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Finding aid to the Ecuador Figurine Drawing collection, undated MS.1308
MS.1308  
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Collection Overview
 
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Description
The collection is comprised of 160 photocopies of drawings that depict figurines, which were likely produced by the Jama Coaque (200 B.C.–800 A.D.) culture in the province of Manabí in Ecuador. Date that the photocopies were made is unknown. In the pre-Columbian era, the Manabí region was inhabited by many cultures who produced ceramic figurines, including the Bahia, Jama Coaque, Guangala and Tolita/Tumaco cultures. Although ceramics from these cultures share some resemblances, the figurines depicted in this collection most closely resemble those of the Jama Coaque culture.
Background
In the pre-Columbian era, the Manabí region was inhabited by many cultures who produced ceramic figurines, including the Bahia, Jama Coaque, Guangala and Tolita/Tumaco cultures. Although ceramics from these cultures share some resemblances, the figurines depicted in this collection most closely resemble those of the Jama Coaque culture. Figures produced by the Jama Coaque were more elaborately decorated than those of other cultures in the region during this period. Jama Coaque figurines were decorated with fine carving and painted in many colors, with many figures wearing ceremonial garments, crowns, pendants and collars. Jama Coaque figurines were often made from molds and had an average height of seven to twelve inches. Figurines frequently depicted warriors, musicians, hunters, dancers, or zoomorphic figures. Although some Jama Coaque figurines were attached to vessels, most were freestanding.
Extent
0.25 Linear feet (1 box)
Restrictions
Copyright has not been assigned to the Autry National Center. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Autry Archivist. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the Autry National Center as the custodian of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained by the reader.
Availability
Collection is open for research. Appointments to view materials are required. To make an appointment please visit http://theautry.org/research/research-rules-and-application or contact library staff at rroom@theautry.org. An item-level inventory is available from library staff.