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Finding Aid to the Carol Tarlen and David Joseph Papers 1977-2010 SFH 73
SFH 73  
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Collection Details
 
Table of contents What's This?
  • Access
  • Publication Rights
  • Preferred Citation
  • Provenance
  • Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements note
  • Biographical/Historical note
  • Related Materials
  • Scope and Contents
  • Arrangement

  • Title: Carol Tarlen and David Joseph Papers
    Collection Identifier: SFH 73
    Contributing Institution: San Francisco History Center, San Francisco Public Library
    100 Larkin Street
    San Francisco, CA 94102
    (415) 557-4567
    info@sfpl.org
    Physical Description: 3 cartons, 3 manuscript boxes (4.25 linear feet)
    Date (inclusive): 1977-2010
    Abstract: Chiefly typescripts of poetry, fiction, essays, reviews and criticism by Carol Tarlen and her partner/husband, David Joseph; together with a small amount of personal papers and publications. Joseph's papers include files related to his editorial and translation work. Many of Tarlen's files were collected or compiled by Joseph in preparation for their posthumous publication.
    Physical Location: The collection is stored onsite.
    Languages represented: The bulk of the collection is in English, with a few files in Spanish.
    Creator: Joseph, David
    Creator: Tarlen, Carol

    Access

    The collection is available for use during San Francisco History Center hours, with photographs available during Photo Desk hours. Collections that are stored offsite should be requested 48 hours in advance.

    Publication Rights

    All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the City Archivist. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the San Francisco Public Library as the owner of the physical items. Copyright is retained by the donor and his family members in perpetuity.

    Preferred Citation

    [Identification of item], Carol Tarlen and David Joseph Papers (SFH 73), San Francisco History Center, San Francisco Public Library.

    Provenance

    Donated in two accessions by David Joseph in July 2009 and May 13, 2010.

    Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements note

    870 files (31.7MB) of electronic files (mostly Microsoft Word 97-2003) in the collection were received on CD-R. Preservation copies have been made and stored on the Library's internal hard drive, and a set of public access copies has been stored on a flash drive and added to the collection.

    Biographical/Historical note

    Carol Tarlen was a San Francisco working class poet and writer, as well as a union, labor, and peace activist, who died in 2004. She was married to writer and poet David Joseph, her collaborator and partner.

    Related Materials

    See also the blog from 2009, Carol Tarlen Lives .

    Scope and Contents

    Chiefly typescripts and drafts of poetry, fiction, essays, reviews and criticism by Carol Tarlen and her partner and husband, David Joseph; together with a small amount of personal papers and publications. Many of Tarlen's files were collected or compiled by Joseph in preparation for their posthumous publication.
    Joseph's papers include files related to his editorial and translation work. Significant files include those of Working Classics magazine; a small number of files on writer colleagues; and files documenting Tarlen and Joseph's travels and correspondence in Nicauragua in the 1980s. Also included are a large number of blog entries by Joseph from 2008-2010.

    Arrangement

    The collection is divided into Series 1: Carol Tarlen Papers; and Series 2: David Joseph Papers. Each series is arranged by type of material; manuscripts and typescripts within each series are arranged by genre, then alphabetically by title.

    Subjects and Indexing Terms

    Joseph, David -- Archives
    Tarlen, Carol -- Archives
    San Francisco (Calif.)--Social conditions
    Women writers.
    Working class writings, American.