Jump to Content

Collection Guide
Collection Title:
Collection Number:
Get Items:
Guide to the NACA Ames Aeronautical Laboratory and NASA Ames Research Center Records at NARA San Francisco, 1939-1971
Record Group 255.4.1  
View entire collection guide What's This?
no PDF HTML
Search this collection
Collection Overview
 
Table of contents What's This?
Description
This finding aid describes records that are housed at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Pacific Region facility in San Bruno, California. Although the records belong to the National Archives, San Bruno, as the regional repository for permanent archival records of Federal agencies in northern California, this finding aid was authored to the Web by staff of the NASA Ames History Project (http://history.arc.nasa.gov).
Background
The Ames Aeronautical Laboratory was the second laboratory of the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA). The NACA was created by act of Congress on March 3, 1915 and charged with the development of aeronautical research and testing facilities to improve both civil and military aviation. By 1917 the NACA had built a fully operational aeronautical research facility called the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory near Norfolk, Virginia. By 1939, American political leaders recognized that the world was heading toward war and that other nations had surpassed the United States in basic aeronautical research. NACA leaders recognized that the Langley laboratory had run out of space for new wind tunnels and was straining the electrical capacity in the area. Thus, the Roosevelt Administration forcefully endorsed a report from the NACA Special Committee on Future Research Facilities, dated December 30, 1938, that argued for the establishment of a second research installation near the West Coast aircraft manufacturers. The tentative site suggested was the U.S. Naval Air Field and Army training base at Moffett Field in Sunnyvale, California. On February 3, 1939 President Roosevelt transmitted the $10 million request to Congress for incorporation into the second deficiency bill. A stiff partisan political struggle followed, however, and it was not until August 9, 1939, that the funds were approved as a part of the third deficiency bill.
Restrictions
Copyright does not apply to United States government records. For non-government material, researcher must contact the original creator.
Availability
This collection is unprocessed, but otherwise open for research. A small amount of materials may still have U.S. government security restrictions. Please contact NARA prior to visiting.