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Finding Aid of the John N. Fraser Letter C057965
C057965  
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Collection Details
 
Table of contents What's This?
  • Conditions Governing Access note
  • Conditions Governing Use note
  • Preferred Citation note
  • Donor
  • Related Archival Materials note
  • Biographical/Historical note
  • Scope and Contents note
  • Existence and Location of Originals note

  • Title: Fraser, John N. Letter
    Identifier/Call Number: C057965
    Contributing Institution: Society of California Pioneers
    Language of Material: English
    Physical Description: 1.0 folder 1 letter
    Date: 1849
    Abstract: Letter, Handwritten, 1page, both sides, on Feb 6, 1913, by John N. Fraser (Lincoln, CA)in response to a request by Mr. H. L. Boyne of the Society of California Pioneers. The subject is his arrival in San Francisco on August 21, 1849, aboard the "Duxbery". The ship struck a reef outside of the Bay and freed itself the next day. The reef is now called Duxbery Reef. The letter contains other brief references to his arrival such as witnessing the hanging of 5 men by the Committee of Vigilance and mining on Horse Bar in Amador County.
    creator: Fraser, John N., 1828-1915

    Conditions Governing Access note

    Collection open for research

    Conditions Governing Use note

    There are no restrictions on access

    Preferred Citation note

    John N. Fraser letter, The Society of California Pioneers

    Donor

    Gift of John N. Fraser, Feb 6, 1913

    Related Archival Materials note

    SOCP Archives Volume 2, p29

    Biographical/Historical note

    Born Nov 25, 1828 in Portland, Maine. He arrived in San Francisco on Aug 22, 1849 on the ship Duxbery. He was a farmer at Tipton, Tulare County. He died on January 27, 1915 in Sacramento, CA.

    Scope and Contents note

    Letter, Handwritten, 1page, both sides, on Feb 6, 1913, by John N. Fraser (Lincoln, CA)in response to a request by Mr. H. L. Boyne of the Society of California Pioneers. The subject is his arrival in San Francisco on August 21, 1849, aboard the "Duxbery". The ship struck a reef outside of the Bay and freed itself the next day. The reef is now called Duxbery Reef. The letter contains other brief references to his arrival such as witnessing the hanging of 5 men by the Committee of Vigilance and mining on Horse Bar in Amador County.
    Woodcut flyer on Duxbery at http://teh.salemstate.edu/educatorsguide/pages/expansion-pdfs/Duxbury.pdf
    Following From: http://www.missourireview.com/content/dynamic/view_text.php?text_id=1941 "Around the Horn: The Journal of a Voyage to San Francisco" in the Missouri Review, recounts in some detail the voyage of the "Duxbery" on which John Fraser sailed.
    "On February 9, 1849, twenty three-year-old William H. DeCosta and ninety-five other passengers, all lured by the hope of fortune and adventure, boarded the ship Duxbury of Boston, bound for the promised land. Like many argonauts, DeCosta recorded the incidents of the voyage in a journal."\
    "Two hundred and fifty ships sailed from Massachusetts in 1849, one hundred and fifty from Boston alone. The Duxbury, built in Duxbury, Massachusetts, in 1833, had been through a number of owners and captains in her fifteen years of service. An elegant threemasted vessel ninety-five feet long by sixty-two feet wide, and extremely hard to maneuver, it was said to "require all of Massachusetts Bay to turn." The numerous disputes between the Captain and passengers of the Duxbury, recorded in DeCosta's journal, suggest that this may have been the case with Captain William C. Varina who commanded this particular voyage.
    "The Duxbury was one of eighty-eight company vessels that sailed from Boston in 1849. She had been chartered by the Old Harvard Company.
    "On the evening of August 20, the Duxbury ran aground on a reef just north of the entrance to San Francisco Bay, at a place that in Spanish times had been called Punta de Baulenas (Point of Whales). The Duxbury sustained very little damage, and at the next high tide passengers and crew lowered the ship's boats and maneuvered them to pull her off the rocks. Although she would safely reach her destination the following day, the Duxbury would forever leave her name on the reef and point. Coastal survey charts of 1851 list this point as Duxbury Point and the reef as Duxbury Reef.

    Existence and Location of Originals note

    The Society of California Pioneers, 300 Fourth Street, San Francisco, CA 94107

    Subjects and Indexing Terms

    California--San Francisco (county)--San Francisco
    Nebraska
    Voyages and travels -- 19th century