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Collection Guide
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Guide to the Hammarskjöld House Photographs
PC0146  
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Collection Overview
 
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Description
The materials consist of digital photographs of house members.
Background
Dag Hammarskjöld House was formerly the home of the Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity. The plans for the house were initiated by several foreign students who were looking to have a place on campus and also were actively involved in the Bechtel International Center. In 1970, Richard Lyman took office as the seventh president of the university. Alfredo Prelat (MS'71,PhD'74) with the support of foreign students and the Bechtel International Center requested to President Lyman to have a place on campus for international students and Americans students that wanted to live with people from different cultures. Several names were proposed for the new international house. After a long debate the name of Dag Hammarskjöld was selected in honor of the UN secretary General who died in a plane accident while on a peace mission in Congo. Clifford Clarke, the foreign student advisor said of Hammarskjöld, "This new concept of a living group (will be) composed of people from other cultures who want to participate in educational and social programs to facilitate mutual understanding and respect."
Extent
1 computer file(s)
Restrictions
All requests to reproduce, publish, quote from, or otherwise use collection materials must be submitted in writing to the Head of Special Collections and University Archives, Stanford University Libraries, Stanford, California 94305-6064. Consent is given on behalf of Special Collections as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission from the copyright owner. Such permission must be obtained from the copyright owner, heir(s) or assigns. See: http://library.stanford.edu/depts/spc/pubserv/permissions.html.
Availability
The materials are open for research use.