

Fundraising (1 of 3) 1982-1986

Box 13, folder 17

Fundraising (2 of 3) 1982-1986

Box 13, Folder 18

Fundraising (3 of 3) 1982-1986

Box 13, Folder 19

Related Organizations, Inc. Correspondence (1 of 9) 1985-1999

Box 13, Folder 20

Related Organizations, Inc. Correspondence (2 of 9) 1985-1999

Box 14, folder 1

Related Organizations, Inc. Correspondence (3 of 9) 1985-1999

Box 14, Folder 2

Related Organizations, Inc. Correspondence (4 of 9) 1985-1999

Box 14, Folder 3

Related Organizations, Inc. Correspondence (5 of 9) 1985-1999

Box 14, folder 4

Related Organizations, Inc. Correspondence (6 of 9) 1985-1999

box 14, folder 5

Related Organizations, Inc. Correspondence (7 of 9) 1985-1999

box 14, Folder 6

Related Organizations, Inc. Correspondence (8 of 9) 1985-1999

Box 14, folder 7

Related Organizations, Inc. Correspondence (9 of 9) 1985-1999

 

SVTC, Founder Ted Smith Series IX: 1983-1995

Scope and Contents

Ted Smith is the founder and former Executive Director of the Silicon Valley Toxic Coalition. He currently serves as the Senior Strategist for SVTC. Smith is also the co-founder and Coordinator of the International Campaign for Responsible Technology (ICRT), an international network committed to working for the development of sustainable, non-polluting technologies. In addition, he is also the steering committee chair of the "Computer TakeBack Campaign", which is working to promote life-cycle producer responsibility within the high-tech electronics industry. He is co-editor of the book Challenging the Chip: Labor Rights and Environmental Justice in the Global Electronics Industry (2006). In 2001, Ted was recognized by the Dalai Lama for his environmental leadership.
Ted Smith maintained a strong awareness of other political arenas in which workers and communities were disputing industrial pollution, whether locally throughout California, in other states, or at the level of federal regulatory agencies. From 1984 onward, acting as Executive Director of SVTC, Smith spoke to hundreds of environmental and community activist groups in the Bay Area, around the state, and increasingly internationally. Included in this collection are news clippings from computer, electronics, and semiconductor industry trade periodicals. Also well-documented is Smith's preparation for a 1985 public debate moderated by California Senator Allen Cranston, in which Smith was pitted against electronics industry representative Leo Kline, then director of the Industry Clean Water Task Force.

Arrangement

This series is arranged chronologically.
 

Ted Smith 1983-1995

Box 14, folder 8

Ted Smith's Board Book 1985-1991

Box 14, folder 9

SVTC-Related Correspondence 1985-1987

Box 14, Folder 10

Publications/Transcribed Talks 1983-1995

Box 14, Folder 11

Record of Scheduled Talks (1 of 4) 1984-1994

Box 14, Folder 12

Record of Scheduled Talks (2 of 4) 1984-1994

Box 14, Folder 13

Record of Scheduled Talks (3 of 4) 1984-1994

Box 14, folder 14

Record of Scheduled Talks (4 of 4) 1984-1994

Box 14, Folder 15

Written Notes (1 of 2) 1984-1986

Box 14, Folder 16

Written Notes (2 of 2) 1984-1986

Box 14, Folder 17

Other Activist Materials (1 of 3) 1990-1991

Box 14, Folder 18

Other Activist Materials (2 of 3) 1990-1991

Box 14, folder 19

Other Activist Materials (3 of 3) 1990-1991

 

Meeting Files 1985-1990

Box 15, Folder 1

Allen Cranston Toxics Debate (1 of 2) 1985

Box 15, Folder 2

Allen Cranston Toxics Debate (2 of 2) 1985

Box 15, Folder 3

Evergreen College Labor Conference (1 of 4) 1990

box 15, folder 4

Evergreen College Labor Conference (2 of 4) 1990

Box 15, Folder 5

Evergreen College Labor Conference (3 of 4) 1990

box 15, folder 6

Evergreen College Labor Conference (4 of 4) 1990

 

SVTC, United Technologies Corporation Series X: 1984-1995

Scope and Contents

The contents in this series describe the successful campaign by the Silicon Valley Toxic Coalition (SVTC) and other local organizers to end the burning of waste rocket fuel in the Coyote Foothills southeast of San José. The company incinerating the fuel, United Technologies Corporation (UTC), manufactured rockets for commercial and military applications, with one of its largest contracts in the mid-1980s coming from the United States Air Force for production of the Minuteman missile. UTC first established a research & development division in the Coyote region in the late 1950s, and it began using open pits to burn excess rocket fuel in the late 1970s. Alongside SVTC, those local groups active in protesting UTC's open-bit burning in the late 1980s included the Coyote Creek Neighborhood Association, the South Bay Greens, the San José State University Environmental Resource Center, and The UTC Conversion Project, which was housed in the San José Peace Center. The UTC Conversion Project, an umbrella group of sorts, was focused not only on eliminating the open-pit burning, but on the larger objective of pressuring the UTC Coyote facility to transition to "non-military, non-toxic" products. In 1989, the Conversion Project authored and circulated a petition to the U.S. E.P.A, requested the pit areas be declared a Superfund federal cleanup site.
For specific details on the role that SVTC played in the UTC Conversion Project, see box 20, folder 1, which includes a long script of arguments presented by Ted Smith to the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) on October 11, 1990. Researchers will also find letters from residents of the Coyote Creek Neighborhood to BAAQMD Chairperson Paul Cooper after the UTC pits were closed in 1992 (see box 20, folder 4). See Series XI, box 22 for a more detailed account of the UTC case, including notes from what appear to be UTC Conversion Project meetings as well as a full transcript of an October, 1990, BAAQMD hearing at which Ted Smith served as a witness for the public.

Arrangement

This series is arranged chronologically.
 

United Technologies Corporation 1984-1995

Box 15, Folder 7

UTC Activism 1989-1992

Box 15, folder 8

Environmental Impact Reports (1 of 2) 1984-1995

Box 15, folder 9

Environmental Impact Reports (2 of 2) 1984-1995

box 15, folder 10

Background/News Clippings 1986-1992

Box 15, Folder 11

Letters to BAAQMD (1 of 12) 1990

Box 15, folder 12

Letters to BAAQMD (2 of 12) 1990

Box 15, Folder 13

Letters to BAAQMD (3 of 12) 1990

Box 15, folder 14

Letters to BAAQMD (4 of 12) 1990

Box 15, Folder 15

Letters to BAAQMD (5 of 12) 1990

box 15, folder 16

Letters to BAAQMD (6 of 12) 1990

Box 15, Folder 17

Letters to BAAQMD (7 of 12) 1990

box 15, folder 18

Letters to BAAQMD (8 of 12) 1990

Box 15, Folder 19

Letters to BAAQMD (9 of 12) 1990

Box 16, Folder 1

Letters to BAAQMD (10 of 12) 1990

box 16, folder 2

Letters to BAAQMD (11 of 12) 1990

Box 16, folder 3

Letters to BAAQMD (12 of 12) 1990

Box 16, folder 4

Letters to BAAQMD 1992

 

SVTC, Toxics Coordinating Project Series XI: 1985-1990

Scope and Contents

The contents in this series describe the Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition's (SVTC) organizational ties to the Toxics Coordinating Project (TCP), a network of California-based environmental, occupational health, and community activist groups established in Sacramento in 1985. SVTC was an early participant in the TCP, joining representatives of the Bay Area Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (a larger group including SCCOSH as a member), Citizens for a Better Environment, Environmental Defense Fund, California League of Conservation Voters, California Labor Federation, and the AFL-CIO.
Both Ted Smith (SVTC) and Amanda Hawes (SCCOSH) attended the TCP's First Annual Toxics Organizing Conference, held in November of 1986 in Sacramento. Starting in the spring of 1986, the TCP produced a newsletter Toxics Watchdog. While the TCP primarily served as a clearinghouse for information between activists, it also undertook its own campaigns. For example, a statewide "Toxic Use Reduction" program in the late 1980s set out to reduce potentially harmful synthetic chemicals at the point of their production and consumption, rather than simply through a safe, or safer disposal.

Arrangement

This series is arranged chronologically.
 

Toxics Coordinating Project 1985-1990

Box 16, Folder 5

TCP Records (1 of 18) 1985-1990

Box 16, folder 6

TCP Records (2 of 18) 1985-1990

box 16, folder 7

TCP Records (3 of 18) 1985-1990

box 16, folder 8

TCP Records (4 of 18) 1985-1990

Box 16, Folder 9

TCP Records (5 of 18) 1985-1990

Box 16, Folder 10

TCP Records (6 of 18) 1985-1990

Box 16, folder 11

TCP Records (7 of 18) 1985-1990

box 16, Folder 12

TCP Records (8 of 18) 1985-1990

Box 16, Folder 13

TCP Records (9 of 18) 1985-1990

Box 16, folder 14

TCP Records (10 of 18) 1985-1990

Box 16, Folder 15

TCP Records (11 of 18) 1985-1990

box 16, folder 16

TCP Records (12 of 18) 1985-1990

Box 16, Folder 17

TCP Records (13 of 18) 1985-1990

Box 16, Folder 18

TCP Records (14 of 18) 1985-1990

Box 16, folder 19

TCP Records (15 of 18) 1985-1990

Box 16, Folder 20

TCP Records (16 of 18) 1985-1990

Box 16, folder 21

TCP Records (17 of 18) 1985-1990

Box 16, Folder 22

TCP Records (18 of 18) 1985-1990

Box 16, folder 23

Toxics Watchdog Newsletter (1 of 2) 1986-1990

Box 16, folder 24

Toxics Watchdog Newsletter (2 of 2) 1986-1990

Box 17, Folder 1

TCP: Ted Smith Notebook 1985-1990

 

SVTC, AB 2948--Tanner Bill Series XII: 1986-1991

Scope and Contents

The contents in this series describe Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition's (SVTC) role in developing a hazardous waste management plan for Santa Clara County under the provisions of California Assembly Bill 2948, which passed in 1986. AB 2948 is also known as the "Tanner Bill", named after the chief sponsor Assemblywoman Sally Tanner. The Tanner Bill implemented countywide planning as the overarching strategy for managing hazardous waste throughout California. Included in this series is Smith's notebook from the Advisory Committee meetings, which also contains miscellaneous letters and reports exchanged between committee members.

Arrangement

This series is arranged chronologically.
 

Tanner Bill 1986-1991

Box 17, Folder 2

Tanner Bill 1986

Box 17, Folder 3

Tanner Bill Correspondence (1 of 4)

Box 17, folder 4

Tanner Bill Correspondence (2 of 4)

Box 17, folder 5

Tanner Bill Correspondence (3 of 4)

Box 17, Folder 6

Tanner Bill Correspondence (4 of 4)

 

SVTC, Stanford University/Biotechnology Activism Series XIII: 1987-1991

Scope and Contents

The contents in this series describe the Silicon Valley Toxic Coalition's (SVTC) dispute with Stanford University over issues related to the university's research agenda and its handling of hazardous materials, most notably a waste incinerator located in the University Medical Center. In August of 1987, SVTC appealed the permit given by the Santa Clara County Planning Commission to a new biomedical research facility on the Stanford campus, located on Serra Street off West Campus Drive. Among SVTC's motivations, the group listed Stanford's past negligence with hazardous materials, the implications for community health of new biomedical practices like genetic engineering, and the lack of a medical monitoring program for researchers and other building staff. Stanford President Donald Kennedy publicly denounced these concerns, yet agreed to delay the construction project until a full environmental review was completed. In December of 1987, an additional source of controversy opened up when a senior engineer in Stanford's Department of Health and Safety resigned, alleging longstanding health issues created by the treatment of hazardous waste at the University Medical Center. Facing negative publicity from SVTC and other community groups, combined with these internal allegations from its DOHS, Stanford conceded to a University-wide special health and safety review, which they eventually completed in the fall of 1988. The review led Stanford to create two new administrative positions: Director of Environmental Health and Safety and a Laboratory Safety Officer.
Over the three years in which Stanford and SVTC disputed these issues, Ted Smith collected detailed notes on the emerging biotechnologies like genetic engineering and their potential consequence for public health and the environment. Researching this subject and making it a part of SVTC activism brought Smith into contact with a variety of groups around the country voicing similar concerns. In January of 1989, SVTC was one of several Bay Area organizations sponsoring a two-day conference on "Creating a Public Interest in Biotechnology in California," at which the renowned environmentalist and critic of genetic engineering, Jeremy Rifkin appeared as the keynote speaker. In the early 1990s, Smith served on the steering committee of the California Biotechnology Action Council (CALBAC), based in Sacramento. Along with a record of Smith's participation in the Action Council, this series includes many newspaper clippings describing tensions between Stanford officials, Palo Alto community associations, and environmentalist groups headquartered within the Bay Area.

Arrangement

This series is arranged chronologically.
 

Building Assessments/Environmental Reports 1987-1989

Box 17, Folder 7

Building Assessments/Environment Reports (1 of 4)

Box 17, folder 8

Building Assessments/Environment Reports (2 of 4)

Box 17, Folder 9

Building Assessments/Environment Reports (3 of 4)

Box 17, folder 10

Building Assessments/Environment Reports (4 of 4)

 

Biotechnology Activism 1987-1991

Box 18, folder 1

SVTC Appeal to SCC Board of Supervisors (1 of 3) 1987

Box 18, folder 2

SVTC Appeal to SCC Board of Supervisors (2 of 3) 1987

box 18, folder 3

SVTC Appeal to SCC Board of Supervisors (3 of 3) 1987

box 18, folder 4

Miscellaneous Correspondence (1 of 4) 1987-1990

box 18, Folder 5

Miscellaneous Correspondence (2 of 4) 1987-1990

Box 18, Folder 6

Miscellaneous Correspondence (3 of 4) 1987-1990

Box 18, Folder 7

Miscellaneous Correspondence (4 of 4) 1987-1990

box 18, Folder 8

Loose Notes on Stanford/Biotechnology 1987-1990

box 18, folder 9

News Clippings 1987-1990

Box 18, folder 10

Background Information (1 of 4) 1972-1987

Box 18, folder 11

Background Information (2 of 4) 1972-1987

box 18, folder 12

Background Information (3 of 4) 1972-1987

Box 18, folder 13

Background Information (4 of 4) 1972-1987

Box 18, Folder 14

California Biotechnology Action Council (1 of 2) 1990-1991

box 18, folder 15

California Biotechnology Action Council (2 of 2) 1990-1991

 

SVTC, Earth Day Series XIV: 1987-1993

Scope and Contents

The contents in this series describe efforts made in the late 1980s and early 1990s by the Silicon Valley Toxic Coalition (SVTC) and other Bay area environmental groups to eliminate chlorofluorocarbons, or "CFCs," from household products and manufacturing processes in use in the region. The International Earth Day celebrations of 1989 and 1990 served as a focal point for these efforts.

Arrangement

This series is arranged chronologically.
 

Earth Day Task Force 1987-1993

Box 18, Folder 16

Toxic Release Inventory System (1 of 2) 1989

Box 18, folder 17

Toxic Release Inventory System (2 of 2) 1989

box 18, folder 18

Earth Day Task Force 1987-1988

Box 18, Folder 19

Earth Day Task Force 1988

Box 18, folder 20

Earth Day Task Force (1 of 4) 1990

box 18, folder 21

Earth Day Task Force (2 of 4) 1990

Box 19, Folder 1

Earth Day Task Force (3 of 4) 1990

Box 19, folder 2

Earth Day Task Force (4 of 4) 1990

Box 19, Folder 3

Earth Day Task Force 1993

Box 19, Folder 4

Earth Day Task Force (1 of 22) 1987-1993

box 19, folder 5

Earth Day Task Force (2 of 22) 1987-1993

box 19, folder 6

Earth Day Task Force (3 of 22) 1987-1993

box 19, Folder 7

Earth Day Task Force (4 of 22) 1987-1993

Box 19, folder 8

Earth Day Task Force (5 of 22) 1987-1993

Box 19, folder 9

Earth Day Task Force (6 of 22) 1987-1993

Box 19, Folder 10

Earth Day Task Force (7 of 22) 1987-1993

Box 19, Folder 11

Earth Day Task Force (8 of 22) 1987-1993

Box 19, folder 12

Earth Day Task Force (9 of 22) 1987-1993

Box 19, folder 13

Earth Day Task Force (10 of 22) 1987-1993

box 19, folder 14

Earth Day Task Force (11 of 22) 1987-1993

Box 19, Folder 15

Earth Day Task Force (12 of 22) 1987-1993

Box 19, Folder 16

Earth Day Task Force (13 of 22) 1987-1993

Box 19, Folder 17

Earth Day Task Force (14 of 22) 1987-1993

Box 19, Folder 18

Earth Day Task Force (15 of 22) 1987-1993

Box 19, Folder 19

Earth Day Task Force (16 of 22) 1987-1993

Box 19, folder 20

Earth Day Task Force (17 of 22) 1987-1993

box 20, folder 1

Earth Day Task Force (18 of 22) 1987-1993

box 20, folder 2

Earth Day Task Force (19 of 22) 1987-1993

Box 20, folder 3

Earth Day Task Force (20 of 22) 1987-1993

Box 20, Folder 4

Earth Day Task Force (21 of 22) 1987-1993

Box 20, Folder 5

Earth Day Task Force (22 of 22) 1987-1993

 

Newspaper Articles Series XV: 1987-1997

Scope and Contents

This series consists of newspaper articles concerning the Silicon Valley Toxic Coalition (SVTC) and the Santa Clara Center for Occupational Health (SCCOSH), and environmental issues involving Silicon Valley companies. Many of the articles cover fines, civil complaints, and federal prosecution of companies based on findings by hazardous waste inspectors. News coverage of the legal case against Silicon Valley, chip board manufacturer Ztron is fetured. Ztron was found guilty of pumping hazardous waste directly into the sewer system. Other stories highlight the controversial storage practices of Lorentz Barrel and Drum Company. This company storing over 300 barrels of hazardous waste within a few blocks of the San José State University Athletics Facility.

Arrangement

This series is arranged chronologically.
Box 20, folder 6

Newspaper Articles (1 of 4) 1985-1997

Box 20, Folder 7

Newspaper Articles (2 of 4) 1985-1997

Box 20, folder 8

Newspaper Articles (3 of 4) 1985-1997

Box 20, folder 9

Newspaper Articles (4 of 4) 1985-1997