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Goldstein (Jesse Sidney) Papers
MSS.2016.03.02  
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Collection Overview
 
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Description
The Jesse Sidney Goldstein Papers document the education and career of Jesse Sidney Goldstein. Included in this collection are scripts, letters, short stories, a thesis and awards which give insight into Goldstein’s studies as a graduate student in English Literature which focused on Edwin Markham’s poetry. The collection also contains scripts, awards and memorabilia from his career as a writer for television and radio.
Background
Jesse Sidney Goldstein was born on October 31, 1915. He was raised in Brooklyn, New York. He received a master’s degree in English literature from Columbia University. His research focused on the poet Edwin Markham. He also wrote a biography of Markham. He was a comedy writer in Hollywood in the 1940s and 1950s. He wrote for radio shows such as "The Danny Kaye Radio Show". He also wrote for television shows including "The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show", "I Married Joan", "It’s Always Sunday", "The Red Skelton Show" and "The Alan Young Show". Goldstein wrote short stories and speculative scripts some of which he sent to publishers and television executives. He died on May 14, 1959.
Extent
11 boxes (16 linear ft.)
Restrictions
Copyright has been assigned to the San José State University Library Special Collections & Archives. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Director of Special Collections. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the SJSU Special Collections & Archives as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained by the reader. Copyright restrictions also apply to digital reproductions of the original materials. Use of digital files is restricted to research and educational purposes.
Availability
The collection is open for access.