Jump to Content

Collection Guide
Collection Title:
Collection Number:
Get Items:
Finding Aid to the John Dewar Correspondence and Catalog MS.715
MS.715  
View entire collection guide What's This?
PDF (76.77 Kb) HTML
Search this collection
Collection Details
 
Table of contents What's This?
  • Custodial History
  • Biographical Note
  • Scope and Contents
  • Preferred citation
  • Processing history
  • Acquisition
  • Use
  • Access

  • Title: John Dewar Correspondence and Catalog
    Identifier/Call Number: MS.715
    Contributing Institution: Autry National Center, Braun Research Library
    Language of Material: English
    Physical Description: 0.1 linear feet (2 folders)
    Date (inclusive): 1941-1975
    Abstract: John Dewar received a B.A. and an M.A. from Mexico City College, and went on to curate in Western Art, History, and Film History at the Southwest Museum, William S. Hart Museum, and Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. This collection of papers includes John Dewar's correspondence, including some with Don C. Talayesva, and a hand-written catalog of Dewar's ethnographic collection which he deposited at the Southwest Museum in 1941.
    creator: Dewar, John
    creator: Talayesva, Don C., b. 1890

    Custodial History

    John Dewar deposited a collection of artifacts, photographs, and papers into the Southwest Museum's care upon his term of military service, beginning June 5, 1941. Dewar intended full donation at a future date, and continued to make donations to the Museum and Library through 1985.

    Biographical Note

    John Dewar received a B.A. and an M.A. from Mexico City College, and went on to curate in Western Art, History, and Film History at the Southwest Museum, William S. Hart Museum, and Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. Dewar published many articles and contributed to many books on Western American Art and History. Dewar was born in South Pasadena, lived most of his professional life in Los Angeles, and died in Arizona.

    Scope and Contents

    This collection of papers includes John Dewar's correspondence and photocopies of correspondence, as well as a hand-written catalog of Dewar's ethnographic collection which he deposited at the Southwest Museum in 1941. The catalog contains notations on provenance, original drawings and watercolors, photographs, and postcards. The correspondence in this collection consists mostly of photocopies made in 1987 of correspondence between John Dewar and Don C. Talayesva between 1935 and 1949. There is also one original piece of correspondence dated 1975.

    Preferred citation

    John Dewar Correspondence and Catalog, 1941-1975, Braun Research Library Collection, Autry National Center, Los Angeles; MS.715; [folder number] [folder title][date].

    Processing history

    Processed by Library staff after 1981. Finding aid completed by Holly Rose Larson, NHPRC Processing Archivist, 2012 November 14, made possible through grant funding from the National Historical Publications and Records Commissions (NHPRC).

    Acquisition

    Donated by John Dewar, beginning 1941 June 5.

    Use

    Copyright has not been assigned to the Autry National Center. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Autry Archivist. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the Autry National Center as the custodian of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained by the reader.

    Access

    Collection is open for research. Appointments to view materials are required. To make an appointment please visit http://theautry.org/research/research-rules-and-application or contact library staff at rroom@theautry.org.

    Subjects and Indexing Terms

    Collier, John, 1884-1968
    Catalog of Ethnological Collections of John Dewar
    Catalogs
    Correspondence
    Hopi Indians
    Indians of North America -- Southwest, New
    Indians of North America -- Southwest, New -- Antiquities -- Collectors and collecting
    Navajo Indians