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Finding Aid for the China Democracy Movement and Tiananmen Incident Archives, 1989-1993
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I. Documents—In Chinese

Box 1

AC 1001.  Beijing student movement flyers. Beijing. April 25-June 4, 1989.

Physical Description: 78 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Letters in support of the demonstrators, political proclamations, news reports, commentaries, and newspaper articles written or copied by students and civilians of Beijing. In addition, there are news reports and letters of protest from foreign countries and prominent Overseas Chinese students and scholars.
Subject codes: CB01 CC01 CE02 CE04
Box 1

AC 1002.  Hand copied texts from various newspapers. Beijing. Dated documents, April 26-June 1, 1989. Several documents undated.

Physical Description: 12 pp.

Scope and Content Note

One-page quotations by numerous different hands of articles from the press.
Subject codes: CB01 CC02 CC05
Box 1

AC 1003.  Dated documents from students in Beijing. Beijing. April 28-June 1, 1989.

Physical Description: 52 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Letters, reports, and announcements, primarily by students at Beijing University.Mostly hand-written.
Subject codes: CB01 CC02
Box 1

AC 1004.  Undated documents from students in Beijing. Beijing. Late April to early June 1989.

Physical Description: 42 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Letters, reports, and announcements primarily by students at Beijing University. Hand-written or printed.
Subject codes: CB01 CC02
Box 1

AC 1005.  Declarations and decisions by the Beijing student groups. Beijing. May 1-June 4, 1989.

Physical Description: 19 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Declarations, mostly hand-written. Most are dated.
Subject codes: CB01 CC02
Box 1

AC 1006.  Dated flyers from Beijing University. Beijing. May 13-June4, 1989.

Physical Description: 39pp.

Scope and Content Note

Flyers, mostly printed, by students of Beijing University, include letters and news reports addressed to soldiers, civilians, and the world community, as well as general comments on the imposition of martial law, government leaders, the Democracy Movement, and freedom of the press.
Subject codes: CB01 CC01 CC03 CC04 CC05
Box 1

AC 1007.  [chinese characters] "Gao quan guo Gongchandang yuan shu" (Declaration to all Communists in the whole country). May 18, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Open letter from Communist students at the Central Arts College [chinese characters] protesting the party's opposition to the Democracy Movement.
Subject codes: CB01
Box 1

AC 1008.  Three brief declarations. Beijing. May 1989.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) [chinese characters] "Guanyu shiju de liu dian shengming" (Six-point declaration on the current situation), May 19, 1989. From four research institutes.
  • (2) [chinese characters] "Zhishifenzi xuanyan" (Intellectuals' declaration), ND.
  • (3) [chinese characters] "Guangming yu heian de zuihou juezhan—shoudu gejie lianxi huiyi guanyu shiju de shengming" (The final battle between light and darkness—declaration of the united meeting on the current situation representing all walks of life in the capital), May 23, 1989.
Subject codes: CC01 CC04
Box 1

AC 1009.  [chinese characters] "Beijingshi zhengfu fayanren da jizhe wen" (The spokesperson for the Beijing city government answers journalists' questions). Beijing: Xinhua she. May 20, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Official explanation of the army's entry into the city of Beijing.
Subject codes: CD01
Box 1

AC 1010.  A small collection of flyers. Beijing. May 20-26, 1989.

Physical Description: 8 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Includes cartoons, poems, and songs about the 1989 Democracy Movement.
Subject codes: CC01 CC04
Box 1

AC 1011.  [chinese characters] "Zhongguo renmin jiefangjun jieyan budui zhihuibu gao Beijing shimin shu" (Declaration of martial law by the Chinese People's Liberation Army to the citizens of Beijing). Beijing. May 21, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Handbill dropped from helicopters above Tiananmen Square and Beijing University campus warning students and civilians participating in the Democracy Movement that demonstrations were to be suppressed.
Subject codes: CD01
Box 1

AC 1012.  Telegram from thirty-six Chinese-American scientists to Deng Xiaoping. New York. May 21, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Telegram sent to Deng Xiaoping by a group of distinguished Chinese-American scientists and Nobel Prize winners, asking him to remove the army from Beijing and to resolve the political crisis peacefully in order to successfully continue his reform program.
Subject codes: CE02
Box 1

AC 1013.  [chinese characters] "Jianjue zhizhi dongluan de xuanchuan kouhao" (Propaganda slogans to suppress the turmoil). Beijing. ND, probably May 21, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Twenty propaganda slogans designed to squelch the Democracy Movement, which were distributed by army helicopters above Tiananmen Square and Beijing University.
Subject codes: CD01
Box 1

AC 1014.  [chinese characters] "Yi wei lao junren zhi xuesheng de gongkai xin" (Open letter to students from an old soldier). Beijing. May [22?] 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A retired military officer offers suggestions to students on how to block the army from entering Beijing.
Subject codes: CC03
Box 1

AC 1015.  [chinese characters] Chu Qijun. [chinese characters] "Zhongguo gongmin su Li Peng shu" (The Chinese citizens accuse Li Peng). Beijing. May 23, 1989.

Physical Description: 5 pp.

Scope and Content Note

List of allegedly illegal activities by Li Peng.
Subject codes: CC04
Box 1

AC 1016.  Two letters. Beijing. May and early June 1989

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) [chinese characters] "Shiminmen, gongren, nongmin, ganbumen, zhishifenzimen, jiefangjun guanbingmen" (Citizens, workers, farmers, officials, intellectuals, PLA soldiers and officers), May 23, 1989, 1 pp.
  • (2) [chinese characters] "Guanyu zuzhi Beijing gaoxiao lianhe changzheng xuanchuan dui de changyi" (Concerning a proposal to form a Long March propaganda team in the Beijing institutes of higher education), June 2, 1989, 1 pp.
  • The first letter appeals for support of the student movement in Beijing. The second calls for students in Beijing to begin a "Long March" to farms and factories in order to express their democratic ideals.
Subject codes: CB01 CC01 CC02
Box 1

AC 1017.  [chinese characters] "Wuhan 5/23 can'an zhenxiang" (The truth about the May 23rd incident in Wuhan). Wuhan. May 24, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Eyewitness account of military police suppression of student demonstrations in Wuhan.
Subject codes: CB01
Box 1

AC 1018.  [chinese characters] Chen Wen. [chinese characters] "Gongheguo jue bu shi siyou caichan" (The Republic is absolutely not private property). Beijing. May 28, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

The article criticizes the tactics of the government as totalitarian. It also accuses Deng Xiaoping, as the supreme leader in China, of acting like a modern emperor. The author calls on the people, in light of the millions who have died over the previous forty years from political persecution and man-made famine, to rise up and overthrow the "feudal system" of China.
Subject codes: CC01 CC04
Box 1

AC 1019.  [chinese characters] "Shoudu gongren zizhi lianhehui linshi zhangcheng" (Temporary constitution of the Autonomous Workers' Union of the Capital). Beijing. May 28, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

This temporary constitution of the Autonomous Workers' Union of the Capital includes the union's purpose, membership rules, and organizational structure.
Subject codes: CC01 CC03
Box 1

AC 1020.  Personal accounts of the apprehension of two members of the Flying Tiger team. Beijing. May 29 and 31, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Very brief accounts of their apprehension by plainclothes policemen and the physical abuse that they suffered upon reaching the police station. The reports also discuss the role played by the Flying Tigers in the Democracy Movement.
Subject codes: CB01 CC03
Box 1

AC 1021.  [chinese characters] Shoudu gongren zizhi hui (chou wei hui) (Autonomous Workers' Union of the Capital [Preparatory Committee]). [chinese characters] "Xinwen fabuhui" (News release). Beijing. May 30, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Press release on the formation of the independent union and the government's attempt to suppress it.
Subject codes: CC03
Box 1

AC 1022.  [chinese characters] Min sheng (People's voice [this is the name at the top of a flyer, not a periodical]). [chinese characters] "Ju wairen de zishu: Ye zuo yi hui Zhongguoren" (An outsider's personal account: Getting to also play the part of a Chinese). Beijing. May 30, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Eyewitness account by a physically disabled writer of what he saw and felt in Tiananmen Square from May 17 to May 30. He comments on the exclusion of the disabled from recognition as citizens.
Subject codes: CB01
Box 1

AC 1023.  [chinese characters] "Minzhuzhishen diaoxiang luocheng xuanyan" (Dedication of the Goddess of Democracy statue) [Title of first of three documents on the Goddess of Democracystatue]. Beijing. May 30, 1990.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Three letters and announcements written by the students of eight arts universities in Beijing to declare their purpose in creating the Goddess of Democracy statue and to protest the government's political pressure.
Subject codes: CC01
Box 1

AC 1024.  [chinese characters] Beijing Zhongguo renquan yundong weiyuanhui (Beijing Committee for Human Rights in China). [chinese characters] "Zhongguo renquan xuanyan" (Declaration of human rights in China). Beijing. ND, probably May 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Lists sixteen definitions and requirements for human rights in China. The second page is a Chinese translation of the French Declaration of Human Rights.
Subject codes: CC05
Box 1

AC 1025.  [chinese characters] "Guanyu zhengzhi shang jinqin fanzhi" (On the issue of nepotism in Chinese politics). Beijing. May 1989.

Physical Description: 5 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Letter compares the effects of the spread of nepotism in the government to the effects of inbreeding on a family.
Subject codes: CC01
Box 1

AC 1026.  [chinese characters] "Beijing ge danwei youxing biaoyu xuan" (The list of slogans for all Beijing units [in the student demonstrations]). Beijing. May 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Two lists of slogans: One set was to be used for posters and other printed material, the other was to be shouted by the demonstrators.
Subject codes: CC01 CC05
Box 1

AC 1027.  [chinese characters] "Wo han! Wo hu!! Zhongguo qingnian zhishifenzi muo bu qianbei houchen! Qilai! Qilai! Zi jiu!" (I shout! I cry out! Educated Chinese youth, don't follow in the footsteps of the older generation! Arise! Arise! Save yourselves!) Beijing. May 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A report and a poem urging young intellectuals to fight for better living and working conditions.
Subject codes: CC02
Box 1

AC 1028.  [chinese characters] Renmin minzhu yanjiu hui (People's Democratic Research Society), [chinese characters] "Ziyou zhe xuanyan" (Declaration by supporters of freedom). Beijing. May 1989.

Physical Description: 6 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Declaration, with a cover letter, on the formation of a prodemocracy organization with a cover letter. Accuses the government of being against the people and against the spirit of democracy.
Subject codes: CC01 CC05
Box 1

AC 1029.  Miscellaneous news and information sheets. Beijing. Approximately May 1989.

Physical Description: 7 pp.

Scope and Content Note

One- and two-page documents by student and worker groups.
Subject codes: CB01 CC02 CC03
Box 1

AC 1030.  Miscellaneous loose pages. Sent from Beijing. Mostly May 1989.

Physical Description: 18 pp.

Scope and Content Note

One- and two-page fragments, some dated in May 1989.
Subject codes: CB01 CC02 CC03
Box 1

AC 1031.  Beijing Democracy Movement flyers, Beijing. undated, approximately May and June 1989.

Physical Description: 45 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Open letters and declarations, mostly hand-written.
Subject codes: CB01 CC02 CC05
Box 1

AC 1032.  Undated printed flyers from Beijing University. Beijing. Approximately mid-May- early June, 1989.

Physical Description: 15 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Open letters and flyers by the students of Beijing University, includes letters and news reports addressed to soldiers, civilians, and the world community, as well as general comments on the imposition of martial law, government leaders, the Democracy Movement, and freedom of the press.
Subject codes: CB01 CC01 CC03 CC04 CC05
Box 1

AC 1033.  [chinese characters] "6.2 jueshi xuanyan" (Declaration of a hunger strike to begin June 2). Beijing. June 2, 1989.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Declaration by four prominent intellectuals—[chinese characters] (Liu Xiaobo, Zhou Duo, Hou Dejian, and Gao Xin) — of the intent and specifics, including the basic slogans and timetable, of the Democracy Movement hunger strike.
Subject codes: CC01 CC02
Box 1

AC 1034.  [chinese characters] "Junfang qi wei gaoji jiangling biao tai" (Seven senior generals express their opinion). Beijing. ND, approximately first few days of June, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Printed sheet over names of seven well-known generals, Zhang Aiping, Xiao Ke, Ye Fei, Yang Dezhi, Song Shilun, Chen Zaidao, and Li Jukui. Asserts that the People's Liberation Army belongs to the people and therefore should not be used against them. Suggests that sending the army into Beijing would only cause more conflict.
Subject codes: CC04
Box 1

AC 1035.  [chinese characters] "Yi wei wugu beida Fada ren de kongsu" (A brief on behalf of an innocent student of the University of Law who was beaten). Beijing. Undated, approximately early June, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A law student recounts how he was beaten on May 30, 1989, by policemen in front of the People's Supreme Court because of his effort to protect a citizen from a beating.
Subject codes: CB01
Box 1

AC 1036.  Chinese Students and Scholars Association. [chinese characters] "Haitang xue di, Zhongguo nuhou" (Bleeding China cries out). Los Angeles: University of Southern California. ND, approximately mid-June, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Letter soliciting donations for the "Beijing May Fourth Fund."
Subject codes: CE04
Box 1

AC 1037.  Conference Secreteriat of the First Congress of Chinese Students and Scholars in the United States. [chinese characters] "Diyi jie quan Mei Zhongguo xuesheng xuezhe daibiao dahui" (The First Congress of Chinese Students and Scholars in the United States). Chicago. Mid-July 1989.

Physical Description: 8 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Introductory packet and agenda for a July 28-30, 1989, conference of Chinese students and scholars, hosted by Chinese student groups at Northwestern University, the University of Chicago, and the University of Illinois.
Subject codes: CE04
Box 1

AC 1038.  [chinese characters] "Zhonghua ren" yiren yi xin chou weihui ("Chinese" One Person-One Letter Preparation Committee). [chinese characters] "Yiren yi xin jihua shu" (The one person—one letter proposal). Los Angeles. July 30,1989.

Physical Description: 9 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Flyer accompanied by a sample letter and six pages of supporting documentation by a Hong Kong-based organization proposing that people write at least one letter to someone in China, the purpose of which is to relate the events of the Tiananmen Incident to the Chinese people.
Subject codes: CE03
Box 1

AC 1039.  Ad-Hoc Committee to Welcome China's Democracy Movement Leaders. [chinese characters] "Huanying Zhongguo minyun lingxiu" (Welcome China's Democracy Movement leaders). Los Angeles. August 4-11, 1989.

Physical Description: 6 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Press releases, flyers, and other materials relating to the arrival of some of the Democracy Movement leaders in Los Angeles. In both Chinese and English.
Subject codes: CE03 CE04
Box 1

AC 1040.  [chinese characters] Li Kexing. [chinese characters] "Guanyu Zhongguo xuesheng yundong lilun yanjiu de wenjuan" (A research questionnaire on theories of student movements in China). Los Angeles. August 5, 1989.

Physical Description: 14 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Survey of attitudes and perceptions of the student movement in light of intellectuals' views on politics, culture, values, and morality.
Subject codes: CE04
Box 1

AC 1041.  [chinese characters] Wan Qiang. Fax. Los Angeles. August 6, 1989.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Fax message from the University of Southern California Chinese Students and Scholars Association to the UCLA Center for Pacific Rim Studies, regarding the news release for the Ad Hoc Committee to welcome leaders of the Democracy Movement.
Subject codes: CE04
Box 1

AC 1042.  [chinese characters] Huang Kai. Fax. Los Angeles. August 6, 1989.

Physical Description: 5 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Fax message from Professor Huang Kai of the University of Southern California to Sue Fan of the UCLA Center for Pacific Rim Studies, on the agenda for the visit of Democracy Movement leaders.
Subject codes: CE03
Box 1

AC 1043.  "Welcome leaders of the Democracy Movement" [chinese characters] "Huanying minyun lingxiu." Los Angeles. August 11, 1989.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Packet in Chinese and English for participants in Los Angeles meeting to welcome several leaders of the Democracy Movement.
Subject codes: CE03 CE04
Box 1

AC 1044.  [chinese characters] Guojia jiaoyu weiyuanhui wenjian (National Education Committee [of the People's Republic of China] document). [chinese characters] "Fabu 'Guanyu juyou daxue he daxue yi shang xueli renyuan zifei chuguo liuxue de buchong guiding' de tongzhi" (Notification of communication "In regard to the supplementary regulations on persons with undergraduate and postgraduate degrees leaving for self-sponsored study abroad"). Beijing. January 25, 1990.

Physical Description: 9 pp.

Scope and Content Note

This new policy requires that students who have received any degree beyond a high school diploma must repay the Chinese government for the cost of their higher education before leaving the country. This change occured in the aftermath of the 1989 Democracy Movement.
Subject codes: CD01
Box 1

AC 1045.  [chinese characters] Zhu Mei shiguan jiaoyu chu (Education Section of the [PRC] U.S. Embassy). [chinese characters] "Dui shaoshu congshi fandui shehuizhuyi zuguo liuxue ren de chuli banfa" (Methods for dealing with the minority of overseas students who committed acts opposing the socialist motherland). Washington, DC. April 10, 1990.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

The Chinese government's policy after the Democracy Movement is to classify Overseas Chinese students into two statuses according to their reaction to the movement. The document also outlines the reeducation policy for those who have protested the government's actions.
Subject codes: CD04
 

II. Documents—In English

Box 1

AE 1001.  Joel Wachs(Los Angeles city councilman). Letter to President George Bush. Los Angeles. May 24, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Letter from Wachs and eleven other members of the City Council asks Bush to express support for the Chinese people.
Subject codes: EE01
Box 1

AE 1002.  Los Angeles Consulate General of the People's Republic of China. "What Has Happened in Beijing?" Los Angeles. June 5, 1989.

Physical Description: 9 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Official account of the events of June 3 and 4 and of the necessity for imposing martial law ("A counter-revolutionary rebellion broke out in Beijing on June 3 and 4 after more than month of turmoil").
Subject codes: ED04 EC01
Box 1

AE 1003.  Board of Directors, National Committee on United States-China Relations. New York. June 5, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Public letter expressing the board's regret at the violent suppression in Tiananmen during the night of June 3-4, and announcing the postponement of some programs between the two countries.
Subject codes: EE01
Box 1

AE 1004.  "Australian Intelligence Report." Beijing. June 6, 1989.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A June 21 summary distributed over International Fidonet BBSes of a purported June 6 cable from the Australian Embassy in Beijing to the Australian government, including graphic details of supression of demonstrators.
Subject codes: EB03
Box 1

AE 1005.  Michael Woo (Los Angeles city councilman). "Woo Calls on China to End Violence." Los Angeles. June 6, 1989.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Woo calls for use of existing channels with China to "urge an end to the brutal slaughter."
Subject codes: EE01
Box 1

AE 1006.  ROCSA [these initials are not elaborated]. Notice. Irvine, California.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Members of the Chinese Students Association at the University of California, Irvine, call for a June 7, 1989, memorial rally at UC Irvine for those who died in Tiananmen Square.
Subject codes: EE04
Box 1

AE 1007.  Harvard University. "American University Presidents Protest Actions in China." Cambridge, Massachusetts. June 7, 1989.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Public letter by fifteen American university presidents denouncing the June 4 crackdown. (With a local distribution letter from the UCLA Public Information Office in Los Angeles.)
Subject codes: EE02
Box 1

AE 1008.  "Behind the Democracy Revolution: Reports from China." Los Angeles. June 8, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Announcement of a public forum at UCLA, sponsored by the Asian American Studies Center, the Center for Pacific Rim Studies, and other UCLA groups.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 1

AE 1009.  Lucie Cheng. "Beijing Experience." Kowloon, Hong Kong. June 8, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Faxed account by UCLA professor who was in Beijing the night of June 3-4.
Subject codes: EB02 EE02
Box 1

AE 1010.  Miscellaneous letters and petitions. Berkeley, Los Angeles, and New York. June 8-July 5, 1989.

Physical Description: 9 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Letters, petitions, and drafts of letters addressed to various officials and bodies, from the National People's Congress to President Bush. Includes endorsements by many distinguished scholars and UCLA professors.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 1

AE 1011.  Los Angeles-Guangzhou Sister City Association. Los Angeles. June 9, 1989

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Letter to association members declaring the postponement of all mutual programs with Guangzhou because of the "recent violence and bloodshed that has occurred in Beijing."
Subject codes: EE01
Box 1

AE 1012.  Solidarity. "China on the Brink of Civil War." Los Angeles. June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Flyer for a forum by Nigel Harris.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 1

AE 1013.  Sandy Brown. Notice of a meeting. Los Angeles. June 10, 1989.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Call for a meeting at Sandy Brown's apartment to raise funds for the Democracy Movement in China. Includes an English translation of a June 3 phone conversation between Chinese students in Beijing and three Chinese students at the California Institute of Technology.
Subject codes: EE04
Box 1

AE 1014.  San Fernando Valley Chinese Cultural Association. Letters. Northridge, California. June 10, 1989, and August 1-4, 1989.

Physical Description: 5 pp.

Scope and Content Note

June 10 letter in Chinese promoting fund-raising for those who died in Beijing and lending of a fax machine from the San Fernando Valley Chinese Cultural Association to the UCLA Chinese Students and Scholars Association. English material from same organization in August around events for visit to Los Angeles by Wu'er Kaixi and Yan Jiaqi.
Subject codes: CE03 EE03
Box 1

AE 1015.  Chinese Students and Scholars Association, UCLA. "A Letter to CSSA Donors." Los Angeles. June 13, 1989.

Physical Description: Two versions of a letter. 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Proposed uses of donations already received, including fax communication with China and financial assistance to families of victims in China.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 1

AE 1016.  Erich Bloch (National Science Foundation). Washington, DC. June 15, 1989.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

John Crowley, Association of American Universities, Washington, DC, forwards to a large list (included) of U.S. university chancellors Bloch's announcement that NSA will seek to offer additional funding to Chinese NSF grantees who decide to extend their stays in the United States in the aftermath of the Tiananmen Incident.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 1

AE 1017.  Sue Fan (UCLA Center for Pacific Rim Studies). Letter. Los Angeles, California. June 16, 1989.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Invitation to Cao Chang-Ching of the Press Freedom Herald (Alhambra, California, Pro-Democracy Movement newspaper) to speak at a rally on June 18, 1989, along with a press release for the rally.
Subject codes: EE03
Box 1

AE 1018.  Pete Wilson. "Wilson to Introduce Senate Resolution Urging Action by U.S. and U.N. on Human Rights Violations by Chinese Gov't." Washington, DC. June 17, 1989.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Summary of Senator Wilson's position as stated in his appearence on CNN and the text of his proposed resolution.
Subject codes: EE01
Box 1

AE 1019.  Press report. NP. June 17, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Copy of a page from an unidentified American journal, which reports that the U.S. National Academy of Sciences has suspended all collaboration with Chinese institutions.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 1

AE 1020.  Organizing Committee of Southern California for the Democratic Movement in China. "An Open Letter to the Officials of the Consulate of the People's Republic of China." Los Angeles. June 18, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Letter in English and Chinese appealing to officials of the Chinese Consulate in Los Angeles to defect as a protest against the suppression in Beijing. The letter promises that the organization will provide help to any officials who do so.
Subject codes: EE03 CE03
Box 2

AE 1021.  Coordination Center for Democracy in China. Northridge, California. June 18, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Letter in English and Chinese to Yang Shangkun and Li Peng denouncing the June 4 crackdown and urging the government to release people arrested as a result of the Democracy Movement.
Subject codes: EE03 EC03
Box 2

AE 1022.  Peace March Organizing Committee of Southern California. "Peace March." Los Angeles. June 18, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Flyers in English and Chinese for a demonstration in MacArthur Park, Los Angeles, with supporting materials.
Subject codes: EE03 CE03
Box 2

AE 1023.  Press Freedom Herald. "Press release." Alhambra, California. June 19, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Announces founding of the Press Freedom Herald by thirty former PRC editors and journalists. Says editions were printed in Los Angeles, Hong Kong, San Francisco, Philadelphia, Maryland, and Indiana.
Subject codes: EE03
Box 2

AE 1024.  "Testimony of the U.S. Department of Justice, Immigration and Naturalization Service, Before the House Subcommittee on Immigration, Refugees and International Law, Concerning the Deferral of the Enforced Departure of Nationals of the Peoples' Republic of China and H.R. 2712, the Emergency Chinese Adjustment of Status Facilitation Act of 1989." Washington, DC. June 20, 1989.

Physical Description: 9 pp.

Scope and Content Note

INS statement delineating why it opposes the H.R. 2712, which provides a blanket waiver of the foreign residence requirement.
Subject codes: EE01
Box 2

AE 1025.  Five UCLA Chinese faculty and staff members. "Dear compatriots and friends of China." Los Angeles. June 20, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Letter calling for an open meeting for the formation of a "UCLA Coalition for Democracy in China."
Subject codes: EE02
Box 2

AE 1026.  Emily Tufeld (Brothers and Sisters, Inc.). Letter, Los Angeles. June 21, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Donation to CSSA Democracy Fund from the sale of T-shirts.
Subject codes: EE03
Box 2

AE 1027.  Nancy Owens Hess (president, CET Academic Programs). Boston. June 23, 1989.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Letter anouncing that CET will continue its China tours despite violence.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 2

AE 1028.  Sue W. Fan (UCLA Center for Pacific Rim Studies). "Linkage Program Update: China Exchange Program." Los Angeles. June 23, 1989.

Physical Description: 5 pp.

Scope and Content Note

An update on the status of UCLA's China Exchange Program after the Tiananmen Incident.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 2

AE 1029.  Asia Watch. "New Information on Arrests in China." New York. June 24, 1989.

Physical Description: 16 pp.

Scope and Content Note

List of names and biographical information on people arrested as a result of the Democracy Movement.
Subject codes: EE05
Box 2

AE 1030.  Democracy Day Association. "Democracy Day Celebrated Nationwide." San Francisco. June 28, 1989.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Announcement that July 1, 1989, is to be "Democracy Day" "for the victims of the Beijing violence on June 3-4." Includes a list of organizers and events held in various cities in the United States.
Subject codes: EE03 CE03
Box 2

AE 1031.  Nathan Gardela (executive director, Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions). "Fund for Chinese Democracy: A Project of the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions." Santa Barbara, California. ND, but has fax date of June 29, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A suggestion to set up a fund to support intellectuals who fled China.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 2

AE 1032.  "Ages of Reform in China: Sung Dynasty to Tiananmen Square." Los Angeles: UCLA Extension. June 30, 1990.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Flyer announcing a summer 1990 educational program at UCLA.
Subject codes: EE02 EC01
Box 2

AE 1033.  Richard Baum (UCLA professor). "Statement." Los Angeles. ND, apparently written within a few days of the June 4, 1989, events.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Calls on UCLA community to contribute to efforts to preserve the freedom and civil liberties of colleagues in China.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 2

AE 1034.  Chinese-American Engineers and Scientists Association of Southern California. "Dear CESASC members and Friends." Rancho Palos Verdes, California. ND, apparently June 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Appeal in English and Chinese for funds to finance faxing material to China in the period following the June 4 incident.
Subject codes: CE03 EE03
Box 2

AE 1035.  UCLA Chinese faculty and staff documents. Los Angeles. June 1989.

Physical Description: 8 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Letter from one Chinese professor to another proposes establishment of a political action group to support the Democratic Movement in China. Also includes marked-up drafts of a letter from Chinese faculty and staff to UCLA Chancellor Young and minutes of a meeting.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 2

AE 1036.  UCLA Coalition for Democracy and Human Rights in China. Los Angeles. ND, probably late June 1989.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Charter of this organization.
Subject codes: EE02 EC05
Box 2

AE 1037.  Preparatory documents for a July 15, 1989, meeting of Chinese professional groups at the California Institute of Technology. Pasadena, California. July 4, 1989.

Physical Description: 9 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Five associations of Chinese scientists, professors, and other professionals with committees at nine Southern California universities call a meeting "for serious discussion on human rights and democracy in China."
Subject codes: EE03
Box 2

AE 1038.  UCLA China Exchange Program. "Reactions, Concerns and Wishes of Chinese Students and Scholars—A Survey Report." Los Angeles. July 5, 1989.

Physical Description: 17 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Report on a questionnaire survey of Chinese students and scholars at UCLA and the University of Southern California conducted between June 28 and 30, 1989.
Subject codes: EE03
Box 2

AE 1039.  Patricia Cheng (Chinese Students and Scholars Association). "Statement on China in L.A. Times and donations." Los Angeles. July 5, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Report to contributors on fund-raising and on an ad the association had taken in the Los Angeles Times.
Subject codes: EE03
Box 2

AE 1040.  Maxwell D. Epstein (UCLA dean of International Students and Scholars). Los Angeles. July 6, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Letter to UCLA Chancellor Charles Young regarding visa options of Chinese students who wish to extend their stay in the United States.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 2

AE 1041.  Sue W. Fan (UCLA Center for Pacific Rim Studies). "Confirmation of Meeting." Los Angeles. July 7, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Confirmation of meeting between UCLA Chancellor Charles Young and Chinese students and faculty on events in China.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 2

AE 1042.  Sidney Jones (Asia Watch). Letter with attachments. New York. July 10, 1989.

Physical Description: 5 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Asks for additional information on people being arrested in China as a result of the Democracy Movement. Attachments are biographical profiles of two prisoners, Liu Gang and Liu Xiaobo.
Subject codes: EC05
Box 2

AE 1043.  Shi Wei. "Why Impose Martial Law in Beijing?" Los Angeles: Consulate General of the People's Republic of China. ND (date stamped by recipient July 11, 1989).

Physical Description: 14 pp.

Scope and Content Note

An official explanation for the decision to impose martial law on Beijing.
Subject codes: ED01
Box 2

AE 1044.  UCLA Coalition for Democracy in China. Los Angeles. July 11, 1989.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Announcement of second meeting of this organization and agenda from its first meeting.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 2

AE 1045.  Typed information sheet and a press clippping on extention of visas for Chinese students in the United States. July 1989.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Includes a typed summary, source unidentified, circulated at UCLA, probably to administrators, on congressional bills concerning visas for Chinese nationals. Also an article by Goldie Blumenstyk, "New U.S. Visa Rules for Chinese Students Challenged as Risky," Washington, DC: The Chronicle of Higher Education, July 12, 1989.
Subject codes: EE01 EE04
Box 2

AE 1046.  Paul Sweet (University of California director of relations with the federal government). Letter to Alan Cranston, U.S. Senator from California. Washington, DC. July 13, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

General comments on proposed bills on the Chinese visa issue. Includes distribution list for this correspondence at UCLA.
Subject codes: EE01 EE04
Box 2

AE 1047.  William Loiterman (professor at Los Angeles Harbor College). Correspondence with Sue Fan, UCLA, and James Lee, press secretary for Senator Pete Wilson. Wilmington, California. July 13-August 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 8 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Concerns participants in a telephone conference panel on "The United States Response to Events in China," July 26, 1989, at Los Angeles Harbor College. Includes summary of discussion with students on this isssue.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 2

AE 1048.  Maxwell D. Epstein (UCLA dean of International Students and Scholars). Letter to UCLA Chancellor Charles Young. Los Angeles. July 14, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

On visa status of Chinese students.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 2

AE 1049.  Michael Pistor, U.S. Information Agency. "Opening Statement of Michael Pistor, Counselor, United States Information Agency, [before the] Subcommittee on Immigration, Refugees and International Law, Committee of the Judiciary, House of Representatives." Washington, DC. July 20, 1989.

Physical Description: 5 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Explanation of changes in the J-1 visa.
Subject codes: EE01
Box 2

AE 1050.  Robert Lee (director, Asian American Arts Center). New York. July 26, 1989.

Physical Description: 5 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Letter to Sue Fan of UCLA Center for Pacific Rim Studies, announcing the plan for an exhibition entitled "China: June 4, 1989."
Subject codes: EE03
Box 2

AE 1051.  Correspondence between the Chinese Students and Scholars Association and UCLA Vice Chancellor Allen Yarnell. Los Angeles. July 28-November 17, 1989.

Physical Description: 10 pp.

Scope and Content Note

UCLA agrees to provide long-term office space and telephones for the organization. Includes work orders for facilities on the UCLA campus.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 2

AE 1052.  UCLA Chinese Students and Scholars Association (CSSA). "We Support the Gorton/Pelosi/Kohl-Cranston Bills." Los Angeles. ND, probably mid-July 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Form letter and petition to California Senate and House delegations urging them to support bills that extend the visas of Chinese students.
Subject codes: EE04
Box 2

AE 1053.  Minutes of two meetings of the Ad-hoc Committee to Welcome the Leaders of the Chinese Democracy Movement, held at the California Institute of Technology, July 31 and August 4, 1989. Pasadena, California.

Physical Description: 5 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Includes the schedule for an August 11 visit to Los Angeles by five leaders of the China Democracy Movement.
Subject codes: EE03
Box 2

AE 1054.  Michael S. Duke. "Reflections on the Tiananmen Massacre." Vancouver. ND, written in July 1989.

Physical Description: 21 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Analysis of the Tiananmen events by a professor at the University of British Columbia who was at Beijing University May 18-June 7, 1989. His essay concerns three broad areas: the 1989 Democracy Movement in historical perspective, alternative scenarios for China's future, and the possible roles of the industrialized democracies in their future relations with China.
Subject codes: EC01 EC02 EC04
Box 2

AE 1055.  Shaw Yu-ming. "The Peking Massacre: Reactions of the ROC." Taipei: Government Information Office. July 1989.

Physical Description: 21 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Transcripts of interviews with American and Japanese television.
Subject codes: EE01 EC01
Box 2

AE 1056.  Shaw Yu-ming. "The Revolution Has Devoured Its Own Children: Some Thoughts on the Democracy Movement in Mainland China." Los Angeles. August 2, 1989.

Physical Description: 10 pp., plus copy of invitational flyer.

Scope and Content Note

Text of address to Los Angeles World Affairs Council by director-general of Taiwan's Government Information Office.
Subject codes: EC01 EE01
Box 2

AE 1057.  Forum West. "China in Crisis." Los Angeles. August 3, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Announcement of a forum on China.
Subject codes: EE03
Box 2

AE 1058.  San Fernando Valley Chinese Cultural Association. Northridge, California. "Forum on Democratization in China." August 3, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Announcement of a public meeting sponsored by various ad hoc Chinese student and scholar groups at UCLA, the University of Southern California, and the California Institute of Technology.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 2

AE 1059.  Ad Hoc Committee to Welcome China's Democratic Movement Leaders. "Media Advisory." Los Angeles. August 4, 1989.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Press packet on August 11-12 Los Angeles area meetings and receptions for Wu'er Kaixi and Yan Jiaqi.
Subject codes: EE03
Box 2

AE 1060.  "Forum on Democratization in China." Los Angeles. August 4, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Fax of flyer for August 12, 1989, meeting at the University of Southern California for Yan Jiaqi, Wu'er Kaixi, Gao Gao, Li Lu, and Su Wei of the China Democracy Movement.
Subject codes: EE03
Box 2

AE 1061.  "Press Release: Chinese Democracy Movement Leaders to Visit L.A. on August 11-12." Los Angeles. August 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Includes the itinerary of the Chinese Democracy Movement leaders' visit to Los Angeles, specifying their public appearances.
Subject codes: EE03
Box 2

AE 1062.  Los Angeles Consulate General of the People's Republic of China. "Interview of Composer Hou De-Jian on His Witnessing the Clearing of Tiananmen Square on 4th June." Los Angeles. August 17, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Xinhua News Agency account of a press conference given by expatriate Taiwanese singer Hou Dejian at his home in Beijing, on his experience on the night of June 3 and the early morning of June 4.
Subject codes: ED04
Box 2

AE 1063.  Potter Chang (professor and chairman of the Coordinating Committee, Chinese American Faculty and Staff Association of the University of California, Los Angeles). Los Angeles. August 21, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Letter to UCLA Chancellor Charles Young suggesting measures UCLA could take to support the Democarcy Movement in China.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 2

AE 1064.  Carol Bentley (California assemblywoman). Letter to constituents. Sacramento. ND (before August 22, 1989).

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Bentley urges supporters to write to other members of the State Assembly in support of her bill to prohibit investment in companies that invest in China.
Subject codes: EE01 EC04
Box 2

AE 1065.  "The Role of Chinese Intellectuals in the Pro-Democracy Movement." Los Angeles. August 29, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Announcement of a forum by Professor Perry Link at UCLA.
Subject codes: CE02
Box 2

AE 1066.  Chinese American Faculty and Staff Association of UCLA. "Meeting Agenda" Los Angeles. For meetings of September 12 and 26, 1989.

Physical Description: 7 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Two drafts of proposed charter of the Chinese American Faculty and Staff Association of the University of California, Los Angeles.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 2

AE 1067.  Wu Shuqing, Zhang Xiaowen, Shen Shituan, et al. "An Open Letter from the Presidents of Ten Universities in Beijing to U.S. University Presidents." Beijing. November 29, 1989.

Physical Description: 3 pp., plus 1 pp. UCLA distribution list.

Scope and Content Note

Expresses opposition to the "Emergency Chinese Immigration Relief Act" (H.R. 2712) on grounds that if Chinese students extend their stay in the U.S. it will make their ultimate return more difficult.
Subject codes: ED02
Box 2

AE 1068.  David P. Gardner (president, University of California), and the chancellors of the nine UC campuses. Letter to U.S. President. Oakland, California. November 29, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp., plus 2 pp. cover sheets.

Scope and Content Note

Letter urges President Bush not to veto H.R. 2712, which would extend visas for Chinese students and scholars in the United States. Includes UCLA distribution list and fax cover sheet from Gardner.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 2

AE 1069.  UCLA Office of International Students and Scholars. "Changes in U.S. Government Policy Regarding People's Republic of China Students and Current UCLA Procedures." Los Angeles. December 13, 1989

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Summary of new U.S. policy on visa extensions for Chinese students and scholars and UCLA procedures for implementation
Subject codes: EE01
Box 2

AE 1070.  David P. Gardner (president, University of California). Letter. Oakland, California. December 14, 1989.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Acknowledgement of an open letter from the presidents of ten Chinese universities opposing the "Emergency Chinese Immigration Relief Act."
Subject codes: EE02
Box 2

AE 1071.  NAFSA (Association of International Educators). "More Information on PRC Students and Scholars—NAFSA Update No.85." Washington, DC. December 18, 1989.

Physical Description: 8 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Cover letter and seven-page handout on changes in U.S. immigration law on visa extensions for Chinese students and scholars.
Subject codes: EE01 EE04
Box 2

AE 1072.  David Pierpont Gardner (president, University of California). Letter to UC chancellors, president's cabinet, and General Counsel Holst. Oakland, California. February 23, 1990.

Physical Description: 7 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Cover letter from Gardner with reply from a White House deputy assistant to President Bush to the November 29, 1989, letter from UC chancellors to President Bush, and including copy of a letter from U.S. Attorney General Thornburgh to Bush on immigration status of Chinese students and scholars.
Subject codes: EE01
Box 2

AE 1073.  Zhu Qizhen (PRC ambassador to the United States). "Remarks by Ambassador Zhu Qizhen at Dinner Hosted by World Affairs Council, Los Angeles, California." Los Angeles: Consulate General of the People's Republic of China. May 16, 1990.

Physical Description: 11 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Remarks on the Chinese government's policy of reform after the events in Beijing and the relationship between the U.S. and China.
Subject codes: ED01 ED04
 

III. Articles from Small Circulation Newsletters, Magazines, and Newspapers—In Chinese

Oversize Box 23

BC 1001.  Transcripts of PRC radio broadcasts from Beijing and many other major Chinese cities. April 14-June 7, 1989.

Physical Description: 840 pp. (420 sheets 11x17, 2 pages each).

Scope and Content Note

Prepared by a Taiwanese intelligence service, marked "secret" [chinese characters].
Subject codes: CB01 CC04 CD01
Box 3

BC 1002.  [chinese characters] Shiyue pinglun (October Review). [chinese characters] Siyue xueyun te kan (Special issue on the April student movement). Hong Kong: Shiyue shu wu. May 4, 1989.

Physical Description: 20 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Loose stapled pages of articles on the student movement's activities during April 1989. (For regular issues of this periodical see Section V, Articles from Commercial Magazines and Newspapers—In Chinese).
Subject codes: CB01 CB02 CC01 CC02 CC03 CC04 CC05
Box 3

BC 1003.  [chinese characters] Xinwen daobao (News Herald). Beijing. Issue #2. May 4, 1989.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Articles and essays including an editorial on the May Fourth Movement, several pieces discussing democracy, freedom of speech, and assembly. There is also an article on the purpose and tasks of the Beijing student movement and an interview with student leader Guo Haifeng [chinese characters] .
Subject codes: CC01 CC02
Box 3

BC 1004.  [chinese characters] Xinwen daobao (News Herald). [chinese characters] Zhang Boli(ed). Beijing. Issue #3. May 12, 1989.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Includes a call for the creation of a bronze statue of Hu Yaobang, a declaration of support for the Democracy Movement issued by several well-known intellectuals, and criticisms of the editorial in the April 24, 1989, issue of the People 's Daily and of the CCP Committee in Shanghai.
Subject codes: CC01 CC02 CC05
Box 3

BC 1005.  [chinese characters] Xinwen daobao (News Herald). Beijing. Unnumbered special edition. May 14, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Two poems written by the hunger strikers.
Subject codes: CC01
Box 3

BC 1006.  [chinese characters] Xinwen daobao (News Herald). Beijing. May 17, 1989.

Physical Description: Issue #4. 5 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Articles written by students and professors including updates on the progress of the hunger strike and criticisms of the government.
Subject codes: CC01 CC02
Box 3

BC 1007.  [chinese characters] Xinwen daobao (News Herald). Beijing. Issue #5. May 21, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Editorial criticizing the government's decision to impose martial law.
Subject codes: CC01 CC04
Box 3

BC 1008.  [chinese characters] Xinwen kuai xun (News Flash). Beijing: Beijing University. May 31, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

An article which was withdrawn by the CCP from the Workers' Daily discussing the issue of freedom of the press.
Subject codes: CC01 CC03
Box 3

BC 1009.  Miscellaneous newsletters. Beijing. May 1989.

Physical Description: 5 documents, 8 pp. total.

Scope and Content Note

Printed pages from newsletters and reprints from newspapers from Beijing and Hong Kong distriburted in Beijing. Dated articles are for May 14, 22, and 24, 1989. Two articles are undated.
Subject codes: CB01 CC05
Box 3

BC 1010.  [chinese characters] Xinwen daobao (News Herald). Beijing. Issue #8. June 3, 1989.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Articles include Wen Yuankai's speech on political reform, a declaration from the Si Tong Research Institute, news, and commentaries.
Subject codes: CC01 CC02 CC05
Box 3

BC 1011.  [chinese characters] Xinwen daobao (News Herald). Beijing. No number. June 4, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Report on the June 4 incident shortly after it happened.
Subject codes: CB01
Box 3

BC 1012.  [chinese characters] Xinwen ziyou daobao (Press Freedom Herald). Alhambra, California. June 9-August 21, 1989. Issues 1-7. Issue 1 is a 2-page tabloid; issues 2-7 are 4-page tabloids.

Scope and Content Note

Local Los Angeles area newspaper containing articles on 1989 Democracy Movement and the Beijing incident written by both native and Overseas Chinese.
Subject codes: CB01 CC01
Box 3

BC 1013.  [chinese characters] Zhen yan (The Truth). Wiesbaden, Germany: The Chinese Students and Scholars Association in the Federal Republic of Germany. January 12, 1990.

Physical Description: 8 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Newsletter, including reports and comments in Chinese and German on the political situation in China and support for the Democracy Movement.
Subject codes: CC01 CE04
Box 3

BC 1014  [chinese characters] "Zhongguo dalu you guan fuze ren: zai shi ling guan jiaoyu canzan (lingshi) huiyi shang de jianghua yaodian" (Mainland China personnel: Synopsis of discussions at the conference of ambassadorial education liaison officials). [chinese characters] Xinwen ziyou daobao (Press Freedom Herald). Alhambra, California. May 20, 1990.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Report on decisions in China regarding attitudes to be taken toward Chinese students studying abroad in the United States and Canada.
Subject codes: CB02 CC04
Box 3

BC 1015.  [chinese characters] Laiyin tongxin: Zeitungfür Chinesische Wissenschaftler und Studenten in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland (Correspondence along the Rhine: Newspaper for Chinese Scholars and Students in the Federal Republic of Germany). Darmstadt, Germany: World University Service. Issue #3. May 1990.

Scope and Content Note

Contains three articles of interest:
  • (1) [chinese characters] Xiao, [chinese characters] "Ninggu de shunjian" (A frozen moment in time), pp. 4-5. A personal report on the June 4 incident and the situation in a local hospital.
  • (2) [chinese characters] Jin Yan, [chinese characters] "6.4, xue ran de rizi" (June 4, a blood red day), p. 6. A reflection on the students who died on June 4th and Overseas Chinese students.
  • (3) [chinese characters] Zhang Ming, [chinese characters] 6.4 zhi hou de Beijing shimin xintai" (The feelings of the people in Beijing after June 4), pp. 7-9. Interviews with Beijing civilians regarding their assessment of the social situation and the Chinese government since June 4, 1989, as well as their personal sentiments.
Subject codes: CB01, CC02
Box 3

BC 1016.  [chinese characters] Minyun maibo (Pulse of the Democracy Movement). Hong Kong: [chinese characters] Hong Kong Alliance in Support of the Patriotic Democratic Movement of China. Not numbered. November 1990.

Physical Description: 51 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Particularly see [chinese characters] Qin Liyan, [chinese characters] "Liuwang zhishifenzi liang da qunluo: Pulinsidun xuepai yu Zhijiage xuepai" (The two main schools of the exiled Chinese scholars: the Princeton School and the Chicago School), pp. 50-51. The article provides valuable description and comparison of the two main schools in terms of their different political beliefs and approaches to the Democracy Movement.
Subject codes: CC02
Box 3

BC 1017.  [chinese characters] "Hou Xiaotian fachu dadan huyu—xunqiu zhu Wang Juntao huo ziyou" (Hou Xiaotian issues an appeal: Help Wang Juntao win his freedom). [chinese characters] Minyun maibo (Pulse of the Democracy Movement). Hong Kong: [chinese characters] Hong Kong Alliance in Support of the Patriotic Democratic Movement in China. Issue # 1. December 1990,

Physical Description: p. 30.

Scope and Content Note

Article cited from Shi bao, Hong Kong, on an appeal by Hou Xiaotian for help in securing the release of her husband, Wang Juntao.
Subject codes: EB01 CC05
Box 3

BC 1018.  [chinese characters] Li Gucheng. [chinese characters] "Jiang-Li tizhi neng fou wending?" (Can the Jiang-Li alliance be stable?). [chinese characters] Minyun maibo (Pulse of the Democracy Movement). Hong Kong: [chinese characters] Hong Kong Alliance in Support of the Patriotic Democratic Movement in China. Issue #2. January 1991,

Physical Description: pp. 1-2.

Scope and Content Note

Comments on the new leadership of Jiang Zemin and Li Peng in the wake of the Beijing incident, as well as reports on the situation in China.
Subject codes: CC01
Box 3

BC 1019.  [chinese characters] "Xue zi lian tongxun" ([Abbreviation for] Communication from the Indepedent Federation of Chinese Students and Scholars [in the United States]). Washington, DC. Issue #9. February 24, 1991.

Physical Description: 6 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Newsletter including a letter to the chairman of the National People's Congress, Wan Li; a speech by Chen Xingyu to Taiwanese students on their relationship with students from China; and reports on the activities of Overseas Chinese students in support of the Democracy Movement in China.
Subject codes: CE02
Box 3

BC 1020.  [chinese characters] Minyun maibo (Pulse of the Democracy Movement). Hong Kong: [chinese characters] The Hong Kong Alliance in Support of the Patriotic Democratic Movement in China. Issue #3. March 1991.

Physical Description: 60 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Includes a response to comments by Chen Yun and Li Xiannian on the historic experience of the Chinese Communist Party since 1949 and responsibility for the turmoil in 1989, and reports on activities for the release of all the political prisoners in China.
Subject codes: CC04
Box 3

BC 1021.  [chinese characters] Minyun maibo (Pulse of the Democracy Movement). Hong Kong: [chinese characters] Hong Kong Alliance in Support of the Patriotic Democratic Movement in China. Issue #4. March 1991.

Physical Description: 64 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Special edition on the 1989 Democracy Movement, including collections of original materials, narratives, and commentary articles.
Subject codes: CB01 CC05 CC02
Box 3

BC 1022.  [chinese characters] Zeng Huiyan. [chinese characters] "Jiefangjun neibu bu weng" (The People's Liberation Army is not internally stable). [chinese characters] Minyun maibo (Pulse of the Democracy Movement). Hong Kong: [chinese characters] The Hong Kong Alliance in Support of the Patriotic Democratic Movement in China. Issue #5. April 1991,

Physical Description: pp. 16-18.

Scope and Content Note

Report from a PLA officer on the situation in China.
Subject codes: CC04
Box 3

BC 1023.  [chinese characters] Minyun maibo (Pulse of the Democracy Movement). Hong Kong: [chinese characters] The Hong Kong Alliance in Support of the Patriotic Democratic Movement in China. Issue #6. May 1991.

Physical Description: 60 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Reports and commentaries on current issues in China.
Subject codes: CC01
Box 3

BC 1024.  [chinese characters] Minyun maibo (Pulse of the Democracy Movement). Hong Kong: [chinese characters] Hong Kong Alliance in Support of the Patriotic Democratic Movement in China. Issue #7. June 1991.

Physical Description: 60 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Reports and commentary on the Democratic Movement, human rights, and the political situation in China.
Subject codes: CC01 CC05
Box 3

BC 1025.  [chinese characters] Minyun maibo (Pulse of the Democracy Movement). Hong Kong: [chinese characters] The Hong Kong Alliance in Support of the Patriotic Democratic Movement in China. Issue #8. July 1991.

Physical Description: 64 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Reports and commentary on the Democratic Movement, human rights, and the political situation in China.
Subject codes: CC01 CC04
Box 3

BC 1026.  [chinese characters] Minyun maibo (Pulse of the Democracy Movement). Hong Kong: [chinese characters] Hong Kong Alliance in Support of the Patriotic Democratic Movement in China. 1991. Unnumbered issue. Materials in this collection are dated May through July, 1991.

Physical Description: 54 pp.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) [chinese characters] Hua Yue, [chinese characters] "Lianyu monan zhong de xing si" (Thinking while being tortured in purgatory), pp. 1-7. A Chinese intellectual in Beijing who was an activist in the Democracy Movement discusses the relationship between the Chinese government and intellectuals since 1989. The article praises the role of Chinese intellectuals in the Democracy Movement and especially Fang Lizhi's actions during and after the student protests and subsequent Tiananmen Incident.
  • (2) [chinese characters] Gao Xin, [chinese characters] "6.4 hou de Zhongyang gaoceng quan zheng" (The high level power struggle in the Central Commmitee after June 4), pp. 8-12. The article asserts four main points: that Deng Xiaoping is both the instigator and suppressor of the student movement; that there is a severe power struggle between Deng and Chen Yun; that Jiang Zemin is currently facing many difficulties; and finally, that those who come forward to rehabilitate the victims of the June 4 incident will be the future leaders of China.
  • (3) [chinese characters] Wen Tianxiang, [chinese characters] "Zhinangtuan de beizhuang jieju" (The moving and tragic end of the think tank), pp. 13-15. The article asserts that the members of Zhao Ziyang's "think tank" played a very important role in the student movement. They struggled to resolve the crisis peacefully. Their efforts were ultimately overcome by the arrest of the leading members of the think tank.
  • (4) [chinese characters] Wan Qian, [chinese characters] "Zou chu Tiananmen, women zou dao nali?" (Where are we going after leaving Tiananmen Square?), pp. 16-18. An activist in the 1989 Democracy Movement who is still in Beijing reflects on and severely criticizes the weakness and problems within the movement.
  • (5) [chinese characters] Mei Jia, [chinese characters] "Zhongguo liuwang zhe zai xifang" (The exiled Chinese in the West), pp. 19-22. An article concerning the day-to-day lives of the exiled Chinese activists of the 1989 Democracy Movement who fled China after the Tiananmen Incident. The article discusses their influence and experiences in the Western world.
  • (6) [chinese characters] Feng Congde (husband of Chai Ling), [chinese characters] "Fansi zhong de kun huo" (Confusion in the reflection), pp. 23-26. An eyewitness account of the situation on June 3 and 4 in Tiananmen Square, a serious reflection on the 1989 Democracy Movement, and a self-criticism from one of the most important student leaders.
  • (7) [chinese characters] Zheng Zhuyuan, [chinese characters] "Tiananmen shijian' yihou de daolu" (The road after the "Tiananmen Incident"), pp. 27-41. The last chapter of Professer Zheng's book, Behind the Tiananmen Massacre— Social, Political, and Economic Ferment in China. The author concludes that after the death of the older hardliners, the democratic reformers will carry out major political and economic change in China. The author speculates that if China and Taiwan were reunified, China would become a modern industrial nation. The author predicts that the events of June 4, 1989, may prove to be as great a historical turning point as that of May 4, 1919.
  • (8) [chinese characters] Qian Xian, [chinese characters] "Qincheng jianyu de pingmin hua" (The plebeianization of Qincheng Prison), pp. 42-45. A report about the change in the composition of inmates of Qincheng Prison. Instead of being dominated by senior cadres, as it was during the Cultural Revolution, the jail is now filled with Democracy Movement activists.
  • (9) [chinese characters] Li Wanfeng, [chinese characters] "Bajiu 'yao fan' jin kuang" (The current situation of the "important convicts" of 1989), pp. 46-47. A report on the current situation of the activists in China. Many of the leading figures among the government reformers and the worker and student activists (Bao Tong, Han Dongfang, Li Mingqi, and so forth) are currently imprisoned in Beijing jails.
  • (10) [chinese characters] Zeng Huiyan, [chinese characters] "'Huangque xingdong' yu minyun renshi tuoxian" ("Operation Yellow Bird" and the flight from danger by Democracy Movement participants), pp. 48-52. A report about the actions taken by the Hong Kong Alliance to aid hundreds of Chinese activists who had participated in the Democracy Movement and wished to flee China.
  • (11) [chinese characters] Yang Manke, [chinese characters] "Su dong bo yu Zhongguo minyun" (The Soviet ripple in the East vs. the Democracy Movement in China), pp. 53-54. A comparison between reform in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe and that in China. The article is subtitled: Gorbachev vs. Deng Xiaoping; Fang Lizhi vs. Sakharov; Hu Yaobang vs. Yeltsin, etc.
Subject codes: CC01 CC02 CC04 CC05 CB01 CB02
Box 3

BC 1027.  [chinese characters] Minyun maibo (Pulse of the Democracy Movement). Hong Kong: [chinese characters] The Hong Kong Alliance in Support of the Patriotic Democratic Movement in China. Issue #9. August 1991.

Physical Description: 68 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Reports and commentary on human rights and the political situation in China.
Subject codes: CC05 CC01
Box 3

BC 1028.  [chinese characters] Minyun maibo (Pulse of the Democracy Movement). Hong Kong: [chinese characters] Hong Kong Alliance in Support of the Patriotic Democratic Movement of China. Issue #10. September 1991.

Scope and Content Note

Reprints about the Democracy Movement, pp. 21-33. Newspaper articles from Hong Kong on the Democracy Movement, mainly urging the Chinese government to treat better Democracy Movement prisoners.
Subject codes: CC02
Box 3

BC 1029.  [chinese characters] Ren yu renquan (Human Rights Tribune). New York: Human Rights in China. Vol. 2, no. 4. September 1991.

Scope and Content Note

[chinese characters] Wu Ming, [chinese characters] "Zhongguo jianyu huanjing erlie jingren: yi ge chu yu zhe de zhengyan" (The surprisingly bad condition of Chinese prisons: A released prisoner's testimony), p. 25.
Subject codes: CE05
Box 3

BC 1030.  [chinese characters] Ren yu renquan (Human Rights Tribune). New York: Human Rights in China. Vol. 2, no. 5. November 1991.

Scope and Content Note

[chinese characters] Su Wei, [chinese characters] "'Liusi' zhi hou ganga nan chu de haiwai Zhongguo ren xintai" (Post-'June 4' embarassing difficulties for Overseas Chinese), p. 33. Brief analysis of the psychological embarrassment of the overseas dissidents in the post-June 4 era. (Note: The author's name is rendered as ËÕì¿ , on p. 33 and ËÕÎ3 in the table of contents.)
Subject codes: EE05 CE05
Box 3

BC 1031.  [chinese characters] "Minyun xiaoxi" (Democracy Movement news), [chinese characters] Minyun maibo (Pulse of the Democracy Movement). Hong Kong: [chinese characters] Hong Kong Alliance in Support of the Patriotic Democratic Movement of China. Issue #14. January 1992,

Physical Description: pp. 40-43.

Scope and Content Note

Brief articles about the Democracy Movement from Hong Kong newpapers, including a report on how the Chinese government strengthened its control over ideology in the aftermath of the movement and another on the arrest of that a student at Beijing University after giving a speech commemorating the anniversary of the 1989 movement.
Subject codes: CC01 CC02 CC03 CC05
 

IV. Articles from Small Circulation Newsletters, Magazines, and Newspapers—In English

Box 4

BE 1001.  Daily Bruin. Los Angeles: University of California, Los Angeles. June 8, 1989,

Physical Description: pp. 1, 3, 4, 17, 20.

Scope and Content Note

Notably:
  • (1) W. Kevin Leung and Kathy Lo, "2 UCLA Chinese Students Reported Missing in Beijing," p. 1.
  • (2) W. Kevin Leung, "Chinese American Students Express Outrage," p. 3 (some continuations from this page missing).
Subject codes: EB01 EB03 EE04
Box 4

BE 1002.  China Flash. "Aftermath of June 4." Hong Kong: Arthur Andersen & Co. No. 89-3. June 1989.

Physical Description: 12 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Discussion of the economic impact of the crackdown.
Subject codes: EE01 EC01
Box 4

BE 1003.  Summer Bruin. Los Angeles: University of California, Los Angeles. July 10, 1989,

Physical Description: pp. 1,5,6.

Scope and Content Note

Notably:
  • W. Kevin Leung, "Congressional Committee Hears Testmony of UCLA Witness to China Massacre," p. 1. Reports that Tong Boning, a UCLA graduate student, having witnessed the Beijing incident, fears that Chinese students in the United States will be punished for their protests in the U.S. if they return home
Subject codes: EE04
Box 4

BE 1004.  Maura McLaughlin, "Young Supports Chinese Students." Summer Bruin. Los Angeles: University of California, Los Angeles. July 13, 1989,

Physical Description: p. 1.

Scope and Content Note

Chancellor Charles Young expresses support for Chinese exchange students at UCLA and for the congressional bills that would allow Chinese students to remain in the United States.
Subject codes: EE01
Box 4

BE 1005.  "Letter Protests Killing of Chinese Students." UCLA Today. Los Angeles: University of California, Los Angeles. Vol. 10, no.1. July 17 to August 29, 1989,

Physical Description: pp. 1, 8.

Scope and Content Note

Partial reprint of a letter of protest sent by fifteen heads of American universities to China's State Education Commission.
Subject codes: EF02
Box 4

BE 1006.  Centerviews. Honolulu: East-West Center. Vol 7, no. 4. July-August 1989.

Scope and Content Note

(1) David Hipschman, "Jefferson Fellows: Witnesses to History," pp. 1, 6. Eyewitness accounts of the Chinese students in Tiananmen Square led by Chai Ling and others during the Beijing Democracy Movement in 1989.
(2) Godwin Chu, "Change in China: Where Have You Gone Mao Zedong?" p. 7. A discussion of the changes in values among the younger generation since the Mao era.
Subject codes: EC05 EC01 EB03
Box 4

BE 1007.  Foreign Policy News Clips. Berkeley: Institute of International Studies, University of California, Berkeley. Vol. 11, no. 1. September 12, 1989.

Physical Description: 133 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Newspaper articles related to the Chinese student movement, dated from late April through August 1989.
Subject codes: EB03 EC04
Box 4

BE 1008.  Paul West. "UC Students, Scholars See Hope for China." UC Focus. Oakland, California: University of California. Vol. 4, no. 1. September/October 1989,

Physical Description: pp. 1, 12 (3 pp. total).

Scope and Content Note

Views on the future of China of University of California students who studied in China under the Education Abroad Program.
Subject codes: EC01 E02
Box 4

BE 1009.  Peggy Blumenthal. "Update/IIE Clearinghouse on Chinese Student/Scholar Needs." Educational Associate (newsletter of the Institute of International Education). New York. October/November 1989.

Physical Description: 7 pp.

Scope and Content Note

An update on the progress of a questionnaire survey on the situation of PRC students and scholars.
Subject codes: EE04
Box 4

BE 1010.  Tiananmen Notes. Van Nuys, California. Special issue, undated (evidently published in October or November 1989).

Physical Description: 8 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Includes:
  • (1) Steven Mosher, "The China Syndrome," pp. 1-7. Comments on the United States' China policy since 1972; a severe criticism of President Bush's China policy following the Democracy Movement in 1989.
  • (2) Anne Whipple, "Bush Blows Big Bull," p. 3. A scathing criticism of Bush's reaction to the Tiananmen Incident.
Subject codes: EC01 EC05 EE02 EE03
Box 4

BE 1011.  W. Kevin Leung. "Chinese Students Request Refuge." Daily Bruin. Los Angeles: University of California, Los Angeles. November 27, 1989,

Physical Description: p. 1.

Scope and Content Note

Reports that approximately 250 Chinese students from UCLA, the University of Southern California, and the California Institute of Technology protested in Westwood urging President Bush to sign a bill that would allow them to stay in the United States after they complete their studies.
Subject codes: EE04
Box 4

BE 1012.  "Farewell, Republic! Remember Your Children." Tiananmen Notes. Van Nuys, California. December 1989.

Scope and Content Note

Eyewitness accounts of the Tiananmen Incident, in the form of individual letters and brief profiles, pp. 4-5.
Subject codes: EE03
Box 4

BE 1013.  Kang Chen. "China's Economic Reform and Social Unrest." China Report. Washington, DC: Washington Center for China Studies and the Theoretical Research Committee of the Independent Federation of Chinese Students and Scholars (IFCSS). Vol. 1, no. 1. March 1990.

Physical Description: 12 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Discussion of the effect of economic disorder on the social unrest in 1989.
Subject codes: EC01
Box 4

BE 1014.  China Report. Washington, DC: Washington Center for China Studies and the Theoretical Research Committee of the Independent Federation of Chinese Students and Scholars (IFCSS). Vol. 1, no. 2. April 1990.

Physical Description: 16 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Principal article: Guanzhong James Wen, "China's Rural Institutions and Their Impact on Sources of Growth," pp. 1-12. Emphasizes the Household Responsibility System. Characterized by uncertainty of property rights, Wen asserts that this system promotes instability. The author calls for further reform of the existing rural institutional systems to provide farmers with greater land use security and to ensure their property rights.
Subject codes: EC01 EC05
Box 4

BE 1015.  China Report. Washington, DC: Washington Center for China Studies and the Theoretical Research Committee of the Independent Federation of Chinese Students and Scholars (IFCSS). Vol. 1, no. 3. May 1990.

Physical Description: 20 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Main article: Ji-xuan Hu, "The Non-Designability of Living Systems: A Lesson from the Failed Experiments in Socialist Countries," pp. 1-17. Hu asserts that one of the causes of the 1989 Democracy Movement was the "nondesignability" of society.
Subject codes: EC01
Box 4

BE 1016.  Jiang Zemin. "Press Release: General-secretary Jiang Zemin Writes to American University Students." Los Angeles: Consulate General of the People's Republic of China. June 11, 1990.

Physical Description: 10 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Letter to Valerie O'Regan and other students at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, California, explaining the Chinese government's view of the Tiananmen Incident and its policies after June 4, 1989.
Subject codes: ED01
Box 4

BE 1017.  Zhi-yuan Cui. "Marx, Theories of the Firm, and the Socialist Reform." China Report. Washington, DC: Washington Center for China Studies and the Theoretical Research Committee of the Independent Federation of Chinese Students and Scholars (IFCSS). Vol. 1, no. 4. July 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 1-28.

Scope and Content Note

In place of Marx's advocacy of the abolition of private property and its replacement with state ownership under central planning, Cui proposes three stages of reform, including employee ownership and management, for the transformation of socialist economies.
Subject codes: EC01
Box 4

BE 1018.  Human Rights Tribune. New York: Human Rights in China, Inc. Vol. 1, no. 4. July 1990. (A Chinese edition of this publication also exists, under the title [chinese characters] Ren yu renquan.)

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) "Interviews with Detainees Awaiting Execution," pp. 2-4. Report of interviews by a journalist with three prisoners, Xu, Yan, and Bian who were sentenced to death for "destroying transportation facilities" during the prodemocracy protests in Shanghai in May and June of 1989.
  • (2) Hou Dejian, Zhou Duo, Gao Xin, "Letter to the Leaders in China," p. 22.Reportedly the first petition to the Chinese government from dissidents within China. Hou, Zhou, and Gao appeal for the release of Liu Xiaobo and other participants in the Democracy Movement.
  • (3) Dr. Zhang Yu, "Please Help My Jailed Father," p. 24. A visiting Chinese researcher appeals to the newspaper editor for help for his father. His father was arrested without charge in June 1989 on suspicion that he, as an amateur writer on the history of the Chinese Communist Party, might be displeased with the military crackdown in China.
Subject codes: EB01 EC02 EC05
Box 4

BE 1019.  Echoes from Tiananmen. Hong Kong: Friends of Chinese Minzhu. No. 4. August 1990.

Physical Description: 41 pp.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) Gin Je, "The Truth in the Mirror," pp. 17-24. A personal account of a student at Qinghua University who took part in the student movement and was imprisoned. The article states that Beijing residents were outraged by the repression of the Democracy Movement and the reportedly inhumane conditions detainees face in Beijing jails.
  • (2) Hou Dejian, "I Want to Be a Dissident," pp. 24-29. An interview with Hou obtained in February 1990, describing what he saw in Tiananmen Square on the night of June 4 and what happened when he subsequently went into hiding.
  • (3) Arif Dirlik, "Socialism Is Dead, So Why Must We Talk About It?" pp. 30-35. A discussion of the way in which Western observers misinterpreted China before 1989 and expressed an overly simplistic unity of opinion following the June 4 incident. It concludes with the author's own analysis of China in recent times.
  • (4) "A Chronology of Recent Events in China," pp. 36-39. Covers the period from April 3 to July 29, 1989.
Subject codes: EC01 EC02 EC04 EB02 EB03 EB04
Box 4

BE 1020.  China Report. Washington, DC: Washington Center for China Studies and the Theoretical Research Committee of the Independent Federation of Chinese Students and Scholars (IFCSS). Vol. 1, no. 5. September 1990.

Physical Description: 46 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Principal article: Xin-shu Zhao and Jian-hua Zhu, "Media Effects on Public Knowledge and Attitudes—The Case of Beijing in the Reform Era," pp. 1-43. The research is based upon data collected in a large-scale public opinion survey in Beijing in spring 1989.
Subject codes: EC01 EC02 EC03 EC05
Box 4

BE 1021.  Human Rights Tribune. New York: Human Rights in China, Inc. Vol. 1, no. 5. October 1990.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) "Human Rights in China Campaigns for the Release of Ren Wanding," p. 5. A call for a letter-writing campaign to urge the Chinese government to release Ren.
  • (2) Overseas Working Group, Beijing Workers' Autonomous Union, "Appeal for the Release of Chinese Workers," p. 26. An appeal to the readers to join the campaign for the release of prodemocracy workers.
  • (3) Yu Shibao, "My Brother Needs Your Help," pp. 26-27.
Subject codes: EB01 EB02 EC05
Box 4

BE 1022.  Wei Ziyuan, "The PRC Way of Death: The Procedure for Execution in China," The Voice of Democracy in China. Washington, DC: The Chinese Alliance for Democracy and the Federation for a Democratic China. Vol. 1, no. 3. October 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 1-2.

Scope and Content Note

Report on typical execution procedures prior to and following June 4, 1989.
Subject codes: EB01 EC01 EC05
Box 4

BE 1023.  Immanuel C.Y. Hsu. The Violent Crackdown at Tian-an-men Square, June 3-4, 1989. Stockholm: University of Stockholm Center for Pacific Asia Studies. Occasional Paper 11. November 1990.

Physical Description: 22 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Reprint of a chapter from the author's book China Without Mao: The Search for a New Order (Oxford University Press, 1990). Examines the political situation and the struggle among Chinese leaders before June 4, 1989.
Subject codes: EB02 EC01
Box 4

BE 1024.  Immanuel C.Y. Hsu. China in Transition, 1986-88: The Cultural Impact of the Open Door Policy. Stockholm: University of Stockholm Center for Pacific Asia Studies. Occasional Paper 12. November 1990.

Physical Description: 44 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Reprint of a chapter from the author's book China Without Mao: The Search for a New Order (Oxford University Press,1990).
Subject codes: EC01
Box 4

BE 1025.  The Voice of Democracy in China. Washington, DC: The Chinese Alliance for Democracy and the Federation for a Democractic China. Vol. 1, no. 4. November-December 1990.

Physical Description: 12 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Articles on the defection of artist Fan Zeng and on the arrest of PLA Lieutenant-Colonel Zhang Zhenlong, as well as a debate on the attitude to be taken toward local elections in Beijing.
Subject codes: EC01 EE03
Box 4

BE 1026.  The Voice of Democracy in China. Washington, DC: The Chinese Alliance for Democracy and the Federation for a Democractic China. Vol. 2, no. 1. January-February 1991.

Physical Description: 12 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Reports of appeals to the Chinese government on behalf of political prisoners, of arrests of some unit leaders in the PLA for opposition to the government, and of persecution of Catholics in China.
Box 4

BE 1027.  Silicon Valley for Democracy in China (Communication Newsletter). Cupertino, California. Vol. 3, no. 1. March 31, 1991.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Includes a report about Chinese graduate student Ge Xun's trip back to China to show his support for his jailed friend Wang Juntao (see also e-mail item DE 1090, December 15, 1990). Also includes a financial accounting for $90,000 raised between November 1, 1990, and March 31, 1991.
Subject codes: EE04
Box 4

BE 1028.  The Voice of Democracy in China. Washington, DC: The Chinese Alliance for Democracy and the Federation for a Democractic China. Vol. 2, no. 6. March 1991.

Physical Description: 16 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Articles on totalitarianism and possible scenarios for democratizing China, and on China's Taiwan policy.
Subject codes: EE01 EC01
Box 4

BE 1029.  Echoes from Tiananmen. Hong Kong: Friends of Chinese Minzhu. No. 5. March 1991.

Physical Description: 40 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Contains principally appeals from abroad for the release of political prisoners in China and a chronology of events concerning the Democracy Movement in 1990. It includes lists of political prisoners and the length of their sentences and a list of persons associated with the Democracy Movement who had disappeared after being arrested.
Box 4

BE 1030.  Human Rights Tribune. New York: Human Rights in China. Vol 2, no. 2. April 1991.

Physical Description: 34 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Includes Andrew J. Nathan, "Is There a Universal Concept of Human Rights?" pp. 4-7, and "On the Prosecution of Wang Juntao" by Wang's wife, Hou Xiaotian, pp. 16-18.
Subject codes: EC01 EC05
Box 4

BE 1031.  The Voice of Democracy in China. Washington, DC: The Chinese Alliance for Democracy and the Federation for a Democractic China. Vol. 2, no. 7. April 1991.

Physical Description: 16 pp.

Scope and Content Note

General news and analysis of the prospects for democracy in China.
Subject codes: EC01 EC02 EC03 EC04 EC05
Box 4

BE 1032.  A Changing China. San Francisco: North American Coalition for Chinese Democracy. Vol. 1,no. 2. Spring 1991.

Physical Description: 24 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Includes:
  • (1) Bu Ping, "Trials of Dissidents—A Chinese Legal Perspective," p 9.
  • (2) Articles by Raymond Chan and Norman Quan, "Special Report on the International Human Rights Delegation to Beijing," pp. 10-14. Introduces the members of the international delegation and also addresses the problems and reported abuse faced by released dissidents and their families.
  • (3) A report on Fang Lizhi receiving the 1991 Human Rights Award from the International League for Human Rights, p. 22.
Subject codes: EC05 EE01
Box 4

BE 1033.  The Voice of Democracy in China. Washington, DC: The Chinese Alliance for Democracy and the Federation for a Democractic China. Vol. 2, no. 8. May-June 1991.

Physical Description: 8 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Information about the continuing Democracy Movement.
Subject codes: EC01 EC02 EC03 EC04
Box 4

BE 1034.  Human Rights Tribune. New York: Human Rights in China. Vol 2, no. 3. June 1991.

Physical Description: 34 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Includes Lee Feigon, "The Limits of Tiananmen Democracy: Gender and the Student Movement," pp. 15-19. Discusses Beijing University students' opinions on sex and gender issues prior to and during the 1989 Democratic Movement. Feigon concludes that lack of unity on gender issues was a significant factor in the movement's defeat.
Subject codes: EC01 EC02
Box 4

BE 1035.  A Changing China. San Francisco: North American Coalition for Chinese Democracy. Vol. 1, no. 3. Summer 1991.

Physical Description: 24 pp.

Scope and Content Note

On the second anniversary of the 1989 Democracy Movement, this issue deals with human rights issues in China, such as the treatment of the Democracy Movement prisoners.
Subject codes: EC01 EC02
Box 4

BE 1036.  A Changing China. San Francisco: North American Coalition for Chinese Democracy. Vol. 2, no. 1. Winter (January) 1992.

Physical Description: 24 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Relevant material pp. 15-16, and 18-23 only:
  • (1) Qi Xin, "Three Special Characteristics of Human Rights in China," pp. 15-16, 18.
  • (2) "A Brief Summary of News on China, Early-September to Early-December 1991," pp. 19-22.
  • (3) "Political Prisoners Update," p. 23.
Subject codes: EB02
Box 4

BE 1037.  A Changing China. San Francisco: North American Coalition for Chinese Democracy. Vol. 2, no. 3. Summer (July) 1992.

Physical Description: 24 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Articles on overseas reactions memorializing the 1989 Democracy Movement and on the political and economic situation in China after 1989.
Subject codes: EC01 EC02 EC03 EC05 EE03
Box 4

BE 1038.  Human Rights Tribune. New York: Human Rights in China. Vol. 3, no. 2. Summer 1992.

Physical Description: 42 pp. In English and Chinese.

Scope and Content Note

Includes: Sophia Woodman, "Inside the Underground," inside front cover and p. 24.
Subject codes: EB01 CC05
Box 4

BE 1039.  China Rights Forum: The Journal of Human Rights in China. New York: Human Rights in China. Spring 1993.

Physical Description: 42 pp. In English and Chinese

Scope and Content Note

Interesting among the contents of this issue are:
  • (1) Sophia Woodman, "Outwitting the Thought Police," inside front cover and p. 23. Reports how a dissident successfully evaded the security forces and escaped to the United States.
  • (2) [chinese characters] Liu Qing, [chinese characters] "Wei Jingsheng— Zhan zai minzhu qiang shang de suxiang" (Wei Jingsheng—the personification of the Democracy Wall), pp. 40-41.
Subject codes: EB01 CC05
 

V. Articles from Commercial Magazines and Newspapers—In Chinese

Box 6

CC 1001.  Photocopied excerpts from various Hong Kong newspapers and magazines. Hong Kong. April 15-May 31, 1989.

Physical Description: 304 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Editorials and commentaries by various Hong Kong editors and columnists on the Democracy Movement.
Subject codes: CC01 CC02 CC03 CC04 CC05
Box 5

CC 1002.  [chinese characters] Neimenggu ribao. Hohhot. April 18-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 104 pp. 11x17, 1 pp. A4.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 5

CC 1003.  [chinese characters] Chen Ruoxi. [chinese characters] "Zhishifenzi de pengyou—Hu Yaobang" (Hu Yaobang—friend of the intellectuals). [chinese characters] Xin bao. Hong Kong. April 19, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A personal remembrance of Hu Yaobang by a famous author. She views Hu as a leader of reform, a champion of all Chinese, including Tibetans, and a friend of the intelligentsia, including Overseas Chinese intellectuals.
Subject codes: CC04
Box 5

CC 1004.  Miscelaneous oversize copies of pages from various Hong Kong newspapers. Of those that are dated, they range from April 19 to June 22, 1989.

Physical Description: 14 pp.
Box 5

CC 1005.  Sixteen editorials in [chinese characters] Ming bao, [chinese characters] Xin bao, [chinese characters] Jingji ribao, [chinese characters] Kuai bao, [chinese characters] Dagong bao, and one unidentified publication. Hong Kong. April 19-25, 1989.

Physical Description: 16 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Editorials on students' activities in memory of Hu Yaobang. The articles consider the activities to represent a patriotic current offering criticial advice to the government. Some articles express the hope that the government will be more responsive to the students' activities than it has been in the past.
Subject codes: CC02
Box 5

CC 1006.  [chinese characters] Gansu ribao. Lanzhou. April 20 to June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 90 pp. 11x17.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 5

CC 1007.  [chinese characters] Sichuan ribao. Chengdu. April 20-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 53 pp. 8-1/ 2x11.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 5

CC 1008.  [chinese characters] Ningxia ribao. Yinchuan,Ningxia. April 20-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 82 pp. 11x17.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 5

CC 1009.  [chinese characters] Hainan ribao. Sanya, Hainan. April 20-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 95 pp. 11x17.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 5

CC 1010.  [chinese characters] Beijing ribao. Beijing. April 20-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 124 pp. 11x17, 1 pp. A4.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 7

CC 1011.  [chinese characters] Xinhua ribao. Nanjing. April 20-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 81 pp. 11x17, 6 pp. 8-1/2x11.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 7

CC 1012.  [chinese characters] "Women zenyang daonian Hu Yaobang tongzhi?" (How we should hold a memorial service for Comrade Hu Yaobang?). [chinese characters] Renmin ribao. Beijing. April 21, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Editorial in the People's Daily stating the government's position on any public observance of the death of Hu Yaobang. The editorial requests that the students in Beijing refrain from holding any memorial ceremony for Hu without permission from the government.
Subject codes: CD01
Box 7

CC 1013.  Two articles. [chinese characters] Shi bao. Hong Kong. April 28, 1989. 1 pp. [chinese characters] Jingji ribao. Hong Kong. April 21, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Two articles argue that immediately preceding the 1989 Democracy Movement the political reputation of the Chinese Communist Party was faltering and the dissatisfaction of party members and intellectuals was growing.
Subject codes: CC01 CC02
Box 7

CC 1014.  Miscellaneous photocopied articles from the Hong Kong commercial press. April 21-June 19, 1989.

Physical Description: 195 pp.
Box 7

CC 1015.  [chinese characters] Henan ribao. Zhengzhou. April 21-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 72 pp. 11x17, 1 pp. 22 x 17, 8 pp. 8-1/2x11.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 7

CC 1016.  [chinese characters] Guizhou ribao. Guiyang. April 21-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 80 pp. 11x17.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 6

CC 1017.  [chinese characters] Jiefang ribao. Shanghai. April 21-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 59 pp 22x17, 12 pp. 11x17, 11 pp. 8-1/2x14, 45 pp. 8-1/2x11.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 7

CC 1018.  [chinese characters] Liaoning ribao. Shenyang. April 21-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 77 pp. 11x17.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 8

CC 1019.  [chinese characters] Yunnan ribao. Nanning. April 21-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 73 pp. 11x17.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 8

CC 1020.  [chinese characters] Anhui ribao. Hefei. April 21-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 84 pp. 11x17, 4 pp. 8-1/2x11.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 8

CC 1021.  [chinese characters] Qinghai ribao. Xining. April 21-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 64 pp. 11x17, 8 pp. 8-1/2x11.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 8

CC 1022.  [chinese characters] Jilin ribao. Changchun. April 21 to June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 92 pp. 11x17.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 8

CC 1023.  [chinese characters] Jiangxi ribao. Nanchang. April 21-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 3 pp. 22x17, 59 pp. 11x17, 1 pp. 8-1/2x11,6 pp. 8-1/2x11.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 8

CC 1024.  [chinese characters] Xinjiang ribao. Urumqi. April 21-May 31, 1989.

Physical Description: 57 pp. 11x17, 4 pp. 8-1/2x11.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 8

CC 1025.  [chinese characters] Hunan ribao. Changsha. April 21-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 72 pp. 11x17.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 8

CC 1026.  [chinese characters] Fujian ribao. Fuzhou. April 21-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 89 pp. 11x17, 4 pp. A4.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 9

CC 1027.  [chinese characters] Shaanxi ribao. Xi'an. April 21-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 109 pp. 11x17, 1 pp. A4.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 9

CC 1028.  Three articles from [chinese characters] Xin bao, [chinese characters] Jingji ribao. Hong Kong. April 25, 27, and 29, 1989.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

The articles report that the representives from forty-one of Beijing's universities organized the Autonomous Beijing College Students Association to promote democratization in China.
Subject codes: CB02 CC02
Box 9

CC 1029.  [chinese characters] Tianjin ribao. Tianjin. April25-May 31, 1989.

Physical Description: 66pp. 11x17.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 9

CC 1030.  [chinese characters] "Beijing Shanghai zhaokai dangyuan ganbu dahui, haozhao xunsu xingdong jianjue zhizhi dongluan" (Meetings of party cadres in Beijing and Shanghai call for firm suppression of the turmoil). [chinese characters] Renmin ribao. Beijing. April 26, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Chen Xitong and Jiang Zemin accuse the students who have engaged in activities since Hu Yaobang's death of causing senseless turmoil. They call on party members and others in Beijing and Shanghai to put an end to the turmoil. In the assembly in Shanghai, Jiang Zemin declared that the editor in chief of the World Economic Herald, Qin Benli, was removed from his position and that the World Economic Herald was banned.
Subject codes: CC01 CD01
Box 9

CC 1031.  [chinese characters] "Bixu qizhi xianming di fandui dongluan" (With a clearcut stand, we must oppose the turmoil). [chinese characters] Renmin ribao. Beijing. April 26, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Editorial defining the Beijing student movement as "turmoil." (The article evoked vivid memories of a similar piece published during the 1976 demonstrations.)
Subject codes: CC01 CD01
Box 9

CC 1032.  [chinese characters] Xizang ribao. Lhasa. April 26 to June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 86 pp. 11x17.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 9

CC 1033.  [chinese characters] Dazhong ribao. Ji'nan, Shandong. April 26-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 95 pp. 11x17, 7 pp. 8-1/2x11.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 9

CC 1034.  [chinese characters] Heilongjiang ribao. Harbin. April 26-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 68 pp. 11x17.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 9

CC 1035.  [chinese characters] Guangxi ribao. Wuzhou. April 26-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 75 pp. 11x17.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 9

CC 1036.  [chinese characters] Shanxi ribao. Taiyuan. April 26-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 88 pp. 11x17

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 10

CC 1037.  [chinese characters] Hebei ribao. Shijiazhuang. April 26-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 85 pp. 11x17, 1 pp. A4.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 10

CC 1038.  [chinese characters] Zhejiang ribao. Hangzhou. April 26-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 83 pp. 11x17, plus 1 pp. 8-1/2x11 from the [chinese characters] Anhui ribao.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 10

CC 1039.  [chinese characters] Nanfang ribao. Guangzhou. April 26-June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 68 pp. 11x17.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of selected articles.
Subject codes: CD01 CD03
Box 6

CC 1040.  Six articles from [chinese characters] Ming bao, [chinese characters] Xin bao, and [chinese characters] Dagong bao. Hong Kong. April 27 and 28, 1989.

Physical Description: (The last page has no identifiable source; it is presumed to be from one of the three publications listed.) 6 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Commentaries on Hu Yaobang's death, including references to his contributions to China's reform and the betterment of people's lives. The reports say there was widespread sorrow at his death.
Subject codes: CC04
Box 6

CC 1041.  Six articles from [chinese characters] Ming bao, [chinese characters] Xin bao, and [chinese characters] Xin bao. Hong Kong. Between April 27 and May 3, 1989.

Physical Description: 6 pp.

Scope and Content Note

On the Chinese government's attitude and policies toward the student movement from the perspective of the Hong Kong media.
Subject codes: CC04
Box 6

CC 1042.  Twelve articles from [chinese characters] Jingji ribao, [chinese characters] Xin bao, and [chinese characters] Ming bao. Hong Kong. April 27-May 3, 1989.

Physical Description: 11 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Commentary on the Chinese student movement. Most of the reportage is sympathetic to the students and expresses the view that there is significant support for them among the general citizenry of Beijing.
Subject codes: CC02
Box 6

CC 1043.  [chinese characters] "Beijing jin ri chuxian yixie sishi erfei chuanwen, youguan fangmian zhiqing renshi pilu shishi zhenxiang" (Rumors are spreading in Beijing; knowledgeable officials are revealing the truth). [chinese characters] Renmin ribao. Beijing. April 28, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Xinhua News Agency deniesrumors about an April 20 incident in front of Zhongnanhai, a car accident, and the student demonstration in Tiananmen Square.
Subject codes: CD01
Box 6

CC 1044.  Photocopied excerpts from various Hong Kong newspapers and magazines. Hong Kong. Undated, approximately April to June, 1989.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Analysis of and commentary on the Chinese student movement and the Tiananmen Incident.
Subject codes: CC01 CC02 CC03 CC04 CC05
Box 10

CC 1045.  [chinese characters] Ren Wanding. [chinese characters] "Lun renquan, pingdeng kouhao de xianshi yiyi" (On the real significance of slogans of human rights and equality). [chinese characters] Ming bao yuekan. Hong Kong. April 1989.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Ren Wanding, a prominant advocate of human rights, argues that the Communist system prevents the Chinese people from enjoying human rights and equality, and the government's denial of these rights perpetuates this system of repression.
Subject codes: CC05
Box 6

CC 1046.  [chinese characters] Zhang Jiefeng. [chinese characters] "Cong baliu dao bajiu xue chao yu daxuesheng xin tai" (The student movement and college students' state of mind from 1986 to 1989). [chinese characters] Baixing semimonthly. Hong Kong. May 1, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Traces the evolution of students' ideological views and psychological states in the years preceding the Democracy Movement. The article is based on several surveys conducted by academic institutions in Beijing.
Subject codes: CC02
 

CC 1047.  [chinese characters] "Dao Hu yu minyun teji" (Special section for commemorating Hu Yaobang and reporting on the Democracy Movement). [chinese characters] Zhengming (Contention). Hong Kong: Pak Ka Publisher. May 1, 1989,

Physical Description: pp. 6-17.

Scope and Content Note

Nine articles on memoralization of Hu Yaobang and the beginnings of the Democracy Movement.
Subject codes: CC02 CC03 CC04
Box 10

CC 1048.  [chinese characters] Renmin ribao. Beijing. May 4, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) [chinese characters] "Shoudu qingnian jihui jinian Wusi" (Young people in the capital convene to commemorate the May Fourth Movement).
  • (2) [chinese characters] "Zai jianshe he gaige de xin shidai jinyibu fayang Wusi jingshen" (Carry on the May Fourth spirit in the new era of construction and reform).
  • Text of May 3rd speech by Zhao Ziyang and an accompanying news article. This material captures Zhao's subtle support of students and youth. In the weeks after the Tiananmen Incident, this article was used in conjunction with other records to incriminate Zhao and remove him from office.
Subject codes: CC02
Box 10

CC 1049  [chinese characters] "Fayang Wusi jingshen, tuijin gaige he xiandaihua shiye" (Carry on the spirit of the May Fourth Movement in order to advance the task of reform and modernization). [chinese characters] Renmin ribao. Beijing. May 4, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Editorial in honor of the seventieth anniversary of the 1919 May Fourth Movement.
Subject codes: CD01 CC01
Box 6

CC 1050.  [chinese characters] Yang Manke. [chinese characters] "'Xue yun' zhi you xiao xing he dui minzhu jia zhi de tantao" (A discussion of the effectiveness of "student movements" and of democratic values). [chinese characters] Baixing semimonthly. Hong Kong. May 16, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

The author contends that seventy years of Chinese student movements have brought no real reforms to China. He feels that the students and intellectuals are not mature or experienced enough to build a democratic China.
Subject codes: CC01 CC02
Box 6

CC 1051.  [chinese characters] "Li Peng zuo qianshu fabu mingling, shoudu si shi nian shouci jieyan" (Yesterday Li Peng issued the order imposing martial law in the capital, the first time in forty years). [chinese characters] Dagong bao. Hong Kong. May 20, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Cites the order for martial law from Beijing.
Subject codes: CD01
Box 6

CC 1052.  [chinese characters] "Shenzhou Zhongguo de weiji yu chulu" (China's crisis and the way out). [chinese characters] Xin bao. Hong Kong. May 21, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Analysis of the Chinese Communist Party's legitimacy and the leadership crisis. The author praises the student movement in Beijing and appeals to the Chinese government to cease referring to the Beijing student movement as "turmoil" and to reform itself.
Subject codes: CC04
Box 10

CC 1053.  [chinese characters] "Beijing xuesheng jueshi ji shi" (Report on the Beijing student hunger strike). [chinese characters] Liaowang. Beijing. May 29, 1989.

Physical Description: 8 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Narration of the Beijing student movement hunger strike, from its beginnings to the date of publication.
Subject codes: CB01 CB04
Box 10

CC 1054.  [chinese characters] "Da po 'ku'nan de xunhuan'" (Break the "vicious circle of suffering"). [chinese characters] Xin bao. Hong Kong. May 29, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

The article suggests that the political situation in China since 1949 has been a "vicious circle." Senior party leaders have repeatedly used the people to attack and depose second-rank leaders, presenting each purge as a popular movement. The cycle has two characteristics: first, senior leaders use military power to suppress people, in and out of the leadership; second, senior leaders rely on the traditional notion that the people should be given a role to play on behalf of a wise and open minded "emperor." The auther predicts the 1989 student movement will break the circle.
Subject codes: CC03 CC04
Box 6

CC 1055.  [chinese characters] "Ken qing zhenxi xue yun shengyu" (Earnestly cherish the student movement's reputation). [chinese characters] Wenhui bao. Hong Kong. May 30, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A group of reporters assert that the problems of corruption and degeneration within the student movement should be resolved and the leaders of the movement should carefully manage the donations they have received.
Subject codes: CC01 CC02
Box 6

CC 1056.  [chinese characters] "Waidi fu jing shengyuan xuesheng chubu tongji biao" (The first statistics on the student supporters who have come from outside of the capital). [chinese characters] Jingji ribao. Hong Kong. May 30, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Statistics on the numbers of students from universities outside of Beijing who traveled to the capital to participate in the demonstrations. The report claims 4,941 students came from 108 universities.
Subject codes: CB01
Box 6

CC 1057.  [chinese characters] "Xue yun juankuan lai de tangzheng yong de qi suo" (Donations to the student movement are rightly given and are well used). [chinese characters] Xin bao. Hong Kong. May 31, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

The article suggests that money donated by the people of Hong Kong should be managed by an honest and effective organization and must be used by the students to promote the democratization of China.
Subject codes: CC01 CC02
Box 6

CC 1058.  Two articles. Hong Kong. May 1989. Source publication and exact date unknown.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopies of two articles on the role of Wu'er Kaixi and Wang Dan in the Democracy Movement.
Subject codes: CB02 CC02
Box 6

CC 1059.  Chronology of the student movement. Hong Kong: Hong Kong Student Union. May 1989.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Major events in the Beijing Democracy Movement, April 15 to May 24, 1989.
Subject codes: CB04
Box 6

CC 1060.  Chronology of the student movement. The Student Newspaper at Hong Kong Chinese University. Hong Kong: The Student Organization at Hong Kong Chinese University. May 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A chronology of the Beijing Democracy Movement from April 16 to May 1.
Subject codes: CB04
Box 6

CC 1061.  [chinese characters] "Bing Xin tan jushi: wo bu beiguan" (Bing Xin talks about the situation: I am not pessimistic). [chinese characters] Ming bao. Hong Kong. June 1, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Bing Xin, a famous writer and participant in the 1919 May Fourth Movement, states that the student movement in Tiananmen Square is a patriotic movement and in significance it will exceed the May Fourth Movement. She describes the situation in Beijing as the darkness before the dawn. Bing strongly supports the students and declares that she loves all the students who are fighting for the future of their motherland.
Subject codes: CC02
Box 11

CC 1062.  Photocopied excerpts from various Hong Kong newspapers and magazines. Hong Kong. June 1-July 1, 1989.

Physical Description: 399 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Reports and eyewitness accounts by Chinese students, teachers, foreign tourists, as well as journalists from Hong Kong and elsewhere about every stage of the development of the movement.
Subject codes: CB01 CB02 CB03
Box 11

CC 1063.  [chinese characters] "Zhongguo shiwei zhe mubiao weibi yizhi" (China's demonstrators do not all have the same goal). [chinese characters] Xin bao. Hong Kong. June 2, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

The article argues that the support for the Democracy Movement in China is only in urban areas and does not reflect the interests of the rural population.
Subject codes: CC01
Box 10

CC 1064.  [Description not given]

Box 11

CC 1065.  [chinese characters] "Xuesheng yu ru cheng junren jietou duihua jiangshu Beijing xianjieduan zhenshi qingkuang" (Students and soldiers in the city debate on the street on the current real situation in Beijing.) [chinese characters] Xinwan. NP. June4, 1989.

Physical Description: 1pp.

Scope and Content Note

Inside page continuation (front page portion missing). Troops and students dispute the meaning of the Goddess of Democracy, the martial law decree, and the role of foreigners in the Democracy Movement.
Box 11

CC 1066.  [chinese characters] " Jiefangjun bao shelun: jianjue yonghu dang Zhongyang juece, jianjue zhenya fan geming baoluan" ( Liberation Army Daily editorial: Support the Party Central Committee's decision, suppress the counterrevolutionary turmoil). 2 pp. (This appears to be reprinted by an unidentified Hong Kong source.) The editorial is dated June 3, 1989, and the Xinhua News Agency dateline for its distribution is June 4.

Scope and Content Note

Editorial declares that the People's Liberation Army is suppressing the turmoil in Beijng in order to protect the socialist system in China.
Subject codes: CD01
Box 11

CC 1067.  Two articles from [chinese characters] Dongfang ribao. Hong Kong. June 5, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Two articles describing the events in Beijing on June 3 and 4.
Subject codes: CB01
Box 11

CC 1068.  [chinese characters] "Bei gao lian gao shijie tongbao shu" (Letter to international compatriots from the Beijing Autonomous Student Union). [chinese characters] Xin bao. Hong Kong. June 5, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Beijing student organization relates the events in on the night of June 4.
Subject codes: CB01 CC01
Box 11

CC 1069.  [chinese characters] "Beijing xuesheng yundong ba zhou da shi huigu" (Chronology of the Beijing student movement for eight weeks). [chinese characters] Ming bao. Hong Kong. June 5, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Chronology of the Beijing student movement and the Tiananmen Incident.
Subject codes: CB04
Box 10

CC 1070.  [chinese characters] "Mao Zedong dangnian ping ai Deng: mianli cangzhen, xingfang siyuan" (Mao Zedong on Short Deng [Xiaoping]: An iron fist in a velvet glove, he thinks things through thoroughly and acts decisively). [chinese characters] Dongfang ribao. Hong Kong. June 7, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Anecdotes and rumors about Mao's relationship with Deng Xiaoping from 1959 and 1972.
Subject codes: CD01
Box 11

CC 1071.  [chinese characters] "Fang Wang Ruowang tan shiju" (On the political situation: Interview with Wang Ruowang). [chinese characters] Xin bao. Hong Kong. June 7, 14, 17, and 18, 1989 [installment for June 8 missing].

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Wang Ruowang asserts that Hu Yaobang did much to protect China's intellectuals. He addresses the issue of what socialism with Chinese characteristics actually means. He also emphasizes the influence of the banned Chinese newspaper the World Economic Herald on reform. Finally, Wang discusses the student movement and the general political situation in China before the events in Tiananmen Square.
Subject codes: CC01
Box 10

CC 1072.  [chinese characters] "Yuan Mu liu ri tan ruci 'zhenxiang,' Beijing Xinhua she qi ri zuo baodao" (Xinhua News Agency in Beijing reports on the 7th that Yuan Mu gave a talk on the 6th on the so-called "truth"). [chinese characters] Dagong bao. Hong Kong. June 8, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp. (This is the continuation only; the first page is missing.)

Scope and Content Note

Yuan Mu, along with other government and military spokespersons, relates the official version of the incidents on June 3 and 4 in Beijing. He says that the number of deaths among the People's Liberation Army is greater than the number among civilians. At the time of the interview, Yuan admits that the situation in Beijing is severe and unstable. His version of the Beijing events reveals that the resistance from students and civilians to the army was very strong.
Subject codes: CD01 CC01
Box 11

CC 1073.  [chinese characters] "Tu cheng si shi ba xiaoshi shilu" (Forty-eight hours of eyewitness accounts of the massacre in Beijing [parts 1 to 5]). [chinese characters] Wenhui bao. Hong Kong. June 8-12, 1989.

Physical Description: 5 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Five articles by a group of reporters who were present in Beijing June 3-4.
Subject codes: CB02
Box 11

CC 1074.  [chinese characters] "Tieti tanke roulin Beijing cheng" (Steel tank treads grind Beijing). [chinese characters] Xingdao ribao. Hong Kong. June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Eyewitness account by a Hong Kong journalist of the June 4 events.
Subject codes: CB02
Box 11

CC 1075.  [chinese characters] "Hunxiao heibai de dianshi pian" (Television news reports mix up black and white). [chinese characters] Wenhui bao. Hong Kong. June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Eyewitness account of the killing of students and civilians by the People's Liberation Army. The author challenges the official Chinese television coverage of the June 4 events.
Subject codes: CB01
Box 10

CC 1076.  [chinese characters] "Zhu Rongji tan Beijing shijian: lishi zhenxiang zhong jiang da bai" (Zhu Rongji discusses the Beijing Incident: Its true history will be revealed). [chinese characters] Wenhui bao. Hong Kong. June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Speech by the mayor of Shanghai on the student movement in Shanghai and the Tiananmen Incident. Zhu appeals to civilians to remain calm because the Shanghai government, unlike the authorities in Beijing, will not impose martial law .
Subject codes: CC04
Box 11

CC 1077.  [chinese characters] Wei Jingsheng. [chinese characters] "Di wuge xiandaihua—minzhu ji qita" (The fifth modernization—democratization and etc.). [chinese characters] Kuai bao. Hong Kong. June 10, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Excerpts from one of Wei Jingsheng's major articles criticizes the political situation in China in 1979. Wei argues that the Four Modernizations (industry, agriculture, science, and national defense) cannot be successful without the Fifth Modernization—democratization.
Subject codes: CC05
Box 11

CC 1078.  [chinese characters] "Qunzhong shi baotu renmin sha jundui, kan dangquanzhe ruhe diandao heibai" (The masses are terrorists, the people are killing the army—see how the authorities reverse black and white). [chinese characters] Wenhui bao. Hong Kong. June 10 and 11, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

The article reports on a news conference delivered by the Propaganda Department of the Beijing Committee of the Chinese Communist Party regarding the events of June 3 and 4. Responses were offered to such questions as: "Is the situation in Beijing serious enough to be called 'turmoil'?"; and "If the purpose of the troops is to suppress the turmoil, why is the army shooting at people?"
Subject codes: CD01
Box 10

CC 1079.  [chinese characters] "Chai Ling yi shu Tiananmen xue an" (Chai Ling recalls the bloody events at Tiananmen). [chinese characters] Wenhui bao. Hong Kong. June 11, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Transcript of student leader Chai Ling's recorded narration of the June 4 events.
Subject codes: EB01
Box 10

CC 1080.  [chinese characters] "Er shi yi xuesheng lingxiu xiangxi ziliao" (Detailed information about twenty-one student movement leaders), [chinese characters] Wenhui bao. Hong Kong. June 14, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Brief biographies of twenty-one student leaders listed as most wanted by the Chinese government after the Tiananmen Incident. Page contains another article reporting Li Peng's remarks at a national party meeting on the danger to Communism posed by the student movement.
Subject codes: CC01
Box 11

CC 1081.  [chinese characters] "Qiang shen xue ying, nao zhong huidang" (The sound of guns and the sight of blood reverberate in my mind). [chinese characters] Ming bao. Hong Kong. June 14, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A reporter's eyewitness account of and personal feelings about the Beijing student movement and the Tiananmen Incident.
Subject codes: CB02
Box 11

CC 1082.  [chinese characters] "Zhongguo dalu sishi nian" (Forty years of mainland China). [chinese characters] Jingji ribao. Hong Kong. June 14, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Chronology translated from the Financial Times of significant events in China from 1949 to 1989.
Subject codes: CB04
Box 11

CC 1083.  [chinese characters] "Xiong Jie zai Gang tan Beijing shijian" (Xiong Jie in Hong Kong discusses the Beijing events). [chinese characters] Wenhui bao. Hong Kong. June 14, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A Chinese American professor's eyewitness accountof and comments on what happened in Beijing. His main point is that persons in the crowd attacked the army first and the army only killed people after this attack. His account stresses the number of soldiers who were killed by rock-throwing ruffians. He claims that there are 20,000 former prisoners living in Beijing.
Subject codes: CB02
Box 11

CC 1084.  [chinese characters] "Shangwang canzhong quan cheng aitong" (The whole city is in mourning for the heavy casualties). [chinese characters] Xin bao. Hong Kong. June 16, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A reporter's eyewitness account of the popular demonstration and the army's attack on the morning of June 4th.
Subject codes: CB02
Box 11

CC 1085.  [chinese characters] "Jixin'ge ping Zhongguo shiju" (Kissinger comments on China's current situation). [chinese characters] Wenhui bao. Hong Kong. June 17, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Henry Kissinger discusses issues such as the price reform of 1988, the corruption of Communist power, the new social class which would be produced by reform, and the traditional methods used to suppress the student movement.
Subject codes: CE01
Box 10

CC 1086.  [chinese characters] "Deng Xiaoping jiejian jieyan budui jianghua" (Deng Xiaoping's speech to the martial law authorities). [chinese characters] Ming bao. Hong Kong. June 17, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Includes three main points: that the military suppression was correct, that the Chinese Communist Party will uphold socialism, and that the government will maintain its open-door policy.
Subject codes: CC04
Box 10

CC 1087.  [chinese characters] "Minyun gui ji" (Democracy Movement chronology). Hong Kong. ND. Source unknown.

Scope and Content Note

A chronology of the Democracy Movement in China from May 26 to June 26, 1989.
Subject codes: CB04
Box 11

CC 1088.  [chinese characters] "Ping Deng Xiaoping 6.9 jianghua quan wen" (Comments on Deng Xiaoping's speech on June 9). [chinese characters] Kuai bao. Hong Kong. June 28, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Commentary written by the editor of Kuai bao condemning Deng Xiaoping and other hardliners as killers and as the reprensentatives of a privileged bureaucratic group in China.
Subject codes: CC04
Box 10

CC 1089.  [chinese characters] "Mei zong gonghui qianze Zhonggong zhengquan: quefa zhi guo de daode zige" (The U.S. AFL-CIO condemns Chinese Communist regime: They lack the moral qualifications to run the country). [chinese characters] Shijie ribao (Chinese Daily News). Los Angeles. June 29, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Chairman of the AFL-CIO criticises the regime as totalitarian.
Subject codes: EE03
Box 10

CC 1090.  [chinese characters] Nan bei ji (North and South Pole, but uses the English title of "The Perspective"). Hong Kong: Long Men Cultural, Inc. June 1989.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) [chinese characters] Li Yu, [chinese characters] "Sanrenbang bi sirenbang geng fandong" (The Gang of Three is even more reactionary than the Gang of Four), pp. 10-12. A comparison between the April 5th supression of 1976 and the June 4, 1989 incident. The article contains personal accounts of both events with comments.
  • (2) [chinese characters] Chai Ling, [chinese characters] "Xue yun huozhong bixu xin chuan" (The sparks of the student movement must be kept aglow), pp. 18-19. A personal account and comments about the student movement in Tiananmen Square and the Chinese government.
  • (3) [chinese characters] Yi Hua, [chinese characters] "Zhao Ziyang de jueqi yu shishi" (Zhao Ziyang's rise and fall), pp. 49-57. A profile of Zhao Ziyang from his early days to May 1989.
Subject codes: CB01 CC01 CC02 CC04
Box 10

CC 1091.  [chinese characters] Zhengming (Contention). Hong Kong: Pak Ka Publisher. June 1989.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) [chinese characters] Liao Tianqi, [chinese characters] "Xide Zhongguo liuxuesheng de liang du youxing" (Two demonstrations held by Chinese students in West Germany), pp. 27-29. A report of demonstrations by Chinese students in West Germany in May 1989 to support the students in Tiananmen Square.
  • (2) [chinese characters] "Minyun beiwanglu" (Democracy Movement chronology), pp. 40-51.
  • (3) [chinese characters] "Si shi Meiguo Hua yi xueren cu Zhonggong gaige: Jinian Wusi yundong qi shi zhounian gan yan" (Forty Chinese-American scholars urge the Chinese Communists to reform: Reactions to the seventieth anniversary of the May Fourth Movement), pp. 74-75.
  • (4) [chinese characters] Chen Deheng, [chinese characters] "Wo mu du le Tiananmen xue yun" (I witnessed the student movement in Tiananmen Square), pp. 76-77.
Subject codes: CB02 CB04 CE02 CE04
Box 11

CC 1092.  [chinese characters] "Tui dang shengming" (Declaration of withdrawl from the party). [chinese characters] Ming bao. Hong Kong. July 1, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Declaration explains why 204 Chinese scholars and students in the United States resigned from the Chinese Communist Party. They condemn the Chinese government and pledge to fight for a democratic China. Page also contains three other short articles.
Subject codes: CE04
Box 11

CC 1093.  [chinese characters] "Wo bushi Deng Li jituan de pengyou" (I am no friend of the Deng-Li alliance). [chinese characters] Xin bao, Hong Kong. July 1, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

William Hinton, an authority on agriculture who spent much time in China from the 1940s and had written widely in support of the Mao government, declares that the military action taken in China did not represent the wishes of the Chinese people, or even of the majority of the People's Liberation Army. He witnessed the army assault on East Chang'an Boulevard on June 4th. He says, "I support China and China's revolution, my feelings towards the Chinese people will not be changed, but, I am not a friend of the Deng and Li faction."
Subject codes: CB03
Box 10

CC 1094.  "NBC [chinese characters] "NBC xinwen zhu bo Kaisi houci ting shen zuozheng, qin yan kanjian gong jun zai Tiananmen fujin sharen" (For the first time, NBC news anchor Kaisi [Kaiser?] provides eyewitness testimony of military killings near Tiananmen Square). [chinese characters] Zhong bao. New York. July 15, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Discussion of an NBC journalist's eyewitness account of the June 4 incident.
Subject codes: CB03
Box 10

CC 1095.  [chinese characters] "Xinwen baodao bixu zunzhong shishi" (News reports must respect the facts). Source unknown. July 15, 1989.

Physical Description: 1pp.

Scope and Content Note

Newspaper editorial expresses doubts about extent of violence on June 3-4.
Box 10

CC 1096.  [chinese characters] "Guo nei minyun yuanshi ziliao" (Domestic source material on the Democracy Movement). [chinese characters] Shiyue pinglun (October Review). Hong Kong: Shiyue shu wu. July 28, 1989,

Physical Description: pp. 17-30.

Scope and Content Note

Sixteen articles, originally published by student organizations in Beijing during the 1989 Democracy Movement, which reflect the responses and attitudes of various walks of life toward the movement.
Subject codes: CB01
Box 10

CC 1097.  [chinese characters] "Qian zhang Tiananmen shijian zhaopian you dixia zuzhi yun di Bali" (Thousands of pictures of the Tiananmen Incident have been sent to Paris by underground organizations). [chinese characters] Guoji ribao (International Daily News). Los Angeles. August 12, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

News report about pictures that were smuggled from China to France by an underground organization in China.
Subject codes: CB01
Box 10

CC 1098.  [chinese characters] Shiyue pinglun (October Review). Hong Kong: Shiyue shu wu. December 10, 1989.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) [chinese characters] "Minzhu Zhongguo zhenxian xuanyan" (Manifesto of the Front for a Democratic China). The reasons and goals for establishing the Front for a Democratic China, pp. 27-28.
  • (2) [chinese characters] "Minzhu Zhongguo zhenxian zhangcheng" (Charter of the Front for a Democratic China). The post-June 4 constitution for the Front for a Democratic China, pp. 28-29.
Subject codes: CC01 CC02 CC03 CC04 CC05
Box 12

CC 1099.  [chinese characters] Liu Binyan. [chinese characters] "Wo he Hu Yaobang" (Hu Yaobang and I) [chinese characters] Shi bao zhoukan (China Times Weekly). New York. December 16-22, 1989,

Physical Description: pp. 69-71.

Scope and Content Note

A profile of the relationship between Hu Yaobang and Liu Binyan since the early 1950s.
Subject codes: EC02 EC04
Box 12

CC 1100.  [chinese characters] "Guo nei minyun yuanshi ziliao" (Domestic source material on the Democracy Movement). [chinese characters] Shiyue pinglun (October Review). Hong Kong: Shiyue shu wu. December 31, 1989,

Physical Description: pp. 26-34.

Scope and Content Note

Nine pieces from original articles written and pubiished during the movement discussing reform and democracy.
Subject codes: CC01 CC05 CC04
Box 12

CC 1101.  [chinese characters] Shiyue pinglun (October Review). Hong Kong: Shiyue shu wu. March 15, 1990.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) [chinese characters] "zhongguo gongren zizhi lianhehui haiwai choubei chu zujian jihua shu" (Plans for founding a Chinese Autonomous Workers Union Overseas Preparation Bureau), p. 20.
  • (2) [chinese characters] "Zhongguo minzhu tuanjie lianmeng, minzhu Zhongguo zhenxian lianhe gonggao" (Joint public statement from the Chinese Alliance for Democracy and the Front for a Democratic China), p. 20. Calls for uniting two of the organizations of exiled activists.
  • (3) [chinese characters] "Shi zi lukou, hequ hecong?" (At the cross roads, which way to go?), pp. 22-23. Discussion of the strategy to achieve a democratic China.
  • (4) [chinese characters] "Li Peng muqian daodi jupa shenme?" (What is Li Peng afraid of now?), p. 24. A criticism of Li Peng and commentary on the 1989 Beijing student movement.
Subject codes: CC03 CC05
Box 12

CC 1102.  [chinese characters] Shiyue pinglun (October Review). Hong Kong: Shiyue shu wu. March 31, 1990.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) [chinese characters] "Beijing gongren zizhi lianhehui rizhi" (The journal of the Beijing Autonomous Workers' Union), p. 16. A chronology of the Beijing Autonomous Workers' Union from April 17 to the end of June, 1989.
  • (2) [chinese characters] Bai Chongqing, [chinese characters] "Yi ben bu yuan bei fang zai lishi lei shujia de shu — jieshao Gongren qilai le" (Introducing The Workers Have Arisen— A book that should not be placed in the history book section), p. 17. An introduction to the book The Workers Have Arisen that emphasizes the role of the workers in the 1989 Democracy Movement.
  • (3) [chinese characters] Wei Wen, [chinese characters] "Shi 'guang jiazi' hai shi douzheng shi ti — 'gong zi lian' zai ba jiu minyun de zuoyong" (The role of the Autonomous Workers' Union in the 1989 Democracy Movement — an empty name or an entity that fights?), pp. 18-20. Analyzes and comments on the role of the Autonomous Workers' Union in the 1989 Democracy Movement. The fact that the government suppressed the workers ruthlessly indicates that the Communist Party believed the role of the workers was crucial in the democratic movement.
Subject codes: CB04 CC03 CC04
Box 12

CC 1103.  [chinese characters] Minzhu Zhongguo (Democratic China). Paris. Democratic China Magazine Association. April 1990.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) [chinese characters] Yuan Zhiming, [chinese characters] "Fandongpai yu fanduipai" (Reactionaries and oppositionists), pp. 8-11. The author delineates the difference between the concepts of "reactionaries" and "opposition factions." While the former slaughter people and treat them as their enemies, the latter are one of the most vital parts of a democratic society. An opposition faction in a democratic society can be identified by four characteristics: Indepedence, grouping, openness, and coexistence with other parties or factions.
  • (2) [chinese characters] Su Wei, [chinese characters] "Zhonggong de 'dang wenhua'" (The "party culture" of the Chinese Communist Party), pp. 12-18. "Party culture" is a third culture, in addition to traditional Chinese and Western cultures. It is allegedly characterized by three elements: cheating, terror, and forgetting. The nature of "party culture" has been the nature of political culture in Chinese society since 1949.
  • (3) [chinese characters] Hua Yifu, [chinese characters] "Xin yumin zhuyi: tezheng yu xiandu" (Neo-obscurantism: its characteristics and its limits), pp. 19-23. The author contends that throughout history, China's leaders have actively worked to withhold information from the people and use their ignorance to advance themselves politically. Hua argues that the vast changes in the modern world have made this no longer possible.
  • (4) [chinese characters] Qi Mo, [chinese characters] "Aiguo yu ziyou" (Patriotism and liberty), pp. 24-28. The author expresses his belief that the Democracy Movement placed far greater emphasis on patriotism than on freedom and liberty. He calls on political activists to distinguish these two concepts and work toward their true goal—democracy.
  • (5) [chinese characters] Chen Xuanliang, [chinese characters] "Zhongguoren weishenme bu chaoyue?" (Why don't Chinese transcend [the obstacles before them]?), pp. 62-67. Explores the main causes of the failure of the 1989 Democracy Movement. The author contends that the movement was in many ways similar to the peasant rebellions of the past, in that it was motivated, not by higher ideals, but by a desire for personal gain. In addition, he feels that China's lack of a democratic tradition society makes the fight for democracy even more difficult. He concludes that the first step is to envisage a better society, then the pursuit of this better society will lead Chinese to transcend the obstacles to democracy.
  • (6) [chinese characters] Pan Mingxiao (Michel Bonnin), [chinese characters] "Cong hefaxing dao feifaxing" (From legitimacy to illegitimacy), pp. 68-73. The Chinese Communist Party preserved its legitimacy in the first several years of the People's Republic through its nationalism, idealism, and realism. However, it later lost its legitimacy and used only one method to mantain power—brutal suppression.
  • (7) [chinese characters] Bei Di, [chinese characters] "Gongheguo de huanmie" (Disillusioned with the republic), pp. 82-104. An essay written one year after the Democracy Movement. The author argues that since the Beijing incident, the Chinese people have become disillusioned with the People's Republic, which they view as deominated by a handful of aging leaders.
  • (8) [chinese characters] Lao Mu, [chinese characters] "Bajiu minyun de hei gu yu fan xing" (Recollections and meditations on the 1989 Democracy Movement), pp. 105-110. Discusses the background of the 1989 Democracy Movement, the power struggle, the various autonomous organizations involved, and the movement's revolutionaries and counterrevolutionaries.
  • (9) [chinese characters] Chen Yizi, [chinese characters] "Shixing minzhu liliang da lianhe" (Unify the democratic forces), pp. 111-12. States that based on their shared political perspectives, the various democratic forces have the opportunity to unite and work together to establish a democratic system in China.
Subject codes: CC01 CC02 CC04 CC05
Box 12

CC 1104.  [chinese characters] Shiyue pinglun (October Review). Hong Kong: Shiyue shu wu. May 20, 1990.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) [chinese characters] Li Si, [chinese characters] "Fan si bajiu minyun" (Thinking back on the 1989 Democracy Movement), pp. 15-16. Asserts that the workers, especially the members of the Beijing Autonomus Workers' Union, contributed significantly to the 1989 Democracy Movement.
  • (2) [chinese characters] "Guo nei minyun yuanshi ziliao" (Domestic source material on the Democracy Movement). Ten articles written as posters during the movement discussing democracy in China, pp. 36-46.
Subject codes: CB01 CC01 CC02 CC03 CC04 CC05
Box 12

CC 1106.  [chinese characters] Dangdai (Contemporary). Hong Kong. June 2, 1990.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) [chinese characters] He Boshi, [chinese characters] "Liusi tu cheng dejunshi bushu" (Military deployment in the June 4 massacre), pp. 18-20.
  • (2) [chinese characters] Wu Ming, [chinese characters] "Beijing qingnian jiaoshi juese zhongyao" (The important role of the young faculty in Beijing universities), pp. 21-23.
Subject codes: CC02
Box 12

CC 1107.  [chinese characters] Chen Yizi. [chinese characters] "Qingsuan shi nian gaige de yi chang zhengbian" (A coup d'etat erasing ten years of reform). [chinese characters] Dangdai (Contemporary). Hong Kong. June 9, 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 18-20.
Box 12

CC 1108.  [chinese characters] Dangdai (Contemporary). Hong Kong. June 16, 1990.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) [chinese characters] Zhong Shimei and Mai Weizong, [chinese characters] "Bali Huaren quan zai liusiyi zhounian zhi hou" (Chinese social circles in Paris—one year after June 4th), pp. 26-27 and 43-44. A report of a memorial ceremony held in Paris by exiled Democratic Movement activists on the anniversary of the Tiananmen Incident, and on the response by the Chinese-French community.
  • (2) [chinese characters] He Min, [chinese characters] "Meiguo jiantao dui Hua zhicai de chengxiao" (A review of the effects of U.S. sanctions against China), pp. 48-49.
Subject codes: CE01 CE03
Box 12

CC 1109.  [chinese characters] Xie Xiaoqing. [chinese characters] "Chen Ziming, Wang Juntao de guannian he zhuzhang" (Chen Ziming and Wang Juntao's beliefs and proposals). [chinese characters] Baixing semimonthly. Hong Kong. June 16, 1990.

Physical Description: pp. 25-27.

Scope and Content Note

Discusses two pioneer political dissidents' thinking on China's political reform.
Subject codes: CC02 CC05
Box 12

CC 1110.  [chinese characters] "Haiwai minyun renshi ji Zhongguo liuxuesheng dui Zhonggong 'zhaoan' ruhe fan ying?" (How do the overseas Democracy Movement activists and Chinese students respond to the "pacification amnesty" of the Chinese Communist Party?), [chinese characters] Dangdai (Contemporary). Hong Kong. June 23, 1990,

Physical Description: p. 17-23.

Scope and Content Note

Reports from the U.S., France, and other countries on the attitudes of local Chinese students and exiled Democracy Movement activists on the Chinese government's gestures of reconciliatioin. Also comments on the difficult situation they are facing.
Subject codes: CC02
Box 12

CC 1111.  [chinese characters] Dangdai (Contemporary). Hong Kong. June 30, 1990.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) [chinese characters] "Fang Lizhi huo shi" (Details on the release of Fang Lizhi), pp. 6-13. Several articles on how Fang Lizhi was allowed to leave China a year after the Tiananmen Incident and the responses to his exile from the government and his friends.
  • (2) [chinese characters] Zhong Guoren, [chinese characters] "Hou Dejian jinhou yao zuo guoji nanmin" (Hou Dejian's future as an international refugee), p. 17. An interview with singer Hou Dejian, followed by commentary, after his forcible deportation to Taiwan by the Chinese government. Hou expresses his dissatisfaction with Chinese culture.
Subject codes: CB02 CC02 CC04
Box 12

CC 1112.  [chinese characters] Hua Yifu. [chinese characters] "Cong zhengzhi wenhua de jiaodu kan 'Liusi' yi zhounian" (Looking at the one-year anniversary of "June 4" from the perspective of political culture). [chinese characters] Jiushi niandai (The Nineties). Hong Kong: Going Fine, Ltd. June 1990.

Physical Description: pp. 54-55.

Scope and Content Note

Argues that cultural beliefs are separated from the political system in China, and that the emergent core of civil society was destroyed by the June 4 incident.
Subject codes: CC01
Box 12

CC 1113.  [chinese characters] Kai fang (Open magazine). Hong Kong: Celeluck Co., Ltd. June 1990.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) [chinese characters] Luo Bing, [chinese characters] "Beijing fankang qiangsheng zhenhan Zhongnanhai" (The sound of resistance gunfire in Beijing shocks Zhongnnhai), pp. 7-9. A report on the situation in China on the first anniversary of the June 4 incident. University students had been protesting and several military policemen were victims of drive-by shootings. In addition, Xu Jiatun, the former bureau chief for the Hong Kong office of the Xinhua News Agency, fled to the United States.
  • (2) [chinese characters] Liu Yuan, [chinese characters] "Minyun zhong de wuming yingxiong" (The unknown heroes of the Democracy Movement), pp. 27-28. Reports that several intellectuals and student leaders were arrested by the local authorities for their participation in the 1989 Democracy Movement in Beijing, Shanghai, Shanxxi, and Shanxi.
  • (3) [chinese characters] Wen Chuan, [chinese characters] "'Liusi': Zhonggong jundui de beiju" ("June 4th": The tragedy of the Chinese Communist army), pp. 41- 43. Describes the deployment of the People's Liberation Army in Beijing on June 3 and 4.
  • (4) Pierre Hurel ([chinese characters] trans. Cheng Zhou), [chinese characters] "Zhonggong mimi chujue minyun fenzi" (The Chinese Communist Party secretly executed democratic activists), pp. 48-49. This article, accompianied by graphic photographs, claims that democratic activists were executed after the June 4 incident in smaller towns, out of the observation of foreign journalists.
  • (5) [chinese characters] Cao Changqing, [chinese characters] "Wan ming liuxuesheng yaoqiu bihu" (Tens of thousands of students abroad apply for political asylum), pp. 84-85. Claims that tens of thousands of Chinese students and scholars in Canada and the United States have asked for asylum to avoid political persecution. Includes a summary of the Canadian government's new policy concerning Chinese students and Chinese goverment documents addressing how to control Overseas Chinese students in the aftermath of the Beijing incident.
Subject codes: CC01 CC02 CC03 CC04 CE04
Box 12

CC 1114.  [chinese characters] Chu Tianshu. [chinese characters] "Liuwang zhe: kaishi zou chu kunjing he xin yu" (Exiles: walking away from a difficult situation and psychological imprisonment). [chinese characters] Dangdai (Contemporary). Hong Kong. July 7, 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 24-25.

Scope and Content Note

Reports that most activists in exile have found a way to live in foreign countries, but are still thinking of returning to China to fight for democratization.
Subject codes: CC02
Box 12

CC 1115.  [chinese characters] He Pin. [chinese characters] "Minyun mingyuan Lü Jinghua yu Cheng Zhen" (Famous women in the Democracy Movement: Lu Jinghua and Cheng Zhen). [chinese characters] Dangdai (Contemporary). Hong Kong. July 14, 1990,

Physical Description: p. 43.
Box 12

CC 1116.  [chinese characters] Zhang, Kai, [chinese characters] "Zhongguo renmin meiyou tingzhi kangzheng" (The Chinese people will never give up their resistance). [chinese characters] Shiyue pinglun (October Review). Hong Kong: Shiyue shu wu. July 25, 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 12-13.

Scope and Content Note

Reports that many Chinese have memorialized the 1989 Democracy Movement and have continued to fight on one year after the Tiananmen Incident, despite tight governmental control.
Subject codes: CC02 CC03
Box 12

CC 1117.  [chinese characters] Mao Li, [chinese characters] "Zhao Ziyang duanqi bu ke'neng fuchu" (Zhao Ziyang will not make a comeback in the short term). [chinese characters] Dangdai (Contemporary). Hong Kong. July 28, 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 18-20.

Scope and Content Note

Zhao's former secretary and two researchers in Zhao's think tank comment on Zhao's contributions to China's ten-year reform and predict his situation in the near future.
Subject codes: CC04
Box 12

CC 1118.  [chinese characters] Zhong Kui, [chinese characters] "Junfang jingshu xieiu de 'ji mi'" (The 'secret' from the military's banned book). [chinese characters] Zhengming (Contention). Hong Kong: Pak Ka Publisher. July 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 86-88.

Scope and Content Note

Reports the government's withdrawal of a book published by the military authorities to honor the heroism of the martial law enforcers when the publication proved to be too graphic in its description of the troops' assault on civilians.
Subject codes: CC04
Box 12

CC 1119.  [chinese characters] Jin Zhong, [chinese characters] "Hongye shanzhuang ye shenchen" (An oppressive night at the Red Leaf Villa). [chinese characters] Kai fang (Open magazine). Hong Kong: Celeluck Co., Ltd. July 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 39-48.

Scope and Content Note

In this three-part interview Hou Dejian offers some general background on his life, his assessment of the Democracy Movement, and his involvement in it. He contends that the student movement accomplished little.
Subject codes: CC02
Box 12

CC 1120.  [chinese characters] Yang Hao, [chinese characters] "Cong Tiananmen laidao Faguo hou—liuwang xuesheng de yi nian zongjie" (From Tiananmen Square to France—a one-year retrospective by an exiled student). [chinese characters] Jiushi niandai (The Nineties). Hong Kong: Going Fine, Ltd. July 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 60-62.

Scope and Content Note

An account of the cultural shock, the bitterness of being criticized, personal conflicts, and other difficulties experienced by Chinese student leaders who went into exile in France after the 1989 Democracy Movement.
Subject codes: CC02
Box 12

CC 1121.  [chinese characters] Lu Keng. [chinese characters] "Fang Lizhi tan dashiguan bi nan shenghuo" (Fang Lizhi on refugee life at the U.S. Embassy). [chinese characters] Baixing semimonthly. Hong Kong, 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 3-7.

Scope and Content Note

An interview with Fang Lizhi discussing his and his wife's lives as refugees in the U.S. Embassy.
Subject codes: CC02
Box 12

CC 1122.  [chinese characters] Luo Bing. [chinese characters] "Zhao Ziyang shi kuang" (Real situation of Zhao Ziyang). [chinese characters] Zhengming (Contention). Hong Kong: Pak Ka Publisher. August 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 6-8.

Scope and Content Note

Report on Zhao's treatment after he was fired from the position of party general-secretary. It is claimed that the Communist Party has assigned special officers to pressure Zhao to say that he supported the Democracy Movement and conspired to split the party.
Subject codes: CC04
Box 12

CC 1123.  [chinese characters] Ou Lu. [chinese characters] "Cong Bali zhuan xiang Beimei" (From Paris to North America). [chinese characters] Kai fang (Open magazine). Hong Kong: Celeluck Co., Ltd. August 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 75-77.

Scope and Content Note

Explains a planned move from Paris to the United States by exiled activists and their organization.
Subject codes: CC02
Box 12

CC 1124.  [chinese characters] Jiushi niandai (The Nineties). Hong Kong: Going Fine, Ltd. August 1990.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) [chinese characters] Li Yi, [chinese characters] "Dalu minzhu: luzi zenme yue zou yue zhai?" (Is the road becoming increasingly narrow? Democracy in mainland China), pp. 43-48. Su Siaokang and Weng Songran talk about who should be held responsible for ordering shooting people on June 3 and 4 and the problems the hardliners are facing after the Tiananmen Incident.
  • (2) [chinese characters] "Zhongguo dalu dangqian de zhengzhi zheng jie" (Mainland China's present political illness), pp. 49-53. A discussion of the military supressions in China since 1949 and the June 4 incident.
  • (3) [chinese characters] Shi Hua, [chinese characters] "Shei xialing kaiqiang?" (Who gave the order to fire?), pp. 54-55. The article reports that the question of who ordered the army to shoot in Beijing on June 3 and 4 has become a hot potato among the hardliners as they fight for power. The article reasons that as no one dares to claim responsibility for the order, there is an opportunity for the reinterpretation of the June 4th events in the future.
Subject codes: CC01, CC04
Box 12

CC 1125.  [chinese characters] Gu Weiqun. [chinese characters] "Zhongguo dalu liu Mei xuesheng xueren minyi ceyan jieguo" (The results of the survey of Chinese students and scholars in the United States). [chinese characters] Baixing semimonthly. Hong Kong. September 1, 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 12-14.

Scope and Content Note

The report includes the questionnaires and the results of a survey of Chinese students in the USA, reflecting their personal choices, comments, attitudes, and opinions on the Tiananmen Incident and the current situation in both Taiwan and China after June 4, 1989.
Subject codes: CE04
Box 13

CC 1126.  [chinese characters] "Di qi hao bei tongji renwu Liang Qingdun tao di Meiguo" (Liang Qingdun, number 7 on the most wanted list, flees to the United States). [chinese characters] Dangdai (Contemporary). Hong Kong. September 22, 1990,

Physical Description: p. 11.
Box 13

CC 1127.  [chinese characters] "Guo nei minyun yuanshi ziliao" (Domestic source material on the Democracy Movement). [chinese characters] Shiyue pinglun (October Review). Hong Kong: Shiyue shu wu. September 25, 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 22-26.

Scope and Content Note

Four articles written as posters during the movement discussing democracy in China.
Subject codes: CB01
Box 13

CC 1128.  [chinese characters] "Minyun tongxun" (News reports on the Democracy Movement). [chinese characters] Dangdai (Contemporary). Hong Kong. September 29, 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 9-13.

Scope and Content Note

Seven articles on the organization of the overseas activists of the movement.
Subject codes: CC02
Box 13

CC 1129.  [chinese characters] "Beijing daxue xuesheng sixiang diaocha baogao" (Report on a survey of students' thinking at Beijing University). [chinese characters] Kai fang (Open magazine). Hong Kong. Celeluck Co., Ltd. September 1990,

Physical Description: p. 55.

Scope and Content Note

Analyzes 453 responses to a survey of students' attitudes toward the current political situation and their personal feelings since June 4.
Subject codes: CC02
Box 13

CC 1130.  [chinese characters] "Te ji: minyun yu guoyun de taolun" (Special number: Discussion of the Democracy Movement and the fate of China). [chinese characters] Baixing semimonthly. Hong Kong. October 1, 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 9-14.

Scope and Content Note

Seventeen articles on the Democracy Movement and China's future. Includes reports from the overseas organizations of the movement and articles written by prominent activists in the movement.
Subject codes: CC02
Box 13

CC 1131.  [chinese characters] Zhang Jiefeng. [chinese characters] "Cong ji'ang dao chengning" (From indignation to calm). [chinese characters] Dangdai (Contemporary). Hong Kong. October 13, 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 12-14.

Scope and Content Note

Report on the second convention of the Federation for a Democratic China, in which new leaders were elected.
Subject codes: CC02
Box 13

CC 1132.  [chinese characters] Dangdai (Contemporary). Hong Kong. October 20, 1990.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) [chinese characters] Yan Jiaqi, [chinese characters] "Min zhen 'er da' deshi" (The gains and losses of the second convention of the Federation for a Democratic China), pp. 23-25.
  • (2) [chinese characters] Ruan Ming, [chinese characters] "Dalu zhengju yu minyun fazhan" (The political situation in mainland China and the development of the Democracy Movement), pp. 44-46. Discusses the relations between the Chinese government and overseas democratic organizations.
Subject codes: CC02
Box 13

CC 1133.  [chinese characters] Jiushi niandai (The Nineties). Hong Kong. Going Fine Ltd. October 1990.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) [chinese characters] Liu Jin, [chinese characters] "Jiang Zemin de qingyun lu—pan shang Chen Pixian" (Jiang Zemin's road to power: on the coattails of Chen Pixian), pp. 53-55. A profile of Jiang Zemin, general-secretary of the Chinese Communist Party, emphasizing his rise under the patronage of Chen Pixian. The article is in two parts, continued in the November issue (CC 1135).
  • (2) [chinese characters] Peng Wenyi, [chinese characters] "Zhao Ziyang weishenme bu zhenya xuesheng" (Why did Zhao Ziyang not suppress the students?), pp. 96-97. Argues that Zhao did not suppress the student movement because of his personal conscience and principles, and his fear that more people would die if he did so. Thus, Zhao's resignation was an act of moral courage.
  • (3) [chinese characters] Wang Chaohua, [chinese characters] "Gongren weishenme mei neng fadong qilai?" (Why couldn't the workers be mobilized?), pp. 106-07. Suggests that the workers in the 1989 Democracy Movement refrained from strong action for fear of damaging the country; further, that many took seriously the position argued by the Communist Party that workers were already the owners as well as the laborers in the factories. The workers' organizations were not sufficiently independent.
Subject codes: CC03 CC04
Box 13

CC 1134.  [chinese characters] Tao Gang. [chinese characters] "Lun quxian jiuguo" (On the theory of indirectly saving the country). [chinese characters] Kai fang (Open magazine). Hong Kong: Celeluck Co., Ltd. November 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 79-81.

Scope and Content Note

Discusses several theories of saving China "indirectly": the idealistic tendency of the activists, the pessimism of sideline observers, and so-called neoauthoritarianism.
Subject codes: CC02 CC05
Box 13

CC 1135.  [chinese characters] Liu Jin. [chinese characters] '"Shanghai wang' hu jia" (Traveling under the protection of the "King of Shanghai"). [chinese characters] Jiushi niandai (The Nineties). Hong Kong: Going Fine, Ltd. November 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 58-60.

Scope and Content Note

Second part of an article on the political history of Jiang Zemin, general-secretary of the Chinese Communist Party. Part one is in the October issue (contained in this collection as item CC 1133).
Subject codes: CC03
Box 13

CC 1136.  [chinese characters] "Nanjing bajiu minyun yuanshi ziliao" (Original material from the 1989 Democracy Movement in Nanjing). [chinese characters] Shiyue pinglun (October Review). Hong Kong: Shiyue shu wu. December 31, 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 25-29.

Scope and Content Note

Eight articles posted on the campus of Nanjing University and several photos of the protesters' banners.
Subject codes: CB01
Box 13

CC 1137.  [chinese characters] Guo Ningzhong. [chinese characters] "Taowang jingying de lishi qingjie" (The 'history complex' in the psyche of the exiled elites). [chinese characters] Kai fang (Open magazine). Hong Kong: Celeluck Co., Ltd. December 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 56-57.

Scope and Content Note

Analyzes the psychological condition of the Democracy Movement exiles, specifically their self-assumption of the historical task of reforming Chinese society. The author believes that they are the future and the hope of China.
Subject codes: CC02
Box 13

CC 1138.  [chinese characters] Shiyue pinglun (October Review). Hong Kong: Shiyue shu wu. May 31, 1991.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) [chinese characters] Zhang Kai, [chinese characters] "Minyun liang zhounian tan jige youguan wenti" (Discussing some relevant problems on the second anniversary of the Democracy Movement), pp. 9-12.
  • (2) [chinese characters] Li Si, [chinese characters] "Gongen, shimin zai ba jiu minyun zhong de juese — He Ya Zou xiang Tiananmen guangchang yi jie" (The role of workers and civilians in the 1989 Democracy Movement—Intruducing The Road to Tiananmen Square by Charlie Hore), pp. 13-15. A brief introduction to the book The Road to Tiananmen Square and some translated paragraphs from the book which describe how the workers and other civilians participated in the Democracy Movement in 1989.
Subject codes: CC01 CC03 CC04
Box 13

CC 1139.  [chinese characters] "Women de lichang yu zhuzhang" (Our positions and proposals). [chinese characters] Shiyue pinglun (October Review). Hong Kong: Shiyue shi wu. August 31, 1991,

Physical Description: p. 28.

Scope and Content Note

An open letter from fifty-nine Overseas Chinese to the Chinese government asking for dialogue and revaluation of the Democracy Movement on its second anniversary.
Subject codes: CE03
Box 13

CC 1140.  [chinese characters] Jun Xing. [chinese characters] "Shengyuan bei qui zhengzhifan jiqi jiashu de douzheng!" (Support the fight of the political prisoners and their families!). [chinese characters] Shiyue pinglun (October Review). Hong Kong: Shiyue shu wu. March 31, 1992,

Physical Description: p. 7.

Scope and Content Note

Describes how the prisoners of the movement and their family members fight for better treatment and reconsideration of their sentences.
Subject codes: CC02 CC03
Box 13

CC 1141.  [chinese characters] Zhang Kai. [chinese characters] "Zhonggong nei dou lie, minjian kang zheng zeng—jinian bajiu minyun san zhounian" (Deepening struggle in the Communist Party, a rise in mass resistence—on the third anniversary of the 1989 Democracy Movement). [chinese characters] Shiyue pinglun (October Review). Hong Kong: Shiyue shu wu. June 15, 1992,

Physical Description: pp. 6-9

Scope and Content Note

Points out that the political situation has been characterized by two main issues since the Democracy Movement, a constant fight among high-ranking party cadres and a trend of people's rebellion of all kinds.
Subject codes: CC01 CC02 CC03 CC04
Box 13

CC 1142.  [chinese characters] Ri Ru. [chinese characters] "Daibu, zheme yu minyun changpao" (Arrest, torture, and the ordeal of the Democracy Movement). [chinese characters] Shiyue pinglun (October Review). Hong Kong: Shiyue shu wu. October 31, 1992,

Physical Description: p. 13.

Scope and Content Note

Reports continued activity in the fight for democratic reform despite severe repression by the government.
Subject codes: CC01 CC03
Box 13

CC 1143.  [chinese characters] Shiyue pinglun (October Review). Hong Kong: Shiyue shu wu. March 31, 1993.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) [chinese characters] Ri Ru, [chinese characters] "Jixu zhengqu shifang suoyou bei qiu minyun renshi" (Continue to fight for the release of the Democracy Movement participants in prison), p. 11.
  • (2) [chinese characters] Wang Dan, [chinese characters] "Zhi guanxin wo de guo nei wai pengyou de gongkai xing" (A letter to my friends at home and abroad who cared about me), p. 12. After his release from prison, student leader Wang Dan wrote this open letter to those who were concerned about him, telling them that he had not changed his political beliefs and that he intended to continue to fight for his dream of a democratic China.
  • (3) [chinese characters] Jun Xing, [chinese characters] "Yi nian junxun zhengce de pochan" (The bankrupcy of the policy of one-year military training [of college students]), p. 14. Argues that the policy of drafting college freshmen for a year of military service has failed as a means of controlling the thinking of students after the Tiananmen Incident.
Subject codes: CC01 CC02 CC04 CC05
 

VI. Articles from Commercial Magazines and Newspapers—In English

Box 13

CE 1001.  New York Times. New York. April 15-June 3, 1989.

Physical Description: 176 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopied clippings reproducing most of the Times' coverage of the events for the period leading up to the Tiananmen Incident.
Subject codes: EB01 EB02 EB03 EC01 EC02 EC03 EC04 EC05
Box 11

CE 1002.  South China Morning Post. Hong Kong. April 20-May 28, 1989.

Physical Description: 7 pp., 8-1/2 x 14.

Scope and Content Note

All of these articles are from April except one in May. Most consist of dispatches from the Beijing correspondents of the SCMP on the demonstrations around the death of Hu Yaobang.
Box 13

CE 1003.  Michael J. Berlin. "Twenty Days That May Have Transformed China." International Herald Tribune. Paris. May 9, 1989,

Physical Description: p. 4.

Scope and Content Note

Analysis of and commentary on the student Democracy Movement in Beijing from the perspective of an American journalist who formerly represented the Washington Post at the United Nations and was now based in Beijing. Also includes an editorial on China's youth from the New York Times, a co-owner of the English-language Paris newspaper.
Subject codes: EC02
Box 13

CE 1004.  Louise Branson. "Student Protests in China Explode into Mass Uprising." Chronicle of Higher Education. Washington, DC. May 24, 1989,

Physical Description: pp. A1, A35.

Scope and Content Note

Report on how the Chinese student movement was broadened to include the citizens of Beijing, and how this in turn transformed the state visit of Mikhail S. Gorbachev, expected to be a major event, into a minor sideshow and seriously threatened the authority of the Chinese government.
Subject codes: EB03
Box 13

CE 1005.  Chronicle of Higher Education. Washington, DC. May 31, 1989.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) Louise Branson, "Tiananmen Square, the Center of Chinese Power, Becomes the Symbol of China's Confusion," pp. A27-A29. A report on the Beijing student demonstrations and the author's sense of the general public's sentiment.
  • (2) Katherine S. Mangan, "In the U.S., Thousands of Chinese Students March in Support of Uprising in Homeland," pp. A29-A31.
  • (3) Elizabeth Greene, "Some Americans Delay Plans to Visit China on Academic Missions, but Many Proceed," pp. A31-A32.
Subject codes: EB03 EC01 EC02
Box 13

CE 1006.  Mark P. Peracca. "President Bush Renews China's Favored-Nation Trading Status." Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles. June 3, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Letters from readers on the President's renewal of China's most favored-nation trading status.
Subject codes: EE03 EE01
Box 13

CE 1007.  Nicholas D. Kristof. ".#x002E;#x002E;The Reasons Why." New York Times Magazine . New York. June 4, 1989.

Physical Description: 6 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Analysis of rise of the student movement.
Subject codes: EC01
Box 14

CE 1008.  New York Times. New York. June 4 to June 30, 1989.

Physical Description: 277 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Photocopied clippings reproducing most of the Times' extensive coverage of the events in China for the month following the Tiananmen Incident.
Subject codes: EB01 EB02 EB03 EC01 EC02 EC03 EC04 EC05
Box 14

CE 1009.  Louise Branson. "Beijing Students, Divided, Last Week on Continuing Protest, Raise a New Symbol of Defiance." Chronicle of Higher Education. Washington, DC. June 7, 1989,

Physical Description: pp. A35-A36.

Scope and Content Note

Reports the dedication of the Goddess of Democracy statue in Tiananmen Square.
Subject codes: EB03
Box 14

CE 1010.  Alliance of Chinese Patriots. "Declaration of Chinese Patriots." New York Times. New York. June 7, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Ad sponsored by the Alliance of Chinese Patriots, Washington, DC, stating a series of principles of freedom and democracy for China.
Subject codes: EE04
Box 14

CE 1011.  Concerned Faculty and Administrators at UCLA. "A Statement Condemning the June 4th Massacre." Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles. June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Subject codes: EE02
Box 14

CE 1013.  Kathleen Lund-Seeden. "Ex-UCLA Student Gives First-Hand Account of Riots." The Outlook. Los Angeles. June 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Report on the forum "Behind the Democracy Revolution: Reports from China!" held at UCLA on June 8, 1989.
Subject codes: EB03
Box 14

CE 1014.  Chronicle of Higher Education. Washington, DC. June 14, 1989.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) Lawrence Biemiller, with Louise Branson, "Defiance and Death in Beijing: after Suppression of Protesters, Chinese Officials Demand that Student Leaders Turn Themselves in or Face Punishment," pp. A1, A35-A36. A report that the Chinese authorities set up military checkpoints around Beijing's university district the previous week, in support of earlier government demands that the leaders of the prodemocracy student movement turn themselves in.
  • (2) Katherine S. Mangan, "Chinese Students Here and Abroad Decry the Slaughter and Worry about Going Home," pp. A36-A38. Accounts of several antigovernment demonstrations by Overseas Chinese students in U.S. cities and in Australia calling for revenge on Li Peng and other Chinese leaders responsible for the shootings in Beijing June 4. Many are said to have vowed that they would not return to their homeland and serve a government that would shoot its own people.
  • (3) Courtney Leatherman, "America Colleges and Scholarly Organizations Condemn Massacre, Scramble to Get Their Students and Professors Out of China," pp. A38-A39.
  • Robert L. Jacobson, "Beijing University, Before and After: The Bloody Crackdown by the Government Stuns Students and Faculty Members," pp. A34-A35.
Subject codes: EB03
Box 14

CE 1015.  Perry Link. "The Powerful Tool behind the Big Lie: To Kill Truth, Chinese Leaders Summon Xenophobia." Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles. June 14, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Subject codes: EC01 EE02
Box 14

CE 1016.  Penelope McMillan. "China's Consulate Corps in LA. Now Keeps Out of Sight." Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles. June 17, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Subject codes: ED04
Box 14

CE 1017.  Chronicle of Higher Education. Washington, DC. June 21, 1989.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) Louise Branson, " Beijing Becomes a Sullen City, with Most Universities Shut and Intellectuals Gripped by Fear as Massive Arrests Begin," p. A28.
  • (2) Robert L. Jacobson, "Distress in China's Academic World May Have Been as Much a Cause of Beijing Protests as Students' Passionate Quest for Democracy," pp. A28-A29.
  • (3) "Chinese Intellectuals' May 16 Statement in Support of the Student Movement," pp. A29-A30. Translation of a statement of support to the student movement issued May 16 and signed by hundreds of Chinese intellectuals, including some 500 faculty members at Beijing University.
  • (4) Courtney Leatherman, "American College Officials Say They Can Offer Only Limited Help to the Estimated 40,000 Chinese Students and Scholars in U.S.," pp. A30-A31.
Subject codes: EC01 EC02
Box 14

CE 1018.  R. H. Tawney. "China 60 Years Ago: 'Mere Boys' Were Executed." Washington Post. Washington, DC. June 25, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

The article, written 60 years earlier, contains analysis that is still applicable to the situation in China.
Subject codes: EC01
Box 14

CE 1019.  Penelope McMillan. "Chinese in L.A. Trade Allegations: Consulate's Charges of Payment to Protesters Angrily Denied." Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles. June 28, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Taiwanese government representatives and UCLA staff members deny that students were paid to participate in demonstrations in Los Angeles in opposition to the PRC government.
Subject codes: ED04 EE04 EE01
Box 14

CE 1020.  Chronicle of Higher Education. Washington, DC. June 28, 1989.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) Ellen K. Coughlin, "Stirrings of Democracy in China and Russia Astonish Experts," pp. A1, A6-A8.
  • (2) Kim A. McDonald, "Sinologists Say Beijing Crackdown Perils Research Under Way," pp. A1, A6. Reports that hundreds of U.S. China scholars feel crackdown in Beijing could hamper their research for years to come.
  • (3) Louise Branson, "China Invalidates Exit Permits Issued before June 20," pp. A27-A28.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 14

CE 1021.  Elayn K. Bernay. "Pace Marketing Professor at Tiananmen Square." June 1989.

Physical Description: Pp. 10-14 of an unidentified U.S. publication, probably published by Pace University, New York.

Scope and Content Note

An account by Pace University, New York, professor of the author's experiences in Beijing from May 1, 1989, until after the June 4 events.
Subject codes: EB03
Box 14

CE 1022.  Robert L. Jacobson. "Future of Scholarly, Student Exchanges with China Is Clouded by Repression." Chronicle of Higher Education. Washington, DC. July 5, 1989.

Physical Description: P. A31.

Scope and Content Note

Subject codes: EB03 EE02
Box 14

CE 1023.  Nan Shen. "The Case Against China Sanctions." Christian Science Monitor. Boston. July 5, 1989.

Physical Description: P. 19.

Scope and Content Note

Supports President Bush's cautious approach to China, arguing that the American government must maintain its economic relationship with China for the sake of the one billion Chinese people.
Subject codes: EC01
Box 14

CE 1024.  Chronicle of Higher Education. Washington, DC. July 12, 1989.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) Goldie Blumenstyk, "New U.S. Visa Rules for Chinese Students Challenged as Risky," pp. A1, A36. Summarizes various legislation proposed to permit Chinese students in the United States to remain in the country indefinitely until the situation in China has stabilized, particularly a bill by Rep. Nancy Pelosi (Democrat, California). Some Chinese students raised the fear that applying for special extensions under such legislation could mark them as suspect by the Chinese government.
  • (2) Louise Branson, "China Seen Using Political Tests for Foreign Study," pp. A35-A36.
Subject codes: EE01 EE04
Box 14

CE 1025.  Glenn Shive. "Point of View: We Will Not Help Our Chinese Colleagues or Ourselves If We Dismantle Academic Contacts in Acts of Protest." Chronicle of Higher Education. Washington, DC. July 12, 1989.

Physical Description: P. A44.

Scope and Content Note

Shive argues that, for the benefit of both parties, U.S. academic institutions must preserve their relations with academia in China in the aftermath of the Beijing incident.
Subject codes: EC01 EE02
Box 14

CE 1026.  Edward A. Gargan. "Eyewitness at Tian An Men Square." Los Angeles Times Magazine. Los Angeles. July 16, 1989,

Physical Description: pp. 6-20, 37-39.

Scope and Content Note

The report of a few people who witnessed the events at Tiananmen on June 3 and 4.
Subject codes: EB03
Box 14

CE 1027.  Chronicle of Higher Education. Washington, DC. July 19, 1989.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) Robert L. Jacobson, "Uncertainty about Status of Academic Relations between China and United States Puts Plans for Fall Semester in Disarray," pp. A30-A31.
  • (2) Elizabeth Greene, '"We Know We're Watched': Chinese Students Now in U.S. Worry about Their Safety as Evidence of Surveillance Accumulates," pp. A31-A32.
  • (3) Louise Branson, "China Begins Ideological Indoctrination at Its Major Universities; Diplomas Tied to Attendance at Political Re-Education Classes," p. A32.
  • (4) Goldie Blumenstyk, "Senate Backs Visa Extension for Chinese Students," p. A32.
Subject codes: EB03 EC04 EC02 EE04
Box 14

CE 1028.  Leo A. Orleans. "Point of View: Students Bear Much of the Responsibility for the Tragedy in China." Chronicle of Higher Education. Washington, DC. July 19, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

The former China specialist for the U.S. Library of Congress places much of the blame for the Tiananmen Incident on the students' own impatience, accusing them of wanting to see reform overnight for problems that have existed for centuries.
Subject codes: EC02
Box 14

CE 1029.  Andrew J. Nathan. "Point of View: Scholars Must Keep Their Vision of China Unclouded by Politics." Chronicle of Higher Education. Washington, DC. July 26, 1989,

Physical Description: p. A44.

Scope and Content Note

Suggestions to American sinologists that while they should rightfully express their condemnation of Deng and Li's repression, they must also keep the door to China open.
Subject codes: EC01 EC04 EE02
Box 14

CE 1030.  Chronicle of Higher Education. Washington DC. August 2, 1989,

Physical Description: pp. A21, A22.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) Louise Branson, "Students at Beijing U. Defy Martial Law, Ignoring Ban on Unauthorized Gatherings; Officials Begin Inquiry." A report from Beijing about the students' continued demonstrations at Beijing University in defiance of martial law.
  • (2) Robert L. Jacobson, "Chinese Had Evidence of Campus Skepticism Over a Year Before Pro-Democracy Movement." Report on a scholarly conference in Taipei at which a paper was presented summarizing large-scale questionnaire surveys by the Chinese government at Beijing and Shanghai universities before the spring of 1988 which showed an "apparent decline in collectivist values" among students.
Subject codes: EB03
Box 14

CE 1031.  Louise Branson. "China Is Reported About to Postpone All Fulbright Exchanges for a Year to Express Dipleasure with U.S.—Among Beijing's Grievances Are Sanctions, Harboring Dissident." Chronicle of Higher Education. Washington DC. August 9, 1989,

Physical Description: pp. A1, A32.

Scope and Content Note

Subject codes: EC01
Box 14

CE 1032.  Elizabeth Greene. "Have Started an Informal but Desperate Campaign to Save Him." Chronicle of Higher Education. Washington, DC. August 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A news report that Liu Xiaobo, an independent intellectual, was arrested by the martial law army in Beijing. The article also appeals to the world community to place strong pressure on the government to release Liu.
Subject codes: EB01
Box 14

CE 1033.  Susan Oberlander. "600 Chinese Students in U.S. Hold an Unprecedented Meeting; Officials in Beijing Are Reported to Call Them 'Traitors.'" Chronicle of Higher Education. Washington, DC. August 9, 1989,

Physical Description: p. A30.

Scope and Content Note

A report on the First Congress of Chinese Students and Scholars in the United States in which 316 delegates plus observers from 190 U.S. universities organized the Federation of Chinese Students and Scholars in the United States and passed a series of bills for more actions to support the prodemocracy movement in China. (See item AC1037 for materials from the organizers of this congress.)
Subject codes: EE04
Box 14

CE 1034.  Chronicle of Higher Education. "Letters to the Editor: Scholars Must Not Collaborate with China's Disgraced Regime." Washington, DC. August 16, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Five U.S. China scholars reply to the opinion pieces by Leo Orleans (July 19 [CE 1028]) and Andrew Nathan (July 26 [CE 1029]). Their comments are entirely hostile and in support of the student Democracy Movement ("Leo Orleans's recent Point of View is perhaps the most asinine you have published..."—William H. Reid, University of Texas, El Paso).
Box 14

CE 1035.  Jay Mathews. "The Scholar of the Chinese Heart: Perry Link, the American Who Became a Sounding Board for Beijing Dissidents." Washington Post. Washington, DC. August 17, 1989,

Physical Description: pp. C1-C3.

Scope and Content Note

A profile of Princeton China scholar Perry Link (formerly of UCLA) and his wife Jean Wong, who aided China's leading dissident, Fang Lizhi, in an attempt to attend a banquet held by President George Bush in Beijing. They were later instrumental in helping Fang take refuge in the American Embassy.
Subject codes: EC02 EE02
Box 14

CE 1036.  Elizabeth Greene. "U.S. Foundations Cautiously Eye Resuming Links with China." Chronicle of Higher Education. Washington, DC. September 13, 1989.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Subject codes: EC04
Box 14

CE 1037.  "The Shattered Dream: China 1989." Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles. September 25, 1989.

Physical Description: 23 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Background, analysis, and a day-to-day account of the Democracy Movement and Beijing incident 1989.
Subject codes: EB04
Box 14

CE 1039.  Richard Bernstein. "Retracing the Road to Tiananmen." New York Times. New York. October 7, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Report of a meeting sponsored by PEN in Manhattan addressed by exiled Chinese student leader Wu'er Kaixi and writer Su Wei. The article covers their opinions on the emerging Chinese youth culture, the sexual liberation of young students, and the similarities between the traditional culture of China and that of the post-1949 era. Other speakers included Robin Munro of Asia Watch and historian Jonathan Spence.
Subject codes: EB01 EC01 EC02
Box 14

CE 1040.  Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles. October 8, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) Mark P. Petracca, "A Massacre of the Spirit Torments China's Campuses." A report that the Chinese government has suppressed the students and faculty of Beijing University after the Tiananmen Incident.
  • (2) Jeanne Kirkpatrick, "Weighing U.S. Goals vs. China's Misdeeds." Former Republican-appointed U.S. representative to the United Nations urges a middle ground, seeking to normalize relations with China while avoiding any fiscal policy that would "assist with taxpayers dollars that government—or any government whose practices seriously violate democratic values."
Subject codes: EB03
Box 14

CE 1041.  Ross Terrill. "In China, an Inescapable Crisis Bears Down." New York Times. New York. October 14, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Essay on the Chinese people's negative assessments of the political system in China. Compares Deng Xiaoping's behavior since the Tiananmen Square incident of 1989 to that of an anceint Chinese emperor.
Subject codes: EC01
Box 14

CE 1042.  Jacques Leslie. "The Re-education of a China Watcher." Los Angeles Times Magazine . Los Angeles. October 15, 1989,

Physical Description: pp. 22-24, 26, 39-40.

Scope and Content Note

Profile of American author, Orville Schell, who as a former idealistic supporter of Maoism, now champions China's dissidents. The article attributes this transformation to Schell's reaction to the Beijing incident and the insight this gave him into the reality of the situation in China.
Subject codes: EE02
Box 14

CE 1043.  UCLA Magazine. "Soaked with Sorrow: Special China Forum." Los Angeles. Fall 1989,

Physical Description: pp. 9-10.

Scope and Content Note

Report of several people who were in Beijing during June 3 and 4.
Subject codes: EB01 EB03
Box 14

CE 1044.  André Ryerson. "China's Untold Story." American Educator. Washington, DC: American Federation of Teachers. Fall 1989,

Physical Description: pp. 10-15, 48-53.

Scope and Content Note

The article raises the question: Will American students understand the events of Tiananmen Square? It also provides data illustrating the "totalitarian" nature of China's government. In addition, the article discusses whether American social studies materials distort reality and ignore the issues of democracy and repression in China after the rapprochement with the United States in 1972.
Subject codes: EC01 EE02 EC05
Box 14

CE 1045.  Nicholas D. Kristof. "China Update—How the Hardliners Won." New York Times Magazine. New York. November 12, 1989,

Physical Description: pp. 38-41, 66, 70-71.

Scope and Content Note

Chronological record, from April 18 to June 4, 1989, of the Tiananmen Democracy Movement and the developments in Beijing, as well as commentary on leaders of the CCP and the PRC government, including Hu Yaobang, Zhao Ziyang, Deng Xiaoping, and Li Peng.
Subject codes: EC01 EC04 EB04
Box 14

CE 1046.  Fang Lizhi. "The Chinese People Must Participate in a Universe of Rights." Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles. November 26, 1989.

Physical Description: 1 pp.

Scope and Content Note

An adaptation of the acceptance speech given by Fang when receiving the 1989 Robert Kennedy Human Rights Award.
Subject codes: EC05
Box 14

CE 1047.  Journal of Democracy. Feature: "Tiananmen and Beyond." Washington, DC: National Endowment for Democracy. Vol. 1, no. 1, Winter 1990.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) Wu'er Kaixi, "After the Massacre," pp. 6-8. The Chinese student leader comments on the 1989 Democracy Movement and the situation since the Tiananmen Incident.
  • (2) Merle Goldman, "China's Great Leap Backward," pp. 9-17. An analysis of the repression in Beijing in 1989 from a historical perspective, including a comparision of the Chinese student movements in 1987 and 1989.
  • (3) Thomas B. Gold, "The Resurgence of Civil Society in China," pp. 18-31. A discussion of the history of the CCP since 1949 and the resurgence of civil society in 1989.
  • (4) Fang Lizhi, "Peering over the Great Wall," pp. 32-40. Text based on Fang's November 18, 1986, speech on "Democracy, Reform, and Modernization," given at Tongji University in Shanghai, one of the seminal documents of the Student Democracy Movement of 1987.
Subject codes: EC01 EC04 EC05
Box 14

CE 1048.  U.S. News & World Report. "Inside China: Exclusive: The First Interviews with China's Leaders Since Tiananmen Square." New York. March 12, 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 40-44,48-51,54-56.

Scope and Content Note

Several reports, including interviews with CCP General-Secretary Jiang Zemin, PLA Chief of Staff Chi Haotian, and Security Vice Minister Tao Siju.
Subject codes: EB03 ED01
Box 14

CE 1049.  Jim Mann. "China's Lost Generation." Los Angeles Times Magazine. Los Angeles. March 25, 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 10-19, 38.

Scope and Content Note

Report on Chinese students' attitudes toward the Chinese government and their own situation in the United States prior to and in the wake of the Tiananmen Incident.
Subject codes: EE04
Box 14

CE 1050.  Sheryl WuDunn. "The Prisoners of Tiananmen Square." New York Times Magazine. New York. April 8, 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 30-34.

Scope and Content Note

Report on the situation of Wang Dan, Bao Tong, Ren Wanding, Dai Qing, Zhang Weiguo, and Liu Xiaobo, all detained in Qincheng Prison.
Subject codes: EB03 EC01 EC05
Box 14

CE 1051.  Nicholas D. Kristof. "Ominous Embers from the Fire of 1989." New York Times. New York. April 15, 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 1,8.

Scope and Content Note

Commentary on the continued effects of the Tiananmen Incident seen ten months later. A profile of the Chinese public's sentiment and their predictions for the future of China.
Subject codes: EC01
Box 14

CE 1052.  Richard M. Nixon. "We're Not Cold War Victors—Yet." Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles. April 15, 1990.

Physical Description: Second two pages (first page missing).

Scope and Content Note

Excerpt from Nixon's book In the Arena: A Memoir of Victory, Defeat and Renewal. Although this clipping is incomplete, it includes the whole of the part devoted to discussing his sixth visit to China, in October 1989, including a record of the talks between Nixon, Deng Xiaoping, Li Peng, and Yang Shangkun after the June 4 incident.
Subject codes: EC04 EE01
Box 14

CE 1053.  Scott Savitt. "Beijing's Big Squeeze." Billion. Hong Kong: Billion Publishing Ltd., Undated; probably published in the spring of 1990.

Physical Description: pp. 38-41.

Scope and Content Note

The Chinese government is pressing its citizens so hard with its Post-Democracy Movement austerity program that many now believe further demonstrations are almost inevitable. Foreign money is only trickling back, despite a breakdown in Western resistance to resuming loans.
Subject codes: EB03 EC01
Box 14

CE 1054.  Marsha Wagner and Jianying Zha. "Witnesses to Tiananmen." Columbia. New York: Columbia University. Vol. 15, no. 3, Spring 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 22-27.

Scope and Content Note

Professor Marsha Wagner and Ph.D. candidate Jianying Zha were witnesses to the events of the spring and early summer of 1989. Their recollections begin with the morning after the Tiananmen Incident and reflect back on the weeks leading up to it.
Subject codes: EB01 EB03
Box 14

CE 1055.  Nicholas D. Kristof. "China's Future on Hold with a 'Gang of Elders'" and "China's Untold Story: Who Died in the Crackdown?" New York Times, international edition. New York. June 3, 1990,

Physical Description: p. 6.

Scope and Content Note

Two dispatches from Beijing. The first is a commentary on the situation one year after June 4th incident. The article discusses the discord within the party and the government, concluding that the Chinese political system is deadlocked between Deng Xiaoping on one side, and Chen Yun and Yang Shangkun on the other. The second article uses the current speculation about the identity and fate of "Wang Weilin," believed to be the man who stood in front of the tanks as they approached Tiananmen Square, as a takeoff point for examining rival claims on the number of casualties suffered during the night of June 3.
Subject codes: EB03 EC01
Box 14

CE 1056.  Liu Binyan. "China's Long Wall of Silence." New York Times. New York. June 3, 1990,

Physical Description: p. E27.

Scope and Content Note

Liu calls on the Chinese to continue the fight for basic human rights and not to languish in inaction for ten years as they did after the 1979 protests. He contends that real change can be acheived simply by putting greater pressure on the Chinese government.
Subject codes: EC01 EC02 EC03 EC05
Box 14

CE 1057.  "Beijing's Bloody Thank You." New York Times. New York. June 3, 1990,

Physical Description: p. E26.

Scope and Content Note

Editoral claims the Chinese government's violated basic human rights after the Tiananmen Incident and discusses President Bush's China policy.
Subject codes: EE01 EC05
Box 14

CE 1058.  Jim Mann. "The Year Since Tiananmen: President Beats a Retreat on Policy toward Beijing." New York Times. New York. June 3, 1990,

Physical Description: pp. M2, M4.

Scope and Content Note

Subject codes: EE01 EC04
Box 14

CE 1059.  Los Angeles Times. "Don't Disturb China's Pace of Reform." Interview with Henry Kissinger. Los Angeles. June 3, 1990.

Physical Description: 1 pp. (incomplete).

Scope and Content Note

An interview revealing Kissinger's visit to China in November 1989 and his assessment of the Tiananmen Incident, the political and economic situation in China, and the spectrum of China's leaders, from reformers to hardliners.
Subject codes: EE01 EE02
Box 14

CE 1060.  "China Tightens Security, Shuts Tian An Men." Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles. June 3, 1990,

Physical Description: p. A5.

Scope and Content Note

A report on the Chinese government's efforts to prevent any attempts to commemorate the one year anniversary of the Beijing incident.
Subject codes: EC01 EC02 EC03
Box 14

CE 1061.  Los Angeles Times. "Beijing Continues to Assault the Spirit of Press Independence." Los Angeles. June 9, 1990,

Physical Description: p. B17.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) Anne Nelson, "Since last June, many Chinese journalists have been purged, jailed or humiliatingly compromised."
  • (2) Holley Fumiyo, '"I screamed with all my energy because of pain and fear.' I wondered whether they were roughest on me because they thought I was Chinese." An L.A. Times journalist's account of her mistreatment and beating at the hands of the Chinese paramilitary police as a result of her attempt to cover the bottle-throwing incident at Beijing University on the first anniversary of the Tiananmen Incident.
Subject codes: EB03
Box 14

CE 1062.  Orville Schell. "The Odyssey of Comrade Fang: China's Leading Dissident Is Free at Last." Los Angeles Times Magazine. Los Angeles. October 7, 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 10-13,16-21,38.

Scope and Content Note

Report on Fang Lizhi's life as a refugee at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing, from June 5, 1989, to June 24, 1990, including discussion of his sense of being torn between politics and science.
Subject codes: EB01 EC02
Box 14

CE 1063.  Nicholas D. Kristo. "Far from Tiananmen: TV and Contentment." New York Times. New York. October 7, 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 1,10.

Scope and Content Note

Interview with a peasant family in Henan Province. The peasants he meets hold a very negative opinion of the rebellion in Tiananmen Square in 1989 and support the government's suppression of the unrest.
Subject codes: EC01 EB03
Box 14

CE 1064.  Anonymous. "China Democracy Movement—1989: A Chronological Account." Undergraduate Journal of Asian Studies. Berkeley: University of California, Berkeley. Vol. 4, 1990,

Physical Description: pp. 1-70.

Scope and Content Note

Two undergraduate U.C. Berkeley students collaborated to produce this article. For political reasons, they have chose to remain anonymous. A chronological account of the Student Democracy Movement and the crackdown in Beijing from April to June 24, 1989.
Subject codes: EC01 EB04
Box 14

CE 1065.  Chronicle of Higher Education. Washington, DC. May 1, 1991.

Scope and Content Note

  • (1) Robert L. Jacobson, "Former Activists from Universities in Beijing Report They Are Reeling from Governmental Repression," p. A35.
  • (2) "The Movement Has Left a Job Unfinished; Somehow Its Goal Must Be Achieved," pp. A35-A37. Translation of a statement distributed clandestinely by former activists at several Beijing universities to commemorate the anniversary of the 1989 Democracy Movement. The statement includes a chronology of the Democracy Movement from September 12, 1989, to March 1991, and information on the current situation at universities in Beijing.
Subject codes: EB01 EB04 EC01 EC02 EC04 EC05
 

VII. E-mail Transcripts—In English

Scope and Content Note

The early entries in this part of the Archives come mostly from material created or relayed by the UCLA China Students and Scholars Association (CSSA). In 1990 this source was mainly replaced by the national e-mail publication China News Digest. While this publication was founded in Canada and individual issues were edited at the University of California at Berkeley and the University of Arizona, its long-term home came to be Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, where the U.S. edition was produced, and the University of Indiana at Bloomington, where a European/Pacific edition was produced. Altogether the e-mail section of the Archives occupies 3,768 pages.
Because of the diversity of the subjects discussed and the often voluminous number of pages transmitted, we have not attempted to summarize the contents in the same way as the rest of the Archives. Instead we simply directly quote some of the major headlines (in upper case headline style, in quotation marks), paraphrase titles of e-mails (in lower case text), or briefly describe some of the longer or more interesting documents. In a few cases we have let a single quoted sentence from the text of a dispatch stand as the summary of the story.
We have emphasized articles about the Democracy Movement itself and actions of the Chinese government concerning this movement. We have generally omitted stories about China's economy or diplomacy, and noted only a small part of the coverage of the then-Soviet Union and Eastern Bloc, which interested the editors of China News Digest. We have added occasional comments, dates, or clarifications in parentheses (square brackets if inserted into literal titles). We have kept all references to a single document to one sentence each so that each paragraph in this section amounts to a (partial) list of the disparate contents of the folder for that day or week, with the abrupt changes of subject indicating different documents in the transmission.
Box 15

DE 1001.  August 4, 1989.

Physical Description: 16 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Reports of Wu'er Kaixi's visit to Los Angeles. Chinese students testify at U.S. House of Representatives hearings on economic sanctions against China.
Box 15

DE 1002.  August 6, 1989.

Physical Description: 32 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Letter from Qinghua University defending the regime. Letter of advice from U.S. Senator Gorton's office on paperwork needed to successfully extend Chinese students' visas. Several news dispatches from wire services on Deng Xiaoping's health. "Manifesto of the Federation for Chinese Democracy and Justice, Beijing," 5 pp. Discussions about Wu'er Kaixi's visit to New Mexico. Reports on the Chicago conference of Chinese Students and Scholars. Letter from Beijing with information on the number arrested, claiming some government sources.
Box 15

DE 1003.  August 7, 1989.

Physical Description: 27 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Further reports on the Chicago conference. "Beijing Alliance Vows to Fight on for Democracy." Report on living situation of Zhao Ziyang under semi-house arrest. Report of refugees crossing into Hong Kong from the PRC. Report on British government plans to permit expanded emigration from Hong Kong to the U.K.
Box 15

DE 1004.  August 8, 1989.

Physical Description: 8 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Wang Meng, China's culture minister, removed from post. Some discussion of Chicago conference. Some general political opinion letters.
Box 15

DE 1005.  August 18, 1989.

Physical Description: 11 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Mailing by UCLA Chinese Students and Scholars Association: "Soul-searching" (letter from Cornell University critical of student movement); report on Chinese refugee Chen Yiwei, detained in Los Angeles for three weeks; plans for a pro-China democracy march on Washington. Interview with a University of New Haven, Connecticut, instructor on the events in Beijing in June, reprinted from the New Haven Register.
Box 15

DE 1006.  August 21, 1989.

Physical Description: 21 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Many brief news reports from South China Morning Post on various topics. Reprints of articles on pending CCP plenum and restrictions of study abroad. Reports and counter reports on alleged arrests in Chinese PLA officer corps. "Hong Kong Official Denounced by Beijing."
Box 15

DE 1007.  August 23, 1989.

Physical Description: 29 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Some Impressions of My Friend after Visiting China." A "blueprint" for a federal and democratic China. Reports on reorganization of CCP leadership. "Students Foiled in Bid to Dig Up Deng's Family Grave." Report that Chicago conference formed a "Selective Sanction Committee" to lobby for sanctions against the PRC.
Box 15

DE 1008.  August 25-27, 1989.

Physical Description: 13 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Lengthy reports on the outcome of the Chicago conference of Chinese Students and Scholars, which on July 27 founded a new organization called the Committee on Chinese Student Affairs (CCSA). "Top Shanghai Newsman Faces Plotting Accusation." "Students Warned against Politics."
Box 15

DE 1009.  August 29, 1989.

Physical Description: 24 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Visa Group, UC Berkeley, reports on meeting with Congresswoman Pelosi on visa bills affecting Chinese students in the United States. Discussion of application of democracy to China, including lengthy critique of Sun Yat-sen. Several short news items on public attacks in China on Zhao Ziyang. "Beijing Massacre Was Deliberately Planned by the Chinese Regime" (article from Ohio State University).
Box 15

DE 1010.  August 30, 1989.

Physical Description: 8 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Misc. brief news. Chinese students meet with Congressman Terry Bruce.
Box 15

DE 1011.  August 31, 1989.

Physical Description: 5 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Announcement from the Selective Sanction Committee.
Box 15

DE 1012.  September 18-24, 1989.

Physical Description: 26 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Chai Ling arrested in Shenzhen; Liu Xiaobo sentenced to die. Report on lobbying on visa bills in U.S. A memorandum to President Bush by Chinese students at the University of Virginia (7 pp.). Plans to rebuild the Goddess of Democracy statue in several U.S. cities. "Washington March for Democracy in China." Chinese exiles hold three-day meeting at the Sorbonne of the Federation for Democracy in China.
Box 15

DE 1013.  September 25-26, 1989.

Physical Description: 22 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Report on visit by Los Angeles PRC consul to Arizona. More information on the Washington March for Democracy in China. Call for a protest rally in front of the Los Angeles PRC Consulate. Protest scheduled against the celebration of the fortieth anniversary of the PRC.
Box 15

DE 1014.  September 29, 1989.

Physical Description: 13 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"About Professor T. D. Lee" (a defense of Prof. Lee of Columbia University, who had been accused of being pro-CCP because the Chinese government offered him a job in China after the Tiananmen Incident). Biographical report from the Toronto Globe and Mail (Sept. 22, 1989) on three of those killed in Beijing. More on march on Washington plans. "CCP's Secret Activities in Georgia." Official slogans for the fortieth anniversary of the PRC (such as "Cheers, for the victory of putting down the anti-revolutionary riot!"). Proposed slogans for the march on Washington.
Box 15

DE 1015.  October 3, 1989.

Physical Description: 31 pp.

Scope and Content Note

2,000 people reportedly demonstrated at the San Francisco Chinese Consulate October 1. Report by Ding Jian, president of the UCLA Chinese Students and Scholars Association (CSSA), that 10,000 people attended the October 1 march on Washington. Report on Los Angeles rally at Chinese Consulate. Several pages of brief new items. "Resolution of the Constitutional Position of IFCSS [Independent Federation of Chinese Students and Scholars] Working Committees." "Bullet Holes Contradict Beijing's Line," Toronto Globe and Mail. "VISAUM-77 (CCSA): Situation Report (10/3)" on Washington lobbying. "Final Report of the Bush Memorandum Committee of the Chinese Students and Scholars Society, University of Virginia." Call (October 3) by the IFCSS for an October 7-8 conference in Washington on the future of democracy in China. "Living Room Talks from Beijing" ("Beijing Ren" reports on discussions with a friend recently arrived from Beijing).
Box 15

DE 1016.  October 9, 1989.

Physical Description: 14 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Discussion of whether the IFCSS president should accept an invitation to visit Taiwan. Article by Cal Tech student on the visa extension issue.
Box 15

DE 1017.  October 13-18, 1989.

Physical Description: 21 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"IFCSS Announcement on Passport Extension." Text of IFCSS questionnaire on status of opposition exile groups. Report on status of visa legislation. "Students in China Learn About Power of the State" (report from Canadian press on interrogation of former student activists by Shanghai police and compilation of dossiers). "China's Pro-Democracy Movement" (part 1 of 6 by Professor Lawrence C. Wolken, Texas A&M University).
Box 15

DE 1018.  October 19-24, 1989.

Physical Description: 33 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"VISAUM-80 (CCSA): Situation Report (10/18/89)" on Washington lobbying efforts. "IFCSS Plans a Visit to Taiwan." "Jiang Warns Party Purge Will Go On," South China Morning Post. Call for contributions to Washington lobbying work. "Sorrow of Urkesh [Wu'er Kaixi]." Lawrence C. Wolken series, parts 3-6 of 6. Correspondence with Congressman Joe Moakley on visa bills. Several VISAUM documents.
Box 15

DE 1019.  October 26, 1989.

Physical Description: 15 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"VISAUM-83 (CCSA): Situation Report (10/25/89)" on visa legislation. China News Digest (description of this e-mail periodical, including a list of its editorial board). Report on debate between Canadian students and Chinese Ambassador to Canada Zhang Wenpu. "Imprisoned Student Wang Says 'Keep Up the Effort.'" "Underground Movement by Student[s]," South China Morning Post.
Box 15

DE 1020.  October 30, 1989.

Physical Description: 23 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Several short news items on opposition in East European states and on former President Nixon's October 1989 visit to China. "An Open Letter to Wu'er Kaixi by Dennis Lee" (accuses him of financial corruption). "VISAUM-84 (CCSA): Situation Report (10/30/89)" on status of Pelosi bill. "China Crushes Dissident Ring," South China Morning Post. "Mainland Trio Flee to Taiwan." "Survey Shows Majority Support for Democracy Protests." Several articles on status of democracy in Hong Kong. "New Restrictions Issued for Chinese Students."
Box 15

DE 1021.  November 8, 1989.

Physical Description: 23 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Congress Agrees to Toughen U.S. Sanctions Against China." "China Has New Requirements for Oversea[s] Study." "Beijing Police Renew Inquiries into Student Activities." "Troops Disappear from U.S. Embassy." "Comments from Uerkesh's Intimates about Him" (discussion of alleged lavish lifestyle of Wu'er Kaixi after his arrival in the United States).
Box 15

DE 1022.  November 10-13, 1989.

Physical Description: 28 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Deng Resigns as Military Chief," South China Morning Post, 4 pp. "China Breaks Up Escape Network." "Beijing Tells Regions to 'Toe the Line.'" "Democracy Activists Denied Entry to HK."
Box 15

DE 1023.  November 22, 1989.

Physical Description: 18 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Deng Xiaoping's Resignation Letter.""VISAUM-91 (11/9/89): Situation Report" (on visits to Washington officials on visa issues). "Events in E. Germany Make China Nervous" (4 pp.). "Military Told to Support Jiang." "Li [Peng] Plans to Boost Image with Trip."
Box 15

DE 1024.  December 14, 1989.

Physical Description: 26 pp.

Scope and Content Note

" Press Freedom Herald" (report by Ge Wang of UCLA on local Chinese communities' concerns with Monterey Park newspaper's management). Appeal for help in supporting American Timothy W. Bell, who was facing disciplinary action from Wake Forest University for smuggling NBC tapes of "June Fourth Massacre" out of China. "VISAUM-123 (12/12/89)": Legal analysis by attorneys Steve Trow and Elain Budd on President Bush's directive waiving the two-year foreign residence requirement (from Quinson Zhang, University of Virginia). Proposal for a petition drive to override President Bush's veto of bill H.R. 2712. "Consulate Officials Visits [sic] Oregon State University." "Workers Hold Rally Over Wages," South China Morning Post, 2 pp.
Box 15

DE 1025.  December 21, 1989.

Physical Description: 24 pp.

Scope and Content Note

From Ge Wang, UCLA: Information for Chinese students and scholars regarding the presidential directive of November 30, 1989. From Zhao, Stanford University: Assessment of efforts to override the presidential veto of H.R. 2712. Statement issued at press conference with Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi on December 12, 1989. From Stanford University: INS updates on Chinese students/scholars employment regulations and designated INS contacts listed by region.
Box 15

DE 1026.  December 22, 1989.

Physical Description: 31 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"VISAUM-125 (Huang 12/23/89)": Response by INS/lawyers advocating on behalf of Chinese students to most frequently asked questions on visa matters. NAFSA-86: Update on previous list of INS contacts. CCSA: Announcement of upcoming conference (January 6-7, 1990) in Boston to deal with congressional legislative matters regarding Sino-U.S. relations. From Ge Wang, UCLA: "Radio Beijing Reports on Romania and the Reaction of China." Ge Wang: "Chinese Students Meet Official [State Council spokesman Yuan Mu]" (12/ 27/89). Joint statement by various groups expressing solidarity with Romanian people's struggle. "China & Hong Kong News": Report on number of officers/soldiers allegedly refusing orders by PLA to crack down on prodemocracy movement (12/28/89). Beijing officials criticize (what is perceived to be) Gorbachev's efforts to undermine socialism in Eastern Europe. Daniel Kwan: Dissident actor Shum's response to charges by Chinese government that link him with smuggling dissidents out of China. "Party Official Humiliated by Students," South China Morning Post, 12/29/89.
Box 15

DE 1027.  January 1, 1990.

Physical Description: 19 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"In China I'd Be Dean (and Bush Wouldn't Care)" by Li Lu (described as "deputy commander of the student demonstrations in Tiananmen Square," New York Times, 12/24/89). Chinese government response to overthrow of Ceaucescu in Romania, South Chinese Morning Post. "Beijing Upgrades Alert to Stop Democracy Protests," South China Morning Post. "Businessmen Sense Unrest," South China Morning Post. "NAFSA UPDATE 87" (Summary of U.S. Information Agency handout on Chinese student/scholars immigration matters, 4 pp.).
Box 15

DE 1028.  January 10, 1990.

Physical Description: 28 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Cable from INS on PRC Nationals" (Bill Carroll, NAFSA Central Office, 2 pp.). Ignatius Ding, chairman, Silicon Valley for Democracy in China (SVDC): Report on employment assistance offered by SVDC to Chinese students. Bulletin from attorneys Steve Trow and Elaine Budd on cable issued from INS regarding President Bush's directive on Chinese students (3 pp.). Report from opposition sources in Beijing claiming that workers in thirty cities have applied for permits for legal demonstrations to protest the government's austerity program. "Top Job in PLA for Ally of Yang." "State Workers Set for Pay Rise." "New Chief for Key Party Department [Organization Department of the Party Central Committee]." "Li [Peng] Pledges to Keep Zhao Reform Group. "
Box 15

DE 1029.  January 16, 1990.

Physical Description: 34 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Results of CCSA/IFCSS conference with Chinese student leaders nationwide (3 pp.). Huang Yuangeng: List of Republican members of Congress joining Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi's efforts to override President Bush's veto. "Major Leadership Reshuffle Likely." "Beijing Puts Lid on Demonstrations, Hard-Liners Tighten Grip on the Media," South China Morning Post, 4 pp.
Box 15

DE 1030.  January 21, 1990.

Physical Description: 39 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"China to Sacrifice Economy to Educate Students on Socialism," South China Morning Post. "China Puts Communist Party above Rule of Law," South China Morning Post. "China's Old Men Will Keep Tight Grip on Power," South China Morning Post.
Box 15

DE 1031.  January 25, 1990.

Physical Description: 25 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Ge Wang, UCLA: Letter lamenting the failure of the veto override effort.
Box 15

DE 1032.  January 27, 1990.

Physical Description: 26 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Chinese Students' Reactions to Congress's Failure to Override Veto," China News Digest.
Box 15

DE 1033.  January 29, 1990.

Physical Description: 27 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Mongolian Government Not to Shoot Its People," South China Morning Post .
Box 15

DE 1034.  February 1, 1990.

Physical Description: 49 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"New Year Celebrations Mark Upsurge of Army Role," South China Morning Post.
Box 15

DE 1035.  February 7, 1990.

Physical Description: 37 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Punishment in China Report," from Asia Watch.
Box 15

DE 1036.  February 12, 1990.

Physical Description: 31 pp.

Scope and Content Note

China News Digest: "IFCSS Will Organize China Trip." "Students Unable to Return from Home Visit." Financial report on the Voice of June Fourth radio station. "Call for Proposals for 2nd Congress of IFCSS." IFCSS staff salaries/ expense report. "New Year's Party at Chinese Embassy." "Embassy Officials Visiting University of Virginia." "Thousands in Mongolia Demand Communists Give Up Sole Power." China said to stage more than 200 political trials. Report on status of arrested journalist Dai Qing. Various letters debating the controversial trip proposed by IFCSS to China. "Japanese Firms in China Affected by Tiananmen Incident." "U.N. Human Rights in China Session Report." Bush criticizes new PRC restrictions on studying abroad.
Box 15

DE 1037.  February 15, 1990.

Physical Description: 33 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Brief report on IFCSS/INS meeting. UPI report on U.S.-China Relations. AP report on new restriction on news media in China. "China TV Shows Soviet Reforms," South China Morning Post. "Chen Yun's Health Causes Concern." "Bush Signs Bill that Includes China Sanctions." Report on three-day conference at State University of New York, Buffalo, on "Crisis of'89 in China." "A Chinese National's Pleas for No More Sanctions," Asian Wall Street Journal Weekly. Copy of Immigration Handbook for Chinese students/scholars. "New Mongolian Party Forms." Copy of Senator Kennedy's speech urging Bush not to waive sanctions against China.
Box 16

DE 1038.  February 21, 1990.

Physical Description: 45 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Human Rights Abuses Still Widespread" (UPI report on annual Freedom House survey). Report on IFCSS attempt to send delegation back to China. Liberal president of Chinese law school reportedly forced to resign. "China Government Protest[s] U.S. State Department Report [on human rights abuses]." IFCSS clarification on its China trip motion. "Directory of Representatives of the Sixteen Council Universities of IFCSS." "Zhao Ziyang Faces 'Final Fall' at NPC Session," South China Morning Post . "Beijing Moves to End Dissent at Convention [of the National People's Congress]," South China Morning Post. "New Rules to Keep Students at Home," South China Morning Post.
Box 16

DE 1039.  March 1, 1990.

Physical Description: 40 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Letter discussing the possible IFCSS trip to China. "An Open Letter to Chinese Government," by Chinese student and scholar federations outside of China. "French Reporters Ordered to Leave China." "Foreign Journalists Seek Meeting with China Govt." Letter from a reader arguing that sanctions are necessary. The Hong Kong Alliance in Support of Patriotic Democratic Movement of China invites grant applications for funding for activities to mark the first anniversary of June 4th. IFCSS releases relating to proposed trip to China. CSSFA representatives from Arizona State University meet with Senator McCain to hear his explanation why he dropped his position of voting to override Bush's veto of H.R. 2712. Bulletin on the revision of Immigration Handbook. Report on restrictions of Chinese reporters. Top party official in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region warns of possible ethnic unrest. "Li Peng's Visit to USSR Being Reconsidered [because of possible demonstrations by opposition groups]." CCP General-secretary Jiang Zemin says that Tiananmen events should not interfere with U.S.-China cooperation.
Box 16

DE 1040.  March 8, 1990.

Physical Description: 37 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Education Exchange Program Resumed on a Smaller Scale." Report on the anniversary of martial law in Lhasa. "Hong Kong Student to Be Charged in Shanghai." "A Letter from Beijing: How People Were Forced to Lie [describes the compulsory criticism sessions organized by the government in which all citizens were ordered to denounce the Democracy Movement after the Tiananmen Incident]." Open letter from IFCSS deploring restrictions on students studying abroad. "Labor Unrest in China," South China Morning Post. "Many in China Doubt the Effectiveness of Sanctions," Asian Wall Street Journal Weekly.
Box 16

DE 1041.  March 15, 1990.

Physical Description: 41 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"China Striving to Rebuild 'Socialist Ideals." Open letter from IFCSS denouncing Chinese government's restrictions on foreign study. Open letter urging other schools to sign previous letter. IFCSS wins U.S. Student Association Award. Wu'er Kaixi said to have dropped out of Harvard and joined crew of opposition radio station on ship off China coast. "Hu Jiwei Ousted from Congress." Liu Qing released from prison after ten years. Pirate radio ship the Goddess of Democracy sets sail for China.
Box 16

DE 1042.  March 21, 1990.

Physical Description: 53 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Premier Li Peng opened annual legislative session. "Underground Group Revived by Dissidents," Toronto Globe and Mail. "Hunted Leader [Zhai Weimin], 22, Surfaces Unharmed [in Beijing]." Federation for a Democratic China (FDC) calls joint conference with prodemocracy groups in Eastern Europe, South China Morning Post. "An American Student's Tour to Lei Feng's Hometown." "Move to Forestall Muslim Militancy," South China Morning Post.
Box 16

DE 1043.  March 25, 1990.

Physical Description: 45 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Reviews of books and articles dealing with China. "Chinese Exiled-Politician [Yan Jiaqi] in Uppsala, Sweden." "Forty People Blocked by Chinese Security at the Airports." "Vice Minister Talks about Fate of Zhao and Others," South China Morning Post. "Radio Ship Runs Risk of Seizure," South China Morning Post. "Call for Donation to Hao Family Fund [student killed in Beijing, June 3, 1989]." Personal report claiming international telephone calls are being tapped in China. More on Immigration Handbook.
Box 16

DE 1044.  March 29, 1990.

Physical Description: 18 pp.

Scope and Content Note

China's Foreign Minister warns of repercussions if U.S. withdraws "most favored nation" trade status. "Swedish Sanction against China Remains in Effect." Chinese student in U.S says Chinese government has tampered with his mail. China News Digest, "Past and Present [gives brief history of CND]." "Beijing Major Denies [that] Restrictions on Tiananmen Strolls [have been ordered]."
Box 16

DE 1045.  April 2, 1990.

Physical Description: 62 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"General Advice on Filing Your Tax Return." "Questions and Answers from INS." "Figures for Party Expulsions Revealed [33,400]." "Tiananmen Square Closed on Day of Proposed Protest." "Square Opens Under Heavy Police Surveillance." Report that Chinese student leader Chai Ling and her husband have escaped to Europe after living in hiding in China for ten months. "Official Calls for Patriotism Campaign in Chinese Schools." "Mongolia Brings Tide of Democracy to China's Border." "[Beijing University] Students Stay Calm over Anniversary." South China Morning Post writer questioned by police for photographing plainclothes policeman in Tiananmen Square. Young Pioneers' parade quashes plans for "Big walk of the people around Tiananmen Square." Chinese government stages massive show of force in Beijing, allegedly to prevent demonstrations on Day of the Dead. Chai Ling appears on Hong Kong television. IFCSS reports modifications in rules for changing from J-1 to F-1 visa status.
Box 16

DE 1046.  April 5, 1990.

Physical Description: 28 pp.

Scope and Content Note

The Chinese government reportedly warns citizens not to wear black armbands on the Day of the Dead, and announces that permits are required for groups to hold ceremonies in cemeteries. Various reports on Chai Ling's arrival in Paris and texts of her speeches there. "Tiananmen Square Closed Again, Blocking Protests. " Premier Li Peng reportedly asks France to restrict public activities of Chai Ling and other Chinese exiles ( Washington Post). Letter commenting on the closing of Tiananmen Square. "President's New Executive Order [on visa matters]." "Different Voice Still Can Be Heard in Chinese NPC [National Peoples' Congress]."
Box 16

DE 1047.  April 15, 1990.

Physical Description: 42 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Report by Dee Bruce Sun on a March 8-25, 1990, visit to China (5 pp.). Student leader Wang Chaohua ("18th on the 21 most wanted list of the Chinese government") holds a press conference in Los Angeles. "Mysterious Underground Railways Still Exist [for the escape of dissidents from China]." "Exiles Keep Flame of Democracy Alive." China reportedly cracks down on student dissidents attempting to mark several political dates. Several articles on the plight of hijacker Zhang Zhenhai. A report on interview with Chai Ling.
Box 16

DE 1048.  April 20, 1990.

Physical Description: 35 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Further article on Chai Ling. Letter from reader urging support for June Fourth Radio. Brief report on Conference on Democratic Strategies for China, held in Florida April 9, which focused on overseas funding for the prodemocratic movement. "Report on Tele-Conferences of IFCSS Council [April 7 and 12]." Chinese Foreign Ministry issues global warning against helping Goddess of Democracy radio ship. Zhang Zhenhai, Chinese air hijacker, denied asylum by Tokyo Supreme Court. "China Deported American for Defending Jailed Writer [novelist Tang Min]." Joint meeting in East Berlin between Chinese dissidents and Eastern block reformers convenes under the direction of Paris-based Federation for Democracy in China (FDC).
Box 16

DE 1049.  April 25, 1990.

Physical Description: 49 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Report on radio equipment aboard the Goddess of Democracy. Protest planned for May 11 at San Francisco Chinese Consulate. Article reprinted from The Nation on problems within the Chinese exile organization Front for Democratic China (FDC). Japan agrees to extradite Chinese hijacker Zhang Zhenghai on condition he receive no more than ten years in prison. " Goddess of Democracy Can Dock in Singapore." "The Voice of June Fourth Begins Clandestine Broadcasting [from a secret location, but financed by the Taiwan government]." "[Former Communist Party chief] Zhao Criticized in Secret Session with Politburo." Letter from Bo Xiong, the editor of China News Digest, explaining the CND's financing and affirming its independence from the IFCSS. Note on the frequency and hours of broadcasting by the June Fourth Radio station. "A True Story of a Returned Ph.D. in China." Various letters on hijacking issue (Zhang Zhenhai).
Box 16

DE 1050.  May 1, 1990.

Physical Description: 26 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Chinese government condemns Taiwan for offering support to the Goddess of Democracy radio ship. Chai Ling honored by University of Tromsoe, in Norway. "Chinese Consuls Met UIUC [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign] Students on Passport Issue." Article reviewing World Press Review's cover story dealing with Tiananmen. "How Tiananmen Massacre's Victims Are Treated" (reports that the dead are divided into three categories: died at home of gunshot wounds by troops are "work related" and compensated; died in the streets of gunshot wounds are "natural deaths" and are not compensated; died fighting the troops are "rioters" and are not compensated). "Visa Denial Cases and Family Reunion." "Chai Ling's Escape Interests Guangzhou People." "Radio Ship Leaves for Hong Kong but Might Be Rejected." "China Embassy Official Seeks Asylum in U.S."
Box 16

DE 1051.  May 5, 1990.

Physical Description: 46 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Famous Taiwanese Dancer Joy Fan to Perform 'Chai Ling.'" Article on activities commemorating the first anniversary of the Tiananmen Incident, at the Flint Center, Cupertino, California. Announcement of Second Congress of IFCSS, to be held in Columbus, Ohio, July 6-8, 1990. A small underground group in Beijing said to meet clandestinely with Western news agencies on the 71st anniversary of the May Fourth Movement. Review of [chinese characters] Laiyin tongxin: Zeitung für Chinesische Wissenschaftler und Studenten in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland (Correspondence along the Rhine: Newspaper for Chinese Scholars and Students in the Federal Republic of Germany [see item BC 1015 for a copy of this publication]). Article on the perspective of the Chinese, regarding Western coverage of the Tiananmen story. "In China after the Crackdown," Seattle Times. INS update on President Bush's April 11, 1990, executive order. "U.S. Warned China to Leave Ship Alone."
Box 16

DE 1052.  May 10, 1990.

Physical Description: 42 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Taiwan government refuses to permit Goddess of Democracy to broadcast from Taiwanese waters. China News Digest; Various reports on Western groups commemorating the first anniversary of the Tiananmen Incident. "China's Secret Document and Real Policy towards Overseas Students." "China Frees 211 People." "Radio Ship May Dock in Taiwan." "Voting Results of Report [on vote on IFCSS budget proposal]." "Secret Document on Overseas Students (Part I)." "Beijing's Jail Release Aims at Influencing U.S." "On the Secret Document." "U.S. Investigates Harassment of Students by China Government." "Posters in Beijing University." "Chai Ling Writes to Vancouver Chinese." "A Brave Student Is Detained at Beijing University."
Box 16

DE 1053.  May 15, 1990.

Physical Description: 58 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Minutes of a Meeting on Passport Issues in Chinese Embassy in DC—A Must Read." Various articles covering prodemocracy activities around the U.S. "Arguments for Maintaining Contact with China." "Tape of Personal Talk Confiscated by Chinese Custom[s]." Chinese student leader Shen Tong challenges Ted Turner for comments criticizing the student occupation of Tiananmen Square in 1989. Various articles on artistic efforts to comment on the China Democracy Movement. "Teleconference of IFCSS Council on Renewing MFS [most favored nation status] for China." Rules for election of representatives to IFCSS Second Congress. Poll showing Beijing University student support for future protests. "China Arrests Seven People." "A Special Tour of Shanghai People's Courts." Report on defection to the U.S. of Xu Jiatun, former head of the Xinhua News Agency in Hong Kong. "China Prepares to Sentence Students and Intellectuals." "The Difficulty of Radio Ship Project." Article on reliability of Chinese army to quell possible uprisings. "Abstracts from IFCSS Statement on China's MFN Status."
Box 16

DE 1054.  May 20, 1990.

Physical Description: 68 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"UCLA Students' Response towards the Secret Document [results of a poll at UCLA on the Chinese government's document on overseas students]." Lengthy three-part IFCSS report debating the "most favored nation" issue. "Turner Says He Never Meant to Condone Beijing Massacre." Report on May 18, 1990, teleconference of IFCSS Council. "Police Rearrest a Chinese Dissident [Liu Qing]."
Box 16

DE 1055.  May 25, 1990.

Physical Description: 61 pp.

Scope and Content Note

China News Digest: "Update on Tiananmen Memorial in Washington, DC." Lengthy official statement on IFCSS/CCSA's position on MFN issue, to be forwarded to U.S. House of Representatives. "China's New Secrets Law." "Inside Story on Arrests of Wang Juntao, Chen Ziming, and Others." "Open Letter Demands Release of Dissidents," South China Morning Post China News Digest: "China Government Launches 'Anti-Imperialist' Campaign." Several articles debating the MFN issue.
Box 16

DE 1056.  May 30, 1990.

Physical Description: 27 pp.

Scope and Content Note

China News Digest: "IFCSS Second Congress Update." "State Council spokesman Mr Yuan Mu has said some participants in last year's 'counter-revolutionary rebellion' were motivated by the desire to help the party and to promote democracy," South China Morning Post. China News Digest: "Beijing Urges Overseas Chinese Students Back to China." "Three Activists Disappear before Their News Conference."
Box 17

DE 1057.  June 1, 1990.

Physical Description: 32 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"The First Anniversary of Beijing Massacre." "Three Students Arrested, Hou Dejian Believed in Custody." News brief on arrest of writer Wang Ruowang. "Tiananmen Square to Remain Closed Until Next Week," South China Morning Post. "Hou Dejian and Dissidents Still Missing," South China Morning Post. "China Stages Executions to 'Ensure Stability,'" South China Morning Post. China News Digest: "Troops Roar Through Beijing at Anniversary of Massacre." "Brave Show of Defiance by Beijing Students and Citizens." "More Details for Today's Protest at Beijing University." Articles on memorial activities in the U.S. to honor the deaths at Tiananmen Square.
Box 17

DE 1058.  June 5, 1990.

Physical Description: 51 pp.

Scope and Content Note

China News Digest: "Beijing Under Heavy Security at Anniversary of June Fourth." "More than 100,000 Joined Protest March in Hong Kong [to mourn victims of the Tiananmen Incident]." Various reports on the worldwide observation of the anniversary of the Tiananmen Incident. "Chai Ling Joined Candle Light Vigil in Front of Chinese Embassy [in Washington, DC]." "Students Stage Second Night of Bottle Breaking Protests [at Beijing University],' South China Morning Post. China News Digest: "Underground Groups in China Strife [sic] for Democracy." "Tiananmen Square Reopens." "Foreign Journalists Warned." "Deng Blamed Party Chiefs for Last Year's 'Rebellion,'" South China Morning Post. "Foreign Journalists Protest Mistreatment." "Activist Risks Seizure in Rally at Chinese Embassy in UK," South China Morning Post. "Memorial Activities in Taiwan," Hong Kong Standard. Several articles covering memorial activities in the U.S. News brief on Japan's protest to China over treatment of Japanese journalists covering the anniversary of the Tiananmen Incident. Report on Tiananmen toll, Toronto Globe and Mail (estimates 3,000 total, of which 40-100 were in the square itself). "Soviet, East European Students Remembered June Fourth Massacre," South China Morning Post. "Beijing Students Summoned after Night of Protest," Hong Kong Standard. China News Digest: "Chai Ling Met with U.S. Vice President Dan Quayle." "Report by Asia Watch on the Beijing Massacre." "Surface Calm Belies Anger of Beijing Residents," Hong Kong Standard.
Box 17

DE 1059.  June 10, 1990.

Physical Description: 30 pp.

Scope and Content Note

News brief on senior Chinese official's comments on Hong Kong's demonstrations marking the first anniversary of the Tiananmen Incident. Chinese diplomat criticizes Canadian policy that allows Chinese students to stay permanently, Toronto Globe and Mail. "Federation for a Democratic China Fights for Survival," South China Morning Post. China News Digest: "A Year Later, A Dissident's Testament from China," by Gao Xin. Special series marking the anniversary of the Tiananmen Incident, including first two parts of "Who Died in Beijing, and Why?" by Robin Munro, reprinted from The Nation.
Box 17

DE 1060.  June 15, 1990.

Physical Description: 47 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Part III of "Who Died in Beijing, and Why?" by Robin Munro. Hou Dejian et al. "Under House-Arrest," Hong Kong Standard. "Teleconference Report of the Working Group for Revising the IFCSS Constitution." An April 26, 1990, report from the Supervisory Committee of the Independent Federation of Chinese Students and Scholars (IFCSS) disavowing a "CCP Agent Report" issued in their name by Wang Liang of Northwestern University (Wang had been entrusted with hunting down CCP spies in the organization, but circulated his report without consultation with the group's leadership, who determined that it contained unproved charges against several individuals). "China Frees 97 Protesters." "Authorities to Deal with Pro-Democracy Activists," Ming bao (reports that Chinese leaders plan to begin sentencing dissidents arrested in June 1989). Zhao Fusan, former vice president of the Chinese Academy of Social Science and a member of the National People's Congress Standing Committee, reportedly stripped of all official positions June 18 while in absentia in France.
Box 17

DE 1061.  June 19, 1990.

Physical Description: 46 pp.

Scope and Content Note

South China Morning Post: "Twenty-nine Sentenced at Public Rallies." "355 Still Detained Says NPC Official." Gao Xin and Zuo Duo, arrested with Hou Dejian, are released. "Harassment by China in U.S. Documented," Chicago Tribune. "Mainland Helps Hou Dejian 'Flee' to Taiwan." "Top Dissidents Face Charges [Wang Juntao and Chen Ziming]." "Hou [Dejian] Claims Deal to Help Dissidents." "Tiananmen Dissidents to Face Trial [including Ren Wanding]." "Li Mingqi Arrested [at Beijing University]." "Beijing Survey Shows Grievances Among Students," Ming bao magazine. "Hou's Loyalty Questioned by [Taiwan] Press," South China Morning Post.
Box 17

DE 1062.  June 25, 1990.

Physical Description: 77 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Visit to China—A Recent Impression," by Da Hsuan Feng, Drcxel University. "China Allows Best-Known Dissident [Fang Lizhi] to Leave Nation for Britain." "Whereabouts of Zhao [Ziyang] Still Pose Mystery," South China Morning Post. "[China claims] Tank Protester Never Arrested," South China Morning Post. "Revision of IFCSS Charter." Claim that secret opposition organizations exist within the CCP and PLA. "Beijing Frees Zhao's Adviser [Bao Tong]," South China Morning Post. Further IFCSS reports on passport extension and visa problems. "[Full text of] Chinese Governmental Documents on Overseas Students [printed in three parts, 15 pp. total]." Statement by Fang Lizhi and Li Shuxian with other documents about them.
Box 17

DE 1063.  July 1, 1990

Physical Description: 48 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Report by Feng Congde. Interview with Fang Lizhi. Series of reports on immigration matters in Australia. South China Morning Post: "Fang Wants 'Peace and Quiet' in UK." "Scientists Keep Up Mainland Boycott." "Agenda for 2nd Conference of IFCSS." "Chinese Student Organizations Convene in Canada and USA."
Box 17

DE 1064.  July 5, 1990.

Physical Description: 34 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Report on preparation for IFCSS Second Congress. Running reports from the IFCSS Second Congress, which opened July 6 at Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. "The Timing of Fang's Release," Mainichi Daily News. China News Digest: Six reports on the convening of the 2nd Congress of IFCSS. Various book reviews on China.
Box 17

DE 1065.  July 10, 1990.

Physical Description: 35 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Chinese Dissident [Fang Lizhi] Criticizes U.S. on Human Rights." Letters questioning the validity of IFCSS congress representatives. "Houston Rally against Japan's Aid to China—Chai Ling Show[s] Her Leadership." "Peking University Student Arrested for Speech." "Abstracts of Some Impressive Speeches/Debates of 2nd Congress." "Three Letters from Readers on IFCSS 2nd Congress." "Directory of the 2nd IFCSS Council Members." "Wang Juntao's Wife Asks [for] a Public Trial," Sing Tao Daily.
Box 17

DE 1066.  July 15, 1990.

Physical Description: 59 pp.

Scope and Content Note

China News Digest: Report on the establishment of an opposition party among Overseas Chinese (Chinese Liberty Democratic Party). Last issue of eight reports on IFCSS 2nd Congress. "Japan Orders Dissidents to Leave," South China Morning Post. "China Arrests Another Student Despite Foreign Pressure." "Mr. Feng Congde, Chai Ling's husband, is now the official candidate to be the chair of IFCSS Human Rights Committee."
Box 17

DE 1067.  July 20, 1990.

Physical Description: 56 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Chinese Students' Plight Narrated by a Former INS Lawyer." "Less than 300 Overseas Students Went Back to China This Year." "Thoughts and Plans— after IFCSS Second Congress," by Feng Congde. "Report from an IFCSS Representative." Various reports on IFCSS's operations.
Box 17

DE 1068.  July 25, 1990.

Physical Description: 45 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Interview with Professor Guan Weiyan, former president of the University of Science and Technology of China, now a visiting scholar at the University of Houston. "Chai Ling Seeks Support of UN," South China Morning Post. China News Digest: "News Release on IFCSS." "Pardon for Reluctant General," South China Morning Post. "Heir of the Dragon: Hou Dejian Felt 'Hopeless.'" "Elimination of the Traces of Last Year's Cracking Down," Sing Tao Daily. "The leader of the outlawed Beijing Autonomous Workers' Union, Han Dongfang, who has been held in detention since last June, will be brought to trial later this year."
Box 17

DE 1069.  August 15, 1990.

Physical Description: 24 pp.

Scope and Content Note

South China Morning Post: "450 Killed in Lhasa Crackdown in 1989." "Thousands in Reform Camp." Fang Lizhi declines invitation to join Federation for a Democratic China. China News Digest: Fang Lizhi agrees to serve on board of Human Rights in China. Taiwanese singer Hou Dejian is charged in Taipei for martial law violation for slipping back into the country after spending six years in China.
Box 17

DE 1070.  August 20, 1990

Physical Description: 40 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Appeal to Students for Patriotism and Stability [during Asian Games]," South China Morning Post. China News Digest : "Random Notes on the Western Visions of China." Series of IFCSS internal organizational reports. "China Claims Only 355 Activists Still Imprisoned," Sing Tao Daily.
Box 17

DE 1071.  August 25, 1990.

Physical Description: 43 pp.

Scope and Content Note

China News Digest: Commentary on religious persecution in China. Call to join Human Rights in China. "Propaganda Campaign in China Takes Aim at Western Liberalism."
Box 17

DE 1072.  September 1, 1990.

Physical Description: 13 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"China Bars Visit by Five Academics [from Beijing and Nanjing to international symposium in Hong Kong]." Top radio official reportedly ordered to undergo "political re-education." "China Bid to Avert October Protests."
Box 17

DE 1073.  September 5, 1990.

Physical Description: 38 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Thirty Chinese Held [in Australia] over Breach of Visa Regulations." IFCSS Headquarters report. Open letter on behalf of Han Dongfang (leader of Beijing Autonomous Workers' Union) to the Supreme Court of China. Report on meeting between IFCSS representatives and the U.S. State Department on family reunion issue. Biographical article on Wu'er Kaixi (Uerkesh) from Esquire magazine ("Better Fed Than Red," part 1 of 4). Letter warning about possible changes in INS's views on asylum requests by Chinese students.
Box 17

DE 1074.  September 10, 1990.

Physical Description: 43 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Better Fed Than Red" (parts 2, 3, and 4). South China Morning Post: "Dissidents Vow to Keep Up Pressure." "Only Three Detainees Left, Mayor [of Shanghai] Says." China News Digest: Book review of feminist literary works. "Dissident [Wan Runnan] Calls on Group to Infiltrate." China News Digest: "Former Political Prisoner Tells His Story." "Uneasy Truce with Moslems in Desert Northwest." "More than 500 Executed in China this Year, Rights Group Says." "Beijing Frees Top Student Dissident [Yang Tao]," South China Morning Post. "Dalai Lama Says China Pursuing Torture, Arrests in Tibet."
Box 17

DE 1075.  September 15, 1990.

Physical Description: 34 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Several letters from readers on "Better Fed Than Red." China News Digest: Review of newsletter founded by Chinese Liberal and Democratic Party (CLDP). "Hardliners in Beijing Expand Power," South China Morning Post.
Box 17

DE 1076.  September 20, 1990.

Physical Description: 46 pp.

Scope and Content Note

China News Digest: Updates on family reunion issue. More letters from readers on "Better Fed Than Red." "Beijing Set to Improve World Ties," South China Morning Post. "Dissident Group FDC [Federation for a Democratic China] to Name New Leaders," South China Morning Post.
Box 17

DE 1077.  September 25, 1990.

Physical Description: 44 pp.

Scope and Content Note

China News Digest: Interview with Dr. Houqi Chen, chairperson of the Chinese Liberty and Democratic Party (CLDP). "Prominent Scientists Back International Boycott of China." Various briefs on INS changes as they apply to Chinese students. "FDC [Federation for a Democratic China] to Promote Mainland Links at Its Second Congress," South China Morning Post. "FDC's New Structure," Sing Tao Daily. "Report on Chai Ling's Visit to Yale University," China News Digest.
Box 18

DE 1078.  October 1, 1990.

Physical Description: 51 pp.

Scope and Content Note

China News Digest: Various news releases on IFCSS meetings. "Exiled Dissidents' Children Join Parents," Hong Kong Standard. China News Digest : Urgent call by IFCSS to support Pelosi amendment. Asia Watch releases extensive report on China Mid-autumn Festival statement by 93 organizations of mainland Chinese students and scholars.
Box 18

DE 1079.  October 5, 1990.

Physical Description: 36 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"CCSA/IFCSS: Current Situation on Immigration and MFN Bills." Asia Watch says Japan harasses Chinese students. "Big Rise in Overstaying Mainlanders [who fail to return from trips to Hong Kong (incomplete)]".
Box 18

DE 1080.  October 10, 1990.

Physical Description: 66 pp.

Scope and Content Note

China News Digest: "Q&A Column on Visa/Job/Legal Matters." Update on immigration legislation. Report on progress of Pelosi amendment. Book reviews of interest to Chinese scholars.
Box 18

DE 1081.  October 15, 1990.

Physical Description: 69 pp.

Scope and Content Note

China News Digest: Call by IFCSS to support the letter writing campaign for the Mitchell-Dole-Gorton amendment on Chinese immigration. "Q&As on Job Hunting." "Lee [Kuan Yew] Blames TV Viewing for Massacre," South China Morning Post. Fund appeal for CCSA/May Fourth Foundation. "CCSA/ IFCSS Funding Crisis." "[IFCSS in Canada] FCSSC Report about PR and Family Reunification." "Radio Beijing Dissent[er (Wu Ziaoyong)J Freed Quietly." Update on immigration bill.
Box 18

DE 1082.  October 20, 1990.

Physical Description: 43 pp.

Scope and Content Note

China News Digest: Personal account of two Canadians touring in China. Open letter urging that pressure be exerted on the U.S. Congress for the passage of the Mitchell-Dole-Gorton amendment. Various reports on the status of M-D-G amendment. "Australia Declined to Provide Names of Detained Students."
Box 18

DE 1083.  October 25, 1990.

Physical Description: 48 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Question and Answer Column on Visa/Job/Legal Matters." "Traveller's Tales [from) China." "Immigration Bill Passed Congress."
Box 18

DE 1084.  November 1, 1990.

Physical Description: 33 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Old Revolutionary Bemoans Abandoning of Term "Comrade."' "Maker of 'Chai Ling Audio Tape' [Li Haitao] Arrested." " CND Q&A Column on Visa/ Job/Legal Matters." China News Digest: "Top Officials Stress the Need of Improving China's Image." "Hong Kong Paper Runs Wu'er Kaixi Column," South China Morning Post. "Democracy Eludes Three Beijing Students," China News Digest.
Box 18

DE 1085.  November 5, 1990.

Physical Description: 30 pp.

Scope and Content Note

China News Digest: "Wang Juntao's Wife Pleads: Help Me Win His Freedom." Protests at Li Haitao sentence of 4.5 years. "New Restrictions on Chinese Campuses Detailed." Reports on visit of IFCSS officers to Chicago. Shen Tong, an activist in the 1989 Tiananmen movement, begins a national book tour in the U.S. to promote his book Almost a Revolution.
Box 18

DE 1086.  November 10, 1990.

Physical Description: 78 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Chinese Artist's [Fan Zeng] Reported Defection to France." " CND Q&A on Visa/Job/Legal Matters." "New Wave of Crackdowns Forces Tibetans to Flee." "Update: The Immigration Act of 1990." Letter from president of IFCSS to Hou Xiaotian, wife of Wang Juntao. Report on visit by Hu Ping, chairman of the Chinese Alliance for Democracy, to Arizona.
Box 18

DE 1087.  November 15, 1990.

Physical Description: 40 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Chinese Government Faces Protest from Provinces." Dissidents Face Secret Trials in China." "Report from IFCSS." "Question and Answer Column on Visa/Job/Legal Matters." "Job Hunting Essentials." "Cadres in Special Economic Zones Call for More Power," South China Morning Post.
Box 18

DE 1088.  November 20, 1990.

Physical Description: 40 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Report of IFCSS delegation to the Soviet Union. "Question and Answer Column on Visa/Job/Legal Matters." "Japan Denied Visa Application by Former IFCSS President for Political Reasons."
Box 18

DE 1089.  November 25, 1990.

Physical Description: 6 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Wang Juntao's Charges: Sedition and Counter-Revolutionary Propaganda," China News Digest.
Box 18

DE 1090.  December 15, 1990.

Physical Description: 48 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Chinese Official Rejects Softening on Human Rights." "Interview with Ge Xun [friend of Wang Juntao who recently returned to Beijing from Texas to offer to help Wang] and His Wife Ms. Luu Jin." Letter to China News Digest: "Why OSU [Ohio State University] Did Not Co-Sign Open Letter for Dissidents [charges that the president of the OSU IFCSS has a collaborationist attitude toward the Beijing government]." "Recent IFCSS Works on Behalf of Dissidents." "Son's Return Sparks Crisis for Family [report on return to Beijing of Ge Xun, petitioning to be a defense witness for Wang Juntao]," South China Morning Post. "Ge Xun at Beijing Public Security Bureau [where he is refused request to meet Wang Juntao]". "Ge Xun Comes Back on Wednesday." "China Allows Activist [Ge Xun] Safe Departure." China News Digest: "U.S. Human Rights Official Visits Beijing." "U.S. Envoy Asks Facts on 150 China Political Prisoners."
Box 18

DE 1091.  December 20, 1990.

Physical Description: 29 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Second CND Interview with Ge Xun."
Box 18

DE 1092.  December 25, 1990.

Physical Description: 45 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Wen Yankai Freed [university professor from Hefei University, Anhui, held for 15 months]," China News Digest. "About Deadline for Trials of 60 Dissidents," South China Morning Post. China News Digest: "Deadlock over Trials of Party Brass [officials who supported Democracy Movement]." "Question and Answer Column on Visa/Job/Legal Matters."
Box 22

DE 1093.  January 1, 1991.

Physical Description: 25 pp.

Scope and Content Note

China News Digest: "Three Chinese Diplomats Ordered out of Sweden." "Recent Development of Li Haitao's Case [jailed for circulating audio tape of Chai Ling]." "More about How PRC Consuls Got Expelled from Sweden," South China Morning Post. "Question and Answer Column on Visa/Job/Legal Matters: PRC Educational Counsel Answered CND Q&A Editor's Questions on the U.S. Advance Parole and PRC Exit Permit."
Box 22

DE 1094.  January 5, 1991.

Physical Description: 41 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Nine Students Were Sentenced in Beijing," Xinhua News Agency. China News Digest: "More about Students Sentenced in Beijing." "Recent CLDP Activities in Atlanta." "China Quietly Freed a Group of Intellectuals." "Student Leader in Qingdao Sentenced to 18 Years in Prison." "Second Round of Trials Underway."
Box 22

DE 1095.  January 10, 1991.

Physical Description: 27 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Chinese government spokesperson Yuan Mu says most arrestees in Tiananmen roundup will be released without trials. "Tiananmen Exiles Divided, Face Lack of Support in Japan," Daily Yomiuri. China News Digest: Open letter to Chinese Consulate in San Francisco from Bay Area Chinese rights organizations. "China Delays Trials of Dissidents." "Wang Juntao's Wife [Hou Xiaotian] Arrested." "Some Suggestions on Helping Political Prisoners in China."
Box 22

DE 1096.  January 15, 1991.

Physical Description: 34 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Trial starts for protest leader Bao Zunxin, one of seven prominent intellectuals active in the "Democracy Salon" meetings in Beijing during the 1989 Democracy Movement. "China Steps Up Prosecutions, Puts Liu Xiaobo on Trial." Lengthy critique of the viewpoint of orthodox PRC supporter He Xin (8 pp.). "Chinese Students Sent Representatives to Observe Beijing Trials." "Mr. Mao Jiye Left for Beijing to Observe Trials." "Representatives of Overseas Chinese Arrived in Beijing." Appeal to write to U.S. members of Congress to ask support for Liu Xiaobo. "Chinese Government Expelled Students' Representative." "Chinese Authorities Held Student's Parents as Hostages." "China Bars Overseas Chinese from Trials."
Box 22

DE 1097.  January 20, 1991.

Physical Description: 21 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Mao Jiye Arrived in Vancouver Safely." "Joint Statement of Protest by FCSSC [Canadian counterpart of IFCSS] and IFCSS." "U.S. State Department Statement on Chinese Dissident Trials." "China Detains Human Rights Activists." "Chinese Leadership Vows to Continue Security Crackdown in 1991." "Key Chinese Student Leader [Wang Dan] Tried for 'Counter-Revolution.'"
Box 22

DE 1098.  January 25, 1991.

Physical Description: 11 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Wang Dan Tried for 'Counter-Revolution.'" "Two More China Dissidents Now Face Sedition Charge [constitutional law scholar Chen Xiaoping and physicist Liu Gang]". "Fang [Lizhi]: Beijing Using Gulf War to Pursue Dissidents."
Box 22

DE 1099.  January 26, 1991.

Physical Description: 10 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Fang Lizhi Spoke in Los Angeles." "Chinese Student [Wang Dan] Gets 4-Year Term for Leading Democracy Movement." "More on Sentences."
Box 22

DE 1100  January 28, 1991.

Physical Description: 19 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Hong Kong Protest of China Trials." Text of letter of protest to President Bush by IFCSS to be circulated to members of the U.S. Congress for signatures, with full list of congressional addresses.
Box 22

DE 1101.  January 29, 1991

Physical Description: 6 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Justice with Chinese Characteristics." " Wenhuibao Says Chinese Dissident [Wang Dan] Told Court He Was Sorry." "State Department Criticizes Jailing of Chinese Dissidents."
Box 22

DE 1102.  January 30, 1991

Physical Description: 6 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"China's Stock Market Near Collapse, Fear Government Crackdown."
Box 22

DE 1103.  January 31, 1991.

Physical Description: 19 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Copy of cover letter and declaration from members of German Bundestag in support of Chinese dissidents. "Jailed Democracy Activist Seriously III in China [Wang Juntao]." "A Dreary Look at Hard Time (Prisoner in China)." "Urgent Action Needed on Political Prisoners" (letter from National Committee on Chinese Student Affairs, CCSA/IFCSS). "Special Package on Visa and Job Hunting,"
Box 22

DE 1104.  February 1, 1991.

Physical Description: 6 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"China Rebuffs International Human Rights Mission." "INS Holds Refugees for Months as They Seek Asylum."
Box 22

DE 1105.  February 2-3, 1991.

Physical Description: 10 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Leaving Behind the Iron Rice Bowl." Two reviews of books on historical China.
Box 22

DE 1106.  February 4, 1991.

Physical Description: 8 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Two More Dissidents Tried in China [Chen Yanlin and Zhang Yawei]." "By-laws of the Supervisory Committee of the IFCSS." " CND Q&A Column on Visa/Job/Legal Matters."
Box 22

DE 1107.  February 5, 1991.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Amnesty International criticizes trials of dissidents in China. "China Reported Arrests of Catholics."
Box 22

DE 1108.  February 6, 1991.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"China Tries Second of Four Dissidents for Subversion [physicist Liu Gang]".
Box 22

DE 1109.  February 7, 1991.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"New Year Greeting Cards and Donations for Political Prisoners." Chinese activists meet with U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Human Rights Richard Schifter. " CND Q&A Column on Visa/Job/Legal Matters."
Box 22

DE 1110.  February 8, 1991.

Physical Description: 5 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"China Says U.S. Human Rights Reports Unacceptable." "Taiwan Repatriates Illegal Mainland Chinese Immigrants."
Box 22

DE 1111.  February 12, 1991.

Physical Description: 5 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"IFCSS Calls for Action [to protest sentences of Wang Juntao, Chen Ziming, and Liu Gang]." "World Ignoring China, Student Leader [Li Lu] Says" " CND Q&A Column on Visa/Job/Legal Matters."
Box 22

DE 1112.  February 15, 1991.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

News Brief: Association of Overseas Hong Kong Chinese for Democracy and Human Rights prepares 23 flyers with pictures and biographies of Chinese political prisoners. "IFCSS Call for Cosigners of Open Letter [to protest recent trials of prodemocracy activists in China]." " CND Q&A Column on Visa/ Job/Legal Matters."
Box 22

DE 1113.  February 16, 1991.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"A Japanese Tells the War Story to China."
Box 22

DE 1114.  February 18, 1991.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"The Holiday and Jailed Activist Families."
Box 22

DE 1115.  February 19, 1991.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Update on the IFCSS Open Letter Campaign." 'CLDP Issues Statement on the Recent Trials and Sentencings in China." "Chinese Diplomats Comment on Trials at Home." "Chinese Diplomatic Missions Attempt to Sabotage Student Self-Governing Organizations."
Box 22

DE 1116.  February 21, 1991.

Physical Description: 9 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Open letter from IFCSS to Wan Li, chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress. "Asia Watch Update " "Chinese Students in Germany—A Report from Germany."
Box 22

DE 1117.  February 24, 1991.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"China Officially Denounces Xu Jiatun."
Box 22

DE 1118.  February 25, 1991.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"IFCSS Issues Statement on Chinese Embassy's Attempt of Sabotage." " CND Q&A Column on Visa/Job/Legal Matters."
Box 22

DE 1119.  February 26, 1991.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Some Students Try Cheating Their Way Out of China."
Box 22

DE 1120.  February 28, 1991.

Physical Description: 9 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Fears Expressed for Chinese Dissidents." "Chinese Students and Scholars in Japan and the CND." IFCSS report on the open letter campaign. " CND Q&A Column on Visa/Job/Legal Matters."
Box 22

DE 1121.  March 1, 1991.

Physical Description: 8 pp.

Scope and Content Note

" CND Q&A Column on Visa/Job/Legal Matters."
Box 22

DE 1122.  March 2, 1991.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Report Says Chinese Law Violates Trial Standards." "Trials Held of Hong Kong Men Linked to Activists."
Box 22

DE 1123.  March 3, 1991.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Deng's Views on Handling of 'Turmoil' Cited."
Box 22

DE 1124.  March 4, 1991.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Intellectual Qin Benli Reportedly Dying of Cancer."
Box 22

DE 1125.  March 5, 1991.

Physical Description: 9 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Book reviews on Asian immigrants to the West. "Party Denounces Former NCNA Chief Xu Jiatun."
Box 22

DE 1126.  March 6, 1991.

Physical Description: 16 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"The Making of China News Digest." "About the 'Electronic Newsletter for Chinese Students.'" "How CND Works and Call for Volunteers." "Transcripts Cast Doubt on Wang [Juntao] Trial." "FDC Tries to Rally West for Dissidents." " CND Q&A Column on Visa/Job/Legal Matters." "IFCSS-VISA: Passport Problem?"
Box 22

DE 1127.  March 7, 1991.

Physical Description: 7 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Report Shows Beijing's Attempts to Conceal Hearings." State Department cable on "Nonimmigrant Visas for Relatives of PRC Nationals Under the Executive Order of April 11, 1990."
Box 22

DE 1128.  March 8, 1991.

Physical Description: 3 pp.

Scope and Content Note

(incomplete).
Box 22

DE 1129.  March 10, 1991.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Exclusive Stories from China about Wang [Juntao]'s & Chen [Ziming]'s Trials."
Box 22

DE 1130.  March 11, 1991.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Vietnam Intellectual Asks Communist Leaders to Quit."
Box 22

DE 1131.  March 12, 1991.

Physical Description: 9 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"China Frees a Dissident [playwright Wang Peigong] but Conducts More Trials." "Angry Words Greet the Chinese Foreign Minister." " CND Q&A Column on Visa/Job/Legal Matters."
Box 22

DE 1132.  March 13, 1991.

Physical Description: 13 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Petition for Wang Juntao, Liu Gang in APS [American Physical Society] March Meeting." " CND Q&A Column on Visa/Job/Legal Matters."
Box 22

DE 1133.  March 14, 1991.

Physical Description: 9 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Tibet Could Have 'Kept Its Political System.'"
Box 22

DE 1134.  March 15, 1991.

Physical Description: 5 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Party 'Losing Village Power Base' in China."
Box 22

DE 1135.  March 16, 1991.

Physical Description: 6 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"The Controversial Political Crime to Be Abolished." "Chinese Writers Cope with Life in Exile (Part I)."
Box 22

DE 1136.  March 17, 1998.

Physical Description: 8 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Chinese Writers Cope with Life in Exile (Part II)." "FDC-US Office Is Producing Radio Tapes to Commemorate 'June 4th.'" " CND Q&A Column on Visa/Job/Legal Matters."
Box 22

DE 1137.  March 21, 1991.

Physical Description: 6 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Man [Han Binglin] Tried in China for Counter-Revolution." "More about Recent Execution Linked to Tiananmen Protests." "China Vowed to Have No More Trials of Dissidents." "Top Tiananmen Dissidents Lose Final Appeal."
Box 22

DE 1138.  March 22, 1991.

Physical Description: 10 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Xian [Xi'an] Jails Activist Students and Editor." "Fang Lizhi and Li Shuxian Address the APS [American Physical Society]".
Box 22

DE 1139.  March 23, 1991.

Physical Description: 5 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Beijing Planning 'Glasnost' Congress."
Box 22

DE 1140.  March 24, 1991.

Physical Description: 2 pp.

Scope and Content Note

(incomplete).
Box 22

DE 1141.  March 25, 1991.

Physical Description: 7 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Conflicting Views: The 'People Power/Toycott Project' [to boycott toys manufactured in China]." " CND Q&A Column on Visa/Job/Legal Matters."
Box 22

DE 1142.  March 26, 1991.

Physical Description: 12 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Report on speech by Fang Lizhi at the Los Angeles World Affairs Council. Letter from the author of"'Boat of Democracy' Saved."
Box 22

DE 1143.  March 27, 1991.

Physical Description: 5 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Man in Xian [Xi'an] Blows Self Up Near Terra Cotta Warriors."
Box 22

DE 1144.  March 28, 1991.

Physical Description: 6 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"China Rejects Hong Kong Man's Appeal." "The Chinese Gulag."
Box 22

DE 1145.  March 29, 1991.

Physical Description: 9 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Letter from a Reader: Remember Wei Jingsheng." "Wei Jingsheng, Prisoner of Conscience." " CND Q&A Column on Visa/Job/Legal Matters."
Box 22

DE 1146.  March 30, 1991.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Author of the Poem: 'If We Had Freedom of Speech.'" "Letter from a Reader: Wei Jingsheng Deserves Nobel Prize."
Box 22

DE 1147.  March 31, 1991.

Physical Description: 5 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Dalai Lama Calls for 'Friendly' Pressure on China."
Box 22

DE 1148.  April 1, 1991.

Physical Description: 5 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"Flaws Exposed in China's Half-Reformed Economy."
Box 22

DE 1149.  April 2, 1991.

Physical Description: 9 pp.

Scope and Content Note

" CND Opinion Poll No. 6."
Box 22

DE 1150.  April 3, 1991.

Physical Description: 4 pp.

Scope and Content Note

"China Says Nearly 800 Prosecuted over 1989 Protests." "Supreme Court Official Professes Lack of Knowledge on Trials."

Annex - Annotated Bibliography of Books and Journal Articles Not Included in This Archive

 

I. Books

Box 20

Remember Catherine Lombardo, Michael Ryan and Michael Cutillo Copr. 1989

Physical Description: [cassette tape]
Box 20

All For Freedom [chinese characters]

Physical Description: [cassette tape]
Box 19

EC 1001 Asia Watch. Punishment Season: Human Rights in China after Martial Law. New York: Asia Watch. February 7, 1990.

Physical Description: 164 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A discussion of human rights violations in China after the 1989 Beijing incident.
Box 21

EE 1017 Barmé, Geremie, and John Minford (eds.). Seeds of Fire: Chinese Voices of Conscience. New York: Noonday Press. 1989.

Physical Description: 491 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Essays, short stories, poems, and other texts, mainly by China's reform minded intellectuals. While treating the Tiananmen Incident in several pieces, the focus of this collection is much broader and includes topics as diverse as Chinese film and the treatment of sexuality in modern Chinese literature.
 

Baum, Richard (ed.). Reform and Reaction in Post-Mao China: The Road to Tiananmen. London and New York: Routledge. 1991.

Physical Description: 209 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Collection of academic articles on the course of China's reform and causes of the Tiananmen Incident.
Box 20

EE 1012 Beijing Review. Chinese Leaders Answer Questions at Press Conference. Beijing: New Star Publishers. 1989.

Physical Description: 30 pp.
Physical Description: [2 copies]

Scope and Content Note

A report of a September 26, 1989, press conference held by top Chinese officials on China's internal and external affairs.
Box 19

EC 1008 [chinese characters] Beiping da tusha: 1989 nian Zhongguo dalu renmin zhengqu minzhu yundong jiyao (The Peiping massacre: a summary report of the 1989 Democracy Movement by the people of mainland China). Taipei: [chinese characters] Kwang Hwa Publishing Co. 1989.

Physical Description: 67 pp.

Scope and Content Note

This pamphlet is an official response from the Taiwan government to the Tiananmen Incident. It includes an analysis of the movement's causes and an account of the Taiwan government's attitude toward it at different stages. It also includes many photographs. An English version is cited elsewhere is this bibliography under the title The Peking Massacre: A Summary Report of the 1989 Democracy Movement in Mainland China.
 

Cheng, Chuyuan. Behind the Tiananmen Massacre—Social, Political, and Economic Ferment in China. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press. 1990.

Physical Description: 256 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Offers broad coverage of the interplay of factors that led up to the tragic events of late spring 1989. It presents a comprehensive analysis of why the tragedy occurred, examing in considerable depth economic changes instituted in the 1980s and their effects, power struggles within the Communist Party leadership, the role of the army, and the aims of the student movement. It draws on a variety of sources that help to illustrate not just the events of 1989 but also the recent Chinese political and economic developments.
 

Cherrington, Ruth. China's Student: The Struggle for Democracy. London: Routledge. 1991.

Physical Description: 239 pp.

Scope and Content Note

The causes and development of the Chinese student movements of the 1980s. It also includes a brief chronology of the democracy movements in China since 1919.
 

Chinese Democratic Movement Information Center. Witness Reports on the Democratic Movement of China '89—Bajiu Zhongguo minyun jian zhen baogao zhuan ji. Hong Kong: Chinese Democratic Movement Information Center. 1990.

Physical Description: 376 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A valuable English-Chinese bilingual collection on the 1989 Democracy Movement. It includes United Nation documents, transcripts of audio and video news broadcasts, reports from Amnesty International and Asia Watch on human rights affairs, and a complete name list of prosecuted democratic activists in China.
 

Committee on Human Rights in China. Children of the Dragon: The Story of Tiananmen Square. New York: Collier Books, 1990.

Physical Description: 387 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Eyewitness accounts and chronology of the Democracy Movement in Tiananmen Square and the Beijing incident, with pictures.
 

Des Forges, Roger V., Luo Ning, and Wu Yenbo (eds.). Chinese Democracy and the Crisis of 1989: Chinese and American Reflections. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press. 1993.

Physical Description: 371 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Contains three sections on the 1989 Democracy Movement by both Chinese and American scholars from a variety of backgrounds. Section 1 places the events of 1989 in the context of Chinese history from the earliest times through the reforms of the 1980s. Section 2 analyzes the rise and demise of the movement in spring 1989. The final section addresses issues related to culture, values, and the media.
Box 20

EE 1007 Duke, Michael S. The Iron House—A Memoir of the Chinese Democracy Movement and the Tiananmen Massacre. Salt Lake City: Peregrine Smith Books. 1990.

Physical Description: 180 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Titled with a phrase coined by Lu Xun to provide an image of China's lack of freedom in the 1930s, this book is a detailed eyewitness account of the 1989 Democracy Movement by a Canadian China specialist who was living in the nerve center of the movement—Beijing University campus—at the time. His account braids two paralled narratives: his own memoir of the exuberant Democracy Movement, and a history of the bureaucratic power struggles behind the scenes.
 

Fang Lizhi (James H. Williams, ed. and trans.). Bring Down the Great Wall: Writings on Science, Culture, and Democracy in China. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. 1991.

Physical Description: 336 pp.

Scope and Content Note

This is the first collection of Fang's writings to be published in English. Includes articles and speeches that provoked the wrath of the Chinese government and forced him, in the spring of 1989, to seek sanctuary in the U.S. Embassy in Beijing. This is a rare glimpse into the intellect of one of the central figures in the democratic camp in China.
 

Fathers, Michael, and Andrew Higgins (Robert Cottrell, ed.). Tiananmen: The Rape of Peking. London: Independent, in association with Doubleday. 1989.

Physical Description: 148 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Collection of news reports and photographs of two Western journalists about the Democracy Movement, mainly about the Tiananmen Incident in Beijing.
 

[chinese characters] Feng qi Tiananmen: quanqiu Huaren tongbu shengyuan dalu minyun (The wind from Tiananmen: Chinese people all over the world support the Democracy Movement in mainland China). Taipei: Zhonghuaminguo qiaowu weiyuanhui. 1989.

Physical Description: 167 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Collection of news photographs with captions outlining the development of the student Democracy Movement in the spring of 1989.
 

Gargan, Edward A. China's Fate: A People's Turbulent Struggle with Reform and Repression, 1980-1990. New York: Doubleday. 1991.

Physical Description: 340 pp.

Scope and Content Note

As the Beijing correspondent of The Times during the 1989 Democracy Movement and a specialist in Chinese language, the author provides an authentic record of the movement, especially the democratic opposition's struggle for its ideals. The book is also valuable for its description of the political and economic problems in China during the first ten-years of reform.
 

[chinese characters] Guojia jiaowei shehui kexue yanjiu yu yishu jiaoyu si, Guojia jiaowei sixiang zhengzhi gongzuo si, Beijing shiwei gaodeng yuanxiao gongzuo weiyuanhui (National Education Ministry Society for Scientific Research and Art Education Department, National Education Ministry Political Ideological Work Department, City of Beijing High Level Academy of Education Work Council). 50 [chinese characters] 50 tian de hui gu yu fan si (Reflecting of the 50 days). Beijing: Gaodengjiaoyu chubanshe. 1989.

Physical Description: 199 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Offical education material for college students in China. It tells students that they were used by some "bad people" during the movement, and therefore should study Communist ideology more diligently.
Box 20

EE 1010 Han Minzhu (ed.). Cries for Democracy: Writings and Speeches from the 1989 Chinese Democracy Movement. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press. 1990.

Physical Description: 401 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Collection of translated political and personal documents arranged in approximate chronological order.
 

[chinese characters] Han Shanbi (ed.). [chinese characters] : 1989 [chinese characters] Lishi de chuangshang: 1989 Zhongguo minyun shiliao huibian (The trauma of history: A collection of historical materials of the 1989 Democratic Movement in China).

 

Hong Kong: Tong xi wenhua shiye gongsi. 1989.

Physical Description: 526 pp. in 2 vols.

Scope and Content Note

Selection of official and unofficial documents and eyewitness reports.
Box 21

EE 1016 Hao Jia (ed.). The Democracy Movement of 1989 and China's Future. Washington, DC: Washington Center for China Studies. 1990.

Physical Description: 184 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Collection of articles from the proceedings of a conference held at George Washington University, Washington, DC, October 7-8, 1989, organized by Chinese students in the Washington area. The papers are divided into four parts: Overall Evaluation of the Movement; Causes of the Movement; Process, Experience, and Lessons of the Movement; and Implications of the Movement.
Box 19

EC 1009 [chinese characters] He Zhizhou (ed.). [chinese characters] Xue wo Zhonghua: bajiu nian Beijing xuechao ziliao ji (Bloodsoaked China: A collection of materials on the 1989 Democratic Movement in Beijing). Hong Kong: Xianggang xinyidai wenhua xiehui. 1989.

Physical Description: 2 vols.

Scope and Content Note

Official documents, students' statements, and brief biographies of party and government leaders, famous dissenters, and student movement leaders are contained in vol. 1. Vol. 2 contains articles and analyses of the causes and effects of the events of spring 1989.
 

Hicks, George. The Broken Mirror—China After Tiananmen . Harlow, Essex, United Kingdom: Longman. 1990.

Scope and Content Note

This book draws together the analyses of leading China watchers and scholars, defining the implications of the events of June 1989, both for China's domestic politics and for its foreign relations. It provides an expert examination of the incident—its causes and consequences, the leading figures and principal forces at work.
 

Hore, Charlie. The Road to Tiananmen Square. London: Bookmarks. 1991.

Physical Description: 159 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A socialist explanation of the history of China in the twentieth century, and in particular of the economic and social changes in the decade after Mao's death that led to the revolt of 1989. The author argues that Mao's revolution was nationalist rather than socialist, whereas the 1989 movement raised the possibility of a real socialist change brought about by the collective power of the working class. The revolt of 1989 fundamentally threatened the "modernizers" around Deng Xiaoping. Conceding to the movement's demands, the author argues, would have led to an even greater explosion from below which the ruling class could not hope to control, and so they chose the only other option: brute force.
 

[chinese characters] Hou Jiliang (ed.). [chinese characters] 1957-1989 : [chinese characters] Cong Wei Jingsheng dao Wu'er Kaixi, 1957-1989: Zhongguo dalu minzhu yundong qiang lan (From Wei Jingsheng to Wu'er Kaixi, 1957-1989: A retrospective of the democratic movement in mainland China). Taipei: Haifeng chubanshe, 1989.

Physical Description: 243 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Brief historical review of the democracy movement since 1957, including articles and speeches from some of the movement leaders and a brief chronology of the Tiananmen Incident.
Box 19

EC 1004 [chinese characters] Huang Tian(ed.). [chinese characters] Zhonghua minzhu xue lu (The bloody road of Chinese democracy). Hong Kong: [chinese characters]. Limin chubanshe. July 1989.

Physical Description: 262 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Pictures of the Beijing Democracy Movement and the Tiananmen Incident with a detailed chronology, texts of important speeches, and biographies of some of the leaders of the student movement and of the CCP.
 

[chinese characters] Huo zai shao, xue zai shao (Fire is burning, blood is burning). Taipei: Zhongguo xinwen guangli ju. July 1989.

Physical Description: 414 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Collection of articles, eyewitness accounts, and comments on the 1989 Tiananmen Incident.
 

Lee, Feigon. China Rising: The Meaning of Tiananmen. Chicago: I. R. Dec. 1990.

Physical Description: 269 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Collection of articles discussing the consecutive stages of the student movement in the spring of 1989.
 

[chinese characters] Li Jinkun et al. (eds.). 1989: [chinese characters] 1989: dongluan hou de huigu yu sikao (1989: Reflections and deliberation on the turmoil). Tianjin: Tianjin renmin chubanshe. 1989.

Physical Description: 145 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Official retrospective and analysis of the events in the development of the Chinese Democracy Movement in the spring of 1989.
 

Li Lu. Moving the Mountain: My Life in China from the Cultural Revolution to Tiananmen Square. London: Macmillan. 1990.

Physical Description: 211 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Autography by one of the major student leaders in the 1989 Democracy Movement, who fled to France afterward. Includes an eyewitness account of the movement, which is a vivid description of its every stage, contrasted to his personal feelings, which reflect those of many participants at the time
 

Li, Peter, Steven Mark, and Marjorie H. Li (eds.). Culture and Politics in China: The Anatomy of Tiananmen Square. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Transaction Publishers. 1991.

Physical Description: 369 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Collection of poems about the Democracy Movement.
 

Lin Bih-jaw (ed.). The Aftermath of the 1989 Tiananmen Crisis in Mainland China. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press. 1992.

Physical Description: 460 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Distinguished scholars from Taiwan and the United States analyze the wide-ranging effects of the crisis on the role of ideology; the party; the military; social, legal, and economic reform; foreign relations; and the impact on Taiwan and Hong Kong.
 

Lin Nan. The Struggle for Tiananmen: Anatomy of the 1989 Mass Movement. Westport, Connecticut: Praeger. 1992.

Physical Description: 199 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Attempts to provide a sociological explanation of the development and the failure of the 1989 Democracy Movement. The author focuses on the most puzzling decisions made by the students and the government at each stage of the movement, and discusses how they led to the violence and the movement's failure.
 

[chinese characters] Lishi de jianzheng (Testimonial to history). Hong Kong: Ta Kung Po (Dagong bao). June 1989.

Physical Description: 52 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Photographs of Chinese students in the Democracy Movement in 1989 and the Tiananmen Incident with captions in both Chinese and English.
 

Liu Binyan (Howard Goldblatt, trans.). China's Crisis, China's Hope. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. 1990.

Physical Description: 150 pp.

Scope and Content Note

One of the most thorough analytical works on Chinese politics. Liu examines the reform in the preceding ten years and anticipates the changes China is likely to experience in the near future.
 

Liu Binyan, Ruan Ming, and Xu Gang (Henry L. Epstein, trans.). Tell the World: What Happened in China and Why. New York: Pantheon Books. 1989.

Physical Description: 195 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A valuable record and analysis of the 1989 Democracy Movement. Besides a detailed account of the "Beijing Spring," the author discusses the movement's causes and makes predictions for the future.
 

[chinese characters] Liushisi ming Xianggang jizhe (Sixty-four Hong Kong reporters). [chinese characters] Renmin bu hui wangji (The people cannot forget). Hong Kong: Xianggang jizhe xiehui (Hong Kong Journalists Association). 1989.

Physical Description: 384 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A chronological record and comments on the 1989 Democracy Movement.
 

Lord, Bette Bao. Legacies: A Chinese Mosaic. New York: Knopf. 1990.

Scope and Content Note

A personal account of and commentary on the student movement in Tiananmen Square.
 

Mok, Chiu-yu, and J. Frank Harrison (eds.). Voices from Tiananmen Square: Beijing Spring and the Democracy Movement. Montreal and New York: Black Rose Books. 1990.

Physical Description: 203 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Contains a brief chronological record of the events in 1989, a collection of articles and original documents, including personal statements and declarations created during the Democracy Movement, and comment on the political roles of different societal circles during the events.
Box 20

EE 1006 Morrison, Donald (ed). Massacre in Beijing: China's Struggle for Democracy. New York: Time Magazine Books. 1989.

Physical Description: 280 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Written by the editors of Time magazine, who give a detailed account of the Tiananmen Incident and analyze its causes.
Box 20

EE 1011 Mu, Yi, and Mark V. Thompson. Crisis at Tiananmen: Reform and Reality in Modern China. San Francisco: China Books and Periodicals. 1989.

Physical Description: 283 pp.

Scope and Content Note

The authors provide an account of the whole movement and some analysis of the general situation of China at the time that triggered it. Two appendices collect numerous official documents, eyewitness accounts, and news reports on the 1989 Democracy Movement in Beijing.
 

Nathan, Andrew J. China's Crisis: Dilemmas of Reform and Prospects for Democracy. New York: Columbia University Press. 1990.

Physical Description: 242 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Examines the resources, dynamics, and potential of the 1989 Democracy Movement for changing China. The author believes that in 1989 China reached a new crisis in searching for political reform, and that the crisis was not resolved by the repression of June 1989.
 

1989 [chinese characters] 1989 Zhongguo minyun zhenya pohai zhuan ji (qikan ziliao) (Periodical articles on the suppression and persecution of China's 1989 Democratic Movement). Hong Kong: Chinese Democratic Movement Information Center. 1990

Physical Description: 390 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Collection of 284 articles from fifteen Hong Kong-based newspapers, May 1989 to March 1990.
 

Ogden, Suzanne, Kathleen Hartford, Lawrence R. Sullivan, and David Zweig (eds.). China's Search for Democracy: The Student and the Mass Movement of 1989. Armonk, New York: M. E. Sharpe. 1992.

Physical Description: 488 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Large collection of well-translated documents about the 1989 Democracy Movement. Gives a very good sense of what the environment was at that historical moment and helps to write a new history of China.
 

Oksenberg, Michel, Lawrence R. Sullivan, and Marc Lambert (eds.). Beijing Spring, 1989: Confrontation and Conflict—The Basic Documents. Armonk, New York: M. E. Sharpe, 1990.

Physical Description: 448 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Collection of articles, speeches, letters, and reviews, from various political perspectives, official, semiofficial, or unofficial, on China's current reform program and related issues for 1988 and 1989.
 

[chinese characters] Pang Pang et al. [chinese characters] Tang xue de Beijingcheng: cong Hu Yaobang qushi dao Tiananmen beiju (Bleeding Beijing: From the death of Hu Yaobang to the tragedy of Tiananmen). Taipei: Fengyun shidai chuban gongsi. 1989.

Physical Description: 350 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A collection of news reports, analysis, and commentary, and official and unofficial documents on the influence of the death of Hu Yaobang on the student movement.
Box 21

EE 1018 The Peking Massacre: A Summary Report of the 1989 Democracy Movement in Mainland China. Taipei: Kwang Hwa Publishing Company. July 1989.

Physical Description: 73 pp.

Scope and Content Note

The English version of [chinese characters] Beiping da tusha: 1989 nian Zhongguo dalu renmin zhengqu minzhu yundongjiyao. Official publication of the Taiwan government.
Box 20

EE 1004 Photographers and Reporters of the Ming Pao News, translated by Zi Jin and Qin Zhou. June Four: A Chronicle of the Chinese Democratic Uprising. Fayetteville, Arkansas: University of Arkansas Press. 1989.

Physical Description: 171 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A chronology of the Democracy Movement from April 15 to June 9, 1989, heavily illustrated.
Box 20

EE 1013 Porter, Edgar A., and Mardy Fones (eds.). Journalism from Tiananmen. Honolulu: University of Hawaii. 1990.

Physical Description: 54 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A collection of news reports and photographs by a group of American journalists of what they had witnessed in Beijing from May 28 to November 5, 1989.
 

[chinese characters] Qiao Mingxuan. [chinese characters] Beijing chun xia fengbo shi mo tan (The talk about the Beijing turmoil in spring and summer). Beijing: Haihua chubanshe. August 1989.

Physical Description: 98 pp.

Scope and Content Note

An official Chinese government version of the 1989 events in Beijing.
 

—— (ed). [chinese characters] Beijing chun xia fengbo zhenxiang (The truth about the Beijing turmoil in spring and summer). Beijing: Haihua chubanshe. 1989.

Physical Description: 122 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Chinese leaders' speeches and the record of news conferences held by the official news agency and military leaders.
 

[chinese characters] Qiao Youxuan. [chinese characters] Beijing chun xia fengbo shi lu (A record of the actual events regarding the turmoil in Beijing in the spring and summer). Beijing: Haihua chubanshe. July 1989.

Physical Description: 139 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Official Chinese government version of the report on the events from April to June 1989 in Beijing.
 

Saich, Tony (ed.). The Chinese People's Movement: Perspectives on the Spring 1989. Armonk, New York: M. E. Sharpe. 1990.

Physical Description: 207 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A collection of seven articles that address various causes of the student movement and the Tiananmen Incident, and a brief chronology of the movement.
Box 20

EE 1005 Salisbury, Harrison E. Tiananmen Diary: Thirteen Days in June. Boston: Little, Brown and Company. 1989.

Physical Description: 176 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Records the author's trip to China from June 1 to 13, 1989. He provides his observations of the 1989 Democracy Movement in Beijing and also the situations in other cities.
 

Shen Tong and Marianne Yen. Almost a Revolution. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company. 1990.

Physical Description: 430 pp.

Scope and Content Note

An autobiography and retrospective account of remarkable episodes during the Democracy Movement by exiled student leader Shen Tong.
 

[chinese characters] Sichuan ribao bianjibu (Editors' committee of the Sichuan Daily) (eds.). [chinese characters] Xuechao, dongluan, baoluan (Student movement, turmoil, riot). Chengdu: Sichuan kexue jishu chubanshe. 1989.

Physical Description: 407 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Collection of official news reports and leaders' speeches on the causes and development of the student Democracy Movement in the spring of 1989.
 

Simmie, Scott, and Bob Nixon. Tiananmen Square: An Eyewitness Account of the Chinese People's Passionate Quest for Democracy. Vancouver: Douglas and McIntyre. 1989.

Physical Description: 206 pp.

Scope and Content Note

As consultants for China Central Television, the authors weave interviews with various Chinese intellectuals and artists conducted in 1988 into their eyewitness accounts of Tiananmen. The authors argue that the students and other participants were not misguided dreamers who took advantage of the disorder following Hu Yaobang's death to push for unrealistic Western notions of democracy. Instead, the authors suggest that the Tiananmen movement was deeply rooted in Chinese history and was a turning point for China.
Box 21

EE 1014 Ståhle, Esbjörn, and Terho Uimonen (eds.) Electronic Mail on China, vol. 1:18 February-3 June 1989. Stockholm: Föreningen för Orientaliska Studier, 22. 1989.

Physical Description: 394 pp.

Scope and Content Note

An extensive collection of electronic mail messages by Overseas Chinese students and scholars which contains a large amount of first-hand information and personal reactions to the Tiananmen Incident.
Box 21

EE 1015 ——. Electronic Mail on China, vol. II: 4 June-4 July 1989. Stockholm: Föreningen för Orientaliska Studier, 22. 1989.

Physical Description: 424 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A continuation of the previous volume, covering the month following the Tiananmen Incident.
 

[chinese characters] Tiananmen feng yun: lishi de shangkou (The Tiananmen cloudburst: The wounds of history). Taipei: Lequn wenhua shiye youxiangongsi. 1989.

Physical Description: 252 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Includes a brief chronology and a selected collection of articles and statements by official and unofficial sources, several brief biographies, and reviews of the role of the army during the events in the spring of 1989.
 

[chinese characters] Tiananmen minzhu yundong ziliao huibian (Collection of material on the Tiananmen Democracy Movement). Taipei: Zhonggong wenti ziliao zazhi she. 1989.

Physical Description: 608 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Collection of reactions to the Chinese Democracy Movement from various parties in the spring of 1989, including documents and news reports.
Box 19

EE 1002 Ting Tin-yu and Ming Chu-cheng, directors. The Results of a Survey of Opinions Toward the June 4 Tiananmen Incident on the Part of General Residents of the Taiwan Area and Residents of the Taiwan Area Who Have Visited Relatives on the Mainland. Taipei: China Reunification Alliance: the Public Opinion Research Foundation. 1990.

Physical Description: 86 pp.
Physical Description: [2 copies]

Scope and Content Note

Analysis of survey data on Taiwanese attitudes toward the movement, political and economic developments in PRC, and relations between Taiwan and the PRC after the June 4 Incident.
 

Tonetto, Walter (ed.). Earth Against Heaven—A Tiananmen Square Anthology. Wollongong, N.S.W., Australia: Five Islands Press. 1990.

Physical Description: 134 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Poems commemorating the 1989 Democracy Movement in China—composed in Tiananmen Square during the movement, elsewhere in China, and other countries all over the world.
 

The Truth About the Beijing Turmoil. Beijing: Beijing Publishing House, 1989.

Physical Description: 133 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Chronology of the 1989 Democratic Movement, with photographs, reflecting the official PRC perspective.
Box 20

EE 1008 Turnley, David. Beijing Spring. New York: Stewart, Tabori and Chang. 1989.

Physical Description: 173 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A collection of photographs of the Democracy Movement.
 

United States Congress, House Committee on Foreign Affairs, Subcommittee on International Operations. The Role of the United States Embassy and the Voice of America in the Recent China Uprising: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on International Operations of the Committee on Foreign Affairs, House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, First Session, June 15, 1989 . Washington, DC: U.S.Government Printing Office. 1989.

Physical Description: 104 pp.

Scope and Content Note

The record of the hearing before the Subcommittee on International Operations of the Committee on Foreign Affairs on the role of the U.S. Embassy and the VOA in the Chinese Democracy Movement.
 

[chinese characters] Wang Gengwu et al. [chinese characters] He qu he cong: haiwai xuezhe de fansi (What course to follow? The overseas scholars' view). Teaneck, New Jersey: Bafang wenhua qiye gongsi. 1990.

Physical Description: 163 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Collection of twelve articles by Chinese scholars in America and Hong Kong, analyzing the political, economic, cultural, and social problems facing China after the June 4 crackdown.
 

[chinese characters] Wang Xian et al. (eds.). [chinese characters] Huo yu xue zhi zhenxiang: Zhongguo dalu minzhu yundongji shi (The truth of the fire and the blood: The record of the Democratic Movement in mainland China). Taipei: Zhonggong yanjiu zazhi she. 1989.

Physical Description: (Nonconsecutive paging).

Scope and Content Note

A five part compilation including: (1) a brief narrative of the events; (2) analysis and commentary; (3) a daily chronology; (4) several of the most important articles, reviews, and statements made by all concerned, in and out of China; and (5) photographs.
 

[chinese characters] Wu'er Kaixi et al. [chinese characters] 1989 [chinese characters] Tiananmen 1989 nian (Tiananmen 1989). Taipei: Lianjing chuban shiye gongsi. 1989.

Physical Description: 533 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A collection of photographs with captions and documents categorized under various headings such as the Democracy Movement, governmental affairs, reactions outside of China, and interviews with prominant figures.
Box 19

EC 1003 [chinese characters] Xing Tian and Yi Ye (eds.) [chinese characters] Liang ci Tiananmen shijian (Two Tiananmen incidents). Hong Kong: [chinese characters] Sky River Publishing Co. August 1989.

Physical Description: 129 pp.

Scope and Content Note

A comparison of the two Tiananmen incidents: April 5, 1976, and June 4, 1989.
 

Yan Jiaqi (David Bachman and Yang Dali, trans. and eds.). Yan Jiaqi and China's Struggle for Democracy. Armonk, New York: M. E. Sharpe. 1991.

Physical Description: 201 pp.

Scope and Content Note

An edition of the works of the well-known intellectual Yan Jiaqi, from 1980 to the 1989 Democracy Movement. An insightful critique of the existing regime, with helpful introductory comments by the editors.
 

[chinese characters] Yang Du. [chinese characters] Tiananmen jishi (A record of Tiananmen). Taipei: Shi bao wenhua chuban qiyei youxian gongsi. 1989.

Physical Description: 166 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Collection of news reports by the author, a journalist who witnessed the Tiananmen Incident and other events in Beijing in the spring of 1989.
 

Yang, Winston L. Y., and Marsha L. Wagner (eds.). Tiananmen: China's Struggle for Democracy, Its Prelude, Development, Aftermath, and Impact. Baltimore, Maryland: University of Maryland, School of Law. 1990.

Physical Description: 314 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Analysis of the Democracy Movement, its causes and development, and its impact on China's government, economy, and society.
 

[chinese characters] Yu Kuangzhong (ed.). [chinese characters] Wo de xin zai Tiananmen (My heart remains in Tiananmen Square). Taipei: Zhengzhong shuju, 1989.

Physical Description: 198 pp.

Scope and Content Note

Poems written by Overseas Chinese and articles by leaders of the student movement in Beijing in 1989, with some literary comments on the Tiananmen Incident.