Cathy Cade Photographs Collection, 1972-2002

Finding aid prepared by Tim Wilson
James C. Hormel Gay & Lesbian Center, San Francisco Public Library
100 Larkin Street
San Francisco, CA, 94102
(415) 557-4400
info@sfpl.org
2002


Title: Cathy Cade Photographs Collection,
Date (inclusive): 1972-2002
Collection Identifier: GLC 41
Creator: Cade, Cathy, 1942-
Physical Description: 1 oversized box (25 photographic prints, black & white and color, 16 x 20 in. matted, some hand colored)
Contributing Institution: James C. Hormel Gay & Lesbian Center, San Francisco Public Library
100 Larkin Street
San Francisco, CA 94102
(415) 557-4567
info@sfpl.org
Abstract: Cathy Cade is an Oakland, California-based photographer. The collection contains images of lesbian mothering, GLBT demonstrations and Freedom Day parades, lesbians at work, and various age groups.
Physical Location: The collection is stored onsite.
Language of Materials: Collection materials are in English.

Access

The collection is available for viewing during Photo Desk hours: Tuesday: 1-5; Thursday: 1-5; Saturday: 10-12, 1-5.

Publication Rights

Retained by Cathy Cade.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Cathy Cade Photographs Collection (GLC 41), Gay and Lesbian Center, San Francisco Public Library.

Provenance

Donated by the Friends and Foundation of the San Francisco Public Library, 2002.

Biographical Note

Cathy Cade is an Oakland, California-based photographer who has been documenting the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender communities since the 1970s. She is the author, publisher and photographer of A Lesbian Photo Album: The Lives of Seven Lesbian Feminists (Oakland, Ca: Waterwomen Books, 1987).
Cade grew up during the advent of integration and participated in the Southern Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. She moved to the San Francisco Bay area in 1970 and was a part of the Women's Liberation Movement. During this time she came out as a lesbian and began to document the people and the movements around her. In the late 1970s she had her first child and in 1985 her second. During this time Cade worked on her book of photographs and interviews, A Lesbian Photo Album.
In the 1990s Cade taught photography in high school and learned to hand-color photos. Her "next day job was with a nonprofit that helps people with disabilities living in developing countries design and build wheelchairs. [She] attended the international women's conference in Beijing out of which has grown an international women's wheelchair building program. In the late 1990s [Cade] started leading a support group for artists." Biographical information above excerpted and quoted from www.CathyCade.com.

Scope and Contents

The collection contains 25 photographic prints (some hand-colored), chosen and arranged by the artist. The images cover lesbian mothering, demonstrations and freedom days, lesbian culture, lesbians at work, and generations of the lesbian community.

Arrangement

The photographs are grouped by subject and are in the order preferred by the photographer.

Subjects and Indexing Terms

Cade, Cathy, 1942- --Archives
Gay men--California--San Francisco Bay Area
Gays--California--San Francisco--Social life and customs--20th century--Photograph collections
Lesbians--California--San Francisco Bay Area
Lesbians--California--San Francisco--Social life and customs--20th century--Photograph collections
San Francisco (Calif.)--Social life and customs--20th century--Photograph collections

 

Lesbian Mothering

Physical Description: 7.0 images
Photograph 1

"Spooning," Oakland, Ca. (print made by Cathy Cade), 1979

Photograph 2

"Dana Gives Birth at Home," Albany, Ca. (print made by Mark Weaver, Photolab), 1989

Photograph 3

"Beach Bootie," West Marin County, Ca. (print made by Mark Weaver, Photolab), 1973

General note

An early gathering of lesbian mothers, their kids and friends.
Photograph 4

"Mothering with Muscles," San Francisco, Ca. (print made by Mark Weaver, Photolab), 1988

General note

Kimi, her daughter and her mother.
Photograph 5

"Rally for Jeanne Jullion and Portrait with Her Boys," San Francisco, 1977 and Berkeley, 1978 (print made by Cathy Cade) 1977-1978

See also:

"A Lesbian Mother Fights for Custody of Her Children" at end of finding aid.
Photograph 6

"Rochelle and Her Son Dance at Gay Pride," San Francisco (print made by Mark Weaver, Photolab), 1993

Photograph 7

"Transgendered Family," San Francisco (print made by Mark Weaver, Photolab), 1994

 

Demonstrations / Freedom Days

Physical Description: 8.0 images
Photograph 8

None of Us is Free Until All of Us Are Free," Los Angeles, Ca. (print made by Cathy Cade), 1972/1992

General note

The first "Christopher Street West March and Rally" in commemoration of the 1969 Stonewall Inn riots in New York. The second date denotes the year of handcoloring.
Photograph 9

"Native American Lesbians and Gays," San Francisco (print made by Cathy Cade), 1989/2002

General note

The second date denotes the year of handcoloring.
Photograph 10

"Brazilian Butch," San Francisco, (print made by Cathy Cade), 1984/2002

General note

Dancers with the rhythm group "Sistah Boom." The second date denotes the year of handcoloring.
Photograph 11

"Lesbians for O.J.," San Francisco (print made by Mark Weaver, Photolab), 1977

General note

A reference to Anita Bryant, Florida Orange Juice Queen, and her anti-Gay crusade.
Photograph 12

"Commie, Faggot, Queer, and Proud," San Francisco (print made by Cathy Cade), 1977

Photograph 13

"Mujeres en Lucha / Lesbianas Latinas, "San Francisco (print made by Mark Weaver, Photolab), 1979

General note

Somoza had been a dictator in Nicaragua for many years. A few days before he fell from power there was a big march through the Mission District of San Francisco. This was one of the first times there had been a gay contingent in a Latino political demonstration. "Mujeres en Lucha / Lesbianas Latinas" was a political action and social group.
Photograph 14

"Asian Pacific Islanders," San Francisco (print made by Mark Weaver, Photolab), 1989

Photograph 15

"Cancer Affects Every Body" San Francisco (print made by Mark Weaver, Photolab), 1993

 

Lesbian Culture

Physical Description: 3.0 images
Photograph 16

"Gente Gospeliers," Oakland, Ca. (print made by Cathy Cade), 1975

General note

The singing group, "Gente," developed out of a softball team of lesbians of color by the same name. Left to right: Joanne Garrett, Anita Onang, Pat Parker, Linda Tillery, and Jay Casselberry. The three women on the left all died too young of cancer.
Photograph 17

"Fat Chance," Berkeley, Ca. (print made by Cathy Cade), 1979

General note

Lynn Ellen Marcus, Hannah Bannan, Martha Courtot (hidden), Judy Freespirit, and Leah Kushner. In the winter of 1979 a group of fat lesbians living in Sonoma County asked a local dance teacher, Barbara Penny, to provide a class specifically for fat women. By June the group had a name, was dancing and reading their own writings—for women only.
Photograph 18

"Lesbians with Disabilities Support Group," San Francisco, Ca. (print made by Mark Weaver, Photolab), 1982

General note

This photo was made as part of Jill Lessing's chapter in the book A Lesbian Photo Album by Cathy Cade. Jill is second from the left.
 

Lesbians at Work

Physical Description: 3.0 images
Photograph 19

"Gail and Kate Rebuild My VW Engine," Emeryville, Ca. (print made by Cathy Cade), 1973

General note

"I took a class for women at 'Breakaway: A Women's Liberation School' which demystified auto mechanics and then Gail invited me to join her in her backyard garage. I was so excited to be using my body and tools. Raised as an upper middle class girl, this had been off-limits to me. Non-traditional work was highly regarded in the lesbian community. I got a lot of positive reinforcement from my peers." (Kate Kauffman.) In 2002, Gail is still an auto mechanic in the East Bay.
Photograph 20

"Jackie Lewis, Welding Student," San Francisco (print made by Mark Weaver, Photolab), 1974

Photograph 21

"The Cook and the Carpenter," Oakland (print made by Mark Weaver, Photolab), 1982

 

Generations

Physical Description: 3.0 images
Photograph 22

"Young Lesbians by School Lockers," Santa Cruz, Ca. (print made by Mark Weaver, Photolab), 1995

General note

This photograph was part of the series I did for the book Free Your Mind: the Book for Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Youth—and their Allies.
Photograph 23

"Passing on the Culture," San Francisco (print made by Cathy Cade), 1986

General note

Part of the Gay Games.
Photograph 24

"Elders Dance" San Francisco, Ca. (print made by Cathy Cade), 1984

General note

A dance sponsored by the women's group of Gay and Lesbian Outreach to Elders (GLOE).
Photograph 25

"Fourth International Women's Conference," Beijing, China, (print made by Cathy Cade), 1995

General note

Color copy of original in color and black and white.
 

A Lesbian Mother Fights for Custody of Her Children, 2002

General note

Jeanne Jullion spent her junior year of college in Florence, Italy where she met and later married her Italian husband. They returned to the U.S., had two sons, the youngest of whom was two, before Jeanne recognized that she was a lesbian and could not longer be a conventional housewife. The separation seemed cordial at first. Her younger son, Johnny, lived with her. Luca, her older son, lived with his father nearby and there were visits back and forth. Eventually, concerned about the paternalistic values with which her older son was being raised, Jeanne tried to gain custody of seven-year-old Luca. Her husband countered with his own request for custody for both children citing Jeanne’s lesbianism. In the face of a conservative judge and a family court services investigation that included blatant anti-gay questions, Jeanne took her case to the streets. She was transformed from a shy housewife into an eloquent speaker for the rights of lesbian mothers.
As dreaded, she lost custody in the preliminary court proceeding. Without notice, and in her absence, the police took four-year-old from her home. After months of waiting, her appeal was denied. However, the pressure her case brought on the court forced the beginning of a re-evaluation of homophobic policies. At the final trial she was evaluated primarily on the basis of her parenting, and was awarded custody of Johnny and visitation with Luca. Tragically, against Jeanne’s protests the judge allowed the father to take the boys to Italy on a vacation. He never returned. It took nearly four years and a harrowing “kidnapping” before Jeanne was able to bring Johnny to live with her. Luca remained in Italy. The full story of Jeanne Jullion’s case is beautifully told in her book, Long Way Home (Cleis Press, 1985).
Jeanne speaks in 1994: “Luca is 25 and does computerized accounting for an Italian bank. As he was growing up I visited him and we talked on the phone, but I wish I’d gone more often. He and John are extremely dose. My parenting of John was conducted in considerable isolation, with very little information. A chorus of voices of my family, church and the judge accused me of being driven by my own selfish agenda. I feared I would hurt this boy-child in some deep way. John and I would come upon a new age of his human development and it was all fresh territory. I wish I had known then that it is truly all right for us to raise our kids.” John, at 21, stated in a radio interview that he doesn’t feel all that different from his other male friends, that they all are having to figure out how they want to be men. (June 2002)