Finding Aid of the Clara M. Szego Papers

Processed by Manuscripts Division staff; Finding aid revised 2007 May 9.
© 2004
The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.

Finding Aid of the Clara M. Szego Papers

UCLA Library, Department of Special Collections

Manuscripts Division



Los Angeles, CA
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© 2004 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.

Descriptive Summary

Title: Clara M. Szego Papers,
Date (inclusive): ca. 1937-2006
Collection number: 1640
Creator: Szego, Clara M., 1916-
Extent: 11 boxes (5.5 linear ft.)
Repository: University of California, Los Angeles. Library. Department of Special Collections.
Los Angeles, California 90095-1575
Abstract: Clara M. Szego (b.1916-), a biologist, taught at the UCLA School of Medicine before accepting a position in the Department of Zoology where she was promoted to full professorship (1960). Her research included work on molecular and cellular mechanisms of hormone action, and lysosomes and lysosome theory in the normal cellular economy. The collection consists of correspondence, printed materials, articles, clippings, and photographs related to Szego's career.
Physical location: Stored off-site at SRLF. Advance notice is required for access to the collection. Please contact the UCLA Library, Department of Special Collections Reference Desk for paging information.
Language: English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

COLLECTION STORED OFF-SITE: Advance notice required for access.

Restrictions on Use and Reproduction

Property rights to the physical object belong to the UCLA Library, Department of Special Collections. Literary rights, including copyright, are retained by the creators and their heirs. It is the responsibility of the researcher to determine who holds the copyright and pursue the copyright owner or his or her heir for permission to publish where The UC Regents do not hold the copyright.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Clara M. Szego Papers (Collection 1640). Department of Special Collections, University Research Library, University of California, Los Angeles.

Provenance/Source of Acquisition

Gift of Clara M. Szego, 1989.

Biography

Szego was born in 1916; attended Hunter College and did graduate work in the Department of Physiological Chemistry at University of Minnesota; researcher, Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology; faculty member at Yale University; followed Abraham White to UCLA School of Medicine and later accepted position in the Department of Zoology, UCLA; promoted to full professorship, 1960; research included work on molecular and cellular mechanisms of hormone action, and lysosomes and lysosome theory in the normal cellular economy; closed her laboratory, 1985.

Scope and Content

Collection consists of correspondence, printed materials, articles, clippings, and photographs related to the career of biologist Clara M. Szego.

Indexing Terms

The following terms have been used to index the description of this collection in the repository's online public access catalog.

Subjects

Szego, Clara M., 1916- --Archives.
University of California, Los Angeles--Faculty--Archival resources.
Women biologists--United States--Archival resources.

Related Material

Insight and progress: development of a cell biologist [oral history transcript] / Clara M. Szego, interviewee. UCLA Oral History Department interview, 1989. Available at Department of Special Collections, UCLA.

Container List

Box 1, Folder A1

New Yorker cartoon: “If you were to boil your book down to a few words, what would be its message?”

Box 1, Folder A2

Father's Ph.D. Dissertation.

Box 1, Folder A3

Photograph of plaster bust of Mother, approximately 1926.

Box 1, Folder A4

Baby Book.

Scope and Content Note

Emphasis was on commentary by trained philologue mother on rate of acquisition of speech and other developmental progress.
Box 1, Folder A5

First Story Book, illustrated by father.

Scope and Content Note

With playful but valid homilies on honorable behavior
Box 1, Folder A6

Report from Manumit School.

Box 1, Folder A7

Junior High School valdictorian.

Box 1, Folder A8

Academic interests.

Box 1, Folder A9

Bay Ridge High School records, awards; diploma; college entrance diploma.

Box 1, Folder A10

Arista Society: election as a junior.

Box 1, Folder A11

Los Cuatro Generales.

Box 1, Folder A12

Letter of recommendation from High School principal.

Box 1, Folder A13

New York State Regents' Scholarship.

Box 1, Folder A14 a, b

Correspondence and background, Miss Mary F. Lindsley.

Box 1, Folder A14 c, d

Reunion (February 25, 1989), as described in PerspectivesMarch 16, 1989.

Scope and Content Note

Letter acknowledging gift of book of poetry.
Box 1, Folder A15

Photographs: Dr. Donald D. Mossman, Dr. Dorothea Mossman.

Scope and Content Note

Add framed photograph of D.D.M. in his prime from my office wall.
Box 1, Folder A16

Skit following Qualitative Analysis course.

Box 1, Folder A17

Hunter Memoir by Bel Kaufman (Nobel Laureate alumni of Hunter College).

Box 1, Folder A17

Classmate, Gertrude B. Elion, wins Nobel Prize.

Box 1, Folder A18

Phi Beta Kappa election letter.

Box 1, Folder A19

Garvan Fellowship Award, New York Times clipping B.A. cum laude. June 1937.

Note

Diploma missing.
Box 1, Folder A20

Maurice B. Visscher portrait.

Box 1, Folder A21

Studio portrait CMS as graduate student.

Physical Description: (Copy)
Box 1, Folder A22

J.F. McClendon to Alan Hemingway.

Scope and Content Note

“Characteristic postcard from Japan.”
Box 1, Folder A23

“Millard Hall” prototype, e.g., lights on at all hours.

Box 1, Folder A24

Obituary, Cyrus P. Barnum.

Box 1, Folder A25

M.B. Visscher, biographies. Minnesota Medical Bulletin, w. 1977.

Box 1, Folder A25

The Physiologist. February 1977.

Box 1, Folder A25

Request from Professor Horace Davenport, University of Michigan, for data on MBV to supplement the Biographical Memoir he was commissioned to write by the National Academy of Sciences (December 26, 1988).

Box 1, Folder A25

My comments of January 7, 1989.

Box 1, Folder A25

Davenport's response.

Box 1, Folder A26

Cardiac surgeons trained jointly by Visscher (Physiology) and Owen Wangensteen (Surgery), University of Minnesota.

Box 1, Folder A27

“Our Academic Lineage.”

Box 1, Folder A28

Part 1) Program, Society for the study of Internal Secretions. 1940.

Note

(Forerunner of the present-day Endocrine Society)
This slim pamphlet is to be contrasted to the voluminous program of the latter-named organization (June 1988), also appended as part 2.
Box 1, Folder A28

Part 2) Program, Endocrine Society. June 1988.

Box 1, Folder A28

Part 3) “The Endocrine Society: Origin, Organization, and Institutions,” by A.E. Wilhelmi.

Scope and Content Note

Brings history [of the society] to date.
Box 2, Folder A29

Part 1) M.S. Thesis.

Box 2, Folder A29

Part 2) M.S. record transcript.

Box 2, Folder A29

Part 3) M.S. Commencement Exercises.

Box 2, Folder A29

Part 4. M.S. diploma.

Box 2, Folder A30

Part 1) Ph.D. Preliminary oral examination committee.

Box 2, Folder A30

Part 2) Ph.D. final examination committee.

Box 2, Folder A30

Part 3) Ph.D. Diploma.

Box 2, Folder A31

Part 1) Ph.D. Dissertation.

Box 2, Folder A31

Part 2) “Dissertation” (poem).

Scope and Content Note

Written on the bus, returning to Minneapolis from the Mayo Division, University of Minnesota, after having had to hand-deliver the finished dissertation to the Mayo faculty in order to meet the deadline.
Box 2, Folders A32-A35

Worcester Foundation for Experimental biology. 1945-1953

Box 2, Folder A32

Photograph of television spot with Helen Hayes and Directors. 1953.

Box 2, Folder A33

Composition of the Foundation as it was dedicated in 1945.

Box 2, Folder A34

Descriptive reprint from Industry. December 1945.

Box 2, Folder A34

Supplements 1-3: Later summaries of the nature of the Foundation.

Box 2, Folder A34

Supplement 4: N.W. Pirie, an early member (colleague at the Worcester Foundation).

Box 2, Folder A35

Part 1) Letter of invitation to the Foundation. December 21, 1944.

Box 2, Folder A35

Part 2) Tufts University appointment without salary. May 14, 1946.

Box 2, Folder A36

Szego, C.M. “Steroid-Protein Binding: from Circulating Blood to Target Cell Nucleus.” Gynecologic investigation (vol.7). 1976.

Physical Description: (pp.251-279)

Scope and Content Note

Paper no.117 in CMS bibliography.
Includes a recapitulation of the early Worcester period and the first identification of the specific association of estrogens and androgens with given blood proteins.
Box 2, Folder A37

Part 1) Pictures, Gregory Pincus; Pincus with John Rock.

Box 2, Folder A37

Part 2) Obituary, telegram and letter. Dr. Pincus. August 1967.

Box 2, Folder A37

Part 3) Hudson Hoagland 75th birthday fundraiser; honorary degrees to Mary Calderone and M. C. Chang; Pincus Memorial Lectures (November 1974), including the one by CMS.

Box 2, Folder A37

Parts 4a-d) International Steroid Conference at the Worcester Foundation (June 1953); CMS participating. Newspaper coverage.

Box 2, Folder A37

Part 5) Letter, Gregory Pincus to Sidney Roberts. May 8, 1965.

Box 2, Folder A37

Part 6) My brother's clarification.

Note

“Lest I get a swelled head.”
Box 2, Folder A38

Parts 1-2) M.C. Chang, credentials and family.

Box 2, Folder A39

Memorandum to Tom Slick.

Box 2, Folder A40

Portrait of Professor Edwin J. Cohn.

Box 2, Folder A41

Part 1) Letter, J.T. Edsall. March 18, 1967.

Box 2, Folder A41

Part 2) Obituary by Professor Edsall of Albert Szent-Györgyi, Nature 304 (vol.409). 1986.

Box 2, Folder A41

Part 3) Obituary by Edsall of Carl F. Cori, American Philosophical Society Yearbook. 1985.

Box 2, Folder A42

Paul Ehrlich: “The receptor concept, primary formulation.”

Note

Cited frequently in CMS teaching and writings.
Box 2, Folder A43

The Journal of steroid biochemistry (vol.25, no.2). August 1986. Table of Contents.

Scope and Content Note

To illustrate currency of the concept of steroid-protein association.
Box 2, Folder A44

Background to comments on Dr. Percy Julian re first “Laurentian” Hormone Conference.

Box 2, Folder A45

Photographs of some scientist colleagues met at the Laurentian Hormone Conferences: Roland K. Meyer, William Fishman, Ian Bush, Saul Cohen, Evelyn Anderson, Paul Munson.

Box 2, Folder A46

Letter from Yale University tendering job.

Box 2, Folder A47

Abraham White: portrait, reprinted from Biographical Memoirs (vol.55). Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press. 1985.

Box 2, Folder A48

“Thymic hormones.”

Scope and Content Note

A current paper following up Sidney Roberts' primary observation in laboratory of Professor White.
Box 2, Folder A49

Discussion of Dr. Louis Levin's paper at Laurentian Hormone Conference. 1951.

Scope and Content Note

[Paper appeared in] Recent Progress in Hormone Research (vol.7, p.399). 1952.
Defense of our data on growth hormone-induced fat mobilization during fasting being independent of the presence of the adrenal.
Box 2, Folder A50

Clipping illustrating current interest in growth hormone as a fat-mobilizing, protein (muscle)-sparing substance.

Box 2, Folder A51

Part 1) Leo T. Samuels. Obituary.

Box 2, Folder A51

Part 2) Leo T. Samuels. Memorial.

Scope and Content Note

Introduced here in context with his final academic position as Chairman, Department of Biochemistry, University of Utah School of Medicine.
See also, detailed section on LTS in Historical Research Notes, Notebook IV, as well as notes on Barbara Petrie Samuels, ibid.
Box 2, Folder A52

Part 1) Dolores Drive-in Restaurant: Newsclipping, Los Angeles Times. May 28, 1980.

Box 2, Folder A52

Part 2) View of Westwood village. 1953. Ibid. July 5, 1987.

Box 2, Folder A52

Part 3) Early photograph of UCLA campus, reproduced in 1983 UCLA catalog.

Box 2, Folder A52

Part 4. Documentation that Bratskeller was indeed formerly a Ralphs supermarket, Los Angeles Times. June 23, 1988.

Box 2, Folder A53

Part 1) Commemoration of 25th anniversary of founding of the Biomedical Library, UCLA.

Box 2, Folder A53

Part 2) Naming of the Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library building.

Scope and Content Note

See also, A64, below.
Box 2, Folder A54

Part 1) Portrait, Harry J. Deuel, Jr.

Box 2, Folder A54

Part 2) Photograph, Roslyn Alfin-Slater.

Box 2, Folder A54

Part 3) Obituary, Max S. Dunn.

Box 2, Folder A54

Part 4. Obituary, Anthonie Van Harreveld.

Box 2, Folder A55

Framed photograph, Boris Krichesky, on LS 4203 wall.

Scope and Content Note

Photograph taken by Ansel Adams at UCLA during his tour of the U.C. campuses in 1966, reproduced from the exhibit Ansel Adams: Fiat Lux.

Note

This photograph was taken from the precise angle of the balcony of the old Physics/Biology Building from which, about 1949 or '50, I watched the crowning of the homecoming queen on the quadrangle below by Provost Dykstra.
Photograph reproduced in the UCLA Magazine, Summer 1991.
Box 3, Folder A56

Bound reprints, Boris Krichesky.

Scope and Content Note

Inserted in front is a duplicate of the above photograph.
Box 3, Folder A57

Portrait, H.W. Magoun.

Box 3, Folder A58

Newsclippings, James A. Halstead and Anna Roosevelt Halstead.

Box 3, Folder A59

Reminiscences of members of the Department of Zoology and other colleagues, concluding with obituary, Raymond B. Cowles, Nature (vol.261, p.441). 1976.

Box 3, Folder A60

Reminiscences of Bennet M. Allen's life and work. Brain Research Institute Bulletin. Fall 1981.

Box 3, Folder A61

Part 1) Obituary, Bennet M. Allen; In Memoriam, University of California. 1965.

Box 3, Folder A61

Part 2) Bound reprints, Bennet M. Allen.

Box 4, Folder A62

Obituary, Elmer Belt.

Box 4, Folder A63

Memorial service, Olga Bors; news clipping, Ernest Bors; letter of acknowledgment from latter.

Box 4, Folder A64

Photograph on occasion of acquisition of the 100,000th volume of the Biomedical Library.

Box 4, Folder A65

Julian and Joanne Ganz, newsclipping.

Box 4, Folder A66

UCLA Weekly Calendar. November 15, 1951.

Box 4, Folder A67

UCLA Weekly Calendar. November 30, 1952.

Box 4, Folder A68

News releases re plasma protein carriers of steroid hormones.

Scope and Content Note

Including:
  • Chemical & Engineering News, December 15, 1952, p.5272.
  • Los Angeles Times. November 1952.
  • A press release from Science Service.
Also, some correspondence regarding limitations of popularized versions of scientific advances.
Box 4, Folder A69

Inaugural Ceremony, UCLA Medical Center. November 2, 1951.

Box 4, Folder A70

Early history of the UCLA Medical School in International Medical Digest. September 1969.

Box 4, Folder A71

Hippocratic Oath Ceremony, first medical class. 1955.

Box 4, Folder A72

Part 1) “Under the Cloud; the Decades of Nuclear Testing,” by Richard L. Miller. Book Review Section, Los Angeles Times. September 28, 1986.

Box 4, Folder A72

Part 2) The UCLA Reactor. Daily Bruin. September 30, 1986.

Box 4, Folder A73

Part 1) Ciba Award Citation, Endocrinology (vol.53, pp.120-121). 1953.

Box 4, Folder A73

Part 2) Announcement in University Buleltin. June 29, 1953.

Box 4, Folder A73

Part 3) Note from Dean Paul Dodd and response.

Box 4, Folder A73

Part 4. Interview, Los Angeles Times.

Box 4, Folder A73

Part 5) Interview, Daily Bruin. October 2, 1953.

Box 4, Folder A74

“Some Nonhydrolytic Constituents Sequestered in Primary Lysosomes.”

Scope and Content Note

Projection slide used in teaching and in speaking engagements
Most recent version from a seminar in the Department of Zoology, U.C. Berkeley. May 6, 1988.
Box 4, Folder A75

Some minimum examples of research memoranda, distribution of research problems among the members of the group (designated by initials), and indications of the interrelations among the several otherwise independent problems.

Scope and Content Note

Some of this material reveals the gradual evolution of the concept of lysosomal participation in propagation of agonal signals.
A relatively recent summary of this concept is presented in Figure 5 of paper no.151 in CMS bibliography.
Box 4, Folder A75

Part 1) Précis of one “10-year program.”

Box 4, Folder A75

Part 2) Research Memoranda.

Physical Description: (Notebook)

Scope and Content Note

Compiled in progressive fashion, often with copies to specific laboratory personnel, on ideas for advances in laboratory and integration of findings -- our own and those of others -- into evolving hypotheses.
Box 4, Folder A75

Part 3) Dedication of a research paper by Robert Ezzell.

Box 4, Folder A76

Estrogen-dervivatized fiber (diagrammatic).

Box 4, Folder A77

Time course of uterine response to estradiol-17B.

Scope and Content Note

This presentation of what is manifestly a continuum, constitutes Fig. 3 of the review in International review of cytology (1984), and was current at that time.
As noted in the Legend, preceding versions have been revised regularly, as new and still newer data have appeared.
Box 4, Folder A77

Part 1) Letter from Professor A.E. Mirsky.

Scope and Content Note

Commenting on the significance of our observations on perinuclear clustering and intranuclear penetration of lysosomes triggered by steroid hormones.
Box 4, Folder A77

Part 2) Front cover illustration of General Zoology textbook by Claude Villee, (C.A. Saunders. 1978).

Physical Description: (Photocopy)

Scope and Content Note

[The illustration] was a photomicrograph of a preovulatory oocyte of the rat, taken with Nomarski ( sic) optics by Robert M. Ezzell in my laboratory in course of our work on lysosomal participation in the action of luteinizing hormone.
Box 4, Folder A78

Parts 1 and 2) Guggenheim Fellowship awards to SR and CMS. 1956.

Box 4, Folder A78

Part 3) Woman of the Year Award. The Los Angeles Times. 1957.

Box 4, Folder A78

Part 3a) Photograph in my laboratory by Times staff photographer.

Box 4, Folder A78

Part 4. Woman of Science Award, UCLA Medical Center. UCLA Bulletin. July 3, 1961; Note from President Clark Kerr, and update. June 8, 1988, in The Los Angeles Herald-Examiner.

Box 4, Folder A78

Part 5) A touching congratulatory note from a member of the (then) Royce Hall typing pool (who had typed many of my manuscripts).

Box 4, Folder A78

Part 6) Los Angeles Times write-up of 18 Woman of Science awardees between the years 1959 and 1971.

Scope and Content Note

With photographs, as identified in the accompanying text, that includes many valued colleagues.

Note

“Clearly, UCLA was not entirely devoid of capable women faculty in that period.”
Box 4, Folder A79

Part 1) Profile of Sidney Roberts. Brain Research Bulletin (vol.1, no.2). Spring 1977.

Box 4, Folder A79

Commentary on SR research activities. UCLA Weekly. April 28, 1975.

Box 4, Folder A79

Part 1a) Program, BRI Tenth Anniversary Reunion. July 6-8, 1972.

Box 4, Folder A79

Part 2) Neurotransmitter studies by Sidney Roberts' laboratory. Medicine at UCLA (vol.5, no.1). Winter 1982.

Box 4, Folder A79

Part 3) Greenberg,S.M. et al. “Molecular mechanisms in intermediate memory,” Nature (vol.329, pp.62-65). 1987.

Scope and Content Note

I chose this as an isolated example of a field in neurobiology which Sidney Roberts' laboratory helped to open and establish.
Box 4, Folder A79

Part 4) “Mental illness moves into the genetics lab” (Editorial). Nature (vol.333, p.108). 12 May 1988.

Scope and Content Note

This current view, so far from the consideration of mental illness as a psychiatric domain, was foreseen by SR in an insightful book:

Note

cf. also, other sections of Part 4.
Box 4, Folder A79

Part 5) The Genetic Load. This was drafted during a sabbatical-in-residence in 1971.

Scope and Content Note

This manuscript, which was indeed far ahead of its time (see Table of Contents), was never submitted for publication because final editing was inevitably postponed, due to the heavy pressure of resumed academic and research responsibilities. SR carried an extraordinarily full schedule of teaching in regulatory biochemistry (third quarter of the medical course, which he taught alone), and also cellular/molecular neurobiochemistry (for graduate students in all the biological sciences). On taking early retirement in 1986, SR was replaced in the third quarter medical course by thirteen separate lecturers!
Box 4, Folder A79

Part 6) Sidney Roberts, CV and Publications List.

Box 4, Folder A79

Part 7. Continuing record of distinguished University service.

Scope and Content Note

viz., Budget Committee (since split into two major Senate Committees, the Planning Council and the Council on Academic Personnel “CAP”); Chairman, Committee on Committees; Chairman, Committee on Privilege and Tenure; Chairman, Committee on Academic Policy; elected to post of Chairman-Elect, Academic Senate. 1988-89; Chairman. 1989-90.
Box 5, Folder A80

Bulletin of the London Hospital, in the East (and most bombed-out) End. 1957.

Scope and Content Note

The teaching hospital in which we spent our Guggenheim Fellowship-aided sabbatical in the Department of Experimental Biochemistry with Professor C.J.O.R. Morris.
Box 5, Folder A81

Congratulatory note from “Padre” (Professor Loye Holmes Miller) on attaining the full professorship.

Box 5, Folder A82

Letter from Professor David H. Solomon. October 17, 1986, reminiscing about his sabbatical year in my laboratory in 1960.

Box 5, Folder A83

“Confrontation” (Poem).

Scope and Content Note

Written in response to the tear-gassing (from helicopters) of Berkeley students protesting the Vietnam war.
Box 5, Folder A84

“Spirited Exchange on a UCLA Bulletin Board”

Box 5, Folder A84

Part 1) Holographic originals, some on scraps of paper, as actually posted.

Box 5, Folder A84

Part 2) As later transcribed.

Box 5, Folder A85

Obituary, Josiah Brown.

Box 5, Folder A86

Molecular Endocrinology (vol.1, no.1). January 1987.

Scope and Content Note

To illustrate the vigorous growth of the molecular/cellular aspects of the field, ironically, just as the Department of Biology at UCLA has effectively abandoned it, by administrative fiat, turning it over from Division I (in which I had functioned) to Division II (behavioral/evolutionary biology), where its currently explosive potential cannot be realized. I have protested this retrogressive action, which was undertaken immediately following my retirement without consultation with Division I, in a letter to Vice-Chancelllor Horowitz dated February 25, 1987, the primary thrust of which was another matter (see A95, below).
I also note, ruefully, that the Five-Year Review of the Department of Biology, which was conducted jointly by itself, by the Graduate Council, and by several distinguished outside examiners, and which was just released (June, 1988), echoes these comments in the extramural section. My déja vu feelings may be appreciated on reading sections of the Oral History transcript, which address my early struggle within the Department to focus my research energies on molecular and cellular aspects of endocrine regulation, in keeping with my training and my judgment of the future directions of the field, rather than upon the descriptive (comparative/behavioral) areas that some members judged “more biologically relevant.”
Box 5, Folder A87

Collected correspondence and newspaper clippings, together with current updates.

Scope and Content Note

[Documents] effort, while on Public Affairs Committee of the Endocrine Society, to eliminate the use of the powerful synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES), in cattle feed and in poultry.
Box 5, Folder A88

George C. Szego, Ph.D. Write-ups in national periodicals:

Box 5, Folder A88

Part 1) The Washingtonian. April 1974.

Box 5, Folder A88

Part 2) Newsweek. November 8, 1976.

Box 5, Folder A88

Part 3) Forbes. January 23, 1978.

Box 5, Folder A88

Part 4) Business Week. October 9, 1978.

Box 5, Folder A88

Part 5) The White House News release. July 22, 1980: appointed member of the President's Council for Energy Efficiency, an honorary post for the purpose of encouraging citizen effort at conservation.

Physical Description: (The original journals for Parts 2-4 follow the photocopies of the relevant excerpts).
Box 5, Folder A88

Part 6) G.C. Szego: CV as of 1989.

Box 5, Folder A89

Part 1) G.C. Szego lecture at the Rubey Colloquium, School of Engineering, UCLA. February 13, 1980.

Physical Description: (Reel-to-reel tape)
Box 5, Folder A89

Part 2) Illustrations for above, presented as projected slides during the lecture.

Box 5, Folder A89

Part 3) Correspondence and background.

Box 5, Folder A89

Part 4) Letter of 28 April, 1978.

Box 5, Folder A89

Part 5) G.C. Szego, Teaching and related functions.

Box 6, Folder A89

Part 6) G.C. Szego, Further seminar on planetary energy problems.

Box 5, Folder A90

Part 1) Letter to Jack Gorski and colleagues. February 20, 1987.

Box 5, Folder A90

Part 2) Enclosures to above.

Box 5, Folder A90

Part 3) Gorski's reply. April 4, 1987.

Box 5, Folder A90

Part 4) My response. May 11, 1987.

Note

(See, also, sections entitled, Matters Arising and Record Straight in Historical Research Notes Notebook 6. Much additional correspondence in other Notebooks, representative samples from the voluminous amount in the original files (which had to be discarded for reasons of space), is not in the least contentious.
Box 5, Folder A91

Parts 1-2) 2 Tables.

Scope and Content Note

  • Part 1) “Postulated dichotomy in modes of action of steroid and peptide hormones.”
  • Part 2) “Parallels in modes of action of lipid and peptide agonists.”
In slide-projection form, the above Tables have been regularly updated and have constituted illustrations for teaching and seminar purposes. The data upon which the Tables are based were gradually accumulated over years, and have been utilized in published reviews enunciating the concept of parallels in the modes of action of steroid and peptide hormones (e.g., no.100, 111, 127, 137, 144, 148, and 151 of CMS bibliography).
Box 5, Folder A91

Part 3) Program of the International Congress of Cell Biology, Montreal. August, 1988.

Scope and Content Note

See list of Symposia (highlighted), re peptide hormone entry into target cells, so long denied and now generally acknowledged.
Box 5, Folder A92

Part 1) “Do hormones work by spilling packets of enzymes?” (editorial). New Scientist and Science Journal. 2 September, 1971.

Physical Description: (p.501)
Box 5, Folder A92

Part 2) My response in note to Editor.

Box 5, Folder A93

Interview in California Sun. December 8, 1967.

Box 5, Folder A94

Summary of written comments by anonymous (to me) extramural referees on my international scientific reputation. Provided by Chairman J. Philip Thornber in a letter of 13 March, 1984.

Box 6, Folder A95

Portions of my dossier available to me and file of correspondence with the Administration in course of the consideration of my eligibility for advancement to the Above/Scale Professorship.

Box 6, Folder A96

Tape recording, decomissioning ceremony for Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Endocrinology, Department of Biology. September 30, 1985.

Note

Regrettably, the reproduction is poor.
Box 5, Folder A96'

Correspondence re my appointment to Council on Academic Personnel.

Box 5, Folder A97

Part 1) Studio photograph of SR ca. 1963, and bookplate designed by CMS, which indicates the wide range of his intellectual interests.

Box 6, Folder A97

Part 2) Photograph of SR at his desk at his CHS office. ca. 1986.

Box 6, Folder A98

Humorous invitations for social occasions, joint laboratories of SR and CMS.

Box 6, Folder A99

Part 1) New Yorker cartoon, “She must have come to terms with Something.”

Box 6, Folder A99

Part 2) New Yorker cartoon, “But that's what you said yesterday; “just one more cord!”

 

Miscellaneous Addenda

Box 6, Folder A100

Election to Hall of Fame, Hunter College. May 1987.

Boxes 7-8, Folder A101 (1-3), A101 (4)

Collected Reprints.

Physical Description: (4 vol., bound)
Box 8, Folder A102

Part 1) Sample of two lectures by CMS in the Advanced Endocrinology course, student tape recording. April 4, 1979.

Scope and Content Note

After the preliminary announcements which are not audibly clear, the topic of receptors is considered and the recording quality is good.
Box 8, Folder A102

Part 2) A few student-taped class lectures.

Box 8, Folder A103

Ph.D. students, CMS.

Box 8, Folder A104 #1

Notebooks 1-6, labeled “Historical Research Notes.”

Scope and Content Note

Containing selected correspondence and professional memorabilia, roughly indexed with the aid of a student assistant (a few relatively recent additions have not been indexed).
Box 9, Folder A104

Notebooks 2-3.

Box 10, Folder A104

Notebooks 4-6.

Box 11, Folder A105

An example of humorous output of one of the earliest computers at UCLA in the office of Dr. Robert Tachirgi, then Professor of PHysiology, UCLA, presently, Professor of Neurosciences, UC San Diego.

Box 11, Folder A106

Faculty and their research fields, Department of Biology. ca. 1983.

Box 11, Folder A107

Department of Biological Chemistry, UCLA School of Medicine. ca. 1963

Box 11, Folder A108

Some photographs of UCLA colleagues, past and present.

 

Further Addenda to Guide to Appendix

Note

Oral History, Clara M. Szego
(Added February 1994)
 

Miscellaneous Correspondence and Notes

Box 11, Folder A109

Letter from Professor Donald D. Mossman. December 24, 1984.

Note

One of his last. He died on February 20, 1989.
Box 11, Folder A109

Letter from Dr. Pourreau, Marseilles, re her recent publication confirming our work on surface effects of estrogen.

Box 11, Folder A109

Letter to Jeanne Williams, Administrative Assistant to Deans Stafford Warren and later to Sherman Mellinkoff, on her retirement.

Box 11, Folder A109

Letter to Louise Darling on the occasion of the naming of the Biomedical Library, and her reply.

Box 11, Folder A109

Letter from Dr. Michael N. Moore, Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK, and reprint, on the subject of lysosomal function as related to our work.

Box 11, Folder A109

Correspondence with Professor Roy O. Greep of The American Physiological Society on an article of his about the early investigations on steroid hormones.

Box 11, Folder A109

Letters from Professor Walter L. Davis, on mutual research interests and expressing his generous comments on confirmation of aspects of our work.

Box 11, Folder A109

Letter to Professor Tommie Sue Montgomery, Agnes Scott College, and her reply.

Box 11, Folder A109

My commentary on the gender gap in the Faculty Research Lectureships, and its rectification under the Academic Senate chairmanship of Sidney Roberts.

Box 11, Folder A109

Letter to Chairman, Council on Budget and Planning, on Long Range Development Plan.

Box 11, Folder A109

Letter to C.R. Kleeman and associates re solicitation for assistance from the Hungarian Kidney Foundation in their field of kidney function (Dr. Franklin had been one of my earliest students and bottle washers).

Box 11, Folder A109

Los Angeles Times. January 31, 1990 re closing of the distinguished B. Altman Department Store, where I had a Saturday job during college.

Physical Description: (Clipping)
Box 11, Folder A109

Correspondence with Dr. R.B. B´n´ti of the Max Planck Institute re availability of our lysosomal monoclonal antibody.

Box 11, Folder A109

Letter to Dr. Vera Price, Permanente Medical Group, re her inquiry for leads on her research on trichothiodystrophy.

Box 11, Folder A109

Letters and notes from Russell M. Steinberg, Ph.D., M.D., one of my own doctoral students, including information on the career of Melvyn S. Soloff, another of my Ph.D. advisees.

Box 11, Folder A109

Dedication of a research paper in the Journal of Biological Chemistry by Robert M. Ezzell, M.A. student of mine.

Note

See also A75, Part 3.
Box 11, Folder A109

Correspondence with Lorne Brandes, Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology and attachment of two of his publications dedicated to me.

Box 11, Folder A109

Very heartwarming letter from James A. Roberts, a former “mentoree,” recounting recent advances in his career at the University of Michigan Medical School, including his promotion to full professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Box 11, Folder A109

Correspondence with Drs. Toby A. Appel and Roy Greep regarding historical notes for the American Physiological Societies Archives.

Box 11, Folder A109

Letter from Herman Kabe, Department of Biology photographic technical wizard, on his retirement.

Box 11, Folder A109

Correspondence, notes, official program, etc., on my participation in the International Symposium on the “New Biology of Steroid Hormones,” sponsored by the Serono Foundation in Budapest. September 1990.

Box 11, Folder A109

Correspondence with Professor John Szent´gothai, President of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, on a rather mundane matter--nevertheless, with some sharply humorous side-remarks on matters politico-cultural.

Box 11, Folder A109

Summary of Budapest trip and Symposium in UCLA Emeriti Newsletter, with some notes on Hungarian history and the then current scene.

Box 11, Folder A109

Letter from Professor George V. Avvakumov, Institute of Organic Chemistry, Byelorussian Academy of Sciences, a copy of which was sent with a covering letter to Dr. Pentti Siiteri.

Box 11, Folder A109

Correspondence with Dr. Miguel Trueba, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Bilbao, Spain, on the subject of a sabbatical year in my (then nonexistent) laboratory.

Note

A comparable request from a young investigator at the University of Queensland was also regretfully declined.
Box 11, Folder A109

Correspondence with representative officials of the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, with special reference to the extraordinary value of the 1956-57 Fellowship award.

Box 11, Folder A109

Response to UCLA Emeriti Center Annual Bio-Bibliography form. 1989-90.

Box 11, Folder A109

Letter of condolence to widow of Mr. Arch O'Bryant, retired from his longtime and highly respected position in the UCLA Facilities Management Division, who was killed while working in his own garage by two thug assailants.

Box 11, Folder A109

Letter from Dr. Steven Novak regarding early research with LSD, and notes on telephone resolution of his inquiry.

Box 11, Folder A109

Program of the 48th annual Laurentian Hormone Conference. 1991, with participation as a featured speaker of former student, Barbara M. Lippe, presently chairman of the Division of Endocrinology, UCLA Department of Pediatrics. Also, a memento of her lecture tour of Japan on another occasion.

Box 11, Folder A109

Note from Richard J. Sherins, M.D., also former student.

Box 11, Folder A109

Note from Barbara J. Seeler, my chief laboratory technician for more than 17 years, and my response to “my close comrade-at-arms as we fought our wars of enlightenment.”

Box 11, Folder A109

Letters from Valerie Tom, Pharm. D., former undergraduate student and my reply.

Box 11, Folder A109

Letter to Dean Kenneth I. Shine of the UCLA School of Medicine accepting the invitation to the reception for the Founding Faculty and Staff and including some unsolicited comments on the contributions of Sidney Roberts (who had just undergone aortic valve replacement surgery [v. i.], and whom I did not consult about the offered commentary for obvious reasons). Responses from Professors Longmire and Madden, who received copies of my letter, attached.

Box 11, Folder A109

My letter to family and friends, reporting on Sidney's successful aortic valve replacement surgery.

Box 11, Folder A109

Correspondence with Dr. John A. McCracken, Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology, regarding nomination of Paul Lewis Munson for the Pincus Memorial Lectureship.

Scope and Content Note

Past recipients of this honor, which includes a large medallion in an inscribed presentation case, are listed in an enclosure to the letter soliciting nominations.
Box 11, Folder A109

Letters from Paul Munson, including invitation to provide the Estrogen chapter for his forthcoming massive pharmacology book, and my regretful refusal.

Box 11, Folder A109

Course Description, Biology 179 (Invertebrate Endocrinology) by UCLA colleague, Dr. Franz Engelmann.

Note

My wry response: “Sunk without a trace” refers to the field of cellular and molecular endocrinology in the Department.
Box 11, Folder A109

Flyer for reception on the acquisition of the 500,000th volume by the Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library.

Box 11, Folder A109

Correspondence with Ms. Eva Kulcsár about an exhibit, “Faces of the Nation,” including Hungarians in America.

Box 11, Folder A109

Invitation to participate in the Citizen Ambassador Program, as member of a delegation of endocrinologists to visit Russia, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia in May 1993. Declined.

Box 11, Folder A109

Invitation and follow-up correspondence from Dr. Koji Yoshinaga, Head, Reproductive Endocrinology Unit, Reproductive Sciences Branch, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to participate in an international symposium in which I was to provide the keynote address. Program and Abstract of my talk are appended. As will be noted from the correspondence, the symposium was designed around my own contributions to the field over a period of more than two decades, during which, despite its then “controversial” consideration by some, it was funded in large part by NICHD. (Parenthetically, I am appending in this context two anonymous reviews of our manuscript submitted to American Journal of Physiology. 1987, which clearly reveal awareness of the “dogged patience” that had been required to document over the years a new and unbiased approach to rapid responses to hormones by their cellular targets.).

Box 11, Folder A109

Letters from colleagues following the above presentation.

Scope and Content Note

These include a note from the distinguished Professor Donald S. Coffey of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, undated except for the postmark on the envelope and the obvious context, and also a letter from a more junior colleague, Dr. Donald DeFranco of the University of Pittsburgh. These are accompanied by my respective replies, which comment on the climate during the early period as the data on mechanisms of hormone action slowly accumulated. The new data, now so amply confirmed in independent investigations, simply could not be encompassed by the prevailing conventional, and rather hidebound, views of the time.
Box 11, Folder A109

Exchange of letters and reference to telephone conversation with the editorial staff of the bulletin, UC Focus, on the subject of the featured presentation at the above symposium. Brief summary of the event was denied publication.

Box 11, Folder A109

Congratulatory note regarding my participation in the above NIHCHD symposium from Professor William R. Clark, Chairman, Division I (Cellular and Molecular) of the Department of Biology, UCLA and my reply.

Box 11, Folder A109

Exchange of letters with Dr. Dale W. Johnson, colleague from graduate student days at the University of Minnesota, and husband of the late Dr. Zelda Ball, one of my two roomates during graduate school (the other being Helen Colarich, mentioned in the correspondence, and cited on pp. 218 and 240 in the text). Johnson appears on P. 412 of the text.

Box 11, Folder A109

Exchange of letters with Professor Béla Flerkó, former Chairman, Department of Anatomy, University of Pécs School of Medicine.

Box 11, Folder A109

Elected to the Executive Committee, UCLA Emeriti Association for a 2-year term. 1993-95.

Box 11, Folder A109

Recent consultations by telephone on a range of scientific subjects solicited by:

Box 11, Folder A110

Dr. James R. Zabrecky, Applied bioTechnology, Inc.

Box 11, Folder A109

Dr. David Zava, Aeron Biotech, Inc.

Box 11, Folder A109

Dr. Elaine Mulvihill, Zymo Genetics, Inc.

Box 11, Folder A109

Professor Lawrence Gilbert, Department of Biology, University of North Carolina.

Box 11, Folder A109

Professor Bonnie Sloane, Department of Pharmacology, Wayne State University.

Box 11, Folder A110

Supplement to Notebook VI, which was labeled “Record Straight” and constituted part of original Addendum A104

Scope and Content Note

This is composed of a series of letters to investigators pointing out errors of fact, misquotations, misinterpretations, and misguided conclusions in certain of their publications.
I have tried, over the years, to keep the tone of these coolly constructive, yet collegial (e.g., letter to Baulieu). Although often mild and even jocular (e.g., letter to Stumpf), they were occasionally quite stern, as befitted the specific circumstances (e.g., letters to Lefebvre and to Wehling. One such letter, addressed to eager medical student researcher, Lesly Davidson who had contacted me originally, was designed to provide a learning experience in scientific honesty. Since our ideas are our own mark, I did not accept their appropriation without citation, nor their misquotation without due protest. Where relevant, copies of the te culpa letter were sent to the appropriate editor, which, it was hoped, would discourage similar lapses in future publications in the specific journal. I simply did not tolerate intellectual dishonesty, including that involving suppression of the facts.
Included in this recent array of such correspondence are the following:
Box 11, Folder A110

Lesly Davidson, Eastern Virginia Medical School.

Box 11, Folder A110

Yvonne Lefebvre, University of Ottawa.

Box 11, Folder A110

Etienne-Emile Baulieu, Universite de Paris Sud (NB: his annual Christmas cards).

Box 11, Folder A110

H. Leon Bradlow, Institute for Hormone Research, New York.

Box 11, Folder A110

Alan Tobin, Department of Biology, UCLA.

Box 11, Folder A110

Miguel Trueba, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Bilbao, Spain.

Box 11, Folder A110

Walter E. Stumpf, University of North Carolina. Note his generous response, and that of his co-worker, Duane Bronson.

Box 11, Folder A110

Frederick Naftolin, Chairman, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yale University School of Medicine. He had been one of my own undergraduate students.

Box 11, Folder A110

Martin Wehling and Co-workers, University of Munich. His rather contrite reply and my further response.

Scope and Content Note

As police chief Claude Rains said to nightclub owner Rick (Humphrey Bogart) as they walked away from the airport, arm in arm, in the closing scene of Casablanca, “This may be the beginning of a beautiful friendship.”
Box 11, Folder A110

Another method for “keeping the record straight” is the Letter to the Editor of New England Journal of Physiology. April, 1990.

Box 11, Folder A110

Cordial comments to a colleague who has strongly confirmed some of our findings, giving some background on why our views were so long in overcoming negative conventional wisdom.

Scope and Content Note

This is illustrated by the attached letter to Dr. Julia Barsony, NIH, who had told me by phone beforehand that when she took some of her new supportive data to her mentor, the late Dr. Gerald Aurbach, he asked her whether she would have the stamina to fight the uphill battle that I had to undertake. Similar observations occur in my exchange with Dr. Duane Bronson, above, who reported a precisely parallel discussion with his mentor, Dr. Walter Stumpf.
Box 11, Folder A111

Recently acquired supplemental information re the original “Guide to Appendix” and/or recent developments appearing in the press that bear on subjects designated by A-numbers in the “Guide.”

Scope and Content Note

Here, these supplementary data will be cited in the order of the original mention of the topic, either by A-numbers or, in certain cases, by page numbers in the Oral History text.
Box 11, Folder A111

Letter from Gene Fried (née Gene Watwood, as she was known at Manumit School), written in April 1990 from her Quito, Ecuador, home.

Scope and Content Note

Commenting on her recollections of incidents at the school. These are highlighted in the letter, which is otherwise non-contributory.

Note

See Box 1 (A6), Report from Manumit School.
Box 11, Folder A111

Undated letter, received June 13, 1988, from Bette Weadon (she prefers to be called Liz Robbins, the latter her married name).

Scope and Content Note

Clarifying our exchange in the Yearbook at the time of our graduation from Bay Ridge High School, about which I had grave remorseful recollections for the intervening years.
My exculpatory statement was, as documented by her generous photocopy of the page in the Yearbook, “(P.S. I always managed to think of dumb things to say in History Class...no hard feelings--now or ever.) Sincerely, C.” This non sequitur and the warmth of our communication over the years have partly assuaged my guilt.

Note

See Box 1 (A9), Bay Ridge High School records.
The episode appears on pp.70-73 of the Oral History text.
Box 11, Folder A111

Further data on M.C. Chang: my memoir written for his memorial service on October 12, 1991.

Scope and Content Note

Includes many recollections of the early struggles at the Worcester Foundation, and resultant correspondence.

Note

See Box 2 (A38), M.C. Chang, credentials and family.
Box 11, Folder A111

Review of a biography of Tom Slick by Loren Coleman, which appeared in Nature (vol.343, p.422) ,1990.

Note

See Box 2 (A39), Memorandum to Tom Slick.
Box 11, Folder A111

Interview with opera soprano Christine Weidinger. Los Angeles Times. April 6, 1991.

Scope and Content Note

The section highlighted is the relevant one.

Note

See Szego Oral History (300/313): et seq of Oral History text re childlessness by choice (p.481); see, also, p.139.
Box 11, Folder A111

Revelations, by Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary in December 1993/January 1994 of the appalling nuclear experimentations during the immediate postwar period and thereafter on human subjects without their knowledge or informed consent, were riveting.

Scope and Content Note

These inexcusable procedures were part and parcel of the reckless abandon with which atmospheric and underground nuclear testing were carried out, without regard for environmental consequences, under the blanket justification of the assumed Soviet threat. The newest revelations further verify my concerns about the rise in isotopic background in 1949 and thereafter, without any official acknowledgment or explanation.

Note

See Box 4 (A72), Parts 1 and 2.
See, also, Oral History text (300/313), pp.508-09
Box 11, Folder A111

Undated Los Angeles Times article, illustrated by a group photograph, of the “Women in Science” awardees, probably about 1961.

Note

See Box 4 (A78), Parts 1 and 2.
Box 11, Folder A111

Commentary by the distinguished bacterial geneticist, F.W. Stahl on then recent speculations on apparent environmental influences on mechanisms of genetic mutation. Nature (vol.346, p.791). 1990.

Scope and Content Note

Stahl called attention to some comments by Max Delbrück in 1946, “...One should keep in mind the possible occurrence of specifically induced adaptive mutations.” Predating the latter suggestion was the landmark paper, which constituted but one of the several that were to result from Sidney Roberts' doctoral investigations, formally introducing this concept in the context of metabolic adaptation in mammalian organisms to substrate concentration: Roberts, S. and L.T. Samuels, “The Influence of Previous Diet on the Preferential Utilization of Foodstuffs. I. Fasting Ketosis and Nitrogen Excretion as Related to the Fat Content of the Preceding Diet.” Journal of Biological Chemistry 151 (vol.151, pp.267-271). 1943.

Note

See Box 4 (A79).
Box 11, Folder A111

Point of View. Fall 1992.

Scope and Content Note

Here, the newly-appointed Dean of the UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television, grossly misquot[es] Dickens in an interview!
Another example of my efforts, by means of the bulletin board outside my office, at social consciousness raising and encouragement of humanistic attitudes by science undergraduates and other passers-by.
My commentary: ”What's wrong with his first sentence? A shiny nickel to anyone who knows.“ Although I had several responses on notes slipped under my door, no one 'got it'! (The ”Correction“ printed in a subsequent issue, attached, attributed the error to the unknown editor--or, off with his head!).

Note

See Box 4 (A84), “Spirited exchange on a UCLA bulletin board.”
Box 11, Folder A111

Recent articles from The Los Angeles Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post re reopening of the public health problem of dietary estrogen contamination.

Scope and Content Note

Also appended are a letter to my brother George, who had sent me the latter clipping without realizing that I had been involved with the early efforts to prevent abrogation of the Delaney Clause. Also, a letter to Dr. John A. McLachlan, who had mounted the Conference described in The Washington Post article. These are self explanatory.
This arose through the early practice of injection of the hormone, usually in the form of the synthetic compound, diethylstilbestrol, into the necks of chickens and cattle in the form of pellets, and later, added in powdered form to their feed, in order to promote more weight gain per unit of feed. This practice was limited for some years, through invocation of the Delaney clause, which prohibited any measurable concentration of the hormone in the terminal food product. The meat packers and the poultry industry fought this interdiction avidly, but it stood until very recently, when much agitation is being brought to bear on abandonment of the Delaney clause in the name of the bottom line.

Note

See Box 5 (A87).
See Oral history (300/313), p.664.
Box 11, Folder A111

Annual report of the UCLA Senate Committee on Privilege and Tenure, summarizing certain errors in the academic promotion review process and listing the rights of faculty under consideration for promotion in monitoring the accuracy and completeness of the dossier.

Scope and Content Note

Many of the latter rights were neglected in the case of my proposed promotion to the above-scale professorship, which had been denied, with serious prejudicial error, primarily on erroneous grounds.

Note

See Box 5 (A95), dossier and correspondence.
Box 11, Folder A111

Colleagues past and present, with obituaries of some.

Note

See Box 11 (A108), Photographs.